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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, April 23, 1898, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-04-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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ErttabllaUetl July , I ..
KDIi. XX m, NO. 4001.
HONOLULU, AYAAN ISLANDS, SATURDAY, APItIL 23, 1S9S-.
I'KICE FIVE CEN1T3.
V to
(fl f i n M I 5 f KlflJ M 1 III
if v.y u
3 i 7 PI
1.
J. Q. WOOD,
Attorney at Law
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
OFFICE: Corner Kins and Bethe
Streets.
Ml. c. n. HIGH,
Dentist.
Philadelphia Dental College 1S92.
Masonic Temple. . Telephone 318
A. C. WALL, I). I). S.
Dentist.
LOVE BUILDING, : FORT STREET,
31. E. G1JOSSMAN, H.D.S.
Dentist-
08 HOTEL STREET, HONOLULU.
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
1)11, A. J. HEIU5Y,
Dentist.
CORNER FORT AND HOTEL STS.
MOTT-SMITH BLOCIC
Telephones: Office, 615; Residence, 789.
HOURS: 9 to 4.
GKEO. II. IIUDDY, D.D.S.
Dentist.
FORT STREET, OPPOSITE CATHO
LIC MISSION.
Hours: From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. M. WACHS.
Dentist.
University of California.
Beretania near Fort street.
Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m. and 1 to 4
p. zn.
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
Office No. 537 King street, near
Punchbowl.
Hours 8:30 to 11 a. m.; 3 to 5 p. m.;
7 to 8 p. m.
Telephone No. 44S.
THE HONOLULU SANITARIUM.
1082 KING ST.
A quiet home-like place, where train
ed nurses, massage, "Swedish move
ments," baths, electricity and physical
training may be obtained.
P. S. KELLOGG, M.D.,
Telephone 639. Supt.
CIIAS. F. PETERSON,
Attorney at? Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
15 Kaahumanu St.
IATL.E A. DICKEY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
14 KAAHUMANU STREET.
Telephone, 682.
WILLIAM C. PAlMvE,
Attorney at Law.
AND-
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG
MENTS. Office: Kaahumanu St., Honolulu.
O. Gr. TKAPHAGKEX,
ARCHITECT.
223 Merchant Street between Fort
and Alakea.
Telephone 734.
Honolulu, H. I.
H. HACKFELD & CO.. Ltd.
Ccr. Fort and Queen Sts., : Honolulu.
CdfKM Soflfl lief Works Co.,
LIMITED
Esplanade, Cor. Allen and Fort Sts.
BOLUSTER & CO., - - AGENTS.
P. O. Box
430
TWSr n Telephone
2 lLa 478
New and First-Claw
SECOND-HAND FURNITURE
OF ALL KINDS
SOLD CHEAP FOR CASH.
Highest Cash Price paid for Second-Hand
Furniture at J L Corner KinS
and Nuuanu (Streets.
S. Af- LEDERER.
Genera
(iiiiiii
APIS
FEW IRES
of the following Stocks have
been placed in our hands for sale at
prices that should be of interest to in
tending investors:
Ewa Plantation Co.
Paia Plantation Co.
Kahuku Plantation Co.
Hawaiian Electric Co.
Inter-Island S. N. Co.
Wilder'S. S. Co.
Hawaiian Safe Deposit and
m. r
Investment Company.
GEORGE R. CARTER, Mgr.
Office In rear of Bank of Hawaii. Ltd.
SPECIAL BUSINESS ITEMS.
IF YOU BUY A SINGER,
You will receive careful Instruction
from a competent teacher at your
home.
You can obtain necessary accessories
direct from the company's offices.
You will get prompt attention in any
part of the world, as our offices are ev
erywhere and we give careful attention
to all customers, no matter "where the
machine may have been purchased.
You will be dealing with the leading
company in the sewing machine busi
ness, having an unequalled experience
and an unrivalled reputation the
strongest guarantee of excellence.
Sold on easy payments. Repairing
done. B. BERG ERSEN, Agent.
lG1 Bethel Street, Honolulu.
The City Carriage Company possess
only first-class hacks and employ only
careful, steady drivers.
Carriages at all hours.
Telephone 113.
' JOHN S. ANDRADE.
I
GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, 60c.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
HAWAIIAN CURIOS Leis, Kapa,
Nlihau Mats, Calabashes, Idols, Fans,
Shells, Seeds, etc., etc.
SAMOAN TAPAS, Carved Emu
Eggs, Hula Drums, Gourds, etc., etc.
Point Lace Handkerchiefs, Doylies,
Fayal work and Hawaiian Dolls.
Telephone 659.
DR. GEO. J. AUGUR.
Homcepatiiic Practitioner
Surgeon.
and
Special attention Given to Chronic
Diseases.
Richards street, near Hawaiian hotel.
Office and Residence the same.
Office hours: 10 to 12 a. m.; 3 to 4
p. m.; 7 to 8 p. m. Sundays 9:30 to
10:30 a. m. Telephone 733.
M. W. McCHESNEY & SONS.
Wholesale Grocers and Dealers in Leather and
Shoe Findings.
Agents Honolulu Soap Works Company
and Honolulu Tannery.
LESSONS ON CORNET.
The undersigned will give lessons on
the Cornet to a limited number of pu
pils. Individual Instruction. For terms
apply to
C. KREUTER.
Music Dept Wall, Nichols Co.
THE BLICK
IS BEST.
r 0
U C AAI WfTD Masonic
ill vvnuivuii, Temple.
NUT Z-'VT : : , i 1
$35.00!
HE TALKS OF CUBA
A HofloMa Man Graduate of Ha
vana University.
BUT HE WAS BORN IN SPAIN
How Gomez Has Changed Sugar
Trust People Not of Repub
lican Timber.
Of all the peop'e in Honolulu keen
for news of: Cuba, Spain and the at
titude and purposes of the United
States in the difficulties and questions
hendins Jt is nct -kely that one has
so deep and intense a personal inter
est as Dr. L. F. Alvarez, the practi
tioner and Board of Health specialist.
The gentleman was born in Spain,
went out to the Island of Cuba with
ni9 Parents wnen a Quite young cmld
and iwas educated at the University
of Havana, finishing off nrofesionally.
however, in institutions of the United
States, notaJbly the Johns 'Hopkini
University. At his office on Emma
street Dr. Alvarez yesterday conversed
freely .cn Cuban and Spanish affairs.
The Honolulu man left Cuba in 1S74
and returned for a short time four
years later. In 1S78 the ten years war,
led by Gomez, who today commands
the insurgents, ended. At other times
Gomez, who, by-the way, is not a Cub
an, was at the head cf revolutionists
in 'San Domingo. Another man in the
highest councils of the outbreak on the
Island ds a (Russian. Dr. Alvarez calls
attention to the change of tactics in
Gomez campaigning since 1868-78. In
the war of ten years property was safe
at all times. Incendiarism and robbery
were punished .by the rebels the same
as by the civil authorities, or even
more severely. Tne cultivation ol
cane, the iprcduction of sugar, the
growing or tobacco and the manufac
ture of cigars continued though the
ten years of fighting without any in-
terruption. Dr. Alvarez says that both
the Spanish and French papers state
positively and reiterate from day to
day the charge the Sugar Trust in
duced Gomez to issue the decree 'pro
hibiting the .operation of plantations
under pain of death to the managers
and employes. There was no firing of
cane fields during the ten years war.
Now a Cuban proceeds to the edge cf
a field with a cage of rats. The rod
ents are doused in kerosene, touched
with a match and turned loose in the
cane when the weather is dry. Dr.
Alvarez says that people unable to
read the comments of the Spanish and
French press on the conduct of the in-
surgents'with relation to the industries
of the Island cannot appreciate much
of the bitterness that is felt against
the rebels and those who assist and
encourage them. The man who ended
the ten years war was Martinez Cam
pos, hy many considered the greatest
soldier Spain has produced this cen
tury. When the present revolution
broke out Campos was sent again to
the Island, but failing to speedily end
the revolt was succeeded by AVeyler,
Who 'in turn was followed by Blanco.
In former operations dn Cuba Weyler
had gained the reputation of .being a
man entirely without mercy. But even
his vigorous policy strong and posi-
tive to the extent of cruelty, fai'led
this time.
Dr. Alvarez says the Spanish and
French papers dilate at length and
continuously upon the part the United
States has taken in the present revo
lution. The arraignment begins with
accusation of the private enterprises,
next the Trust and finally the adminis
tration itself. There is cited the 'Ala
bama claims case, followed with inquiry
cr suggestion to the effect that fili
buster exepeditions correspond in ev
ery way to the operations of the Ala
bama. Reliable advices from Cuba ara
to the effect that the insurgents have
so many friends in the United States
that the armies or columns or squads
or details of Gomez have really more
arms and ammunition than they need.
They have thousands of rifles and per
haps hundreds of thousands of cart
ridges buried, while they have no trou
ble in securing small artillery. Gomez.
who is now above 70 years of age is
exeatly admired for his boldness am!
ability. He says that he does not sl'eep
twice in the same place and the Span
ish papers and officials concede 'thai
his capture is most unlikely.
Slavery was abolished completely in
Cuba in 1S7S. The final step was ap
proached gradually. In I860 there wan
issued a proclamation that all personi
born in Cuba s'.icul.i be free. A few
years 'later there was another royal
proclamation to the effect that slaves
of the age of 60 years and over should
be liberated. The last slaves were
brought to Cuba frcm Africa in ISoo
When Cuba had' a population of 1,000
000 there were of 'Cubans" 700.000
The Cubans as listed were forme
slaves and full-blood or mixed-blootJ
children of the Africans. It is claimed
that Cuba has now 1,500,000 popula
tioii. but this is doubted. Dr. A'lvare
says that these Cubans are certainly
not the pecp'.e to have a democratic
government any more than were the
Hawaiians say seventy-five years ago
Autonomy was advocated by the better
classes on the Island and has always
had strong advocates at Madrid. The
Spanish and French papers now say
that autonomy has been choked to
death by the United States. The Sa
gasta Cabinet of the Queen Regen
agreed to autonomy only under heavy
pressure and seem to find that even
this sacrifice has been made 'too late
It was proposed by the radicals at al
times to first conquer the insurgents
then make terms or arrangements as
to autonomy or something of the sort
To the continental press the muddle
now appears almost hopeless unless the
United States 'wil'l permit Spain to
handle the revolution for herself for a
few months.
Dr. Alvarez says the Spaniards are
proud and glory in the record and tra
ditions of their country. They spurn
any thought of selling Cuba or any
other colony to the United States or
any other 'country. They stand on
ceremony and sentiment. Spain has
had a. grand people. - William Cullen
Bryant said after a sojourn on the
peninsula that "even the beggars of
Spain were gentlemen." S. T. Alex
ander, of the Island of 'Maui, this
group, has toured in Spain and speaks
enthusiastically of the characteristics
of the people as a whole. The air of
the haughty Don permeates all classes
and Spain is the only country of the
continent Where to travelers "tips" are
unknown. In the war with the Cubans
Spain has already given 200,000 of tihe
youth the country and has a temper
that would go to the last man and the
sweepings of the treasury before
thought cf the defeat would be enter
tained. But even friends and ardent
admirers and partisans of Spain begin
to think that probably European in
tervention will force a close approach
to an humfbling.
A 'brother of Dr. Alvarez has prop
erty in Havana, but 'being faithful to
the mother country, remains away
from the Island. Dr. Alvarez dwells
particularly upon "what he Calls the
impossible political plans of tihose who
propose a Republic for Cuba. He
grants earnestness and character and
capability to a large number of men
in the movement, but points with
significance to the tremendous percen
tage of unavailable composition.
At the Japanese Legation.
iMinister Shimamura said at the Jap
anese Legation yesterday that he ha
nothing new from his home Govern
ment, concerning the inumigration dis
pute between this country and Japan.
There has been no communication on
he subject since January last. Mr.
Shimamura remarked that no answer
had been received frcim his last letter
to the local Foreign Office. Of course
there had been an acknowledment, but
no reply. Mr. 'Shimamura supposed
that the Government officials here
were busy with the Legislature.
The Japanese Minister is very much
interested in the Eastern situation,
which he says is delicate and compli
cated. In Vanity Fair.
Mrs. S. M. Dajncn entertained tho
Whist Club at her beautiful country
home in Moanalua yesterday.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Hubert Vos will re
ceive in the studio at Hoiani Pa, Rich
ards street, this afternoon.
There will be a .birthday party at
F. A. Schaefer'sJWaikiki, and another
at H. Lewis', this afternoon.
Mrs. W. G; Irwin gave a lunch in
honor of her mother, Mrs. Ivers, of
San Francisco, on Thursday. Those
present he-sides the guest cf honor
were the following: Mrs. Sewall, Mrs.
Miller, Mrs. Haywood, Mrs. J. G. Spen
cer, Mrs. Family Judd, Mrs. Fuller, Mrs.
Swanzy, Mrs. Kirkpatrick, Mrs. J. S.
Walker, Mrs. Neumann, Miss New
lands, Mrs. Charles Carter.
Mr. Dole's Birthday.
Today is another anniversary of the
honored President of Hawaii, Sanford
B. Dole. Early this morning the Pre
sident will be serenaded at the Exe
cutive mansion on Emma street by
the Government band. There will be
no formal celebration of the birhday
of the President, though he will doubt
less receive the warm congratulations
cf friends throughout the capital. A
year ago Mr. DO was given a sur
prise by some intimate friends in old
time native style, but no such program
has been arranged for today.
CRISP PARISIAN NOVELTY.
Gren a bandes, the latest Parisian
craze in dress goods for summer, street
and evening wear. Lightest and hand
somest goods ever placed on the mar
ket. Every conceivable color and com
bination of colors and figures. To be
had only at L. B. Kerr's, Queen street.
COFFEEMANTALKS
Prices and Markets tie Subjects
of His Commnnlcation.
SUPERIOR HAWAIIAN GRADES
What the Tenderfoot Should Know.
Local Production Better Than
Central American.
MR. EDITOR: In your issues of
of ISth, iSd and 25th of March, I no
tice your editorials on the coffee in
dustry and the value of Hawaiian
coffee.
In the first article you challenge the
Bulletin to publish some cf the account
sales returned by Folger & Co., San
Francisco, to some of our coffee ship
pers, while in another you criticise a
statement, made by the same paper,
that Kona coffee will command 8 cents
per pound more than Brazillian.
Now, Mr. Editor, as I have been en
gaged in active coffee planting for
over 15 years, in this country and
abroad, and claim to know something
about the proper preparation of the
bean, for the market, and moreover as
I aspire to the distinction of one of
the "experienced" men whom you
would desire to see annihilated; please
allow me to make a few remarks and
furnish some statistics and facts in
regard to the true value of Hawaiian
coffee in foreign markets. Although,
I quite agree with you in your com
ments on the "boom" pest, and the
misleading statements which are pub
lished in regard to coffee planting in
Hawaii; I beg to differ with your views'
and criticisms on the value of the
bean, and particularly your sneers at
the "ever present experienced man
as you are pleased to term him. I
have found that there are two kinds
of this class in these Islands. First
Those who possess the actual knowl
edge, acquired by many years of hard
and active toil in coffee planting, and
who can make their representations
good on investigation. Second Those
who profess to know all about it, and
talk as though they had been born
and brought up under a coffee bush;
but who in all probability, never saw
a coffee tree before their arrival in
these Islands.
I venture to say that if Hawaii had
possessed a few more of the despised
individuals representing tihe first class;
the value of coffee abroad would have
been established long ere this, and the
tons of rubbish which have been pick
ed up, along the Kona coast in parti
cular, would never have had an exist
ence.
I have not seen the article in the
Bulletin which you criticise in your
ssue of March 22d,.but from the state
ment ycu refer to, I presume that paper
was praising the quality of Kona cof
fee; and I must say I heartily endorse
such an opinion.
Whether Kona coffee will command
8 cents per pound more than that from
Brazil, I am not prepared to say; but
of one fact I am assured, viz: that such
coffee will not only command a higher
price than Brazillian, but as I can show
on good authority, will realize more
than that obtained from the best Cen-
ral American varieties. But you must
Dear in mma, ur. iuiior, mat me
coffee I have referred to is the one
prepared by the experienced man,
whether he possessed that experience
before his arrival in this country, or
acquired it here by experimenting on
samples at the expense of others.
The statement you make, that Kona
coffee at the normal price of Central
American will pay well, is not only
misleading but is inconsistent with the
facts.
With the price the coffee planter of
these Islands has to pay for labor, as
compared with that ruling in other
coffee countries, in order to insure
success, two conaiticns are necessary,
viz.. a greater yield from the trees and
a superior quality in the bean. So far
as my observation goes with the coffee
trees in this district, during the past
seven years, I am led to believe that
both these conditions exist.
If the coffee to be finally shipped
from these Islands is to rank with
seme of the Central American varie
ties, then the sooner we shut up coffee
planting in Hawaii the better.
The test which you suggest, and on
which you express your readiness to
stake money, is no test at all, so far
as the commercial value of the bean is
concerned. "You venture to say that
if four cups of coffee be prepared us
ing Brazillian, Salvador or other Cen
tral American with Java, and ten hab
itual coffee drinkers were asked to pick
out the Kona (you do not mention
Kona coffee in the mixture) after tast
ing each cup without having knowl
edge cf the kind it contained, six out
of the ten would not pick out the Kona
cofTee." I will go further and venture
to say that not one out of the ten
could tell you which was Kona, or
which the Brazlilian, while many out
of the millions who habitually drink
the so-called beverage, could not say
that it was coffee at all.
Likewise with the test made with the
cup of purposed ly adulterated Kona
coffee on the individual, who claimed
to have been a coffee drinker for 40
years,, and who pronounced it the most
excellent cup he had ever tasted; and
at once placed a high value on the
bean. Had he been an habitual drink
er for 140 years, the result would (have
been the same, his cpinicn would have
been worth nothing in connection with
the commercial value of the bean; but
might have served as a good advertise
ment for Kona coffee.
Fortunately for the coffee planter the
profits which will accrue from his years
of hard work and perseverance, will
not be based cn either cf the tests
jou mention above. He had nothing
to do with the varied and nasty mix
tures, which are prepared and sold
under the name of coffee;to be con
creted into that so-called cup, of a
muddy consistency, one finds on one'ss
travel throughout the world. This de
partment is left to the dealers, who
buy their coffees in the bulk, blend
them, mix them, or adulterate them to
suit their fancy, or the tastes of their
consumers. I do not mean to say there
are no honest dealers in the world, but
it is a well known fact, once a demand
sets in for a good genuine article, let
it be coffee, tea or pickles, scores of
spurious imitations will follow In its
wake.
The coffee planter will sell his pro
duce by the cwt. or ton in the open
market, and the price he will realize
will be decided on the merits of the
bean as to size, color and uniformity;
ahd this by experts who have made it
their special business. "Of course, sup
ply and demand will always cut some
figure; but it is my opinion the genu
ine article will invariably come to the
point, and when once a name has been
establishcdfoca, certain brand, and
the reputation for that particular
brand is maintained, it will hold its
own in the face of substitutes or an
inferior article.
Your simile with reference to the
difference of opinion between men in
the coffee trade and amateurs, and
that of the epicurean taste cf the oys
ter fiend only serves to further
strengthen my argument. When an
inferior, in place of the genuine arti
cle, can be palmed off on those who
consider themselves connoiseurs, and
partaken of with reiish, shows that
both the opinion of the amateur and
connoisseur, or habitual consumer, are
of no value; and it takes the expert or
experienced man after all to detect tho
real article and set a true value on the
commodity.
From the foregoing remarks I do not
wish it to be inferred that the cup
quality of the bean, plays no part in
the value of coffee; for most certainly
this does, and any coffee which could
pass a good examination on its techni
cal merits, would possess more or less
a fine aroma. At the same times this
feature may be due, to some extent,
from local conditiens as to soil, clim
ate and especially elevation, and not
as might be supposed, entirely from
the fact of superior methods employed
in the preparation of the bean.
This is an item in coffee planting of
which all practical planters are aware
and is not only confined to countries,
but to different districts in the same
country, and to different localities in
the same district.
In the prosperous days of Ceylon,
the product of the various plantations
was sold in the -London market under
one name, viz.: Plantation Ceylon,'
but entirely on the merits of the bean.
Although the methods employed in
cultivation, and preparation, were al
most identically the same throughout
the Island, the prices realized were
not so; the coffee from one locality
commanding a higher figure than that
'.Continued cu Second Page.)
Royal makes the food pure,
wholesome and delicious.
n U
fc. iif -
J.
m v t r
Absolute! Pure
poval bakimo poworn co.. wrwvosK.
A
t
-,r-

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