OCR Interpretation


The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, June 18, 1898, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-06-18/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

J
i
4
0
1 H 1
51 ft
.1 v i I f-i f
XXVH., NO. 4949.
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, SATURDAY, JUNE IS LS9S.
RICE FIVE CENTS.
t: ? 'y M ; - fowl
vAfci f: f If f ' 3 ?j If
ytf . 1.
V"
I1'
9
r
1 ip
m
. i
J;
'
t!
t
0
1 1 at
f
-
Mly
V:' 1 '
,1. Q. WOOD,
Attorney at Law.
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC.
OFFICE:
Corner King
Streets.
and Bethel
DR. C. 15. HIGH,
Dentist.
Philadelphia Dental College 1892.
asonlc Temple. Telephone 318
A C. WALL. 0. E. WALL.
Dentists.
OFFICE HOURS 8 a. in. to 4 p. m
IJOVE BUILDING, FORT STREET.
M. 12. GUiOSSMAJST, D.D.S.
Dentist.
38 HOTEL STREET, HONOLULU.
Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p. m.
DR. A. J. DEJtBY,
Dentist.
CORNER FORT AND HOTEL STS.,
MOTT-SMITH BLOCK.
Telephones: Office, 615; Residence, 789.
HOURS: 9 to 4.
JEO. II. IIUDDV, D.D.S.
Dentist.
FORT STREET, OPPOSITE CATHO
LIC MISSION.
Hours: From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. M. WACHS.
Dentist.
(University of California.
Ueretania near Fort street.
Ofiice Hours: I) to 12 a. m. and 1 to
& P. El.
DK. IT. Ji. CLiAlMv.
Dentist.
Prosress Block, corner Beretania and
Fort streets.
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
OSce No. G37. King street, near
Punchbowl.
Hours: 8:30 to 11 a. m.; 3 to 5 p.
m.; 7 to 8 p. m.
Telephone No. 448.
MRS. F. S. SAYANT-JEROME, M.D.
HOMEOPATH.
Office, Progress Block Rooms 1-4.
Corner Beretania and Fort streets.
Women's and Children's Diseases.
Special studies made of dietetics and
physiatrics.
W. T. MONSARRAT,
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN
TIST. TELEPHONES 161 & 626.
GIIAS. F. PETERSON,
Attorney at Law.
AND j
NOTARY PUBLIC.
15 Kaahumanu St.
WIliLiIAM C. PAliKE,
Attorney at Law.
AND
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG
MENTS. 02ice: Kaahumanu St., Honolulu.
O. G-. TKAPIIAG-JEX,
ARCHITECT.
23 Merchant Street, between Fort
and Alakea.
'clephone 734.
Honolulu, H. I.
lyle a. dickey,
Attorney at Law.
14 KAAHUMANU STREET.
Telephone, 6S2.
K. HACKFELD & CO., Ltd.
Ciiii ipis,
Czr. Fcrt and Queen Sts., : Honolulu.
Generol
FOR SALE.
A Coffee Estate
OF 150 ACRES,
SITUATED IN THE WONDERFUL
DISTRICT OF PUNA, HAWAII.
Twenty-five Acres Cleared and Planted Over
a Year Ago, Now in Fine Condition.
Adjoining Unimproved Land Com
mands $22.50 per Acre.
Owner cannot give the Property fur
ther attention.
A SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY FOR
A BARGAIN.
Hawaiian Safe Deposit and
Investment Company.
GEORGE R. CARTER, Mgr.
Off.ce in rear of Bank of Hawaii, Lti.
SPECIAL BUSINESS ITEMS.
ART AND SCIENCE.
At the World's Columhian Exposi
tion art and science was thoroughly
exemplified. The greatest achieve
ments of modern times were on exhi
bition. Among the many beautiful
displays none attracted more atten
tion than that made by the Singer
Sewing Machine Company. It won the
enthusiastic praises of all. B. Berger
sen, Agent, Bethel street.
The City Carriage Company possess
only first-class hacks and employ only
careful, steady drivers.
Carriages at all hours.
Telephone 113.
JOHN S. ANDRADE.
OBIS'
GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, GOc.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
Just received from "Morning Star"
a fine lot of Gilbert and Marshall Isl
and Mats, Atvicks, Tols, Baskets,
Spears, Corals, Shells, Mother of
Pearl Hooks, Hats, Cords, etc.
Hair dressing department re-opened
Tel. 639.
J. M. DAVIDSOX.
Attorney and Counsel
lor at Law.
No. 20G Merchant Street : Honolulu.
CIIAULES CLAIUv.
Attorney at Law.
121 MERCHANT STREET.
Honolulu Hale. Tel.
Up Stairs.
315.
M. W. McCHESNEY & SONS.
Wholesale Grocers and Dealers in Leather and
Shoe Findings.
Acents Honolulu Soap Works Companv
and Honolulu Tannery.
BEFORE
BUYING
Your Furniture call at the
IXL and see the low prices
in Antique Oak Bedroom Sets,
Iron Beds, Wardrobes, Chairs,
Rockers, Bureaus, Tables, Meat
Safes, Stoves, Washstands, Ice
Boxes, Etc.
' S. W. LEDERER,
Corner Nuuanu and King Sts.
P. O. Box 4S0. Tel. 478. '
Again we advertise the Greatest
Typewriter in the World:
The "BLICKENSDERFER
H. E. WALKER, Sole Agt.
Masonic Block.
n5: j-vs;. v i has
v I a
STOCK MARKE
Has
Been 'Lively TO in tie
Island Securities.
EVA HIGHWATER MARK
tieiow Par Four Years Ago-Hono'
kaa and Oahu An Exciting Day
and Good Prospects:
iiiis has been an interesting and
active work in Hawaiian securities.
Deals have been numerous. The trade
yesterday was exciting and the week
will close Avith a number of important
transactions. There has been no fluc
tuation. The rise in all directions has
been steady and marked. Money seems
to be easier.
Ewa, which was selling helow par
four years ago went at $333 yesterday,
a block fifty shares was snanned ur
eagerly at that hgure. There was a
demand all through the day and all
the brokers are looking for this gilt-
edged security.
Reports from Honokaa plantation
had the effect of making: that, stock
move np a tew points. I here were
sales yesterday at $240. It is less than
year ago that Honokaa was looked
at askance.
The encouraging prospects of Ewa
ind the daily notes from Oahu have
esulted in establishing a more solid
oundation than ever for stcck of the
newer plantation, oahu assessable,
$65 paid up, sold readily yesterday at
$G7 and there are signs that it will
command a still better price.
ine owners or uiowam stock are
being congratulated by their friends.
Up to a few months ago there were
no sales at all in this corporation.
Then the stock was hawked about $50.
A few of the shrewd ones bought.
There has ibeen one sale of Olowalu
this week at $95 and the holders are
not at all anxious to dispose of their
security.
Makaweli holds its own in a manner
that, vindicates the judgment of those
who have held to the stock in the be
lief that it was good as any. There
were a number of deals in Makaweli
during the week. One occurred yes
terday with the figure at $120. Maka
weli has only $70 paid 'up, with par
$100. All the other stocks mentioned
above are of the par value of $100 a
share and all are fully paid up. Ewa
dividends are yet to come, hut will
be very handsome. The Ewa crop, as
noted yesterday, .will be larger than
ever before.
Mutual Telephone is strong, with
unsatisfied demand for the stock at
good advance.
It is known that $150 shares of Hart
& Co., Ltd., have changed hands dur
ing the week. The sale figure was $11,
par $10. This -is a new stock that has
established itself firmly.
Hawaiian Electric continues to ad
vance.
There have been during this week
. " U Y.rtMfrtif
a good many many iiduaatnui.
Land values are growing steaany. ine
principal demand is for residence lots.
Mr. Ft: nil to Leave.
It is understood that Mr. Fenn, the
head master at Iolani College, has re
signed his position here to accept
something better in the United States.
Mr. Fenn has done well with the boys
of the Bishop's school and there is a
strong attachment between teacher
and pupils. In town, Mr. Fenn, who
is a skilled musician and a pleasing
reader, is a general favorite. Mr. Fenn
has played violin with the Y. M. C. A.
orchestra and has been well liked in
reading at a number of entertain
ments. Dante Tonight.
Dante, the great magician, will give
an atternoon performance today and
a new program this evening. The vis
iting conjurer endeavors to please all
and so far has been highly successful.
For the matinee the prices have been
made 5'.
cents and 25 cents.
For the
evening popular prices win prevail.
Dante will this evening give as two
principal acts a pair of new illusions
of his own. Each one of them created
a great sensation in the States. Dante
- i
will
so far defied the closest observers
d much is expected of his new
num-
For ill- ''u Dinner.
The range appliance for making
coffee on the occasion of the next Exe-
cutive building grounds luau to Boys
in Blue is now in shape. The coffea
pot is an extensive affair. Each brew
will be of 370 gallons. In one portion
of the tropical kitchen building coffee
will be served and meats carved. In
the other apartment soda water will
be handed out. Seventy paid waiters
will be employed to do the heavy work
There will be a man for each table
and they will have a properly number-
erd badges.
Capt. (Jridley Dead.
The sad news of the death of Cap
tain Girdley, late commander of the
U. S. S. Olympia, which did su:h fine
work in the fight at Manila, was re
ceived on the Peru yesterday morn-
mg. captain uiraiey was in v.nen r.e
was in Hong Kong before departure
to Manila and Admiral Dewey advisf-d
him to stay off the ship but he would
not remain from the fight. When this
was over he began to ail again and
it was finally prevailed upon him to
leave the ship and to go to his home
in the States. He arrived as far as
Kobe, Japan, where he died on Sun
day, June oth. His complaint was
dysentery. The body of the late Cap
tain Gridley will pass through here
on the Coptic.
Commander Lamberton has been
placed in command of the-Olympia.
Captain Coffin, who passed through
on the Peru, was a class mate of the
ate Captain Gridley at Annapolis.
SEMI-FINALS TODAY.
Fennis Tournament in Singles
Narrowed Down.
The semi-finals in the tournament in
singles will be played on the courts
of the Pacific Tennis Club at 4 p. m.
this afternoon. These courts have
)een chosen on account of the fact
that the contestants are all men be-
onging to that organization. The re
mainder of the contestants from the
other clubs were all bowded out yes-
erday afternoon by the wearers of the
scarlet and navy blue. Undoubtedly
this detracts from the interest to the
outsiders as there is never so much
commotion over players of one club
pitted against one another as there
is over players from various organi
zations. It has been a disappointment
all around that the Valley club did
not place more men on the field for
then there would have been some
chance for a representation of at least
,one other club ,in the semi-finals.
Yesterday's play was up to the stand
ard of playing that has been going on
during the matches of singles so far.
The resume of the play is as follows:
Beretania courts Clarence Cooke, P.
T. C, vs. E. A. Mott-Smith, B. T. C,
won by Cooke with a score of G-4, 6-0;
Willie Roth, P. T. C. Junior, vs. Donald
Ross, B. T. C, won by Roth with a
score of 6-1, 6-1.
Pacific courts E. R. Adams, P. T.
C, vs. D. Shanks, B. T. C, won by
Adams with a score of 6-2, 6-3; J.
Cooke, P. T. C, vs. S. G. Wilder, P.
T. C, won by Wilder with a score of
6-1, 6-4.
The play in singles for today is ns
follows:
E. R. Adams vs. C. Cooke and Willie
Roth vs. S. G. Wilder. As was stated
above all these contests will be played
on the courts of the Pacific Tennis
club. ' '
Labor From Here.
Frank Wilburton, who since the
wreck of the S. S. Kaala on the other
side of this Island, has been doing odd
jobs along the wrater front, left for
San Francisco on the Peru yesterday
with SO Japanese laborers. His objec
tive point is Clipperton Island off the
coast of Central America, where he
will attend to the work of shipping
guano to America, Japan and these
Islands. The job was given him by
T. H. Davies & Co., who represent
Arundel & ' Co. Mr. Wilburton will
charter a vessel in San Francisco and
will proceed to Clipperton Island
with his gang of Japanese laborers.
He expects to be gone about six months
at the end of which time he will re
turn here.
A GENERAL INVITATION.
The millinery displayed at L. B.
Kerr's Queen street store is a sight
long to be remembered. Hats and
bonnets are many and beautiful. Th
style of trimming most artistic; the
irrangr-mont of colors most exquHt'
nnsl mnt be seen to be appreciated
An inspection is solicited. All are
cordiallv invited.
IMMIGRATION ACT
Radical Chanp in Present Laws
Passes Seconfl Reading .
OMITS OBLIGATORY DEPOSITS
House Rests on One Appropriation
BMI More Questions Answer
ed By Ministry.
SENATE.
One Hundred-fourth Day, June 17.
Notification was made that the Pre
sident has signed the amendments to
the land act.
The Finance Committee made their
report on the books of the Board of
Education. The report was received
and placed on file.
The Passed Bills Committee reported
that the bill permitting the manufac
ture and sale of wine from Hawai
ian grown grapes nau neen presented
to the President for his signature.
A communication was received
from the House announcing concur
rent action on the bill regulating the
opening ot streets through private
ands.
Senator Baldwin reported favorably
on the bill making new regulations for
Chinese immigration. The committee
recommended amendments. They re
ported that the depositors under the
iresent laws numbered 7,000 and
their funds aggregated $163,000. The
new features of the hill as recommend
ed by them and as passed second read-
ng is as follows:
"Conditional permits to enter this
Republic may be granted by the Min
ster of Foreign Anairs with, the ap
proval of the Executive Council for
such Chinese as shall he recommend
ed by the Board of Immigration upon
the application of employers of do
mestic, agricultural or mill labor,
which said permits shall contain the
condition, printed in both the English
language and in Chinese characters,
that the bearer is allowed to enter this
Republic solely on condition that he
gives a bond in the sum of $."0 liquid
ated damages, such bond to be signed
by his employer as surety, and con
ditioned that while here he will en
gage in no trading or mechanical oc
cupation other than domestic" service
or agricultural labor in the field or in
rice or sugar mills, and that he will,
whenever he shall cease to follow his
vocation as agricultural laborer in the
field or in sugar or rice mills or as
domestic servant, leave this Republic,
and that for every breach of such con
dition he shall on conviction by any
District Magistrate be liable to a fine
of one hundred dollars. For each
conditional permit so granted the 'Min
ister 'of Foreign Affairs shall be paid
a fee of one ($1.00) dollar. Permits
to enter this Republic may also be
granted by the Minister of Foreign
Affairs for any Chinese resident in this
Republic at the date of the passaga
of this Act, provided that such per
son shall have resided within the
Republic for two years immediately
preceding such passage; and also to
such other persons as may wish to so
journ temporarily in the Republic as
travelers, or as merchants having
business interests in this Republic;
provided that such sojourn shall not
exceed six months; and provided that
such person so permitted to enter
shall give a bond to said Minister, in
the sum of five hundred dollars, liquid
ated damages, conditioned that he will
leave the Republic within six months,
and also all such persons who may
wish to sojourn temporarily in the
Republic, provided that such sojourn
shall not exceed three years and pro
vided that such persons so permitted
to enter shall give a bond with good
and sufficient surety to the said Minis
ter in the sum of one hundred dollars,
liquidated damages, cDnditioned that
while he shall remain within the Re
public he will not engage in trading or
mechanical occupation other than do
mestic service or agricultural labor in
the field or in sugar or rice mills, and
that he will leave the Republic with
in three years. Any person who shall
remain within, the Republic after the
expiration of the period mentioned in
the bonds given by him to the Minister
of Foreign Affairs under the provis
ions of this Section shall be guilty
of a misdemeanor and shall upon con
viction be imprisoned at hard labor for
a term not to exceed six (6) month-.
For each permit granted under this
Section the Minister of Foreign Affairs
shrill be pnid a fee of five dollars."
The act repeals ?ct 74 of Provi-ion-
al Government and act
27
of the
s:on laws of 1S!5. Third reading was
set for Monday.
Minister Damon's answer to Sena
tor Brown's questions on equalization
of taxation were read and ordercnl
printed.
At 11 o'clock the Senate adjourned
Monday.
to
norsi:.
The following answers to questions
propounded by Rep. Achi wore present
ed by Minister Cooper:
Q. Is it not a fact that the balance
due the J .K. Nahale contract has
been collected? If not. has it been
drawn from the Government depart
ment? A. The balance due on said con
tract, amounting to $230, was paid b
draft dated December 31, 1SD7. Upon
voucher approved by Mr. Rowell,
Superintendent of Public Works.
Q. If paid, in whose possession is
the money at the present time?
A. Mr. Rowell informs me that he
is holding the money for the reason
that the contract has not been fulfilled.
Q. If this money is now in posses
sion of some other person and not in
the Finance Department, state if there
is any law supporting this action?
A. It is customary for the Superin
tendent of Public Works to draw and
pay the amounts payable on a con
tract, in accordance with its terms, and
upon the completion of the work to
draw and pay whatever balance may
be due.
Report laid on the table to be con
sidered with Senate bill 4.
Minister Cooper announced signing
by the President of Senate bill 33, "An
Act to Amend Sections 4, 30, 57, 71,
73, 10, 20, 27, 53, 62 and 69 of Eand
Act of 1S95. relating to Public Lands."
House bill 79, relating to the manu
facture of wines ;from grapes of Ha
waiian growth, passed third reading
unanimously.
First reading and passage of Senate
bill 37, relating to the eligibility of
persons to hold public office. Bill read
second time and referred to the Judi
ciary committee. continuation or
third reading, of Senate bill 4.
Speaker Kaulukou called Rep. Paris
to the chair and then took his place
on the floor with the members. When
the time came he moved to insert an
item of $300 for repairing Desha Eane.
This was carried.
Rep. Eoebenstein next ' arose and
moved to insert an item of $25 for the
removal of the tree in Vineyard street.
If it was the intention of members to
keep putting in .small itemfi, they
might as well go on, even putting in
five cent items, he said.
The remainder of the forenoon was
taken up with the consideration of
various items in Senate bill 4.
The House took a recess at 12 m.
A FTERNOON SESSION.
Continuation of Senate bill 4. Rep.
Robertson moved to strike out the item
of $300 for lights at Kailua, Kona.
There was quite a discussion over this
and the item was carried by a majori
ty of one vote. The items for lighting
Hookena lauding and landings on
Oahu, outside of Honolulu, wrere strick
en out. The item for lighting Kauai
landings was allowed to remain in the
bill by a narrow majority.
When it came to "Forests and Nur
series," Rep. McCandless moved that
the item of $5,000 for Hqnolulu Park
Commission be raised to $7,500. The
commission was already $1,300 in debt
from the last two years. Minister
Damon said it was about time tho
rich people of the city should come
forward and donate something for the
public. The Government should not be
expected to do it all. The item passed
at $3,00.0 as in the bill.
The recapitulation of i the bill was
nostnoned and it will go to the Revi
sion Committee for the purpose of hav
ing the amounts for the various de
partments footed up again as there
have been a great many changes.
When it came to the end of the bill
and the section containing the provi
sion that fifty per cent of the labor
employed to do the different contract
work shall be Europeans and Hawai
ians. Rep. McCandless moved that the
word "American" be added as he did
not believe the word "European" cov
ered Americans. This wa3 done.
Attorney-General Smith then arose
(Continued on Fourth Pnge.
Royal raskes the food pure,
wholesome and delicious.
1U t-j
4
Absolutely Pur
0"i cakivo pniri i-o. xf yfl.
i f
i

xml | txt