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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, May 12, 1898, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-05-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
OFFICE: Corner King and Bethel
Street3.
c. 15. man,
Dentist.
Philadelphia Dental College 1892.
lllasonlc Temple. Telephone 318.
A. C. WALL, L. 1. S.
Dentist.
:LOVE BUILDING, : FORT STREET.
M. .12. GKOSSMAN, D.D.S.
Dentist.
J8 HOTEL STREET, HONOLULU,
Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p. m.
Bit. A. J. DERBY,
Dentist.
CORNER FORT AND HOTEL STS.,
MOTT-SM1TH BLOCK.
Telephones: Office, 615; Residence, 789.
HOURS: 9 to 4.
GEO. II. IIUDDY, D.D.S.
Dentist.
ORT STREET, OPPOSITE CATHO
LIC MISSION.
Hours: From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. M. WACHS.
Dentist.
Cniversity. of California.
Beretania near Fort street.
Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m. and 1 to
- I p. m.
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
Office No. 537 King street, near
I Punchbowl.
Hours: 8:30 to 11 a. m.; 3 to 5 p.
m.; 7 to 8 p. m.
Telephone No. 448.
. r-j
MRS. F. S. SAYANT-JEROME, M.D.
HOMEOPATH.
Has opened office No. 223 Hotel
i street.
Women's and Children's Diseases.
Special studies made of dietetics and
:physiatrics.
THE HONOLULU SANITARIUM.
1082 KING ST.
A quiet home-like place, where train
ed nurses, massage, "Swedish move
.ments," baths, electricity and physical
training may be obtained.
P. S. KELLOGG M.D.
Telephone 639. Supt.
DR. GEO. J. AUGUR.
Homcepathic Practitioner and
Sdroeon.
Special attention Given to Chronic
'Diseases.
Richards street, near Hawaiian hotel.
Office and Residence the same.
Office hours: 10 to 12 a. m.; 3 to 4
p. m.; 7 to 8 p. m. Sundays 9:30 to
10:30 a. m. Telephone 733.
C1IAS. F. PETERSON,
.Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
15 Kaahumanu St.
XjYLE a. dickey,
Attorney at Law.
14 KAAHUMANU STREET.
Telephone, 6S2.
wieeia3i c. parke,
Attorney at Law.
AND
AGENT TO TAKE AGKNOWLEDG-
MENTS.
Kaahumanu St., Honolulu.
-Office:
O. G. TRAPILVGEX,
ARCHITECT.
223 Merchant Street, between Fort
and Alakea.
Telenhone 734. Honolulu, H. I.
HiSO
LIMITED.
Esplanade, Cor. Allen and Fort Sts.
5IOLLISTER & CO., - - AGENTS.
doled
SOflfl
fnrlrn
IlUltVd
of the following Stocks have
been placed in our hands for sale at
prices that should be cf interest to in
tending investors:
Ewa Plantation Co.
Pafa Plantation Co.
Kahuku Plantation Co.
Hawaiian Electric Co.
Inter-Island S. N. Co.
Wilder S. S. Co.
Hawaiian Safe Deposit and
Investment Company.
GEORGE R. CARTER, Mgr.
Office la rear of Bank of Hawaii. Ltd
SPECIAL BUSINESS ITEMS.
ART AND SCIENCE.
At the World's Columbian Exposi
tion art and science was thoroughly
exemplified. The greatest achieve-t
ments of modern times were on exhi
bition. Among the many beautiful
displays none attracted more atten
tion than that made by the Singer
Sewing Machine Company. It won the
enthusiastic praises of all. B. Berger
sen, Agent, Bethel street.
The City Carriage Company possess
only first-class hacks and employ only
careful, steady drivers.
Carriages at all hours.
Telephone 113.
JOHN S. ANDRADE.
it GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, 60c.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
HAWAIIAN CURIOS Leis, Kapa,
Niihau, Mats, Calabashes, Idols, Fans,
Shells, Seeds, etc., etc.
SAMOAN TAPAS, Carved Emu
Eggs, Hula Drums, Gourds, etc., etc.
Point Lace Handkerchiefs, Doylies,
Fayal work and Hawaiian Dolls.
Telephone 659.
MISS TOWNE,
TEACHER OF CHINA PAINTING
Studio, Second Floor Pacific Hard
ware Company.
Glass Days Mondaj-s and Tuesdays,
afternoon; Wednesdays and Fridays,
morning.
CIIAHLES CLARK.
Attorney at Law.
121 MERCHANT STRJEET.
Honolulu Hale. Tel. 345.
Up Stairs.
W. T. MONSARRAT,
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN
TIST. TELEPHONES 161 & 625.
BEFORE
BUYING
Your Furniture call at the
IXL and see the low prices
in Antique Oak Bedroom Sets,
Iron Beds, Wardrobes, Chairs,
Rockers, Bureaus, Tables, Meat
Safes, Stoves, Washstands, Ice
Boxes, Etc.
S. W. LEDERER,
Corner Nuuanu and King Sts.
P. O. Box 480. Tel. 478.
OOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOO
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5 1-2 MILE, G. MARTIN, 59 3-5 sec. $
1-3 MILE, G. MARTIN, 37 1-5 sec.
8 1-3 MILE, F. DAMON - - - 40 sec. o
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0
"CLEVEIANDS" ARE RELIABLE.
0
E. WALKER. Agent.
MASONIC BLOCK. A
8H-
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Cleveland
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Records
FOB ANNEXATION
Arpmit M By Suitor
cd the Snlijeet.
ISLANDS HEEDED BY AMERICA
Would Be Valuable as Base of Sup
plies for Operations in
the East.
NEW YORK, May 2. The Herald's
Washington correspondent telegraphs:
Rear Admiral Dewey's gallant
achievements of yesterday and the able
and courageous support given him bj
the officers and men of his fleet render
it imperative that the Government
should not hesitate a moment to send
supplies to him by the fleetest ships
.that sail out of San Francisco. This
is no time to speculate what eastern
ports may be open to our ships or in
dulge in "what might have been" dis
cussions in the event of the annexation
of the Hawaiian Islands. The prompt
and vigorous action of Rear Admiral
Dewey in front of the Spanish fleet in
spired the Secretary of the Navy to
take immediate measure to relieve our
fleet in the Pacific Ocean of any em
barrassment it might feel for want of
coal.
Accordingly, orders were telegraphed
to San Francisco this morning for the
Government authorities to select two
of the swiftest ships at that port, load
them with coal and dispatch the'm at
once to the relief Admiral Dewey's
fleet.
It was during the consideration of
this subject that the question of an
nexing Hawaii forced itself to the
front. Senator Lodge of Massachu
setts, Senator Frye of Maine and Sen
ator Gray of Deleware, three of the
ablest and best-informed members of
the Committee on Foreign Relations,
were at the Navy Department and dis
cussed the proposition with Secretary
Long. Senator Lodge said he regret
ted very much the failure of the Unit
ed States to annex Hawaii several
years ago.
"We never needed it as much as we
need it today, added the Massachu
setts Senator, with great earnestness.
"It would be an invaluable piece of
property at this moment and to my
opinion the United States should not
hesitate a moment longer about ac
cepting the generous and thoroughly
business-like proposition of the Ha
waiian Government.
"Some of the wise men of this gen
eration," continued Senator Lodge,
"were shrewd enough to appreciate
the necessity of the acquisition of Ha
waii by the United States. If our peo
ple who were opposed to annexation
would throw aside political and per
sonal considerations and look at the
situation from an international stand
point and as a plain, practical, busi
ness proposition they would insist on
the immediate ratification of the treaty
now pending before the Senate. Take
existing conditions into consideration
and any reasonable man will be struck
at once with the importance of the
United States having a base of sup
plies in the Pacific Ocean. Here is our
gallant Asiatic squadron fighting suc
cessfully to uphold the national stand
ard in that far away eastern country.
We have no means of knowing at the
present moment what injuries our
ships and crews have sustained in yes
terday's conflict. We are also in the
dark as to the supply of coal the fleet
has at its diposal. With all foreign
ports closed against us our only re
course is to ship a coal supply from
San Francisco.
"How different would be the condi
tions if Hawaii had been annexed to
the United States before this war with
Spain came on. With cable communi
cation between Hawaii and San Fran
cisco we could relieve Rear Admiral
Dewey's fleet from any embarrassment
it may be subjected to for want of
coal. Consider the difference in the
number of days it takes to go from
San Francisco to Manila and that Ha
waii is more than half way between
those points, and it is at once appar
ent that Hawaii would be of inesti
mable value as part of United States
territory."
A Washington dispatch of May 3 to
the Call says that the proposition to
take Vhe saTus Ytas. met with, cyppo
sition in the Senate, and that in con
sequence it is probable there will be no
further agitation until the opposition
changes heart.
Flagship Olympia.
The U. S. F. S. Olympia, which car
ries the flag of Commodore Dewey in
Manila harbor, was built at the Union
Iron Works, San Francisco. She was
billeted for a stay in this port in the
fall of 1S93, but remained outside a
week. This was on account of the
cholera ashore. A special basin, 33 feet
of water at low tide, had been made in
naval row here for the Olympia. Later
is was thought that the Oregon would
occupy this .berth. Events are shap
ing now so that the Olympia will most
likely come back here and finally use
the basin made for her three years
ago.
On the Bennington
Officers and men of the U. S. Gun
boat Bennington, now in her war paint
in this harbor are at a tension. They
were both interested and excited by
the news of fighting in the Philippines.
All were. sorry that the gunboat had
not been ordered to the Asiatic squad
ron with the cruiser Baltimore. The
feelings 'of patroitism and desire to
act run high. The fervent hope aboard
the Bennington is that she will have
orders very soon now to proceed either
direct to Manila or to port at Hong
Kong. The search lights of the gun
boat were being tested again last night.
Has His Cigars Now.
As details of the fight in Manila har
bor have not been received all Hono
lulu is in suspense as to how the men
and ships so well known here behaved.
Of course it can be taken for granted
that each officer and man gave a good
account of himself. Capt. Dyer, of the
Baltimore, who has a record as fight
ing man, was very anxious for the
fray when he took the cruiser out of
this port only a few wreeks ago. The
captain was getting his personal sup
plies up town a few days before sail
ing. He is quite a smoker, but re
marked that he would take along
only a few Manila cigars, as he expect
ed to get them right from the factory
soon.
Only tleager Advices.
The Government had recourse to the
newspapers for most of its war and an
nexation news. Mr. Hatch had writ
ten from Washington, but had not
sent a telegram. There was nothing
from Consul-General Wilder at San
Francisco. Mr. Thurston did not write
to any member of the Government.
Neither did Mr. Castle, Secretary of
the legation at Washington.
To a friend here, Mr. Thurston sent
a note which included the statement
that the annexation matter was likely
to be taken up at any time at the insti
gation or suggestion of the administra
tion. In a private letter, Consul-General
Wilder said that it was the opin
ion in San Francisco that Hawaii
would be doing decidedly the wrong
thing if she proclaimed neutrality.
Col. Claus Spreckels.
News comes by the-Zealandia that
at one time in San Francisco two
weeks ago the death of Col. Claus
Spreckels was announced. It was her
alded on the bulletin boards and ex
tended obituaries were being prepared
for publication. Even the flag on the
Call building was placed at half-mast.
The facts were that the sugar king had
been ailing slightly at his ranch for
somedays. He came to the city for
treatment, when it was decided that
an operation, for carbuncle on the
back, was necessary. So soon as the
knife had been applied the report went
aboard that while the operation had
been successful the veteran had been
killed by the shock. This story was
soon denied by the man most inter
ested. Colonel Spreckels will be con
fined to his home about a month.
DEPENDABLE BARGAINS.
Now that the stock of the fire sale
is out of the way, L. B. Kerr will
turn over a new leaf and offer to the
trade a personally selected stock of
beautiful dry goods at prices with
prices attacked which competition can
not touch.
The American Legation at Constan
tinople has received more than 2,000
offers of volunteers for the American
Navy, chiefly Greeks, who all declare
themselves ready to pay their fare to
the United States.
MANILA HARBOR
TERRIBLE
Dewey's Squadron Almost Annihilates
Spain's Entire Naval Forces
in the Philippines.
Terrific Cannonading for Nearly Two
Hours Movements in Atlantic Uncer
tainMore Prizes of War.
LOXDOX, May 1 . The Asiatic squadron of the United
States, Commodore Dewey commanding, to-day engaged and
completely defeated the Asiatic squadron of Spain in the har
bor of Manila in the rhillippine Islands. All the news of the
great naval battle thus far received is coming from Spanish
sources. This shows conclusivelyt hat Manila has not yet
been taken bv the American forces and that the cable lines
are still under the control of Spain.
From the fact that even the advices received from Madrid
show that the American warships fared best, there is hardly
any doubt that when complete details are obtainable it will
be learned that it was a crushing defeat for Spain.
Keports of the battle thus far are coming in piecemeal.
During the two engagements that took place Commodore
Montijo, commanding the Spanish fleet, lost 'three of his
largest ships. His flagship, the armored cruiser Maria, lleina'
Christina, and the armored cruiser Castilla were burned,
and the cruiser Don Juan de Austria was blown up. Several
other Spanish vessels were badly damaged.
Under the protection of the guns of their fortitications the
Spanish warships opened tire on the American fleet.
For several hours the harbor resounded with the roar of
guns, the crashing of steel timbers and the shrieks and groans
of the wounded. Thick clouds of smoke at times almost ob
scured the opposing fleets from each other.
A well-directed shot reached the iron cruiser Don Juan de
Austria, a vessel of 1100 tons. A terrific explosion followed
and the ship was blown up.
All the time during the first engagement the American ships
were under way, their maneuvering being intended to render
the marksmanship of Spanish gunners less effective.
There was a heavy loss of life among the Spanish. Captain
Cardase, commanding the Maria Cristina, was killed.
Commodore Montijo, commanding the fleet, shifted his flag
from the Maria Cristina to the Isla. de Cuba, a much smaller
steel protected cruiser, just before the Cristina sank.
The blowing up of the Don Juan de-Austria was attended
by a great loss of life among the crew, her commander also
being killed.
Commodore Dewey's squadron, leaving Subig Hay, a few
miles fro mManila, about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, pro
ceeded toward Manila. Under the cover of darkness he en
tered the harbor of Manila, the batteries located there an
nouncing his arrival.
Both lieets lined up for battle at daybreak about 5 o'clock
this morning. The guns of the American warships began
firing on the fortress of Cavite and the arsenal of Manila.
The American squadron, about 0 o'clock drew off to the
east side of the bay and took refuge behind some foreign
vessels. The ships had evidently suffered consierable
damage.
After thev had made some hasfv repairs thev returned to
the conflict. During this engagement the guns of Cavite
maintained a steadier and stronger fire upon Commodore
Dewey's ships than in the first encounter, but the American
guns were briged with telling effect. As the smoke lifted it
was seen that the flagship Maria Reina Cristina was on firo..
The vessel was completely burned.
In the interval between the two engagements Commodore
Montijo moved his flag from the Cristina to the smaller
cruiser Isla de Cuba. To the fact that he made this change
he doubtless owes his life.
The cruiser Castilla, next to the largest and most powerful
of the Spanish squadron, was also burned. The cruiser Don
Antonio de Ulloa and the Mindanao were also badly damaged
in the encounter.
That the American squadron received severe damage in the
encounter cannot be doubted. Early reports had it that five
of Commodore Dewey's fleet had been sunk. Later advices
from Madrid put the number at two. I have been able to as
certain nothing more.definite than this, but I consider it highly
significant that the latest advices I have received from Mad
rid and Lisbon make no mention of an American being des
troyed. There were, undoubtedly, heavy losses in men on both
sides.
One apparently trustworthy report states that the Spanish
had 200 killed and 400 wounded.
Trustworthv details of the American loss of life will hardlv
be obtainable until Commodore Dewey has taken Manila or
has sent a vessel with dispatches to Hongkong.
(Continued on page two).
SEES
CONFLICT
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