OCR Interpretation


The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, June 15, 1898, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-06-15/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

s
- a -
1.
' -J
r " . ..." .- "L r ; "! .
Kr,tabllUeti .Inly isr.ij
KDIi. XXVH., NO. 4916.
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, WEDNESDAY, .JUNE 15, 1S9S.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
'ff x 0
S M ! d I !f SI 4 ill $ W !H
n'mim m a s
' h A ti a a w
, - i irj !"J .1 v 1 .,i t--3 ,i i i Kl I ' 4 H -
i
V ,1
tr
J. Q. WOOD,
Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
OFFICE: Corner Kins and Bethel
Streets.
Dlt. C. 15. HIGH,
Dentist.
Philadelphia Dental College 1SD2.
Masonic Temple. Telephone 318.
A C. WALL. 0. E. WALL.
Dentists.
OFFICE HOURS S a. in. to 4 p. m.
LOVE BUILDING, FORT STREET.
31. E. G1IOSSMAN, D.D.S.
Dentist,
93 HOTEL STREET, HONOLULU.
OSce Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p. m.
Dli, A. el. jmiUJY,
Dentist.
CORNER FORT AND HOTEL STS.,
MOTT-SM1TH BLOC1C
Telephones: Office, C15; Residence, 7S9.
HOURS: a to 4.
GrKO. II. IIUDDY, 'D.D.S.
Dentist.
FORT STREET, OPPOSITE CATHO
LIC MISSION.
Hours: From U a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. M. VVACHS.
Dentist.
Cniversity of California.
Bereiania near Fort street.
OSce Hours: 9 to 12 a. m. and 1 to
4 p. m.
DR. 1 i:. CLAIHv.
Dentist.
Progress Block, corner Beretania and
Fort streets.
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
Oiee No. 5o7 King street, near
Punchbowl.
Hours: S:30 to 11 a. m.; 3 to 5 p.
ra.: 7 to S p. m.
Telephone No. 44S.
MRS. F. S. SAYANT-JEROME, M.D.
HOMEOPATH.
0:Ti?, Progress Block Rooms 1-4.
Corner Beretania and Fort streets.
Women's and Children's Diseases.
Special studies made of dietetics and
physK-.trIcs.
W. T. MONSARRAT,
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN
TIST. TELEPHONES 1C1 & G26.
GIIAS. F. PETERSON,
Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
15 Kaahumanu St.
WILLIAM C. rAIJ KE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
AND
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG
MENTS. Oc-e: Kaahumanu St., Honolulu.
O. O. TRArilAGEX,
ARCHITECT.
L23 JIarchaut Street, between Fort
and Alakea.
Telephone 734.
Honolulu, II. I.
LY.LE A. DICKEY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
14 KAAHUMANU STREET.
Telephone, GS2.
!I. HACKFELD I: CO., Ltd.
Cor. Tort and Queen Sts., : Honolulu.
FOR SALE.
A Coffee Estate
OF 150 ACRES,
SITUATED IN THE WONDERFUL
DISTRICT OF PUNA, HAWAII.
Tweaty-Dve Acres Cleared and Planted Over
a Year Ago, Nov in Fine Condition.
Adjoining Unimproved Land Com
mands $22.50 per Acre.
Owner cannot give the Property fur
ther attention.
A SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY FOR
A BARGAIN.
Hawaiian Safe Deposit and
Investment Company.
GEORGE R. CARTER, Mgr.
Cfrce In rear of Bank of Hawaii, Ltd.
SPECIAL BUSINESS ITEMS.
ART AND SCIENCE.
At the World's Columbian Exposi
tion art and science was thoroughly
exemplified. The greatest achieve
ments of modern times were on exhi
bition. Among the many beautiful
displays none attracted more atten
tion than that made by the Singer
Sewing Machine Company. It won the
enthusiastic praises of all. B. Berger
scn, Agent, Bethel street.
The Cit3r Carriage Company possess
only first-class hacks and employ only
careful, steady drivers.
Carriages at all hours.
Telephone 113.
JOHN S. ANDRADE.
GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, GOc.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
Just received from "Morning Star"
a fine lot of Gilbert and Marshall Isl
and Mats, Atvicks, Tols, Baskets,
Spears, Corals, Shells, Mother of
Pearl Hooks, Hats, Cords, etc.
Hair dressing department re-opened.
Tel. 639.
J. 31. DAVJDSOX.
Attorney and Counsel
- lor at Law.
No. 206 Merchant Street : Honolulu.
ciiai?jlj:s clakk.
Attorney at Law.
121 MERCHANT STREET.
Honolulu Hale. Tel. S45.
Up Stair3.
M. W. McCHESNEY & SONS.
Wholesale Grocers and Dealers in Leather and
Shoe Findings.
A'vnts Honolulu Soan Works ("nun.sTiv
and Honolulu Tannery.
BEFORE
BUYING
Your Furniture call at the
IXL and see the low prices
in Antique Oak Bedroom Sets,
Iron Beds, Wardrobes, Chairs,
Rockers, Bureaus, Tables, Meat
Safes, Stoves, "Washstands, lee
Boxes, Etc.
S. W. LEDERER,
Corner Nuuanu and King Sts.
P. O. Bos: 4S0. Tel. 47S.
JUain m advertise the Greatest
Typewriter in tlie World:
H. E. WALKER, Sole Agt.
Tilasonic Block.
IWtX
i - V'--'"
AS.
DOWSETT
Citizen Passes to Great Beyond
3 Age.
WAS A NATIVE OF HONOLULU
Had a Ivlost Interesting: Career.
Confidant of Monarch Success
ful in Business Funeral.
JAMES ISAAC DOWSETT, one of
the best known citizens of Hawaii nei
and a man all his life held in high es
teem by his fellow men, died last even
ing. The end came at the Queen's
Hospital at 7:25 p. m. Quickly the
news was telephoned over town and
expressions of regret and condolence
and proffers of assistance came to the
family by the hundreds.'
Mr. Dowsett was OS years of age on
the lath day of last December, having
been born in the year 1S29. He has
always been strong and healthy up to
a few weeks ago. When he had passed
the fiftieth mile post it was a common
saying when his age and physique were
mentioned that he would certainly
live to round out a full century of ex
istence. It was willed differently and
he has departed at the time that was
to an individual of his vitality and
temperament but middle life.
Aoout a month ago Mr. Dowsett
took to his bed at his home in Palama.
For a few days he ailed only slightly.
Then his condition became more se
rious. Relatives were summoned from
the other Islands. The trouble was
not easily defined by the physicians.
There was nothing of a constitutional
nature, but rather the results of the
wearings of close attention to busi
ness. Mr. Dowsett gradually became
weaker and less cognizant of what
was going on about him.
On Thursday of last week, the 9th
inst., five physicians held a consulta
tion on the case. Mr. Dowsett was
taken to the Queen's Hospital the
next day and on the following day,
Saturday the 11th, while the royal
named lie loved so well was upon the
lips and in the thoughts of so many
people throughout the group, an oper
ation was performed. This -was a
severe draft upon the strength and
was a serious and trying stirgical ex
pedient, though by no means the cause
of death. The spark of life dimmed
and fluttered and finally went out.
Mr. Dowsett died with those about
him to whom he iwas devoted and
1
dear. An eventful and in many re
spects a remarkable and extraordinary
career was closed. Mr. Dowsett was
part of the life of Hawaii and his
life story is entwined with the life
stories of scores of others.
James 1. Dowsett was born in Ho
nolulu. The house in which he first
saw the light of day and which was
built by his father, still stands and is
occupied, it is the 2-story building in
Union street, next to the old bell
tower lire station. The parents of
Mr. Dowsett came to this country
from New South Wales, where they
were married at Sydney in 1S2-5. The
mother was originally from England.
She died here July 4, 1S00. The father
was a sea captain. He lost his life
at the hands of savages in the South
Seas. He went ashore from his whal
ing vessel with a boat's crew and all
were murdered by the natives. The
elder sister of James I. Dowsett was
the first wife of Capt. Howland, a sea
captain. The younger sister is Mrs.
M. C. Monsarrat of this city.
The wife of Mr. Dowsett was the
beautiful Miss Annie Ragsdaie. There
survive Mr. Dowsett seven daughters
and four sons. Two sons have preceded
their father to the grave. There are
a number of grandchildren.
By the death of James I. Dowser,
a blank is left in the community. Hj
did not care for public office. Had
he yearned for political preferment,
any ofiiee was at h;s disposal for many
years. He was appointed a Noble of
the Kingdom by Kamehame-ha III and
was friend and confident of Kameha
meha IV and V. His advics w.is cfren
sought by the monarchs and ws 3 giv
en as one entirely disinterested and
he held the trust of those in the high
est
positions r.s well as the implicit
confidence of the common people. Ho
was a great favorite with tbe native
Ilawaiians and spoke their language
beautifully. Mr. Dowsett was quiet
in the conduct of business, but was
capable and successful as a man o!
affairs. In the earliest days he soon
saw the opportunities for money mak
ing in the whaling industry and was
a capitalist in that field. He still has
pending Alabama claims, showing that
when the fleet was young he was ac
tive as promoter and manager. He
had since reaching man's estate own
ed schooners plying in Hawaiian
waters, had extensive land and stock
interests and owned the salt works
at Pearl Lochs. He owned an un
divided one-half interest in the quar
antine Island and reef property more
generally known as belonging partly
to the Sumner estate. Mr. Dowsett
amassed a large fortune. Up to the
very day he was compelled to take
to his bed he was at his office in
Queen street, where he handled mer
chandise and schooner business and
' iiijTHP- sNoSvlMiiJ'nHr-- r
"niMib At Mm.bstf 'if '
'liiJMfMv -wiilisMy if ;!
"'iftiSfc jpMmmU 35JL ;
r-n-rrT liJ! ) r !-: fitPMaii i !
JAMES I.
(Photo by
dealt in live stock. There were al
ways natives about the place. The
Hawaiians called Mr. Dowsett "Kimo
Pelekane" (Jim the Englishman.)
They would ask him about anything
and everything concerning their in
terests. Being interested in shipping, Mr.
Dowsett had a place in big heart for
the men who go down to the sea and
he was a trustee of the Sailors' Home.
He was very proud of the new build
ing and visited it often. The Queen's
Hospital had his name on its director
ate and this was an institution for
which he had the warmest affection.
He was a charter member of the
Chamber of Commerce. Of late years
Mr. Dowsett gave nearly all his time
outside his business hours to the Sail'
ors' Home, the Queen's Hospital and
the Chamber of Commerce. He took
little or no interest in current poli
tical affairs, though he always knew
what was going on both at home and
abroad.
Mr. Dowsett was a man of kindly,
genial disposition. It was a habit of
his for a number of years to make r
trip to Waikiki each evening in a
street car. It was genuine treat to
be a passenger with him. It was a
study for one not acquainted with him
to watch him in the car and to see
all the natives and even the Chinese
pay their respects to him On entering
the car. Everybody knew who he wa-;
and strangers liked him in advance,
while those who came to speaking
terms with him valued the privilege.
Mr. Dowsett was very clear minded.
He was a quick thinker and an excel
lent reasoner and while not a talka
tive man was always willing to sup
ply any information from his great
storehouse that might be useful to
another or that might interest an in
quirer. He knew the town, the peo
ple and the country. He never left
the Islands but once in his whole lift;
and then four days in San Francis.-o
was enough of life in foreign parts.
He was a perfect encyclopaedia of
history and biography not only cf Ho
nolulu and Oahu. but of the entire
croup. The common suggestion to
one in search of obscure historical
data was to go to Mr. Dowsett and he
never failed. He could always supply
day and date and all required details.
He was not even close to the end a
man who lived in the p.ist, but he wa
pleased to talk of the old days.
There are not here many men who
knew Honolulu as did Mr. Dowsstt.
One day about three years ago the
el
in the harbor struck :
the
Dov
the
she
told
and
fivrn of a sunken ve5; ??1.
was told of this
nd
(.-ene described the schooner as
had looked half a century ago.
all about the owner and captain
the circumstances cf the sinking
of the vessel.
Mr. Dowsett had in his life the con-
neeting links of old and new Hono
lulu and Hawaii. He remembered
when California sent to the Islands
for flour, salted beef and vegetables.
He had the most vivid recollection of
the advent of the whalers, of the
tremendous growth and proportions of
the whaling business, of the early and
discouraging experiments in the pro
duction of sugar. He has watched
the Islands progress from the germ
of test and trial and failure and par
tial success and full success, to the
proud commercial position of his day.
He has seen the school and church
systems develop and grow. He was
acquainted with young Pacheco when
that boy, destined to in full life be
come the Governor of the Golden
State, was in Honolulu from San Fran
cisco because there were no schools on
the Coast. Honolulu then had the
DOWSETT.
Williams).
best educational facilities and the only
real social life in this part of the
world. Mr. Dowsett saw the grass hut
replaced by the atone business block
and the taro patch filled up for man
sion site. He saw the little paths be
come fine streets and the broad and
j barren plains thickly populated dis
tricts, lie saw the life of a nation
change. He witnessed the most mar
velous transformation worked out
with a people and a country in mod
ern times. Through all this he was
a close observer and always on the
side of what was right and just. Such
a man is to be mourned and is mourn
ed. Effort will doubtless be made to se
cure for publication, in part at least,
of Mr. Dowsett's diary, which covers,
it is said, a period of more than fifty
years. Mr. Dowsett entered up his
diary every day and denied access to
it. The use of the diary has been
sought a number of times in the set
tlement of estate matters and land
disputes, but it was always withheld.
It contains information of the A-ery
firrt historical and other value.
Members of the family could not
say last evening whether or no Mr.
Dowsett had left a will or if he car
ried life insurance.
The funeral will be held at ? o'clock
tomorrow (Thursday) afternoon. The
body was tab en late last night from
the" Queen's Hospital to the family
home in Palama.
Salvation Army.
Col. Evans and 4 others of the Salva
tion Army, left for Kauai on the Hall
yesterday afternoon. It is their in
tention to hold a rousing meeting in
Lihue this evening. Tomorrow even
ing they will hold a meeting in Koloa
and the following night at Waimea,
returning to this place on Sunday.
The Army has two posts on Kauai.
One takes in Lihue and Koloa and the
other takes in Waimea and Makaweli.
It is the intention of sending Captain
Peterson to the latter place to work in
the near future. Lieutenant McKeever
is already there.
A GENERAL INVITATION'.
The millinery displayed at L. B.
Kerr's Queen street store i3 a sight
long to be remembered. Hats and
bonnets are many and beautiful. The
style of trimming most artistic; the
arrangement of colors most exquisite
and must be seen to be appreciated.
An inspection is solicited. All are
cordially invited.
Daily Advertiser, delivered by car
riers, 73 cents a month.
inTMcnTinn
11 men 1 1 ivi
Oahn Railway Coistriiciioa Bill
Signed By President.
HOUSE HEARS ROAD REPORT
One Appropriation Bill Passes Sec
ond Reading Discussion
on Estrays,
SI'XATE.
One Hundred-second Day, June 14.
Notice was given that the President
had signed the act granting a further
extension of the time for constructing
the Oahu Railroad.
The reports of the examination of
the books of the Attorney General's
ofiice and the tax department were
read and ordered filed.
1 he House substitute bill passed
third reading specifying in what cir
cuits cases and actions shall bo
brought. The bill is intended to sim
plify the work in the different circuits
and relieve the First Circuit of much
business.
The bill passed third reading defin
ing the clegibility of persons to hold
ofiice under the Government. -
Upon his request Minister Damon
was voted further time for answering
the questions asked by Senator Jlrown
on the assessment taxes.
At 10:40 o'clock the Senate adjourn
ed to Thursday.
HOUSIv
Hop. IloberUon reported for the
Judiciary Committee on House bill 8S,
relating to a public administrator, in
part as follows:
"We believe similar laws have work
ed well in ,ome countries where they
have been tried.
'"This bill was evidently hurriedly
drawn, it contains provisions inappli
cable to this country. Many changes
would have to be made in the bill be
fore passage. As the present session
is drawing to a close, and there being
no urgency in the matter requiring
early action, we recommend that the
bill be laid on the table.
"A. G. M. ItOPEil'l SON,
"S. K. KAEO."
"i think the bill ought to be given
to a special committee of this House,
with instructions to prepare a bill
which may suit the conditions in this
Republic.
"XV. C. ACHI."
Rep. Loebenstein reported for the.,
special committee on road contracts,
presenting 54 pages of typewritten
matter. The findings at the end of
the report are as follows:
"That your committee has endeav
ored to obtain and present a state
ment of facts may be easily perceived
when review is had of the many mat
ters which occupied the,.r very careful
and impartial consideration. The
complaints, so numerously presented,
of poorly constructed and improperly
completed roads, infringement of priv
ate rights of way and the illegal exer
cise of the right of eminent domain
by the Superintendent of Public
Works, all of those complaints, also
others relative to the apparent favor
itism and utter disregard of the in
terests of the Government and of the
rights of the tax-payers, have been
carefully investigated by your com
mittee and the result of their inves
tigations appear in the recommenda
tions respectfully submitted herein to
(Continued on Page 2.)
Royal makes the food purs,
wholesome as4 delicious.
r- -,-.1
J . - -
-4 U
POVAL EAV-N-" TA"jr L .. fWWfl.
jnon
iiHoru
..--...-t--.iwf-'-i

xml | txt