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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, September 27, 1898, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-09-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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.VOL. XXVIII., XO. 5035.
HONOLULU, HAWAILVX ISL.VXDS, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1S9S.
TRICE FIVE CENTS.
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A
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
J. Q. WOOD.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. Office: Corner King and
Bethel Streets.
DR. C. B. HIGH.
DENTIST. PHILADELPHIA DENT
al College 1S02. Masonic Temple.
Telephone 318.
OR. A. C. WALL DR. 0. E. WALL
DENTISTS OFFICE HOUIIS: 8 A. M.
to 4 p. m. Love Building. Fort
Street.
M. E. GROSSMAN, D.D.S.
DENTIST OS HOTEL STREET, Ho
nolulu. Ollice Hours: 0 a. m. to
4 p. m.
DR. A. J. DERBY.
DENTIST CORNER FORT AND
Hotel Streets., Mott-Smlth Block.
Telephones: Office, 615; Residence,
789. Hours: 9 to 4.
GEO. H. HUDDY, D.D.S.
DENTIST FORT STREET,
site Catholic Mission.
From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. F. E. CLARK.
OPPO-
Hcurs:
DENTIST PROGRESS BLOCK, COR-
ner Beretania and Fort Streets.
DR. R. I. MOORE.
DENTIST 210 HOTEL STREET.
Office Hours 9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m.
1 p. m. to 4:00 p. m. Telephone 505.
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
OFFICE No. 537 KING 'STREET.
near Punchbowl. Hours: 8:30 to
11 a. m.; 3 to 5 p. m.; 7 to 8 p. m.
Telephone No. 448.
T. B. CLAPHAM.
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN-
tist. Office: Hotel Stables. Calls,
day or night, promptly answered.
Specialties: Obstetrics and Lame
ness. MISS L. A. CURTIS.
MANICURE G16
site Chinese
FORT ST., OPPO-
Church., Tel. 519.
Manicuring, Facial Massage, Mass
age, Electricity, Shampooing and
Scalp treatment.
J. H. WIDMAN.
CHIROPODIST.
Villa," 731
hours: 9 a.
RESIDENCE: ' THE
Fort street. Office
rn. to 12 m., and 2 to
5 p. m., Lovo Building. Corns and
bunions cured by a new "process.
Intrrowing nails a specialty. No
pain. Engagements made after
office hours.
M. Monsarrat. Harry P. Weber.
MONSARRAT & WEBER.
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS
at Law. Cartwright Block. Mer
chant Street. Telephone 68.
CHAS. F. PETERSON.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. 15 Kaahumanu Street.
11
WILLIAM C. PARKE.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND AGENT
to take Acknowledgments. Office:
Kaahumanu Street, Honolulu.
LYLE A. DICKEY.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. King and Bethel Streets.
Telephone 806. P. O. Box 7S6.
JOHN D. WILLARD.
ATTORNEY AT
chant street.
O. 617.
LAW. 314 MER
Telephone 415. P.
J. M. KANEAKUA.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
Law. Office: In the Occidental
Hotel, corner of King and Alakea
Streets, Honolulu.
CHARLES CLARK.
ATTORNEY AT LAW 121 MEU
chant Street. Honolulu Hale. Tel
ephone 345. Up Stairs.
0. G. TRAPHAGEN.
ARCHITECT 223 MERCHANT ST.,
Between Fort and Alakea. Tele
phone 734. Honolulu, II. I.
I : a
o oo
tOCte and Bonds
For Sai f
o oo
Sharpy Oflhil Slno-nr C.n fA;-
i o
sessable).
Shares O. R. & L. Co.
Bonds O. R. & L. Cc.
GEORGE R. C4RTER, Treasurer
Office la rear of Bask of Hawaii. Ltd.
SPECIAL BUSINESS ITEMS
ART AND SCIENCE.
At the World's Columbia Exposi
tion art and science was thoroughly
exemplified. The greatest achieve
ments of modern times were on exhi
bition. Among the many beautiful
displays none attracted more atten
tion than that made by the Singer
Sewing Machine Company. It won the
enthusiastic praises of all. B. Berger-
sen, Agent, Bethel street.
JAMES T. TAYLOR, i U. SOC. C. E.
CONSULTING HYDRAULIC ENGI-
neer. Telephone 1059.
MORRIS K. KEOHOKALOLE,
LOUIS K. M'GREW.
OFFICE:
NO. 15 KAAHUMANU
Street, Honolulu, Formerly A.
Rosa's Office. United States Cus
tom House Brokers, Accountants,
Searchers of Titles and General
Business Agents. Telephone 520.
L. C. ABLES.
REAL ESTATE AND FINANCIAL
Agent. 315 Fort Street.
P. SILVA.
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG-
ments to. Instruments, District of
Kona, Oahu. At W. C. Achi's office.
King street, near Nuuanu.
GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, GOc.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
Just received from "Morning Star"
a fine lot of Gilbert and Marshall Isl
and Mats, Atvicks, Tols, Baskets,
Spears, Corals, Shells, Mother of
Pearl Hooks, Hats, Cords, etc.
Hair dressing department re-opened.
Tel. 659.
LEWIS & CO.,
ers
111 FORT STREET.
Telephone, 210 : : P. O. Box, S9.
H. MAY & CO.,
loieie and Retail Grocers
-:- 9S FORT STREET. -:-Telephone.
22 : : : P. O. Box, 470.
Large
Foot
Pumps,
EXTRA
QUALITY,
$1.50.
E. WALKER,
Masonic
Temple.
Ill : IS
USUI:
ftinlGon q nnri
uroc
f HUibOUIb UI1U
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.? So- U i
A BODY FLOATING
Remains of Half Caste land in
lie Bay.
kiki rihgeb, a town boy
Mark'j
on His Body Suggestions
of
a Crime More Likely
Accident A 'Sailor.
The dead body of Kiki Ringer
a
you:g half white, well known to all of
the older settlers and almost everyone
about town, was found floating in the
bay abol,t 3 'clock esterda' after-
noon. All atternoon ana mgnt tnere
was a fever of interest in the matter in
VliLV IMLlCOf 1. W I I II.. A e Cb J- - lUJft
that a frightful murder has been com
muted, w nen tound tne body bore a
deep, sharp cut above the right eye,
evidently made by a knife. There were
bruises on the breast and in several
other places which impressed one as
being the result of kicks or beatings
with a club.
The dead man was seen alive on Sun
day night by the watchman at the
Inter Island wharf. He appeared then
to have been drinking. There are evi
dences which connect him with a card
game later. It is believed there was
gambling at the time. These are the
clues the police thus far have to work
upon.
A coroner's jury was impaneled by
Deputy Marshal Chillingworth and wall
meet this morning. All are natives,
for the most part hackmen. Dr. Emer
son examined the body and will make
a statement to the
jury. Last night the
'd William Ringer, '
brother of deceased
who is stableman for llder & Co.,
was permitted to take the remains to
Ed Williams' undertaking parlors.
The dead man, who is known simply
as iviKi, was uorn, raisea anu
schooled in Honolulu. He was nearly
white and had reddish hair unusually
light for a Hawaiian. His age was
about 27. During the time the trans
ports were calling at Honolulu in the
summer he kept a refreshment stand
on the wharves for the convenience of
the soldiers. His last ship was the
Peru. He kept his stand back of the
California Feed Co.'s store and did a
rushing business with the troops. It
is said that he gave freely to those
without money.
Recently he went on the steamer Mi
kahala as a sailor. He was employed
on her on the day of his death. There
is in this fact a chance that he may
have fallen and hurt himself while at
tempting to reach his vessel, though
this solution of the case is not accept
ed by the police.
Capt. Thompson, of the Mikahala,
first discovered the body. It was then
floating on top of the water between
the Mikahala and the Fort street
wharf. A sling was thrown out and
the body drawn to the wharf. It was
then in good condition and had evi
dently just risen from the bottom of
the bay. The police were notified and
the body was removed to the Station
house. There Dr. Emerson conducted
the examination soon after and the
sleuths were put to work on the case.
Kiki was always a friend of annexa
tion and the Republic. When the re
bellion broke out in 1S95 he volun
teered and served in Capt. Murray's
company of Citizen Guardsmen. He
was for a long time regarded as one
of Marshal Hitchcock's "specials," but,
as a matter of fact, was never in the
employ of the department. William
Ringer, brother of the dead man. was
a policeman in those times.
An Earnest Drummer.
Mr. Graham, at Castle & Cooke's, has
received a Manila letter from his friend
Lieut. Thos. G. Sparrowe, of G Com
pany, First California, U. S. V. Lieut.
Sparrowe writes most feelingly of the
funeral of the first men killed in action
with the Spaniards and speaks of the
trying duty of going forth night after
night to the trenches. The lieutenant
gives a good account of the taking of
Manila and cannot refrain from com
menting on a comical sight. He says
that as they were wading a stream and
hearing the zip of bullets the band
of the First Colorado was playing
"Hot Time" and the bass drummer
had his machine high in the air to save
it from wetting and did not miss a
stroke.
The Child tar.
Chinese far and near are now deeply
interested in the little girl that is per
forming at the new Chinese theater.
The little one has a speaking part in
the play, sings and then does special
ties. The latter consist of tumbling
and contortion work and sword., spear
and knife fighting exhibitions. The
youngster is very clever. The firs:
Chinese woman to appear on the stag?
here is the mother of the child. One
of the characters in the play now run
ning gives a song half in English. It
is a love ditty. On Saturday night las:
the Chinese, contrary quite to their
custom, applauded frequently. The lit
tle girl has received many presents
from admirers.
Before the War.
An incident of Spanish injustice be
fore the war is told by one of the of
ficers of the Valencia. It occurred at
Manila and the victim was the master
of an American ship, with general
cargo from New York. His infringe
ment of the custom law there consist
ed in having made an error on his ves
sel's manifest of 10 cases of lubricating
oil, making a certain item 11 instead
of 21. The total number of packages
footed up correctly and the mistake
was obviously a very simple clerical
error which could be detected at a
glance. It cost the Yankee skipper
just $GG4 in gold coin, however, that
being the fine imposed by the dons.
vationaI League.
The Hawaiian National League will
meet at the office of S. K. Ka-ne at
noon today. Representatives from all
the outside districts will be present.
Permanent organization will be per
fected at the meeting.
MAKE A MOVE.
American Engineers Begin Sur
veys at Pearl Harbor.
Company I, the Engineers conting
ent, from Denver, Col., Capt. Draper,
left the city yesterday morning to
march to Pearl Harbor. A wagon of
camp supplies, tents, etc., and another
of provisons accompanied the troons.
halt was made on the road last night
and the destination will be reached this
morning. The men will make surveys
or a coaling station and an iron-frame
wharf to go alongside it, using the
maps and soundings prepared by the
"dV-u ul'e,.?L1 -V, V 1 a s.uuaui
,ocatlon 1S founcl 1; Wl11 De Put in con-
dition for use, subject to the approval
of the Secretary of War. Company
will remain two weeks at the harbor
and will then be relieved by another
company.
In town the company was breakfast
ed by Mr. and Mrs. Krouse at 'the Ar
lington. The table was stretched up
on the lawn. Mrs. McCully-Higgins,
Miss Alice McCully, Mrs. Tomes, Miss
j omes anu otner lauies assisted in
serving the breakfast. Just before
leaving the place the engineers gave
three rousing cheers for Mr. and Mrs.
Krouse.
Police Court.
In Judge Wilcox's Court yesterday
morning Lum Hoy was fined ?75 and
Ah Him $15 for operating a the -fa
bank. The case of Ah Cheong, charged
with being a runner in the same mat
ter, was dropped.
Seven natives were fined $10 each
and three $5 each for playing Russian
War.
Sixteen "drunks" paid the usual fine
of $2 each.
Kealoalii was fined $5 for using vul
gar and obscene language. Appeal.
The case of Ueda, assault and bat
tery with deadly weapon, was further
postponed to next Thursday.
Good teaming Weather.
The schooner John G. North arrived
in San Francisco September 10th from
Honoipu, after a passage of twenty
seven days. Capt. Anderson said he
never before made such a tedious pas
sage. The weather that has enabled
steamships to make good time between
island ports and San Francisco is re
sponsible for the long passages made
by sailing packets, and this weather,
calms and light airs, has prevailed for
the past few months.
The Waimea Bridge.
J. McClellan, head carpenter for the
Public Works Department, returned
from Kauai Sunday morning, where he
had been engaged in putting in the new
Waimea bridge. It will take about
one and a half months to complete the
work. This bridge will be about fifty
feet longer than the one washed away
last February. It will also have stone
piers in place of the wooden piles used
to support the old bridge.
N. G. II. Officers.
A special invitation has been issued
to the officers of the N. G. H. to attend
the reception to American Army and
Navy officers by Minister Damon at
Moanalua next Saturday. It is prob
able that the officers will go down in
uniform in a body.
ESTATE VALUED AT $10,000.00.
John Smith left an estate valued at
this amount. The greater part was
saved by buying goods at L. B. Kerr'a,
Queen street. See hi3 ad and you will
realize how it was done.
FROM A REPORT
Selections Ont of a Confidential
' Retirn on Labor.
DATA OH A CHANCE OF MASTERS
Why Contract Men Desert Wages
in Coffee District Company
Loss Word on Lunas.
Some weeks ago Wray Taylor, in the
capacity of labor inspector, made a
trip to Hawaii districts from which so
many desertions of contract men had
been reported. An extended report was
returned by Mr. Taylor to the Minister
of Interior, but the newspapers were
denied access to the document as well
as knowledge of any part of its con
tents. The correspondent of the San
Francisco Call managed to reach the
report, however, by a means not neces
sary to seek out and the Coast paper
ha these extracts from Mr. Taylor's
confidential report to the Minister of
Interior:
From all the plantations from Lau
pahoehoe to Hilo desertions have taken
place, and there is no doubt that in
Olaa and Kona a large number of the
deserters could be found were a sys
tematic search to be made. In consid
ering this question as a whole there is
no doubt that the coffee districts are
a great attraction for laborers, both
free and contract. The work is lighter
than on sugar plantations and the
wages higher. The Japanese are paid
$15 a month in Olaa. Quite a number
of Chinese are beginning to jet into
this district. One way to stop deser
tions might be a combination of the
sugar and coffee planters, but it would
have to be a thorough one to have any
effect. Soon after my return from this
trip I had a long talk with Mr. Inouye
nf the Kumamoto Immigration Com
pany, who stated that the desertions
of Japanese brought here by his com
pany had ibeen a loss to them of about
$3,700, and desertions were still being
rpnorted. He was very anxious, as
were the other companies in the busi
ness, to have an end put to this whole
sale desertion. Since April 1 of this
vear I understand the Japanese Gov
ernment allows the immigration com
panies to exact a monetary bond from
eacn laborer neiore leaving japan siu-
ficient to cover the amount of the pas
sage money, and in the event of deser
tion the immigration company to con
fiscate the money. As yet no laborers
have come in under this new agree
ment. The companies hope by exacting
the monetary bond to lessen the deser
tions, and another way will be to re
cruit laborers from new districts, men
who have never been to the Islands be
fore. This will necessitate the com-
panies going to tne nonnern uisincus
or men. The cry from all the planta
tions is that they are short of labor,
and two new plantations have just
een started which will call for a largo
number of laborers.
With regard to the ill-treatment of
aborers by lunas something certainly
should be done to protect these people,
as they come here with the guarantee
rom the employer that they will have
the full and equal protection of the
aws of the Hawaiian Islands, and no
where can it be found on the statutes
hat the laborers have to lie kicked and
cuffed around by a lot of ignorant
unas.
Will (Jive a Ball.
Company 1), N. G. II., had a large
nd enthusiastic business meeting last
evening. Among tne matters uiscusseu
was tnat 01 a ban. Lompieie arrange
- 1 . i
ments were perfected. The function
will take place on I-riday evening,
October 21, in the Armory. I lckets
will be entrusted to a special commit
tee which will have discretion in the
selection of guests. The drill shed will
be beautifully decorated and lighted,
refreshments will be served and there
will be music by a large orchestra.
Hilo Will Advertise.
The Hilo Chamber of Commerce has
decided to prepare several articles on
the resources of its district for publica
tion in the Hawaiian edition oi tun
set," the advertising periodical of the
Southern Pacific Railway Co. In this
matter the people of the Rainy City
have moved ahead of Honolulu. Com
missioner or Agriculture uyron u.
Clark is still waiting for local articles
0:1 resources, scenery, etc.
Theosophists.
The Aloha Branch of the Theosophi-
cal Society has moved from the Wo
man's Exchange on Merchant street to
the large building at the corner of
Fort and Queen. A meeting will be
held this evening, when Mr. Marques
will speak to the class on the "Human
Aura." On Saturday evening the be
ginners class will have a lesson from
the "Secret Doctrine."
Honolulu Water Works.
The Cabinet continued yesterday
morning the consideration of plans for
public improvements. It was voted to
use at once $60,000 for the Kalihi
pumping plant and to purchase pipe for
the extension of the city water system,
at a cost of $65,000. There was some
talk on the proposed system of sewer
age for the city. It Is not likely that
sewerage plans will get started before
next year.
Charles Doing Well.
"Charlie" Williams, formerly chief
engineer at the Ice Works here, is now
manager for the large plant of the
Union Company at Redlands, Calif.
The establishment there turns out 300
tons of ice daily. It had a banner
month in June last when shipments to
the extent of ninety-two cars were
made. Mr. Williams has the respon
sibility and salary of a good position,
having fifteen men in his corps. It Is
a good ice town, as the temperature
during the pasl summer was several
times 112 above zero.
FOR MISS ROSE.
Hawaiian Carnival Queen to Re
ceive Attention.
Miss Anna Rose, the Hilo younfj
lady who has gone to the States to bo
Queen of a Carnival at Topeka, Kas.,
is to receive a great deal of attention.
The San Francisco Call of the 9th inst.,
says:
A committee of ladies and gentle
men from Topeka will com to San
Francisco to meet Miss Rose, who will
arrive on the steamer Alameda about
the 21st inst.
Colonel Funston of the Kansas regi
ment yesterday received a telegram
from Governor Leedy relative to Miss
Rose's reception. It is as follows:
TOPEKA (Kan.), Sept. 9, 1898.
Colonel Frederick Funston: The Gov
ernor and State officials would be
greatly pleased to have you co-operate
with the Karnival Knights in their
reception to Miss Anna Rose, Queen
of Karnival, upon her arrival from Ho
nolulu about September 21.
A. P. SHREVE,
Chief Clerk Executive Department.
A letter from the chairman of tho
carnival committee, C. K. Holiday, a
director for the Santa Fe Railroad, has
also been received by Colonel Funston.
Holiday asks that the Colonel, his
staff, the band and the Topeka com
pany, together with the Topeka. com
mittee, meet Miss Rose on her arrival
and offer her the greetings and honor
due her station. Mayor Phelan lias
also been asked to welcome Queen
Anna in behalf of the people of San
Francisco and "the committee, which
will leave Topeka on the 15th, has
been instructed to see to it that the
Honolulu lady be properly introduced
into and entertained by San Francisco
society."
Lieut. SafTbrJ.
It is stated in one of the despatches
that Lieut. W. E. Safford, who was an
officer of the Bennington, while she
was in this port last year, may be at
tached to the staff of the Peace Com
missioners who are about to meet in
Paris. He has commanded one of the
transports during he war. His knowl
edge of the Spanish language, and his
travels in South American states will
make him a desirable attache of the
Commissioners.
Stock Exchange.
Five shares of Ewa sold on 'Change
yesterday at $235, a drop of five points.
Bids for I. I. S. N. Co. at $125 and
Wilder S. S. Co. at $105 found no sel
lers. No sales between boards were re
ported. .111 iiannj
Royal makes the food pure, "
wholesome and deiicioon.
mm
Khtir. nWji
Absolutely Puro
ova. hakiwi poof j ro.. vo"..
1
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