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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, May 16, 1898, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-05-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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5TOLL XXVH., NO. 4920.
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, 51 ONI) AY, MAY 1G, 1S9S.
PRICE FIVE
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J. Q. AT()()I),
Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
OFFICE:
Corner Kins
Streets.
and Bethel
J)I?. C. 15. HIGH,
Dentist.
Philadelphia Dental
Masonic Temple.
College 1SD2.
Telephone 318.
A. C. WALL, I). D. S.
Dentist-
LOVE BUILDING. : FORT STREET.
31.02. GliOSSMAX, DD.S.
Dentist-
OS HOTEL STREET, HONOLULU.
OHice Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p. m.
A. J. DIERliY",
Dentist.
CORNER FORT AND HOTEL S.TS.
MOTT-SMITH BLOCK.
Telephones: Office, CIS; Residence, 7S9.
HOURS: 9 to 4.
GEO. II. IIUDDY, D.D.S.
Dentist-
FORT STREET, OPPOSITE CATHO
LIC MISSION.
Hours: From V a. m. to 4 p. m.
. DR. M. WACHS.
Dentist.
Cniversity of California.
Beretanla near Fort street.
Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m. and 1 to
4 p. m.
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
Office No. 537
King street, ndar
Punchbowl.
Hours: 8:30 to 11 a. in.;
m.; 7 to 8 p. m.
Telephone No. 448.
5 p.
MRS. F. S. SAYANT-JEROME, M.D.
HOMEOPATH.
Has opened office No. 223 Hotel
street.
Women's and Children's Diseases.
Special studies made of dietetics and
physiatrics.
DR. GEO. J. AUGUR,
HOMCEPATIIIC TKACTITIONER AND
SURQEON.
Special attention Given to Chronic
Diseases.
Richards street, near Hawaiian hotel.
Office and Residence the same.
"VflTC. Vi-iiej. in trx 19 a m 5 r A.
VU4VC UIO. 4.VJ lS -.U U. U W M. I
p. m.; 7?to 8 p. m. Bunaays u:zv to
10:30 a.m. Telephone 733.
W. T. M0NSARRAT,
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN
TIST. TELEPHONES 161 & 626.
CIIAS. F. PETERSON,
Attorney at Law.
-AND-
NOTARY PUBLIC,
15 Kaahumanu St.
lyle a. dickey,
Attorney at Law.
14 KAAHUMANU STREET.
Telephone, 6S2.
WJX.LIAM C. PAKKE,
Attorney at Law.
AND
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG
MENTS. Office: Kaahumanu St., Honolulu.
O. G. TRAPIIAGEX,
ARCHITECT.
223 Merchant Street, between Fort
and Alakea.
Telephone 734. Honolulu, H. I.
H. HACKFELD & CO., Ltd.
Cor. Fart and Queen Sts., : Honolulu.
nni
Gomm
liiill
flaenis
of the following Stocks have
been placed in our hands for sale at
prices that should be of interest to in
tending investors:
Ewa Plantation Co.
Paia Plantation Co.
Kahuku Plantation Co.
Hawaiian Electric Co.
Inter-Island S. N. Co.
Wilder S. S. Co.
Hawaiian Safe Deposit
and
Investment Company.
GEORGE R. CARTER, Mgr.
Office la rear of Bask of Hawaii, Ltd.
SPECIAL BUSINESS ITEMS.
ART AND SCIENCE.
At the World's Columbian Exposi
tion art and science was thoroughly
exemplified. The greatest achieve
ments of modern times were on exhi
bition. Among the many beautiful
displays none attracted more atten
tion than that made by the Singer
Sewing Machine Company. It won the
enthusiastic praises of all. B. Berger-
sen, Agent, Bethel street.
The City Carriage Company possess
only first-class hacks and employ only
careful, steady drivers.
Carriages at all hours.
Telephone 113.
JOHN S. ANDRADE.
IK'
GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, GOc.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL. NEWSDEALERS
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
HAWAIIAN CURIOS Leis, Kapa.,
Nlihau Mats, Calabashes, Idols, Fans,
Shells, Seeds, etc., etc.
SAMOAN T4kPAS, Carved Emu
Eggs, Hula Drums, Gourds, etc., etc.
Point Lace Handkerchiefs, Doylies,
iFayal work and Hawaiian D0II3.
Telephone 659.
MISS TOWNE.
TEACHER OF CHINA PAINTING
Studio, Second Floor Pacific Hard
ware Company.
Class Days Monda3rs and Tuesdays,
afternoon; Wednesdays and Fridays,
morning.
fJ. M. DAVIDSOX.
. . . .
niiunicy cxiika uuuiici
nr at I nu
Nc. 206 Merchant Street : Honolulu.
CIIABLiES CLAEK.
Attorney at Law.
121 MERCHANT STREET.
Honolulu Hale. Tel. 343.
Up Stairs.
BEFORE
BUYING
Your Furniture call at the
IXL and see the low prices
in Antique Oak Bedroom Sets,
Iron Beds, Wardrobes, Chairs,
Rockers, Bureaus, Tables, Meat
Safes, Stoves, Washstands, Ice
Boxes, Etc.
S. W. LEDERER,
Corner Nuuanu and King Sts.
P. O. Box 4S0. Tel. 47S.
OOCKX)XXXXOCOXX0000
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i-2 MILE, G. MARTIN, 59 3-5 sec.
1-3 MILE, G. MARTIN, 37 1-5 sec.
1-3 MILE, F. DAMON - - - 40 sec.
"CLEmnffir m reliable.
H.
E. WALKER, Agent.
MASONIC BLOCK.
ooc ooooooooooocxxxxx?
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IB 1
Records
WAS BETTER PLAN
Improvement in the Ho
nolulu Ball Team.
MADE AH UPHILL FIGHT
Beaten, But Not Badly Regiments
Nearly Caught Napping Close
Finish Causes Excitement.
The baseball game of Saturday was
very much of an improvement on the
previous one between the Regiments
and Honolulus and toward the 7att?r
part, great enthusiasm was aroused by
the hard and determined playing of the
Honolulu boys. In the beginning, they
did not seem to go into playing as if
they felt very much like it. In the
last two innings they made a brilliant
effort to catch up but it was too late
in the day and the Regiments finished
winners with a score of 13 to 9. There
was quite a large turnout to witness
the game. The umpiring was done by
First Baseman Flint' of the famous
Bennington team, which met its water
loo at the hands of the Kamehameha
team. The work was well done and
both sides were satisfied. The players
in the order of their bathing, were as
follows:
Regiment Moore, 2b; Jones, cf;
Wilder, c; Lishman, rf; Gorman, 3b;
Davis, lb; Kiley, lf; Bower, ss; Hart,
P-
Honolulu Willis, lb; Pahau, If;
Kaanoi, cf; Pryce, rf; Dayton, c; Ma
nuka, 2b; Lemon, p; Luahiwa, 3b;
Thompson, ss.
In the early part of the game, Hen
nessey substituted for Lishman of the
Regiments and Duncan for Pahau of
the Honolulus. The regular players
arrived later.
The Regiments went first to bat and
Moore started the ball rolling for one
base. Jones hit for three bases and
got home on careless fielding of the
Honolulus. Hennessey had bad luck
in this inning. He had just struck out
and was stepping away from the plate
when Dayton threw the ball to the
pitcher. Hennessey was struck fairly
in the nose and dazed for a minute or
so. The Honolulus were retired with
out a run.
The Regiments made two runs in the
second and the same number in the
third innings. In the second Bower
made a three bagger. The Honolulus
failed to score in these two innings.
In the fourth and fifth innings neith
er team scored. The playing was very
sharp on both sides.
In the sixth inning the Regiments
piled up three more runs. Gorman
made a three bagger. This was the
first inning that the Honolulus suc
ceeded in scoring. Pryce got base on
balls, stole second and then third on a
beautiful slide that just saved him and
then came home on a single by Ma
huka. Had it not been for the excel
lent base stealing of Pryce he never
would have reached home. This was
the only run in the sixth.
In the seventh inning Davis made a
home run. He would have taken but
three bases had it not been for the
carelessness in fielding of the Hono
lulus. With Bower's home run in the eighth
ended the score of the Regiments for
that inning. Then came the Honolulus
with three runs.
The greatest excitement was aroused
in the ninth inning. The Regiments
got three runs and then the Hono
lulus jumped in for five tallies. It
looked for a while as if they would
win the game. Hart of the Regiments
became a little bothered and the Hono
lulu boys batted him freely.
The score of the game by innings is
as follows:
1234GG7S9
Regiment 1 2200311 313
Honolulu 00000103 Z 9
The Uig Pictures.
The pictures that are attracting most
attention in town just now are those
of John F. Hackfeld and Robert
Lewers, shown by the Davey Company.
The work is called Paris enamel and is
far ahead of anything of the sort yet
seen here. The finish is something ex
quisite and is said to be lasting, while
the likenesses are remarkably good.
Fred Whitney with Irwin & Co., had
the first Paris enamel. The work prom
ises to have a vosne.
Society Notes.
On Saturday there was an im
promptu picnic, at Miss Paris' resid
ence on Pearl harbor. The place is ad
mirably adapted for the purpose, as it
lies directly on the water, and has an
excellent view of the mountains.
The persons attending the picnic
were Mrs. Dr. Cooper, Mrs. C. L. Car
ter with her two children, Mrs. Ivers,
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Irwin and Miss
Ilelene Irwin," two of the children of
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Damon, Mrs. C.
II. Judd, Dr. Walter Maxwell, Mr. Can
avarro and Mr. W. N. Armstrong.
Several of the town boys gave a
dinner to Mr. T. Driscoll, the champion
tennis player, at Sans Souci on Satur
day evening.
First view of the Spring exhibition
of the Kilohana Art League on May 17,
Marshal and Mrs. Brown gave a ca
noeing party on Saturday.
Miss Pauahi Judd gave an afternoon
tea on Saturday.
Suggests a Barbecue.
Senator John Wright was a soldier
boy himself for the United States when
they had a big row over there some
thing more than 30 years ago. The
Senator saw much active service, had
uncomfortable railway traveling and
trying marches. Speaking on Satur
day of the proposal to entertain here
American troops en route to Manila,
advanced first in the Advertiser, Sena
tor Wright says: "My idea would be
to give them a good feed of plain
'grub' when they get here. They will
have been a week on rations and will
want a change and something substan
tial. Fruit might make them sick and
pie and cake would do them no good.
I speak from experience and say give
them plenty of coffee and good fresh
meat and bread."
Editors Get Off.
Before the libel case against Edmund
Norrie and W. Horace Wright was
sent to the jury on Saturday last, the
name of Mr. Wright as a defendant
was withdrawn by the prosecution.
Lively arguments were made by coun
sel and the 12 men retired to fix on the
immediately future of Norrie in his
relation to the Courts. Two ballots
were taken. The first was eight for
acquittal and four for conviction. The
second, which was had at once without
discussion, was ten for acquittal and
two for conviction. The verdict of not
guilty, two dissenting, was returned to
Judge Perry and the defendant was
discharged.
A Rally of Sailors.
There was a most encouraging at
tendance for the service at the Y. M.
C. A. on Saturday evening arranged
by Mr. McCombe entirely for enter
tainment and benefit of sailors. The
large hall was well filled with men
from the merchant vessels and a num
ber from the U. S. gunboat Benning
ton. Mr. McCombe made the prin
cipal address and was quite effective
in talking to the men concerning their
spiritunl welfare. There was music
such as sailors would enjoy and the
social had a tone that did much to
make the men feel at home.
Senator Rice's Dog.
A very peculiar case came up in the
District Court in Lihue last week.
Senator Rice had a fine thoroughbred
dog which was a valued possession.
One day the animal got away and
wandered over to Grove Farm where
some natives lived. The dog's identity
was soon lost in an imu and a luau
was the result. Piopio and others were
arrested. Piopio was found guilty and
sentenced but has taken an appeal.
A GREAT OPPORTUNITY.
We will sell for one week Table
Linen, Napkins, Sheeting, Pillow Cas
ing, below cost. This means such
bargains as are not offered every day.
Ladies will do well to replenish their
supply. L. B. Kerr, Queen street.
The Advertiser, delirered to any part
of the city for 75 cents a month.
MARGARET H. WON
Directress, the Favorite Was De
feated in tie Hatch.
ill THREE STRAIGHT HEATS
Good Time Was Made An Interest
ing Contest Quickly Settled.
Race in Detail.
Turf patrons, as well as people who
simply enjoy looking upon a horse
race were delighted with the match at
Kapiolani Park track on Saturday aft
ernoon. It was a clean, interesting
and satisfactory contest. It was just
the settlement in a sportsmanlike
manner of a dispute as to the merits
of a pair of well known harness horses.
The animals were Norton's Directress,
a roan mare four years old and Hol
linger's Margaret H, a sorrel mare
4iged. The roan is small, prettily gait-
ed and looks staunch. The sorrel is
big, reaches out well and gives the
impression of being powerful. Both
horses were in Al condition. The ar
gument was settled in favor of Marga
ret H in three straight heats and the
verdict may be regarded as final and
decisive. Margaret H is the better
horse by five seconds and if the ex
pression of a number of good judges
may be accepted is of better quality.
Directress appeared to be faithful, fast
and responsive to about the three
quarters. Down around the first turn
and in the backstretch she was able to
more than hold her own and at these
stages often seemed more than a
match for the big sorrel. But comin
home, Directress, while traveling even
ly, appeared jaded and when given the
gad quite severely rather failed to
fight. Some of the wise ones had said
that the little roan would "quit.'
Probably that is putting it too strong
It more likely and more just to as
sume that the mile at the pace is sim
ply too much for her.
Thp nntrnme of the match was a
Waterloo for the sports. Nineteen
out of twenty of the men who are us
ually supposed to be infallible in mat
ters of this sort were in the wrong
on Saturday and paid for it without
grumbling. The match was for $500
a side, but with the other betting there
was not less than $4,000 to $5,000 in
the hands of stakeholders. There was
a crowd of several hundred at the
track for the race. The gathering in
cluded such representative racegoers
as Dr. McGrew, John A. Cummins,
Parker and many jockey club mem
bers, with a sprinkling of ladies.
In this affair the question of driv
ers was an interesting one. Walter
Bagsby had Magaret II and "Jack"
Gibson Directress. Each man had driv
en the other horse before and each
was confident of victory on Saturday.
Bagsby drove with skill and judgment
and apparently without any idea other
than sending the better horse under
the wire first. The day and track
were favorable for good time.
First Heat The pole had been
drawn for Directress. They were sent
off evenly on the fourth trial. Direc
tress broke just at the word and Mar
garet II went ahead, with her driver
looking back to see if it was "a go."
Before Directress "came down" Marga
ret II was four lengths to the goon.
Gibson used the whip a little on Direc
tress in rounding up the upper turn
and at the eighth had reduced the sor
rel mare's lead to three lengths. Bags
by held Margaret II. steady and was
looking back down the home stretch.
Directress was brought up perhaps one
more length, losing the heat by two
lengths, with Margaret IPs time 2:26
1-5. There came on the faces of mem
bers of the "talent" looks of anxiety.
Second Heat Gibson sent Directress
from the first, apparently trying to
take the inside from the big mare.
This was a futile effort, though at
times it looked like a close fight and
was a pretty sight. At the half Mar
garet led by a length, at the three
quarters by two lengths and she fin
ished under a pull three lengths to the
good. Directress was again punished,
but did not respond as was expected
by her admirers and backers, though
she had m?.de a splendid showing in
the early going of the heat. Such had
been the pace for the seven-eighths
that the time for the mile was 2:24 1-5.
Third Heat Gibson took Directress
out from the start again and at the
quarter had the pole and the lead,
with the Directress people shouting
that the little mare had at last waked
up and was showing what she could
do. Until they came into the back
stretch it looked as though the beau
tiful little roan might take the mile.
Then Bagsby merely "shook up" the
strong sorrel. Margaret H struck out
like a runner, at the half was ahead
a length and under easy driving moved
on till she was five lengths to the
good in finishing, with Directress
again getting the whip, but too fagged
to spurt. Time, 2:24 2-5. It was no
ticed that in the finishes Directress
took the whip without breaking.
SUMMARY.
Match race at Kapiolani Park track,
Waikiki, Honolulu, Oahu, II. I., Satur
day, May 14, 1S9S, between Hollinger's
Island bred Margaret II, aged, driven
by Walter Bagsby and imported Nor
ton's Directress, 4 years old. driven
by "Jack" Gibson, best three heats In
five for a purse of $1,000.
Margaret II, by Boswell, Jr.. 2:1S..1 1 1
Directress, by Director, sire Di
rect, 2:05 1-4 2 2 2
Time 2:2G 1-5, 2:24 1-5, 2:24 2-5.
Track good, weather favorable.
Even betting to day of race with
surplus of Directress money. Post
odds, 10 to 8 on Directress.
Judges Theo. Hoffman, Capt. Clu
ney, Seeley I Shaw.
Starter Capt. Cluney.
Timers "Dick" Davis and Dr.
Miner.
Time of entire race One hour and
15 minutes.
Horse Wela Ka Hao.
There is talk that "Billy" Cunning
ham intends to dispose of his race
horse Wela Ka Hao. This will be
solely for the reason that the owner
cannot take the time from his business
to give his horse the attention it
should receive according to his Ideas.
Wela Ka Hao, whose name was chang
ed from Our Boy, was a well known
harness racer on the Coast and has
performed once here. He is one of the
soundest and most "honest" animals
ever seen here. Mr. Cunnlngnam
brought the horse here without at
tempting to make any secret of its
identity and it was largely on account
of the importation of Wela Ka Hao
that such horses as W. Wood and
Loupe have been brought from the
Coast. A local hui has made an offer
for Wela Ka Hao and a deal may be
said to be pending.
Another Match in Prospect.
Alter the decisive victory of MarA
garet II. over Directress on Saturday,
there was talk at once of a match be
tween Hollinger's sorrel mare and L.
L. McCandless' bay, Irish Lassie, win
ner over Violin a few weeks ago. Ne
gotiations are under way and it may I
be that Margaret H. and Irish Lassie
will meet on Saturday afternoon next.
The Lassie people are especially anxf
ous for such a dispute.
Violin and Irish Lassie are matched
to meet on the 28th under the same
conditions as the race of last Saturday
and the contest of the year is expected.
Gibson will drive Lassie and Bagsby
will be up behind Quinn's Violin.
Palestine Journey.
Another large audience heard an
other interesting travel lecture by Rev.
M. L. Berger, D. D., at the Y. M. C. A.
assembly hall at 4 o'clock yesterday
afternoon. Dr. Berger had selected
from his course one of the most
graphic and attractive of the group and
held the closest attention of his hear
ers. Through Dr. Berger's lectures a
large number of men in the city are
being vastly benefitted. The speaker
not only conveys reliable and useful
information, but as well impresses all
with the royal thoughts that should
be associated with consideration of the
Holy Land. For this lecture there was
music by an orchestra.
Royal makes the food pure,
wholesome and delicious
Absolute! Puro
BOVM. BAKtNO POWOrP CO.. NfWW.

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