OCR Interpretation


The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, May 04, 1898, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-05-04/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

0
(
if
ij i ; s i ii. m sp7! i
I ( ' ' f :t Ji J .' v
i
a m
KDL. XXVII., NO. 4910.
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 1S9S.
riUCE FIVE CENTO.
in
1 1 ii
ir
v.
!fi
'.!
y
r.' ;
j.
i
1
5
i
i
I
f
T. Q. A ()(I,
Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
V3FFICK: Corner King and Bethel
Streets.
J)JJ. C. J5. HIGH,
Dentist.
Philadelphia Dental College 1832.
ClonIc Temple. Telephone 318
A. C. WALL, I). D. S.
Dentist.
LOVE BUILDING, : FORT STREET
M. GIKJSSLAX, D.D.S.
Dentist.
C8 HOTEL STREET, HONOLULU.
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DIL A. J. L1RI5Y
Dentist.
CORNER FORT AND HOTEL, STS.
SIOTT-SMITII BLOCK.
Telephones: Office, 615; Residence, 789.
HOURS: 9 to 4.
GKKO. II. IIUDDY D.D.S.
Dentist.
JTORT STREET, OPPOSITE CATHO
LIC MISSION.
Hours: From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. M. WACHS.
Dentist.
' University of California.
Deretania near Fort street.
Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m. and 1 to 4
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
Office No. 537 King street, near
2?unchbowl.
Hours 8:30 to 11 a. m.; 3 to 5 p. m.;
1 to 8 p. an.
Telephone No. 448.
IRS. F. S. SAYANT-JEROME, M. D.,
HOMEOPATH,
ILas opened office No. 223 Hotel
etreet.
Woman's and Children's Diseases.
Special studies of dietetics and phy
siatrics. THE HONOLULU SAMTARIUA1.
1082 KING ST,
A. quiet home-like place, -where train
ed nurses, massage, "Swedish move
ments," baths, electricity and physical
training may be obtained.
P. S. KELLOGG, M.D.,
telephone 639. Supt.
CIIAS. F. PETERSON,
Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
15 Kaahumanu St.
LYLE A. DICKEY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
14 KAAHUMANU STREET.
Telephone, 6S2.
william c. paeke,
Attorney at Law.
AND
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG
MENTS. Office: Kaahumanu St., Honolulu.
O. G. TltAPIIAG-ISX,
ARCHITECT.
223 Merchant Street between Fort
and Alakea.
Telephone 734.
Honolulu, H. I.
SoRsoiidoiefl Soda wafer works Co.,
LIMITED
Epl&nde, Cor. Allen and Fort St.
HOLLISTER A CO., - - AGENTS.
P. O- Box
430
Telephone
478
IrS
New and First-Claw
SECOND-HAND FURNITURE
OF ALL KINDS
SOLD CHEAP FOR CASH.
tBghest Cash Price paid for Second-Haud
Furniture at L Corner KinK
and Nuuanu Streets.
xa. l-e: d e: ii e: -
FEW li
of the following Stocks have
bten placed in our hands for sale a
prices that should be of interest to in
tending investors:
Ewa Plantation Co.
Paia Plantation Co.
Kahuku Plantation Co.
Hawaiian Electric Co.
Inter-Island S. N. Co.
Wilder S. S. Co.
Hawaiian Safe Deposit
Investment Company.
and
GEORGE R. CARTER, Mgr.
Office In rear of Back of Hawaii, Ltl.
SPECIAL BUSINESS ITEMS.
ART AND SCIENCE.
At the World's Columbian Exposi
tion art and science was thoroughly
exemplified. The greatest achieve
ments of modern times were on exhi
bition. Among the many beautiful
displays none attracted more atten
tion than that made by the Singer
Sewing Machine Company,
enthusiastic praises of all.
It won the
B. Berger
sen, Agent, Bethel street.
The City Carriage Company possess
only first-class hacks and employ only
careful, steady drivers.
Carriages at all hours.
Telephone 113.
JOHN S. ANDRADE.
IK'
GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, OOc.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL, NEWSDEALERS
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
HAWAIIAN CURIOS Leis, Kapa,
Niihau Mats, Calabashes, Idols, Fans,
Shells, Seeds, etc., etc.
SAMOAN TAPAS, Carved Emu
Eggs, Hula Drums, Gourds, etc., etc.
Point Lace Handkerchiefs, Doylies,.
Fayal work and Hawaiian Dolls.
Telephone 659.
DR. GEO. J. AUGUR.
Homcepathic Practitioner
and
Surgeon.
Special attention Given to Chronic
Diseases.
Richards street, near Hawaiian hotel.
Office and Residence the same.
Office hours: 10 to 12 a. m.; 3 to 4
m.; 7 to 8 p. m. Sundays 9:30 to
10:30 a. m. Telephone 733.
MISS TOWNE. '
TEACHER OF CHINA PAINTING
Studio, Second Floor Pacific Hard
ware Company.
Class Days Mondays and Tuesdays,
afternoon; Wednesdays and Fridays,
morning.
CHARLES CLARK.
Attorney at Law.
121 -MERCHANT STREET.
Honolulu Hale. Tel.
Up Stairs.
J45.
W. T. M0NSARRAT,
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN
TIST.
TELEPHONES 161 & 626.
The Name Plate That Marks
the High Grade Wheel.
H. E. WALKER, ,Agt.
CCLEVELANDJ
fesff
V i M ANFG' COpJ
FAVOR THE GABLE
Committee Recommenfls Exclusive
Franchise to Japan.
lYlUnt lYJUNtY HJK 1 HIS SrSSII N
Legislative Funds Running Low.
HouselCommittee Reports
on Rapid Transit.
SENATE.
Sixty-sixth Day, May 3.
The special committee considering
the cable bill reported recommending
the passage of the bill with an amend
ment giving an exclusive franchise for
20 years for a cable between Hono
lulu and Japan. The committee be
lieved that the franchise affecting the
Islands in the South Pacific should not
be exclusive. The report was received
to be considered with the bill. The
recommendation of the committee is
as follows:
In the opinion of this committee,
the matter of cable communication of
these Islands with the outside world
comes next to annexation, and if ob
tained, will build up this port, so that
it will be known as the "Queenstown
of the Pacific," and will confer on Ho
nolulu relatively the same advantages
and prosperity that the Reciprocity
Treaty gave to the Islands as a whole.
The bill introduced gave the Pacific
Cable Co. an exclusive franchise for
20 years from and beyond the Hawai
ian Islands to any other Islands in the
acific Ocean and to Japan; the com
mittee is willing to recommend an
exclusive franchise for 20 years be
tween these Islands and Japan, but
not to any other Islands in the Pacific
Ocean, and have therefore amended
Section 1, so that the exclusive fran
chise to Japan will not cover any Isl
ands or places between these Islands
and Japan, that lie south of the tenth
degree or parallel of north latitude,
thus leaving all other Islands that
may or might be necessary for the pur
pose of laying a cable from here to
Australia or New Zealand open and
untrammeled with any exclusive fran
chise from these Islands.
The company now seeking the bene
fit of the Act and the exclusive fran
chise to Japan is about the only one
that has ever applied without asking
or a subsidy, and from what your
committee can learn mean business
and we my confidently expect within
two years to be connected with the
United States by cable.
The right of laying a cable between
here and the Pacific Coast of the Unit
ed States is not exclusive nor was
an exclusive right asked for that por
tion of the line. The principal reason
of granting an exclusive right between
lere and Japan, is that the cost of
aying is great (estimated at $iu,uuu,-
000), and if that amount of money
should be spent, the projectors would
naturally want some assurance that
they would not have opposition be
tween here and Japan for some time.
This committee think as long as no
exclusive franchise is granted between
hese Islands, the north west coast of
America and the Islands of the Pacific
Ocean that lie south of the 10th degree
of north latitude, no objection can be
made by any foreign power whose in
terests are paramount or controlling
in this part of the world.
The report concludes by incorpora
ting its recommendations relative to
the Islands of the North Pacific.
The Committee on Passed Bills an
nounced that the bill to appoint an
additional temporary Circuit Judge
and a bill accepting the Penal Laws
compiled by S. M. Ballou, had been
presented to the President for his ap-
proval.
The bill authorizing the Govern
ment to acquire and preserve ancient
heiaus and puuhonuas or the sites or
remains thereof passed second read
ing. The bill defining the eligibility of
persons to hold public office passed
second reading and went to the Judi
ciarj' Committee.
The Public Lands Committee recom
mended that $36,000 be appropriated
for a new road from Kailua to Nahiku.
Maui. After some discussion and ex
amination of the surveyor's map, the
item passed.
An item of $2,500 for Court house
at Kailua, Hawaii, was also passed.
On motion of Senator Holstein an
item of $3,000 for a new road at Hoo
kena. North Kona. and $2,000 for road
crusher, was inserted in the appropri
ation bill.
Minister Damon's appropriation bill
for $15,000 additional for expenses of
'ithe present session of the
Legislature
passed first reading.
Senator Holstein asked for an item
ized account of the expenses of the
President and suite to the United
States.
The light wine and beer license bill
was made the special order for Wed
nesday. Special appropriation bill 22, passed
second reading as a whole and went
to the Revision Committee.
Upon recommendation of the Judi
einrv Cnrnmittpp thp hill relntinsr to
notice of increased assessment of taxes
ana property, passed second reading.
The Judiciary Committee reported
recommending the passage of the
House bill abolishing the payment of
one-half the fines for opium convic
tion to the informant. The report was
accepted to be taken up with the bill.
The Public Lands Committee recom
mended the passage of the Land Act
framed by the President. The report
of the committee and the amendments
made by them will be taken up vith
the bill.
The House bill permitting the with
drawal of alcohol free of duty from the
Customs House for the use of the
Queen's Hospital was recommended by
the Commerce Committee. The till
passed second reading. Third reading
was set for Wednesday.
The Senate also passed ut second
reading the House bill fixing the duly
on spirituous liquors, etc., male from
materials other than grape juice. The
bill as passed by the House stipulated
that such beverages mentioned in the
bill, if containing 9 per cent and not
more than 14 per cent of alcohol,
should be subject to pay a duty of CO
cents per gallon; more than 11 per
cent and not more than 21 er cent
of alcohol, should pay a duty of fl
per gallon. It also provided that cake,
if containing not more than 17 per
cent of alcohol, should be subject to
pay a specific duty of 60 cents per
gallon.
The amendments recommended by
the committee and adopted by the
Senate changed the percentage govern-
ing the specific duty from 14 to 17 perjtorical background, and presents the
cent, and struck out the proviso for picturesque period which preceded the
sake. The latter change was made
on the ground that the amended per
centage would include sake as well as
other liquors under the 60 cents per
gallon duty.
At 11:45 o'clock the Senate adjourn
ed. HOUSE.
Rep. Pogue read the report of the
special committee on the Rapid Tran
sit bill, in part, as follows:
"All of the amendments proposed by
the Minister of the Interior
more specifically defining as well as
limiting the rights f the association
and others. The amendments propos
ed to Section 8 we do not approve of
as we do not believe that the prac
tice of having mail boxes on passen
ger cars will work well. Again by
another amendment, mail carriers are
granted free transportation on all cars
of the association and we believe that
this should suffice and would be in
practice far better than mail boxes.
We do therefore recommend that this
amendment be laid upon the table, but
all other amendments with amend
ments proposed, be adopted."
Report laid on the table to be con
sidered with the bill.
House bill 57, relating to foreign
corporations was made the special or
der of the day for Wednesday.
Second reading of House bill 65, re
lating to rapid transit, with report of
committee on the bill. One member
explained the work of the committee
and the disposition of the amendments
made by the Minister of the Inetrior.
The amended sections as proposed
by the committee were referred back
to the Printing Committee to be re
printed. Rep. Kahaulelio was appoint
ed on the committee to assist Rep.
Paris. Rep. Robertson stated that he
had been the one largely instrumental
in getting the bill into its present mud
dle and should by rights, assist in the
work of taking out the tangles.
Third reading of House bill 72, re
lating to barbed wire fences. Unani
mously passed.
Report 108, relating to registry of
deeds, was laid on the table to be con-
.sidered with the appropriation bill.
First reading of Senate bill 35,
ISO-, roioHncr t ti1P Kntinnni CuarA
of Hawaii. Rules suspended and the
bill read second time by title. Re
ferred to the Military Committee.
House adjourned at 11 a. m.
DEPENDABLE BARGAINS.
Now that the stock of the fire sale afterward, the only other large island,
is out of the way, L. B. Kerr will Kauai, gave itself up to Kamehameha,
turn over a new leaf and offer to the and the work of uniting the Islands
trade a personally selected stock of under one government was complet
beautiful dry goods at prices with ed."
prices attacked which competition can
not touch.
A very sensational novel by John R.
Musick, well known here, has been put
on the market by Wall, Nichols. The
story is called "Mysterious Mr. How
ard" and has for one incident the as
sassination of Jesse James by "Bob"
Ford at St. Joseph, Mo.
ISLAND GOD"
"N3W
Bool" a Tale of the First
Kamelamek
IT IS BY CURDOH S. MUMFORD
Before the Missionaries Came.
Said to Be a Clever Story Love
and War in Olden Times.
The 1S93 affair here and again the
uprising of two years later caused or
called forth a flood of literature on
the Islands. The fount is not yet ex
hausted. It seems likely that Hawaii
will for all time afford themes for
story writers and those who recount
travel as well as the serious essayists.
The Kilohana Art League has given
an impetus to the work of local writ
ers and the pen wielders abroad find
that a tale set in the Islands carries
a certain amount of prestige. So far
this year there have come from the
press the books of Prof. John R. Mus
ick and Liliuokalani. A third of pre
tension has been added to the list and
will be at the stores in due time. It
is thus reviewed by an American pub
lication under the suggestive heading:
"Before the Missionaries Came:"
"An Island God: A Tale of the First
Kamehameha," by Gurdon S. Mumford,
is a pretty little story, written in a
light, pleasing style, with a semi-his-
amalgamation ana civilization oi me
Hawaiian Islands. The scenes of the
story are laid on" the Island of Oahu,
where is situated the present chief
city, Honolulu at the time when Ka
lanikupule was king.
The story relates the adventures of
a Jesuit priest who is wrecked on the
tropical Island of Oahu, and is held a
prisoner by the natives, who believe
him a god. He is beloved by a native
girl, Aloha, who, when he is about to
be sacrificed by the king to appease
the anger of the pagan gods, proposes
that he fly to her tribe and act as their
the great Kamenamena, wno is on tne
point of attacking the Island, having
just conquered Maui. Her only stipu
lation is that he take her for his wife.
Owing to the priest's pledge of celiba
cy, he bids her go. Later in the day,
Kamehameha lands with his followers,
and, having been informed by Aloha
of the place where Kalanikupule has
gathered his men, hastens to save the
life of the white god. But he is too
late, for as they draw near the temple
of sacrifice, built of bleached bones
and grinning skulls, the priest, his
body bruised and charred beyond rec
ognition, springs out from the pillar
of smoke, only to fall dead at their
feet.
The volume is supplemented with
"An Historical Sketch of the Hawaii
an Islands from the Earliest Times
to the Present Day," which is rather
fragmentary but interesting. Of the
victory of Kamehameha over Kalani
kupule, Professor Frank Woodward,
the author of the historical sketch
says :
"In 1705, Kamehameha undertook
the conquest of the island of Oahu.
The king of this island, Kalanikupule,
had just received a few English guns
from Captain Brown, who had landed
at Honolulu in the schooner Jackal.
Kamehameha, in planning to attack
Oahu, raised the largest army ever
seen in the Islands, including about
sixteen thousand men, of whom sixteen
were foreigners, in charge of his can
nons and musketry. It is said that his
war-canoes lined the shore for four
miles. The decisive battle occurred in
a long, sloping valley called Nuuanu,
which cuts transversely, with vertical
sides, through the mountains and ends
in a steep precipice called the Pali,
i over a thousand feet high
The army
of Kalanikupule fought well, until
their leader was killed by. a cannon-
ball, when they weakened, and those
who were not killed were driven over
the precipice to death. For many
t-ocit-g tVio lmrific: nf thp;fl warriors
. , f. ,n heaps eo goon
Only a "Jolly."
There was excitement along the wa
ter front shortly after the arrival of
the Mauna Loa yesterday forenoon.
One of the employes of the Inter-Isl
and company spread the report about
that the Mauna Loa had brought down
the news of the arrival of a sailing
vessel in Hilo after a quick trip from
San Francisco. She had brought down
the news of the engagement of the
Spanish and American fleets off Ha
vana and the destruction of the Texas
and Indiana. People did not stop to
inquire further into the case but swal
lowed the yarn in toto. A reporter on
one of the afternoon papers was a vic
tim and had it not been for the fact
that he saw Purser Tuft who denied
the story, the city might have been
treated to another sensation.
Finished With Othello.
The class in Shakespeare which
Prof. Cora McDonald has been con
ducting at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
J. B. Atherton finished last evening
with Othello. Considerable discussion
on the play itself and the various char
acters was had. Miss McDonald quoted
the eminent critics and gave her own
views in a succinct manner. It so
happened that there were present
those who differed with the greatest
students of Shakespeare. There will
next be read by the class "The Win
ter's Tale," affording a further oppor
tunity for the analysis or study of
jealousy as a moving passion.
Prayer Aboard Ship.
The Y. M. C. A. held a very interest
ing service aboard the Bennington last
evening. Secretary Coleman made a
short address, Miss Hammond sang
and Mr. McComb, chairman of the
visiting and shipping committees of
the Y. M. C. A. read a short article by
Chaplain Wood of the navy yard at
Brooklyn on the Maine disaster, fol
lowing this with a strong appeal to the
men to enlist as Christians. Twenty-
five stood up and wished to be remem
bered in prayer by the Christians
ashore. Twelve openly confessed
Christ.
Unions Retire.
The Union baseball team is no more.
A meeting of the League was held in
the hall of the Chamber of Commerce
yesterday. Manager Goudie stated that
it was impossible to get together a
team capable of fighting on an equal
footing with the Regiment and Hono
lulu teams. He proposed that each of
the teams mentioned pay him $20. He
had already expended $53 on material
for the team. This was accepted. It is
now proposed to arrange for a series
of 15 games between the remaining
teams.
In Circuit Court.
Before Judge Perry yesterday the
appeal of Helen and John Hilo, for
mitigation of sentence passed by the
District Court, was denied. These na
tives had been convicted of conducting
a che fa game for the patronage of
Chinese and others. The woman was
fined $100 and the man $50 and costs.
John Gilman, the amateur bicycle
racer, was found guilty by jury on tfte
charge of being unlawfully on the
premises of another at night. Notice
of motion for a new trial was given.
WHOOPING COUGH.
I had a little boy who was nearly
dead from an attack or wnoopmg
cough. iMy neighbors recommenoea
rhnmbrlain's Cough Remedy. 1 na
not think that any medicine would help
him. but aCter giving him a few doses
of that remedy I noticed an improve
ment, and one bottle cured him entire
ly. It is the best cough medicine I
ever had in the house. J. L. Moore,
South Burgettstown, Pa. For sale by
all Druggists and Dealers. Benson,
Smith & Co., Ltd., Wholesale Agents
for H. I.
Royal makes tbe food pure,
wholesome and dcllcloa.
Hi
Absolutely Pure
povai &AkM4 3wrr m.. rwvoic
0m

xml | txt