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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, April 25, 1898, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-04-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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Established July a, iHSfl.
KDL. XXVH., NO. 4902.
HONOLULU, ' HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 1S9S.
PRICE FIVE GENES.
0
(
1
J. Q. WOOD,
Attorney at Law
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
OFFICE:
Corner King
Streets.
and Bethel
DR. c. r. HIGH,
DentiSt
Phlladelphia Dental College 1892.
Masonic Temple. Telephone 318.
A. c. WALL, J). I), s.
Dentist.
LOVE BUILDING. : FORT STREET.
M.E. GHOSSMAX, JXD.S.
Dentist.
18 HOTEL STREET, HONOLULU.
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. A. J. DERBY,
Dentist.
CORNER FORT AND HOTEL STS.
MOTT-SMITH BLOCK.
Telephones: Office, 615; Residence, 789.
HOURS: 9 to 4.
GEO. II. IIUDDY, D.D.S.
Dentist.
FORT STREET, OPPOSITE CATHO
LIC MISSION.
Hours: From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. M. WACHS.
Dentist.
University of California.
Beretania near Fort street.
Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m. and 1 to 4
p. m.
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
Office No. 537 King street, near
Punchbowl.
Hours 8:30 to 11 a. m.; 3 to 5 p. m.;
7 to 8 p. m.
Telephone No. 44S.
.
1 1
THE HONOLULU SANITARIUM.
1082 KING ST.
A quiet home-like place, where train
ed nurses, massage, "Swedish move
ments," baths, electricity and physical
training may be obtained.
P. S. KELLOGG, M.D.,
Telephone 639. Supt.
CIIAS. F. PETERSON,
Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
15 Kaahumanu St.
A. DICKEY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
.14 KAAHUMANU STREET.
Telephone, 682.
william c. parke,
Attorney at Law.
AND
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG
MENTS. Office: Kaahumanu St., Honolulu.
O. G. T1LVPIIAGE.X,
ARCHITECT.
223 Merchant Street between Fort
and Alakea.
Telephone 734.
Honolulu, H. I.
H. HACKFELD & CO., Ltd.
Cor. Fort and Queen Sts., : Honolulu.
LIMITED
Esplanade, Cor. Allen and Fort Bts.
HOLLISTER & CO.. - - AGENTS.
P. O. Box
480
Telephone
478
New and First-Claw
SECOND-HAND FURNITURE
OF ALL. KINDS
SOLD CHEAP FOR CASH.
Highest Cash Price paid for 8econd-Und
Furnifare at j X L Corner Kin"
and Nuuanu Streets
3- V- a-EDERI
PI.
Gill 81111 NCI,
Gonso
soda
water
oils
a fEi m
of the following Stocks have
been placed in our hands for sale at
prices that should be of interest to in
tending investors:
Ewa Plantation Co.
Paia Plantation Co.
Kaliuku Plantation Co.
Hawaiian Electric Co.
Inter-Island S. N. Co.
Wilder S. S. Co.
Hawaiian Safe Deposit and
Investment Company.
GEORGE R. CARTER, Mgr
Off.ce In rear of Bank of Hawaii, Ltd.
SPECIAL BUSINESS ITEMS.
IF YOU BUY A SINGER,
You will receive careful Instruction
from a competent teacher at your
home.
You can obtain necessary accessories
direct from the company's offices.
You will get prompt attention in any
part of the world, as our offices are ev
erywhere and we give careful attention
to all customers, no matter where the
machine may have been purchased.
You will be dealing with the leading
company in the sewing machine busi
ness, having an unequalled experience
and an unrivalled reputation the
strongest guarantee of excellence.
Sold on easy payments. Repairing
done. B. BERGERSEN, Agent.
16 Bethel Street, Honolulu.
The City Carriage Company possess
only first-class hacks and employ only
caneful, steady drivers.
Carriages at all hours.
Telephone 113.
JOHN S. ANDRADE.
I
GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, COc.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
HAWAIIAN CURIOS Lei s, Kapa,
Niihau Mats, Calabashes, Idols, Fans,
Shells, Seeds, etc., etc.
SAMOAN TAPAS, Carved Emu
Eggs, Hula Drums, Gourds, etc., etc.
Faint Lace Handkerchiefs, Doylies,
Fayal work and Hawaiian Dolls.
Telephone 659.
DR. GEO. J. AUGUR.
Homcepatiiic Practitioner
Surgeon.
AND
Special attention Given to Chronic
Diseases.
Richards street, near Hawaiian hotel.
Office and Residence the same.
Office hours: 10 to 12 a. m.; 3 to 4
p. m.; 7 to S p. m. Sundays 9:30 to
10:30 a. m. Telephone 733.'
M. W. McCHESNEY & SOWS.
Wholesale Grocers and Dealers in Leather and
Shoe Findings.
Agents Honolulu Soap Works Company
and Honolulu Tannery.
LESSONS ON CORNET.
The undersigned will give lessons on
the Cornet to a limited number of pu
pils. Individual Instruction. For terms
apply to
C. KREUTER,
Music Dept, Wall, Nichols Co.
THE BLICK
IS BEST.
$35. OOI
H. E WALKER,
Masonic
Temple.
ORES BURNED
Cane Fields at Watop
Swept By Flames.
Were
SHIPPING FOR A WHOLE WEEK
Hamakuapoko Mill Stops Grinding
Base Ball Team Ready
for Business.
(Special Correspondence).
MAUI, April 23 Thirty acres of
cane was burned at Waikapu last Mon
day. At the present writing the origin
of the fire is unknown. The Wailuku
Sugar Company expects to start grind
ing the damaged cane in about four
days.
On last Thursday evening the eld
friends, of Deputy Marshal Charles
OhillingworLh gave a dance in his
honor in the Wailuku Court House
Music was furnished by an excellent
stringed band. The second Deputy
Marshal returned to Honolulu early
the next morning.
Bishop Willis and Rev. W. Ault held
services in the Wailuku church last
Sunday evening, the 17th.
Hamakuapoko mil'l has recently
stopped grinding for a short time in
order to utilize water used for mill
purposes in irrigating cane.
Today, Mr. J. W. Colville, (recently
manager of Paia plantation), and Mrs.
Colville depart for Scotland, intending
to reside permanently in that country.
Sincere regrets are expressed by Maui
friends at the -departure of so affable
a gentleman and so gracious a lady.
Collector E. H. Bailey of Wailuku
has been confined to his home for a
week past with "la grippe."
. The Ulupalakua Ibaseball club is now
ready to accept challenges from any
nine or nines cn iMaui, for the 1S9S
championship of the Island. L. R.
Crook is the captain of the new organ
ization. During the afternoon of the 21st, the
Thursday Club met at the residence of
Mrs. H. P. Baldwin, Haiku.
Inspector-General H. S. Townsend
wi'U visit the schools of Hana district
during the coming week. He spent
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday in
the Makawao schools.
No arrivals or departures of vessels
from the port of Kahului during the
week. The 'barkentine George C. Per
kins is now in the offing and will prob
ably enter the bay today.
The schooner Eva is expected in
Hana during the middle of next week.
Other vessels soon expected in Ka-
hului are the Allen A. and a coal ves
sel from Australia.
The weather is twarm, and sultry.
Back From Camp.
The Kamehameha boys are back at
their school again for the opening to
day, after spending a week in camp at
Waianae. It is the custom of the school
to have an outing of this sort an
nually. The expedition just ending has
been one of the pleasantest and most
successful ever had. The boys had a
regular camp routine and besides in
dulging in fishing in the sea and nunt-
ing in the mountains. The teachers
of the school in charge were Messrs;
Richards, Thompson, Woodward, Rugg
and McDonald. The boys have done!
considerable marching besides climb-j
ing and have been greatly benefitted by
the trip.
A Detective's Surprise.
Detective Kaapa went into the house
of somematives in an alley opposite the
Commercial saloon on Saturday with
the intention of seeking out some in
formation. Upon arrival he found nine
natives engaged in gaming. He put
them under arrest and "held for inves
tigation" was placed opposite their
aames. This of course spoiled the de
tective's chances of getting what infor
mation he was after.
From Three Pulpits.
Revs. D. P. Birnie of Central Union.
G. L. Pearson of First Methodist and
T. D. Garvin of the Christian Church,
all had the same topic for the service
yesterday morning. The theme of each
sermon was "Cooperation in Christian
Work." The idea of this treatment of
30
a special subject grew .out of discus
sions at the Friday meetings of the
"Christian Workers." Naturally the
tone of each discourse was the fame.
Rev. Mr. Birnie spoke of unity of pur
pose for the church, for charity an
u,'
educauon. Under the head of ed
tion Rev. Mr. Birnie spoke especially
o such work as the establishment of
kindergarten studies andpastimes.
Short on Li&ht.
Despite the best efforts of the force
at the Hawaiian Electric Light Works
last night, there was a famine in sev
eral quarters. A crowd of Waverley
Club boys found themselves in dark
ness. They divided up into squads and
visited various churches. Hart & Co.
T t- ,1 J A 1 1J 1 1
uiu., useu int; oiu Ktu u&eiit; lamps
again. New machinery for the elec
tric company is expected from San
Francisco this week. Manager Hoff
man is returning with it. So soon as
the repairs are made there will be light
for everybody.
AT THE THEATER.
Good Audience for Miss Adair's
Specialty Show.
There was a fine audience for Miss
Elsie Adair's specialty show at the
opera house Saturday evening. The
entertainment wfas about all that had
been promised and in most respects
was of merit and was satisfactory. It
had a few incidents that added some
zest, scarcely anticipated 'by a reading
of the program. In the curtain raiser
The Decision of the Court," Miss
Adair was decidedly clever. Mr. Walk
er, the city amateur, was quite at ease
and entirely natural. His only fault
was that his voice was too contained.
The climax of the pretty little piece
was made a trifle awkward, if laugh
able from the lack of lubricant or mus
cle for the slowly descending curtain
The Hawaiian Quartette consisted of
four- natives and a beautiful Saturday
night jag. The man who had been
dallying with the demijohn made a
great hit. He came on for the encore,
but was not permitted to appear for the
second number of the combination.
McGuire and Vierra were lively and
very amusing in the sketch Ten Min
utes with the Irish Help in the Kitchen
of a Klondike Millionarie." Their
gags" and songs were more than good
and their dancing up to the mark.
Miss Adair, in two appearances, sang
about a dozen songs and each one was
voted- "immense." Miss Adair's voice
has not entirely recovered from its
Lenten deprivations, "but her style is
certainly "the real thing."
T1 ttZ r. r-. . 1 J A "U OA
uuijr tt tuupie ui uie ou views
shown, the Edison vitascope, as pre
sented by W. H. Kenake, was a revela-
lon and a downght joy. There wras no
vibration and some of the pictures were
so realistic as to call forth great ap
plause. Strange Funeral.
It is either a good thing or a bad
thing that there were no camera fiends
about on Thursday when the funeral
of the child of some South Sea Isl
anders was held. These people live en
tirely by (themselves. They apparently
do not care for fellowship with the Ha
wraiians, and hold away from foreign
ers altogether. When the child died
they secured a small coffin and arrang
ed for a little burial plot in Makiki.
The procession went out Beretania
street from the neighborhood of Ka
maukapili and an odd cortege it was.
Four of the men bore ithe dead casket
suspended from poles. Two men fol-
lowed with SDades upon their should-
ers. This was all.
appealing spectacle.
It was a unique,
CRISP PARISIAN NOVELTY.
Gren a bandes, the latest Parisian
craze in dress goods for summer, street
and evening wear. Lightest and hand
somest goods ever placed on the mar
ket. Every conceivable color and com
bination of colors and figures. To be
had only at L. B. Kerr's, Queen street.
I was reading an advertisement of
Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and Diar
rhoea Remedy in the Worcester Enter
prise recently, which leads me to write
this. I can truthfully say I never used
any remedy equal to it for colic and
diarrhoea. I have never had to use more
than one or two doses to cure the worst
case with myself or children. W. A.
STROUD, Popomoke City, Md. For
sale by all druggists and dealers. Ben
son, Smith & Company, Limited,
wholesale agents for Hawaiian Islands.
TAME BASE BALL
Reorganized Union Team Not Up
to
REGIMENTS HAVE EASY TIME
No Trouble to Best the New Nine.
A Couple of Incidents.
Small Attendance.
Saturday's game of baseball between
the Union and Regiment teams was
certainly most disappointing. People
who went out expected to see a good
game on account of the fact that the
Union team had been reorganizd and
better players assigned to the various
positions. Indeed the work in. the first
two innings seemed to 'lend color to
that belief. However, the remainder
of the game was enough to change
their minds. Tne whole fault sscnied
to be in the fact that the Union players
had not sufficient time for prac
tice. Then again, two of the very ibest
players on the team were compelled
to be away on account of having to at
tend drill of the Mounted Patrol, of
which they are meimbers. As scon as
the Union team began to do -down
hill, the members seemed to go all to
pieces. The 'ball was ibatted alll over
the field by the Regiments and the
players seemed unaible to stop a thing.
Even little pop-up flies were muffed.
However, (with all this bad playing on
the part of the Union they were not
the subject of more unfavorable com
ment by the audience than the Regi
ment team. In the last two innings the
players simp'.y struck wildly at the
balls that were pitched to them and
in icase they hit them, refused to run
but simply allowed themselves to be
thrown out. The audience was much
displeased at this performance and
many left before the game was finish
ed, on this very account.
The team were as follows:
Regiment Jones, c. f.; Wilder, 1 b.;
Lishman, s. s. ; Gorman, 3 b.; Davis,
c. ; -Kiley, 1. f.; Hansman, r. f. ; Bower,
p.; Moore, 2 b.
Union Karratti, 1 b.; Jackson, c. f.;
Gomes, 2 b.; Kiwa, p.; Cummings, s. s.;
Akina, r. f.; Luahiwa, 1. f.; Sebastian,
c; Duncan, 3 b.
A complete summary of the game
wi'il not be given at it was by no
means an interesting contest. There
was some excitement in the first in
ning when Moore of the Regiment
team knocked a home run and arrived
at the plate after a splendid run, only
to find that the 'Umpire had called time
previous to his hit and that therefore,
all the work went for nothing. Moore
did not say much but he admits he
did think a great deal.
Although Kiwa the small pitcher for
the Union boys, was batted about
pretty freely, he did succeed in strik
ing out some of the .best batters in the
Regiment team. Akina was substi
tuted in his place but lasted only for
a short time, luiwa again iook tne
box. It was at this time that the Re
giment began to pile up the runs. 16
was evident that Kiwa's arm was
weakening.
In the fifth inning an accident fefell
Hansman' of the Regiment team. He
was running past first and was just
turning to take second when he drop
ped to ground. It seems that he turn
ed his knee. When the Regiment
players ran to attend to him, Moore
picked him up and carried him to first
base so that there could be no ques
tion as to his safety. After that, cold
water was applied. Hansman was
substituted by Hennessey.
In the sixth inning, Wilder went in
as catcher for the Regiments and his
place on first was taken by Davis.
In the last two innings the Regi
ment players let balls pass them and
played without any object whatever.
12 2 4 5 6 7 8 9
Regiment 10344060 018
Union 0 1011020 05
The number of spectators was
small.
A Happy Celebration.
Lusitana Hall was a blaze of light in
side from 7 Saturday evening till mid
night. The place was beautifully decor
ated with flags and banners and em
blems and flowers and greens and was
thronged with people. The occasion
was the celebration of the fifth anni
versary of Court Camoes, Ancient Or
der of Foresters. This society is well
known, and popular on account of its
good fellowship and its splendid coop
erative system. The celebration of
Saturday eveing ended with a jolly
dance.
Col. larkcr Will Come.
It is learned how some -of the
teachers on Islands other than Oahu,
have gathered from some source the
thought that Colonel Parker and wife
will not be here from the United States
for the Summer School to be held in
Honolulu. It has been settled for a
year now that Colonel and Mrs. Parker
will be here and the lecture course has
been published in this paper. There
has been mo intimation that there
might be any possibility of failure to
keep the engagement. It can further
be announced at this time that there
will also be here as one of the Summer
School instructors, Miss Annie E. Al
len, a kindergarten trainer in the Chi
cago Normal School.
A. K. AKAU.
An Hawaiian of Sterling Worth
Passes Away.
One of the truest and best'and most
capable of Hawaiians passed away,
when A. K. Akau died at his School
street residence here at 7 o'clock yes
terday morning. Man and boy he had
been for 20 years an employe of the
Honolulu Iron Works. Starting in as a
messenger boy, Akau gained promo
tion on merit alone, until he became
cashier for; the big establishment. Year
after year he handled thousands upon
thousands of dollars and ever without
any error or a fault. He was trusted
implicity by officials of the company,
and enjoyed ito the fullest the confid
ence and esteem of his fellow workers
and citizens generally. Mr. Akau was
of a pleasant disposition, graceful and
cordial of manner and was at once
liked by all. He was frequently offered
positions with the Government, but
preferred to remain with the old house.
At various times he served as a clerk
or judge of election.
Mr. Akua leaves a wife and five chil
dren. His parents also survive him and
for a number of years have been mem
bers of his household. All are left
above want, as Akau had been careful
and as well carried a life insurance
policy. He made his will about a fort
night ago. Consumption was the cause
of the death. The young man had been
quite strong until about a year ago.
For the past six months he has been
failing and for two months has been
confined to his bed. The funeral will
be held from the Roman Catholic Cath
edral at 5 p. m. today.
Cricket Afternoon.
British Cormmissioner Kenny had
about twenty cricket guests on
Saturday afternoon. There was In
teresting practice on the new pitch
and some fine bowling was shown.
The host was pleasant and gen
erous as ever in his entertainment
of all comers. On Saturday afternoon
next at 2 o'clock the cricketers will
have a game on the Makiki recreation
grounds.
District Court.
In the Police Court Saturday, Kaha
hawai, the young native who entered
the house of some Japanese one might
last week was found guilty of vagrancy
and sentenced to 30 days on the reef.
Casino, the German girl who threw a
stone at a Portuguese boy in Kukulu
aeo last week, was reprimanded.
Earnest Marks was found guilty of
truancy and sent to the Reform School
for six months.
Royal makes the food pure,
wholesome and delicious.
Absolute) Pure
ROVAL PAtowfl poworq co.. wfwvwnc.

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