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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, June 17, 1898, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-06-17/ed-1/seq-12/

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PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER : HONOLULU. JUNE
17, 1S9S.
12
THE
1
I I!
in
til
OF KiLQHAHR AH I
the Attractions
Leaps ExME
at
ft
n if:-: innu: or ner recen
K'.enn-! v:A)o she was o:
One (,r two vors actually
the steamer dec-lr. as th
e
THE LAST YEAR IS CITED
More Water Color-Island Atmos
phere of Work-Individual Men
tion-Hall Now Open to AM.
n
n
This is the last week of the Kilo-
hana Art exhibition. As the picture
went on to the walls about the time
the. ndve.nt of the Boys m Blue, tn
latter (perhaps diverted some attention
from what local artists have Deen ac
nm-mlihSnfr during the last half year
However, the remaining afternoons of
thP rvvpek will be ample time for eve
the most tardy ones to avail them
cpivpq of what is awaiting them i
the Art League rooms. Catalogue and
admission are alike free to the public
this year.
As one looks down the list it may
be discovered that the number coin
cides almost exactly with that of six
months ago, although perhaps fewer
of the exhibits are offered for sale.
It appears also that there are less oil
colors in proportion to the others, but
some large and striking water colors
are there in compensation. Of these
Sirs. Kelley takes the lead as being
the author, and so well appreciated
were two of her representations of
Hawaiian leis, one Ilima and the
other of carnations with a 3coa cala
bash, that they were both purchased
the first evening. There is still a
golden Ilima lei which invites the
purchaser and excites the admiration
of many a one who would gladly :be
the owner if only his ship had come
in. A most striking picture by the
same artist hold a fine middle space
on the wall. "The Mouth of Onomea
Gulch." Mrs. Kelley improved to the
fullest degree her hours spent in the j
vicinity of Ililo last winter, and this is
one of the evidences. The silvery
water in contrast to the rich red soil
lhl brilliant verdure, together with
The fantastic natural formation make
a picture not soon to be forgotten.
Typically Hawaiian also are two
other scenes showing grass houses
which the tourist to come will look
for in vain except upon canvass, un
less he goes into some of the by ways
and out of the way places to search
for such .picturesque scenes as are here
depited. Besides her Hawaiian views
which are the most endearing objects
of her brush is a .beautiful piece of
workmanship, No. 19, "In .Alameda,"
and the little gem in the gold sur
rounding, "A Storm," No. 22. When
Mrs. Kelley works the feeling of this
foreign bit into some of her Island
scenes, the attractions of the Art
Lpaeue will be richer yet.
Turning to the work of another ex
hibitor whom all welcome for the
first time. is found a number of clear
and crisp bits of scenery in Califor
,.;,1.:miiv in- Mrs. Herbert Gor
illa, l'l III'- fc'" ' 'J
It is a pleasure to see a i
stin.
it
thp. list, and it is hoped tha
it may continue there, and with work
ns attractive. It is hard to single out
any particular ones from among those
by this artist, but one may ask that
the public be favored often with work
in the same vein by the same brush.
Mr. Hitchcock has been engaged of
late with interests closer to his heart
than painting, and his numbers are
hardly as large as usuaf, but all will
pardon him at this turning point in
his life, in .full confidence that the
present interests of his heart and
painting Avill hereafter be such help
to each other that friends will behold
him happy in life, and better than
ever before represented on canvass.
The good wishes of the Art League
and of all his friends will surely be
extended to him in both these direc
tions. Meantime he has been ponder
ing -what the wild waves say, and has
shown in his chef-d'oeuvre of the
present time. "Outposts." It. may not
appeal to some as the one large move
of a former exhibition did. but it is
full of thought and careful study.
"Kilauea in 1S93." close at hand shows
the vividness of our favorite crater
scene without the blood and thunder
element that once obtained as indis
pensible. Mr. Hitchcock has set that line of
work upon an entirely new plane, in
daylight and reality, and the picture
lover" owes him a debt of gratitude.
V piece of his Cocoanut Island shore
appears in a frame exhibited by Mrs.
Graham, separately numbered and also
a work of art. There are two others
by the same lady enclosing the work
of Mr. Dodge, and the originality of
design and execution of the poker
etchtng wakes the wish for more work
from the same source, distinctive and
apart from the work of others. Men
tioning Mr. Dodge, the merit on this
occasion seems somewhat m reverse
proportion to the size. Almost un
noticed among the others appear a
u nf rotf which is the best
ULLltJ liner .... i
thing from his brush at this time, be-
TYint simnle and free. An
other bit, not so very lage was also
among those sold on xne him
i . tinted that the purchaser had
in mind those whose associations were
cf .ins to the bit or rums at
Kaneohe, and who would best appre-
ciate "Where tne Hussion ul wi.
It should have (been mentioned
above that "Sunrise on West Maui,"
)v Hitfhr )(:, wa.-- among the
first to be ticketed as sold, and his
harming sepia, study of a studio cor
ner i.T also out of the market.
The contributions of Mrs. Alfred
Willis r.re vf l y ruode.st in size and em-
5. nco .ionic original Hawaiian stucke
-is '.vf'ii as
trip abrcat
the wing,
take from
interesting tiller lead one to infer
namely, "Entrance to Suez Canal,'
No. CM, and "Off the Straits of Mes
sina." If all the other absent or trav
eling members of the League would
but do as well en route, it would add
very much to the enjoyment of thos
who stay at home, as well as to th
traveler. Other glimpses of foreign
-cenery are shown by Mrs. H. M. von
Holt, in "A Bit of Grumwald, near
Berlin," and "On the Island cf Rugen,
numbered respectively 31 and 37. It i
pleasant that members of the Island
community have been able to glean so
far from home, and these two pieces
in oil colors show the possibility of
what lies close at hand. But cnief
among those on the oil color side of
the erallery are three canvasses by Mr
S. Decoto. "Stopping first at the Mag
nolias " No. 32, and then at the land
scape showing a scene in the quaint
"Kilipaki Village, Lahaina," one
pauses before No. 45, for it is one of the
most attractive pictures on the wall.
Few of the exhibitors are not strug
gling for advancement in technique
and the artist who gives "Threaten
ing." is among them, but the force and
feeling of course in question surpasses
any that she has contributed. It is
an especial credit to one whose time
is mostly spent at a distance from
even such a little nucleus of artists as
Honolulu affords, and the effect of
cloud and sea herein defined are filled
with thoughtful meaning.
While at the oils the viewer can
pass if not careful a small one in a
simple frame by Fred. Yates. It is
designated "Quiet," and all through its
composition and its tone is bespeaks
its name. Mr. Yates treatment of
landscape is quite unique, and the
ability which produced this bit is a
great lesson to the beginner or the
realist who leaves "all the soul out of
a canvass while striving to depict its
body.
There is sreat vitality in the con
tributions of Mrs. Belle Jones, No. 21,
'An Impression" is an example of dar
ing simplicity, and has a dash and a
'reedom which should underlie all art.
It is simnlv what its title calls for, but
from such impressions rightly develop
ed grow sturdy and substantial re
sults in the way of pictures. Mrs.
Jones' "Oleanders" will be an attrac
tion to a great many who may he a
ittle at a loss to interpret the former
bnet
The space between the windows are
occunied by architectural work in
which is recognized the well known
hand of Mr. Wm. Diokey. Some of
these are a little foretaste of what
may be realized around Honolulu in
more substantial form, hoth m pic
turesque cottage and stately mansion.
Do not fail to mark those designated
as koa halls; happy is the man who
an design and execute on paper such
artistic effects and happy are those
who can carry the ideas on to their
final intention and have reproduced
for their homes these beautiful forms
n the materials best suited for their
permancy. In tne same line, ana in
color also in frames, are the work of
Mr. G. E. CUcCrea. This gentleman
exhibits for the first time in the
,eague, but with an impression that
ill hp n lastinsr one. Here, as in the
rt of the hypnotfst, is shown the
power of "suggestion," and the direct-
ess ami force of Mr. McCrea s techni
cal skill are very much to be admired.
The absence of anything overdone is
most essential, and for this artist the
hope is that before the next exhibition
he will have been let free among the
rocks and hills, by the water side and
anions: the sunsets, for much can be
expected from what his brush will be
able to accomplish under the inspira
tion of nature.
The work of Mrs. A. B. Tucker is
much missed from the walls on this
occasion. It would oe very pieasani.
if she could have sent a number of
pieces as charming as her one glimpse
of "Idlewild ." No. 12. The youngest
contributor this time is Miss Florence
Hall, who will be found represented
in the corner cabinet of the alcove,
by a prettily decorated dessert set, and
one or two other pieces. In anotner
cabinet near by is a portion of work
in the same line by Miss Towne. l nis
ladv has siven much pleasure in Ho
nolulu during the past six months and
many have been glad to avail them
selves of her instruction, with the
prospect of accomplishing dainty and
beautiful chinaware like that which
SIP JIMS Oil ifV ilL luia umc, uunuuB.i
her best pieces had flown to the pos
session of others before the exhibition
onened. On a large table, and on the
walls back of it, is the rare work of Miss
Herrick in the line ceramic. Miss Her
rick is a sojourner from San Francisco
and it is very pleasant that it could
be arranged that her fine and exquisite
productions could add to the Art
League attractions at this season. One
will linger long over the graceful
forms which have been so beautifully
decorated in this alcove, which is an
annex to the main exhibit, and as
Miss Herrick is also imparting her
knowledge to others, from these two
sources ma 5 be expected fresh impulse
in the line of printed porcelain for
future exhibitions.
From one to five the remainder of
the week the doors will be open, and
even if one has seen the pictures be
fore, it is a pleasure to stroll in with
a friend and chat over what artist
friends have realized for the community.
RAfHFALL FOR MAY, !8S8.
r'ii.i iU p"
it
w .;. her
Gazette (semi-weekly) will be issued
as usual this morning for the out-going
Island and foreign mails. Copies in
wrappers at the newsdealers and pub
lication office.
I FfATION. V.LKV. Ft
j Hawaii
j Waiakea
Hi 10 (town) ...
Kaumana....
I'ept'okeo ,
Hnnomu
Honomu
Hakalau
Honohina -
Laupalioehoe .
Ookala
Kukaiau
I'aauilo
Paauhau
Paauhau -
Houokaa
Honakaa
Kukuihaele
Niulii
Kohala, (0.-trom)...
Kohala Mission
Kohala Sugar Co...-
Awini Ranch
Waimea
Kailua
Lanihau
Kealakekua
Kalabiki M
lvalahiki
Naalehu
Naalehu
Naalehu-
Honuapo
Hilea
Pahala
Moaula
Olaa (MasoD)
Pohakuloa
Waiakaheula
Kapoho
Pohoiki ...... ....
Kamaili
Kalapana
Maui
Kabul ui
Jabainaluna
Olowalu
Hamoa Plantation..
Waiopai Ranch
1(0
1' 0
SOU
f -"
"io
40i
2-50
750
300
1200
700
200
3-50
obo
234
1100
2720
950
1540
15S0
SOU
1200
6-50
1250
1725
15
310
re. -ill.
) l:.u ( I :i
7 25
s 19
S
15
S 4S
13 3S
3 96
3 76
3 52
3.5S
2.93
4 2
4 93
3.91
4.84
3.9S
4.11
2 54
7.2S
S57
7 SI
4 74
8 37
0.74
1.32
3.47
0 00
0.50
700
1650
2600
750
110
10
650
8
10
13 GO
4.17
3 4S
Paia
Puuomalei
Haleakala Ranch...
Kula
Haiku
Kipabulu
Kaupo, (Mokulau
Coffee Co.)
MOLOKAI
Alapulehu
LAN A I
Koele
Vraiapaa
Oaiiu
Makiki Reservoir...
Punahou W.Bureau
Kulaokahua
Kewalo (King St.)
Kapiolani Park
Pauoa
Insane Asylum
Nuuauu (Scbool st.)
Nuuanu (Wyllie st. )
Nuuanu (Elec. Stn)
Nuuanu, Luakaha..
Maunawili
Kaneohe
Waimaisalo
Ahuimanu
Kahuku
Waianae
Ewa Plantation
Waipahu
Kauai
Lihue, Grove Farm..
Lihue (Moiokoa)
Hauamaulu
Kilauea
Hanalei. .......
Waiawa .......
15
60
Tso
1400
2000
4000
70
1600
0.00
0.00
3 41
5 32
1.55
4.44
4.97
2.91
150 1.S5
50 1.35
50 0.68
15 0 43
10 0.22
50 1.84
30
50 1.47
250
405 4 31
S50 9.30
300 2.92
100 1.5S
25 1.26
350 3 51
25 1.24
1700 2.45
60 0 22
0.35
200 1.89
300 2.79
200 1.73
325 4.46
10 6.10
32
Records Not Hitherto Published:
AI'KIL.
IlAWATI
Luiij ahoeboe ...
Kamaili
Honoka..
Maui
Hamoa Plantation..
Paia
OAHU
Kawelo giving St.)
Kauai
Lihue (Molokia)
1900
60
15
300
7.50
4.46
10.84
1.65
1.80
.37
2.00
C. J. Lyons.
N. B. Observers are requested to
forward their renorts promptly at the
end of each month, that they may ap
pear in the published report on tne
fifteenth of following month.
CON PER EN C E to EM P i!RS
Clergymen and Laymen of Hawa
iian Association.
At the recent meeting here of the
Hawaiian Evangelical Association,
Rev. S. Kapu was moderator and Rev.
J. K. Hihio was scribe. The mem
bership of the conference was as fol
lows: PASTORS Revs. S. Desha, Kamaka
wiwoole, S. W. Kekuewa, Luhiau, W.
M. Kalaiwaa, W. N. Lono, G. W. Wai
au, J. Kauhane. Naahumakua, J. N.
Kamoku, J. K. Hihio, A. Pali, S. Kapu,
O. Nawahine, J. Kalino, M. Kuikahi.
Kaailua, E. M. Hanuna. K. Kaaiaka
manu, D. Kunukau, H. Manase, J. Ka
alouahi, D. K. Kaumiumi, D. Kaai,
S. P. Kaaia, H. H. Parker, E. S. Timo
teo, O. H. Gulick, S. Ooili, Nuuhiwa,
Jas. Davis. J. M. Ezera, J. Kekahuna.
J. Waiamau, G. L. Kopa, Lydgate, S.
Kaulili, S. Kaili, C. M. Hyde, S. E.
Bishop, O. P. Emerson. Leadingham,
D. Kapali, R. Maka, Lewis Mitchel,
J. Nua, J. M. Lewis. Kaeo, Naeole,
Z. S. K. Paaluhi, J. S. Kalana.
DELEGATES Keala, Kawewehi,
Kaeha, Keoloewa. John Hulu. John
Kama. Piohia, Opunui, Kane, Geo. Ke
kipi. Oni. Ma-pu, Ku, Ahina, Kaeha,
Apolo, Kalohaiole, S. Ekaula, D. L
Naone, Nalua, W. WT. Hall.
Couldn't See the Chicken.
When the transports were here,
several of the Boys in Blue entered
a Chinese fruit store to purchase some
fruit. One of the Boys gave a very
smooth American quarter to the Pake.
The side which the eagle was on, was
worn entirely, smooth. The Pake re
fused to take the quarter, saying:
"No can takee. Him no good. Me no
can see chicken."
i ll. hi
H OU
LIMITED
Offer for Sale:
KEF1XED SUGARS
4
Cube and Granulated.
PARAFIXE PA1XT CO.'S
Paints, Compounds and Buildinj
Papers.
PAINT OILS,
Lucol Raw and Boiled.
Linseed Raw and Boiled.
LNDURLNE,
Water-proof cold-water paint. In
side and outside; in white and
colors.
FERTILIZERS,
Alex. Cross & Sons' high-grade
Scotch fertilizers, adapted for su
gar cane and coffee.
N. Ohlandt & Co.'s chemical fertil
izers and finely ground Bone
Meal.
STEAM PIPE COVERING,
Reed's patent elastic sectional pip
covering. FILTER PRESS CLOTHS,
Linen and Jute.
CEMENT, LIME & BRICKS
AGENTS FOR
WESTERN SUGAR REFINING CO.,
San Francisco. Cal.
BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS,
Philadelphia, Penn., U. S. A.
NEWELL UNIVERSAL MILL CO.
(Manf. "National Cane Shredder").
New York. U. S. A.
N. OHLANDT & CO..
San Francisco. Cal.
R1SDON IRON AND LOCOMOTIVE
WTORKS,
San Francisco, C&L
A Model Plant is not complete with
out Electric Power, thus dispensing
with small engines.
Why not generate your power from
one CENTRAL Station? One gener
ator can furnish power to your Pump,
Centrifugals, Elevators, Plows, Rail
ways and Hoists; also, furnish light
and power for a radius of from 15 to
30 miles.
Electric Power being used, saves the
labor of hauling coal in your field, also
water, and does away with high-priced
engineers, and only have one engine to
look after in your mill.
Where water power is available It
costs nothing to generate Electric
Power.
THE HAWAIIAN ELECTRIC COM
PANY is now ready to furnish Electric
Plants and Generators of all descrip
tions at short notice, and also has od
hand a large stock of Wire, Chande
liers and Electrical Goods.
All orders will be given prompt at
tention, and estimates furnished for
Lighting and Power Plants; also, at
tention is given to Rouse and Marine
Wiring.
THEO. HOFFMAN, Manager.
Monuments and Headstones.
The undersigned is prepared to do
CEMETERY work of all kinds, and
supply MONUMENTS and HEAD
STONES of which he h23 a great va
riety cf the latest and most artistic de
signs, and will also supply stone cop
ing separate!" for surrounding ceme
tery lots.
Estimates given in Marb'.e, Granite.
Hawaiian Stone, etc.
FRED. HARRISON.
is
t r
TbA QfriPTllP QrrJim between Honolulu ani S.m Francisco is
liiC OaaaiCl OtilllO saJly r.,ixeJ jJst 3t present, anJ as a
result it is hard to know just when goods that are due will arrive.
We still have a store well l:'!ed with nearly everything that anyone
needs in the Hardware line, to say nothing of Paints and Oils,
Leather cf all kinds, Guns, Rif.es and Cartridges, Bicycles and
Bicycle Supplies, and as we depend largely on sailing vessels from
New York, England and San Francisco we are able to keep our tock
well up all the lime. When needing anything in any cf the above
lines trv
E. O. MALL & SON, Ld.
1
V,' J , JL
In addition to recent invoices from'the United States,
The Pacific Hardware Co.
have just receive. direct from England:
Winsor & Newton's Artists' Colors,
Color Boxes, Canvas, Academy Board
Palettes and Vouga's Studies,
Dandy Brushes, Wostenholm's Cutlery,
Wade and Butcher's Razors,
Open and Twisted Link Trace Chains.
And a full assortment of
DOOR MATS.
acme
ardware Co,,
LIMITED.
Fort Street.
emington Standar
d Typewriter!
WHAT IS IT!
A simple, compact, and durable machine, which successfully
performs the work of the pen, with a tremendous saving of
time and exertion.
WHAT WILL IT DO?
It produces, with speed and certainty, in clearly legible
printed characters, one or many copies of any kind of writing,
excepting such as must be done in books.
TO WHOM IS IT USEFUL?
To every one who has writing to do. In business circles its
desirability is assured. Lawyers and journalists cannot do
without it. Professional and scientific men realize its worth
to them. The author and thinker find it invaluable. It con
serves the most potent kind of energy that of the brain by
reducing to a minimum the mechanical labor of writing, and
distributing it among all the fingers of both hands. Writer's
cramp disappears where it is used. It presents the printed
appearance of the work to the mind at once.
WHO CAN OPERATE IT?
Any one of ordinary intelligence. A very few trials enable
any one to write upon it readily. Thereafter it is only a mat
ter of practice.
H. HACKFELD & Co., Ltd
SOLE AGENTS.
ERT CATTON,
Engineer.
Importer
Ma
212 QUEEN ST.
chinery
HONOLULU
A TT
ON,
NEILL & m.
Founders and Machinists.
213 Queen St., bet. Alakea and Richards Sts., Honolulu.
Invite Enquiries for General Ironwork; Iron and Brass Cast
ings. Ships' Blacksmiths. Cemetery Railings and
Crestings Made to Order: Samples on Hand.
REPAIRS PROMPTLY ATTENDEP TO.
TEL. 410.
Issued Tuesdays and Fridays.
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