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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, May 31, 1898, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-05-31/ed-1/seq-1/

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KDLL XX VH., NO. 4933.
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, TUESDAY, MAY 31 , 1S9S.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
J. Q. WOOD,
Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
OFFICE:
Corner King
Streets.
and Bethel
DR. C. 15. HIGH,
Dentist.
Philadelphia Dental College 1S32
Masonic Temple. Telephone S18
A ft W T T A 1? T ATT
J.V j, 1 llLtlj. J JJi. JIJjL.
t- " JL
OFFICE HOURS 8 a. m. to 4 p. m.
LOVE BUILDING, FORT STREET.
M.JS. GKROSSMAX, D.D.S.
Dentist.
38 HOTEL STREET, HONOLULU.
Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p
m.
DIl. A. J. D.EIM.5Y,
Dentist.
CORNER FORT AND HOTEL STS.,
MOTT-SM1TH BLOCK.
Telephones: Office, C15; Residence, 789.
HOURS: 9 to 4.
GEO. II. IIUDDY, D.D.S.
Dentist.
FORT STREET, OPPOSITE CATHO
LIC MISSION.
Hours: From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. M. WACHS.
Dentist.
University of California.
Beretania near Fort street.
Office Hours:
p. m.
9 to 12 a. m. and 1 to
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
Office No. 537 King street, near
Punchbowl.
Hours: 8:30 to 11 a. m.; 3 to 5 p.
m.; 7 to 8 p. m.
Telephone No. 448.
MRS. F, S. SAYAHT-JEROME, M.D.
HOMEOPATH.
Has opened office No. 223 Hotel
street.
Women's and Children's Diseases.
Special studies made of dietetics and
physiatrics.
W. T. MONSARRAT,
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN
TIST. TELEPHONES 161 & 626.
CIIAS. F. PETERSON,
Attorney at Law.
AND-
NOTARY PUBLIC.
15 Kaahumanu St.
IjY.L.E A. DICKEY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
14 KAAHUMANU STREET.
Telephone, 6S2.
WILLIAM C. PABKE, .
Attorney at Law.
AND
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG-
MENTS.
Kaahumanu St., Honolulu.
Office:
O. G. TltAPIIAGKEN,
ARCHITECT.
223 Merchant Street, between Fort
and Alakea.
Telephone 734. Honolulu, H. I.
HONOLULU IRON WORKS CO.
Steam Engines,
BOILERS, SUGAR MILLS, COOLERS,
BRASS AND LEAD CASTINGS,
And machinery of every description
made to order. Particular attention
-paid to ship's blacksmithing. Job
work executed on the shortest notice.
.ft
8
.ft
ft
"ft
'ft
H. HACKFELD & CO., ltd.
s,
ii
Cor. Fort and Queen Sts., : Honolulu.
Genera!
PnmmiQQifin
11
uuimmuoiu!
FOR SALE.
A Coffee Estate
OF 150 ACRES,
SITUATED IN THE WONDERFUL
DISTRICT OF PUNA, HAWAII.
Twenty-five Acres Cleared and Planted Over
a lear Ago, Now in Fine Condition.
Adjoining
Unimproved Land Com
mands $22.50 per Acre
Owner cannot give the Property fur
A SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY FOR
A BARGAIN.
Hawaiian Safe Deposit and
Investment Company.
GEORGE R. CARTER. Mgr.
Office in rear of Bank of Hawaii, Ltd.
SPECIAL BUSINESS ITEMS.
ART AND SCIENCE.
At the World's Columbian Exposi
tion art and science was thoroughly
exemplified. The greatest achieve
ments of modern times were on exhi
bition. Among the many beautiful
displays none attracted more atten
tion than that made by the Singer
Sewing Machine Company. It won the
enthusiastic praises of all. B. Berger
sen, Agent, Bethel street.
The City Carriage Company possess
only first-class hacks and employ only
careful, steady drivers.
Carriages at all hours.
Telephone 113.
JOHN S. ANDRADE.
GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, GOc.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
Just received from "Morning Star"
a fine lot of Gilbert and Marshall Isl
and Mats, Atvicks, Tols, Baskets,
Spears, Corals, Shells, Mother of
Pearl Hooks, Hats, Cords, etc.
Hair dressing department re-opened.
Tel. 659.
T. M. DAYIDSOX.
Attorney and Counsel
lor at Law.
No. 206 Merchant Street
Honolulu.
CIIAKLES CLARK.
Attorney at Law.
121 MERCHANT STREET.
Honolulu Hale. Tel. 345.
Up Stairs.
M. W. McCHESNEY & SONS.
Wholesale Grocers and Dealers in Leather and
Shoe Findings.
Agents Honolulu Soap Works Coninanv
and Honolulu Tannerv.
BEFORE
BUYING
Your Furniture call at the
IXL and see the low prices
in Antique Oak Bedroom Sets,
Iron Beds, Wardrobes, Chairs,
Rockers, Bureaus, Tables, Meat
Safes, Stoves, Washstands, Ice
Boxes, Etc.
S. W. LEDERER,
Corner Nuuanu and King Sts.
P.. O. Box 4S0. Tel. 478.
Hired by the Hour,!
8
Day or Week.
NEW
CLEVELAND
BICYCLES.
i
(ft
(ft
J. RICHARDSON,
HOTEL ST.
Near Arlington Hotel.
IN FOND MEMORY
Impressive ana Elaborate Ceremon
ials for the Deal
PROCESSION AND SERVICES
Decoration Day Generally Obser
vedBusiness Suspended Par
ade Oration By J. A. Cruzan.
A HOLIDAY.
The Heavens were weeping through
out the greater part of the Memorial
uay exercises yesterday, mere was a
great gathering of people of all
nationalities at the cemetery. The
graves, and especially those of the
sleeping war veterans, were profusely
decorated with flowers and vines.
The day was practically a holiday.
The Government offices suspended
business early in the forenoon while
the business portion of the city was
deserted after the noon hour. Only
the Government schools were in ses
sion.
The procession was late in reaching
the cemetery. Many carriages and
hundreds of pedestrians preceded it.
Immediately upon the arrival of the
column at the cemeterjr, the services
wrere begun on the G. A. R. plot.
After an appropriate selection by the
Government band. Post Commander
L. L. La Pierre read the ritual. This
was followed by prayer by Chaplain
Greene. Comrade Williams decorated
the graves of the dead.
O. C. Swain, of the Sons of Veterans,
read Lincoln's Gettyberg address.
Comrade J. A. Cruzan followed with
an oration. The roll call of the dead
was made by Adjutant Copeland.
Then were fired three volleys over the
graves of the veterans by the Benning
ton bluejackets.
The great throng of people then took
up the strains of America, accompanied
bytheband.at the conclusion of which,
Rev. Douglas Putnam Birnie pro
nounced the benediction.
THE ORATION.
Following is the excellent address
by Rev. J. A. Cruzan, orator of the
day:
It is thirtjr-seven years since the
first gun fired at Sumpter called a na
tion to arms. A new generation, worthy
in every way to succeed that one,
has drawn its sword in one of the most
righteous wars that the world has
ever seen, and it is now making his
tory. Some of our comrades who wore
the blue in that older struggle are help
ing in the new. Dewey. Sampson and
Schley of the navy, and Miles, Mer-
ritt, Shafter and scores of others, who
are now in this army, which is now
making history, shared the fortunes
of that elder army.
Today we pause to remember. We
call to mind another righteous war.
We remember another army which
carried the old flag at Donaldson, Shi
loh, Pittsburg, Chickamauga, Atlanta,
Antietam, Cold Harbor, Fredericks
burg, Chancellorville, Gettysburg and
in the Wilderness. We remember an
other navy that fought at Forts Henry,
and Donaldson, Hampton Roads, New
Orleans, Fort Fisher and Mobile Bay.
We recall such names as Lyons, Baker.
Reynolds, Hancock, Schofield, Rose-
crans. Hooker, Meade, Howard, Thom
as, Sheridan, Sherman and Grant. We
remember Admirals Foote, Dahlgren.
Porter and Farragut. We remember
Wilson, Sumner, Ben Wade, Chase.
Stanton and Abraham Lincoln. These
men, and the boys in blue they led.
also made history of which Americans
shall ever be proud.
I want to open a page or two of this
older history and see what we find
written thereon. It was given to these
history makers, whom we honor to
day, to uphold our flag and save our
nation from dismemberment. More
than a century ago into this bit of
bunting our forefathers stitched and
stained our democracy. It became
morethan a bit of bunting, it was a
symbol of a free country, nationality.
Fired on at Sumpter. hauled down
through one-half of America, the loyal
North sprang to arms in its defense.
Whv? Because that flag meant Amer
ica. The ringing words of General
John A. Dix, "If any man attempts
to haul down the American flag shoot
him on the spot." found response in
every American heart.
That flag stood for nationality, liber
ty, equality. With one and a half mil
lion loyal bayonets back of it, what
a power there was in that bit of bunt
ing. How like a thing of life the old
ran. 'mid fire and smoke and terri-
carnage to the ton o command
ble
everywhere, and how the insurgent
colors sank before it. And it is still
a power as England in Venezuela dis
covered, as Spain is learning in Cuba
2nd the Philippines today. Why this
.ewer in this bit of bunting? Be
muse these our comrades stained
Us stripes a deeper red with loyal
blood.
It was also given to these history
makers of more than one-third of a
century gone to demonstrate that a
free government, of the people, for
the people and by the people, is a pos
sibility.
Again and again had the experiment
of democracy been tried, but it had al
ways failed most disastrously. The
.lews tried it in Palestine. Greece,
Rome and France failed signally. With
these failures in mind, Webster thirty
years before. Sumpter said: "If we
also fail, popular government will for
ever be an impossibility." And so
thought the world. When, in '61, the
lurid fires of civil war lighted our Wes
tern horizon, Carlyle, the English cy-
REV. J. A. CRUZAN.
(Photo by Williams).
nic, said: "A foul chimney is burn
ing uselt out over there. He voiced
the glad thought of depotism every
where and the town-trodden and op
pressed throughout all the world hid
their faces in despair.
But in that critical hour two mil-
lion brave soldiers stretched forth
their hands to stay the tottering ark of
liberty. One-half a million willingly
went to their death. America and the
world owes it to these men that free
government is no longer an experi
ment but an omnipotent fact, a fact
as dear to the South as the North, for
President McKinley, the worthy suc
cessor of Washington, Adams, Jeffer
son, Lincoln, finds no more loyal sup
port north of the Mason-Dixon line
than that which comes to him from the
South. .
Think for a moment what- would
have been the result had these com
rades failed in this part of their work.
Instead of a grand, strong nationali
ty, two weak, rival, jealous republics,
would be side by side, suspiciously
watching each other. What nation
would then have dared to say to Spain:
"Starvation and butchery in Cuba
must cease."
It was the mission of these men also
to strike down slavery and to make
free speech the right of every Ameri
can from one end of the land to the
other. Americans born since 1S01 do
not realize the priceless boon, the free
dom of speech, which we now possess,
nor at what cost it was purchasd. It
would do some Americans good to vis
it some other land and breathe for a
time a different atmosphere. It is told
that a bright American girl, a graduate
of Wellesley, formed one of an excur
sion party on an American steamer in
the Mediterranean. They spent sev
eral weeks in Constantinople. In her
shopping tours she made the acquain
tance of an intelligent Turkish mer
chant. One day after having complet
ed her purchases, this American girl
said to Ali: "Why do not the Turks
of your class say to the government
that these horrible Armenian atroci
ties must cease?"
Ali sprang from his cross legged po
sition on his mat and bowing low, said !
in bated breath: "We do not speak." j
"But you ought to speak. In Ameri- ';
ca if the men did not put an end to
such atrocities, we women would rise
and overthrow such a government in
a single day."
"Madam." said Ali, "We dare not
speak."
Passing through the streets she
met an artist acquaintance who was
making his temporary home, in Con
stantinople. She repeated the incident
! to him. The artist looked furtively j
j to-lhe right and then to the left, and j
! then whispered: "Ali is right. We
dare not speak."
"Why do you dare not speak? Amer
iea would protect you?"
"Yes,, perhaps, but men who dare to
speak, disappear mysteriously. What
then, could my government do? Ali
is right. We dare not speak."
That evening, as the sun was set
ting, this young American girl, relat
ed these conversations to the other
members of the excursion party. Then
springing from her chair she took off
her yatching cap and waving it shout
ed: "Three cheers for grand Old Glory
and a country wiiere men and women
dare to speak."
Yes, but forty years ago in one-half
of America we too, dared not speak.
Listen to Whittier:
When first I saw our banner wave
Above the Nation's Council hall,
I heard beneath its marble wall,
The clanking fetters of the slave!
In the foul market place I stood
And saw the Christian mother sold
And childhood with its locks of gold
Blue-eyed and fair with Saxon blood.
I shut my eyes and held my breath;
And smothering down the wrath and
shame
That set my northern blood aflame,
Stood silent, where to speak was
death.
On the oppressor's side was power:
And yet I knew that every wrong,
However old, however strong,
But waited God's avenging hour!
I knew that Truth would crush the lie:
Somehow, sometime .the 'end would
be;
Yet scarcely dared I hope to see
The triumph with my mortal eye.
But now I see it! In the sun
A free flag floats from yonder dome,
And at the Nation's hearth and home
The Justice, long-delayed, is done.
Yes, thank God, we live at last under
a free flag. Wherever the Stars and
Stripes float there is freedom both for
the bodies and brains of men. No
longer, North or South, do they
shackle the hands or tongues of
Americans. We owe this boon of a
nation, free in fact as well as in name
to the brave men of 1861.
We living comrades, survivors of a
passing generation, join in honoring
the patriots who are today making a
new page in history. We too, love our
Dewey, Sampson, Miles, also Foote,
Farragut, Grant and Lincoln. All
honor to our living heroes who are
making history. Honor also for our
dead comrades who made history.
That is a grand army gathered at
Chickamauga, now facing Cuba and the
grand work cut out for it there. That
is also a grand army in charge of Com
rade Merritt now on the ocean speed
ing its way to Manila by the way of
Honolulu.
But also were those armies grand,
one under Grant which fought its way
through the Wilderness by way of
Petersburg to Appomatox, and that
other under Sherman, which marched
from Atlanta to the sea. And when
their grand work was done these two
armies, you remember, held a review
in Washington. Of them, some one
wrote:
Did you see them yesterday
Marching down the broad highways.
Did you hear the distant drum
And the people's shout. "They Come!"
If with me you then had stood.
Seen that city's multitude.'
On their front, their rear, their flanks,
Pressing in their very ranks
Gods! Methinks ye would have spared
Half a lifetime to have shared
All the swelling thoughts that then
Met those swarthy battle men.
THE PROCESSION.
The members of the regular and vol
unteer companies arrived at the Drill
Shed in good time, formed quickly and
marched away promptly. From the
Drill Shed the soldiers marched to the
boat landing where they met a com
pany of bluejackets from the U. S. S.
Bennington in command of Lieutenant
Eaton. The sailor boys were ready on
time and Grand Marshal De La Vergne
was there to assign them to their
place in the procession. It did not
take long to do this customary courte
sy and in about five minutes the sol
diers and sailors were on their way
to Harmony Hall on King street where
the members of Geo. W. De Long Post,
G. A. R. and the Army and Navy Uni
on from the Bennington were wait
ing. The soldiers and sailors marched to
Alakea street, where they faced about
in line. The members of the G. A. R.
were soon in their wagonettes and,
followed by the members of the Army
and Navy Union, joined the first part
of the procession and marched up Ala
kea street. The procession then con
tinued up Emma and turned over on
Vineyard to Fort. From Fort the line
of march was across School to Nuuanu
and up to the cemetery.
The procession was not as large as
it was last year but the appearance
was fine. There was an absence of the
police as well as officials of the Gov
ernment.
There were in all six companies of
volunteers and two of regulars in the
procession, i heir excellent marching
wras commented upon frequently by
people along the way. Col. Fisher was
in command of the Regiment'.
There were three wagonettes used
by the members of the G. A. R. In
the first, Avith Post Commander Greene
and other veterans, rode Lieut. Win
terhalipr and Assistant Paymaster I)u
Bois of the Bennington. Each of the
G. A. R. men carried a small bouquet
of flowers with which to decorate the
graves of their dead comrades.
The detachment of members of the
Army and Navy Union was twenty
three strong and in command of Chief
Master-at-arms McKay. Of these, 20
were from the Bennington and three
from the city. The latter brought up
the rear. The band, in command of
Captain Berger and the drum corps,
were never in finer shape.
Everything went off in good shape
from the start at the Drill Shed to the
end of the march at Nuuanu Ceme
tery and for this a great deal of credit
must be given to Col. De La Vergne,
the Marshal of the day.
Upon returning from the cemetery
the soldiers escorted the Bennington
company back to the boat landing and
then returned to the Drill Shed.
Gamblers Fined
In the Police Court yesterday the
gang of Chinese gamblers captured
at the old Chinese theatre last week,
plead guilty to the charge of gambling.
The two men who had charge of the
table were fined $10 and costs while
the remaining1 15, the players, were
fined $3 and costs.
A GENERAL INVITATION.
The millinery displayed at L. B.
Kerr's Queen street store Is a sight
long to be remembered. Hat3 and
bonnets are many and beautiful. The
style of trimming most artistic; the
arrangement of colors most exquisite,
and must be seen to be appreciated.
An inspection is solicited. All are
cordially invited.
Royal makes the food pure,
wholesome and delicious
Absolutely Puro
POVAt BAVOVO POWTC CO. . NFWVOW.
,-.-.v.J:.JJ'4mi,l,'J1''!-

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