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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, May 26, 1898, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-05-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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abU-"i Jnly 185-
fZOIi XX VH., NO. 4920.
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1S9S.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
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J. Q. WOOD,
Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
OFFICE: Corner King and Bethel
Streets.
mi. c. u. high,
DentiSt
Philadelphia Dental College 1892.
Masonic Temple. Telephone 218.
A. C. WALL, I). 1). S.
Dentist.
LOVE BUILDING, : FORT STREET.
M. E. GROSSMAN, D.H.S.
Dentist.
.08 HOTEL STREET, HONOLULU.
Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p. m.
DR. A. J, DERBY,
Dentist.
CORNER FORT AND HOTEL STS.,
MOTT-SM1TII BLOCK.
Telephones: Office, 615; Residence, 789.
HOURS: 9 to 4.
GEO. II. IITJDDY, D.D.S.
Dentist.
FORT STREET, OPPOSITE CATHO
LIC MISSION.
Hours: From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. M. WACHS.
Dentist.
CTniversity of California.
Beretania near Fort street.
Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m. and 1 to
4 p. in.
C. L. GARVIN, 2VI.D.
Office No. 537 Kins street, near
Punchbowl.
Hours: 8:30 to 11 a. m.; 3 to 5 p.
m.; 7 to 8 p. m.
Telephone No. 448.
MRS. F. S. SAYANT-JEROME, M.D.
HOMEOPATH.
Has opened office No. 223 Hotel
street.
Women's and Children's Diseases.
Special studies made of dietetics and
physiatrics.
V. T. MONSARRAT,
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN
TIST. TELEPHONES 161 & 626.
CIIAS. F. PETERSON,
Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
15 Kaahumanu St.
IiYLE A. DICKEY,
Attorney at Law.
. 14 KAAHUMANU STREET.
Telephone, 6S2.
WIELIA3I C. PARKE,
Attorney at Law.
AND
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG
MENTS. Officer Kaahumanu St., Honolulu.
O. G. TRAPHAGEX,
ARCHITECT.
223 Merchant Street, between Fort
and AlaUea.
Telephone 734. Honolulu, H. I.
HONOLULU IRON WORKS CO.
Steam Engines,
BOILERS, SUGAR MILLS, COOLERS,
BRASS AND LEAD CASTINGS.
And machinery of every description
na tn nrdpr "Particular attention
Drtid to ship's blacksmithing. Job
work executed on tne snorie u.
H. HACKFELD & CO., Ltd.
Cor. Fort and Queen Sts., : Honolulu.
Gg Mitt n flaents
FOR SALE.
A Coffee Estate
OF 150 ACRES,
SITUATED IN THE WONDERFUL
DISTRICT OF PUNA, HAWAII.
Twenty-five Acres Cleared and Planted Over
a Year Ago, Now in Fine Condition.
Adjoining Unimproved Land Com
mands $22.50 per Acre.
Owner cannot give the Property fur
ther attention.
A SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY FOR
A BARGAIN.
Safe DeDosit and
Investment Company.
GEORGE R. CARTER, Mgr.
Office la rear of Bank of Hawaii. Ltd.
SPECIAL BUSINESS ITEMS.
ART AND SCIENCE.
At the World's Columbian Exposi
tion art and science was thoroughly
exemplified. The greatest achieve
ments of modern times were on exhi
bition. Among the many beautiful
displays none attracted more atten
tion than that made by the Singer
Sewing Machine Company. It won the
enthusiastic praises of all. B. Berger
sen, Agent, Bethel street.
The City Carriage Company possess
only first-class hacks and employ only
careful, steady drivers.
Carriages at all hours.
Telephone 113.
JOHN S. ANDRADE.
GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, COc.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMAN'S EXCHANCE.
215 Merchant St.
HAWAIIAN CURIOS Leis, Kapa,
Niihau Mats, Calabashes, Idols, Fans,
Shells, Seeds, etc., etc.
SAMOAN TAPAS, Carved Emu
Eggs, Hula Drums, Gourds, etc., etc.
Point Lace Handkerchiefs, Doylies,
Fayal work and Hawaiian Dolls.
Telephone 659.
T. M. X)AVIDSOT.
Attorney and Counsel
lor at Law
No. 206 Merchant Street : Honolulu
CHARLES CLARK.
Attorney at Law.
121 MERCHANT STREET.
Honolulu Hale. Tel. 345.
Up Stairs.
M. W. McCHESNEY & SONS.
Wholesale Grocers and Dealers in Leather and
Shoe Findings.
Agents Honolulu Soap Works Company
and Honolulu Tannery.
BEFORE
BUYING
Your Furniture call at the
IXL and see the low prices
in Antique Oak Bedroom Sets,
Iron Beds, Wardrobes, Chairs,
Rockers, Bureaus, Tables, Meat
Safes, Stoves, Washstands, Ice
Boxes, Etc.
S. W. LEDERER,
Corner Nuuanu and King Sts.
' P. O. Box 480. Tel. 478.
Hired by the Hour,
Day or Week.
NEW
CLEVELAND
BICYCLES.
J. RICHARDSON,
HOTEL ST.
Near Arlington Hotel.
1
ft
1
:&:X
I
DEBATE IN NOUS
Lower Branch Discusses Revenue
aid Salary Roll.
ONE ALLOWANCE IS REDUCED
Pay of Kalihl Physician Cut Down.
Remarks On Schedule "E" the
Attorney General Gives Views.
senate:
Eighty-fifth day, May 25.
Consideration of the opium hill was
put off to todajr and action on the
barb-wire fence act postponed to Mon
day next.
The Senate adopted a committee re
port which approves of the House reso
lution for condemnation of Youmans
estate, water front property, for wharf
purposes.
At 10:30 the Senate adjourned.
HOUSE.
The Appropriation Bill was brought
up for consideration. The first item
was "segregation of lepers, pay roll"
and, under this, "salary of physician,
$3600.00." Attorney-General Smith
spoke of the importance of the work
done by Dr. Alvarez at the leper re
ceiving station. His salary, he did not
believe, should be reduced. The bac
teriological work on leprosy should be
continued. Rep. Gear spoke on the
matter stating that Dr. Alvarez had
a large practice outside of his work
at the receiving station where he spent
but two or three hours a day. Certain
ly he should not object to a reduction
under the circumstances. Rep.
Richards stated that the item under
consideration was one hi; believed
should not be reduced. He moved the
item pass at $4800.00. This was lost
and the item passed at $3600.00.
The various items under "Leper Set
tlement, Molokai," were consolidated
into one item, "assistants and em
ployes," and passed at $20,000 instead
of $19,068.00 as recommended by the
committee.
Third reading of House Bill 8, re
lating to income tax, announced. Con
sideration of this was deferred and
Substitute Senate Bill 26 was taken
up in its place. Reps. Robertsofr, Min
isters Smith and Damon spoke against
the passage of the bill which provides
for the striking out of Schedule E.
Notwithstanding the forcible remarks
made the bill passed second reading
by a vote of 7 to 5.
The Attorney-General said:
"There is probably no more difficult
subject to approach among the various
subjects for legislation than that of
taxation. The more one has to do
with taxation and legislating upon it,
the more the difficulties are apprehend
ed; and I think it is a sound principla
of political economy, and the admin
istration of public affairs, that when
existing systems meet public require
ments fairly well they should not be
changed, unless for very good reasons.
"The present system which is at
tacked by the bill now before the
House was adopted two years ago and
has been in force ever since. Like all
new departures in the system of taxa
tion, great opposition was raised to
it; and strongly contested actions were
brought before the courts, testing
every feature of that law; and the
construction of the law has been fully
and finally declared. The tax payers
have became accustomed to its pro
visions and the revenues of the
country have been very material
ly increased; as reported by the
Minister of Finance. It is anticipated,
as shown by the Minister of Finance's
report and the message of the Presi
dent at the opening of the Legislature,
that it will still more increase the
revenues in the future. There has
been a substantial increase in the in
come from that law, which was a very
(j) marked departure in some respects
Cj) j from the previous law.
"Now when we have barely become
accustomed to that law, it is proposed
tn ctnrf an innnvntinn nnil brandl
(J) 'out into another system of taxation,
which I believe is not a sound method
W ' . . j ii..
of procedure under the circumstances,
and not suited to our conditions. We
are in a transition state. We all un
derstand the conditions of population,
society and business, and our political
position at the present time; and to
mdertake now a radical departure,
& after so recently making a very great
change, seems to me unsound.
& "As far as I understand the prin-
j ciple or idea of the income tax, it is
theoreticalH the fairest tax. It has
been successfully applied in England
and some of the colonies, where con
ditions are different. In England, with
a great population and comparatively
a small area, and with a machinery
of government unexcelled on the earth,
they have been able to carry out the
system' fairly well. In New Zealand,
with a homogeneous population of
700,000 people, with the best of condi
tions as to education and development
of the country, they have carried out
the provisions of an income tax suc
cessfully. There were great difficul
ties in instituting it there. With ou?
conditions it would be extremely diffi
cult to carry out such a law and have
it work fairly and justly.
"In regard to the policy of the Gov
ernment in this matter, that has been
clearly and distinctly announced,
through the message of the President
to the Legislature at its opening, which
is as follows: 'The operation of the
tax law of 1896 produced in the main
satisfactory results, and while it gave
rise to litigation, it is now more fully
understood, and its administration in
the future will undoubtedly meet with
but little opposition. For this reason,
and also on account of a desire that
all legislation should follow conserva
tive lines, the Exeucutive .have decid
ed not to introduce and new measure
for the purpose of increasing the rev
enues. "I will in this connection remark
upon the matter of the policy of the
Executive. It has been stated in this
house, and it has been published in
the local press, that one of the diffi
culties of the work in the Legislature
at this Session, one reason for the
delay in its work, has been on account
of the lack of policy on the part of the
Government. It seems to me that
those statements have been made
rather thoughtlessly, and without
basis in fact, because in the message
of the President the policy of the Gov
ernment was announced very clearly
on the more important matters which
are before the country. In the first
place, the policy was announced in
regard to the political status, with
reference to our relations with the
United States; next came the matter
of public improvements, the policy of
the Government in regard to which
was clearly stated. Then in regard
to education, revenue, consolidation
of the public debt, cable communica
tion,, forestry, sanitation, and the ap
propriation bills. On all the main, es
sential matters for the administration
of the Government for the next two
years, a clear and definite policy has
been announced in the message, the
Appropriation Bill and on the floor
of both Houses, and is being followed.
It seems to the Executive that under
existing conditions it would be a mis-
take to exchange for the present sys
tem of taxation a new, untried and
experimental system.
"I therefore support most heartily
the motion to indefinitely postpone tha
present bill, which would set us adrift
on the sea of experiment."
AFTERNOON SESSION.
At 2:10 o'clock there was still no
Quorum in the House. Rep. Kaeo
moved to adjourn. The Speaker stated
that he thought it would be better for
the House to adjourn for three months
and allow the members to go back to
their homes rather than to keep put
ting off work by the tardiness of mem
bers. House Bill 8, Income Tax Act, was
taken up for consideration. Rep. Ka
haulelio moved that the bill be laid
on the table. Lost by a vote of 6 to 7.
Under suspension of rules Rep.
Robertson presented the report of the
Judiciary Committee on Senate Bill!
27 relating to tne jurisdiction or tne
First Circuit in certain civil cases.
The report recommended the Senate
Bill be laid on the table. A substitute
bill was presented and read first time
by title while the report was laid on
the table to be considered with the
bill.
Some of the members kept walking
out into the hall and frequently there
were calls of "no quorum." Rep. Oear
evidently became tired of this kind of
thing and moved to adjourn. This was
carried by a vote of 6 to 5.
Royal makes the food pure,
wholesome and delicious.
r
r
PSWOEf!
Absolutely Puro
povai eoNj rrw?fa eo.. Ntwvrw.
SPAIN IS ALL
Political Intrigue
Old
PORTO RICO
Spain's Fleet Has Cone Home Reconcentraios Starving American
Army to Operate in Cuba Admiral Dewey Reports
That AH is Well in Manila.
U. S. S. CHARLESTON HAS SAILED
Transports Probably Miss Hawaii End Must Como
Soon Civil War Defies Authority
of Italy.
BOMBARDMENT OF SAN JUAN.
WASHINGTON, May 13. Admiral Sampson, with nine
warships, bombarded the San Juan forts.
Reports from Port Au Prince state that the Iowa fired the
first shot; the Indiana followed.
The forts were laid in ruins within a few minutes.
A slight response was made by the batteries to the Amer
ican fire.
The town of San Juan then surrendered.
The Consuls and several thousand residents lied to the
interior. ;
The cruiser Yale captured the Spanish steamer Rita.
DEWEY'S OPERATIONS.
HONGKONG May 13. n. M. S. Linnet, which was detailed
to watch the operations at Manila, has returned to Hongkong.
Her captain has reported to the British Government that Ad
miral Dewey is unwilling to bombard the city of Manila. He
hopes to starve the garrison into subjection. The Spaniards
defy him, and declare they have ample food stores placed be
yond the range of the warships' guns.
Admiral Dewey telegraphs that he still maintains the
blockade of Manila.
He also states that he has secured the breechloaders from
the sunken Spanish vessels at Manila, and a quantity of
arsenal stores.
SUICIDE OF A SPY.
WASHINGTON, May 13. A man named George Downing,
who was arrested at Washington on suspicion of being a
Spanish spy, committed suicide.
AMMUNITION FOR ADMIRAL DEWEY.
WASHINGTON, May 12. The cruiser Charleston, taking
a supply of ammunition for Admiral Dewey's squadron, has
sailed.
CAPTURED STEAMERS RELEASED.
WASHINGTON, May 12. The American Prize Court has
ordered the release of the Spanish steamer Miguel Jover, cap
tured off Havana. The Prize Court at Key . West has con
demned the capture of the Spanish steamer Buena Vestura,
and ordered her release.
BRITISH SUBJECTS IN MANILA.
The Cable Company is advised for the information of peo- ,
pie in New Zealand who have relatives and friends in the
Philippines, that II. M.'s Linnet has arrived at Hongkong from
Manila, and reports that all the British subjects in Manila are
safe. The message adds that further news may be expected
later on.
GERMAN AVARSHIPS FOR MANILA.
BERLIN, May 12. The German Government has despatch
ed four warships to Manila, with a view of conserving the in
terests of German subjects.
A SPANISH PROTEST.
LONDON, May 12. Senor Bonilla, the Spanish Consul-Geu-eral
at Montreal, has protested to the British Government
against the sale and transport of sulphur in Canada intended
for America. It is claimed that sulphur is a contraband of
war.
AMERICAN TROOPS FOR TIIE PHILIPPINES.
WASHINGTON, May 12. General Merritt, who goes as
Commander-in-Chief of the American army for the occupation
of the Philippines, takes as a first installment 1500 troops.
The first transport vessels to be employed are the steamers
Australia and City of Peking, whilst the City of Sydney sails
next week.
THE STATE OF SPAIN.
MADRID, May 12. The whole of Spain is now under mar
tial law.
The bread riots are spreading, and the looting of business
places has become general.
CAPE VERDE SQUADRON.
MADRID, May il. The Cape Verde squadron is at Cadiz.
WASHINGTON, May 11. The American war authorities,
on learning of the position of the Cape Verde squadron, de
cided to land a force in Cuba on Tuesday.
Mr. Long, Secretary of the Navy, doubts the accuracy of the
BUT BEATEN
and Wild Rioting in
Madrid.
IS CAPTURED
5.'
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