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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, December 24, 1898, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-12-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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jJ !in I Pi i fir
K.tnbtltlied July J, 1SMJ.
EOL. XXVIII., NO. 5111
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, SATURDAY, DECEMBER, 21, 1888.
PKICE FIVE GENTS.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
J. Q. WOOD.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. Office: Comer King and
Batbel Streets.
DR. C. B. HIGH.
DENTIST. PHILADELPHIA DENT-
al College 1892. Masonic Temple.
Telephone 318.
DR. A. C. WALJ. DR. 0. E. WALL
DENTISTS OFFICE HOURS: 8 A.E
to 4 p. m. Love Building, Fort
Street.
M. E. GROSSMAN, D.D.S.
DENTIST 38 HOTEL STREET. Ho
nolulu. Office Hours: 9 a. m. to
4 p. m.
DR. A. J. DERBY,
DEiNTIST CORNER FORT AND
Hotel Streets.. Mott-Smith Block.
Telephones: Office. 615; Residence.
789. Hours: 9 to 4.
GEO. H. HUDDY, D.D.S.
DENTIST FORT STREET, OPPO
SING Catholic Mission. Hours:
From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. F. E. CLARK.
DENTIST PROGRESS BLOCK. COR-
ner Beretanla and Fort Streets.
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
OFFICE No. ' 537 KING STREET,
near Punchbowl. Hours: 8:00 to
9:00; 2:00 to 5:00; 6:00 to 7:00.
Telephone No. 448.
DR. WALTER HOFFMAHH.
CORNER BERETANIA AND PUNCH-
bowl Streets. Office Hours: 8 to
10 a. m.; 1 to 3 p. m.; 7 to 8 p. in.
Sundays: 8 to 10 a. m. Telephone
510. P. O. Box 501.
T. B. CLAPHAM.
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN
tist. Office: Hotel Stables. Calls,
day or night, promptly answered.
Specialties: Obstetrics and Lame
ness. Lorrin A. Thurston. Alfred W. Carter.
THURSTON & GARTER.
A ttor neys-at-Law.
next to Post Office.
Merchant Street
W. C. Achi. Enoch Johnson.
ACHI & JOHHSOII.
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS
AT LAW. Office No. 10 West King
Street. Telephone 8S4.
T. McCAIITS STEWART.
(Formerly of the New York Bar.)
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
Law, Spreckels Building, Room 5.
305 Fort Street, Honolulu.
CATHCART & PARKE.
ATTORNEYS AT
manu Street.
LAW. 13 KAAHU-
CHAS. F. PETERSON.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. 15 Kaahumanu Street.
LYLE A. DICKEY.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. King and Bethel Streets.
Telephone S06. P. O. Box 7S5.
J. M. KANEAKUA.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
Law. Office: In the Occidental
Hotel, corner of King and Alakea
Streets, Honolulu.
CHARLES CLARK.
ATTORNEY AT LAW- 121 MER
chant 6treet. Honolulu Hale. Tel
ephone 345. Up Stairs.
0. G. TRAPHAGEN.
ARCHITECT 223 MERCHANT ST.,
Between Fort and Alakea. Tele
phone 734. Honolulu, H. I.
1 : M : ill
111 : I
Will buy for you
or
In this market or abroad.
GEORGE R. CARTER. Treasurer.
Office In rear of Bank of Hawaii. Ltd.
GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, 60c.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMEN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
Makea a specialty of ancient Hawai
ian Curios, and also carries the best
assortment of modern Hawaiian work
to be found in Honolulu, including
Mats, Fans, Leis, Bamboo, Lauhala
and Cocoanut Hats, Etc., Etc. Tel. 659.
DR. MILAN SOULE.
LATE S. S. AUSTRALIA HAS RE-
sumea practice at in. is. corner
Sutter and Kearney streets, San
Francisco.
DRESSMAKERS.
MISS FREIBURG KNOKE. DRESS-
making parlors, corner School and
Nuuanu streets.
C. S. RICHARDSON.
FUJJLIU STENOGRAPHER AND
Typewriter. Expert work at low
est prices. Telephone 313, with II.
Waterhouse & Co., Queen street.
MORRIS K. KE0H0KAL0LE,
LOUIS K. M'GREW.
UNITED STATES CUSTOM HOUSE
Brokers, Accountants, Searchers of
Titles and General Business
Agents. Office: No. 15 Kaahu-
manu street, Honolulu. Formerly
A. Rosa's Office. Telephone 520.
A. J. CAMPBELL.
STOCK AND BOND BROKER. OF
fice Queen street, opposite Union
Feed Co.
M. W. M'CHESNEY & SONS.
Wholesale Grocers and Dealers in Leather and
Shoe Findings.
Agents Honolulu Soap Works Company
Honolulu and Tannery.
P. SILVA
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG-
ments to Instruments, District of
Kona, Oahu. At W. C. Achi's office.
King street, near Nuuanu.
Robert Lewers. F. J. Lowrey. C. M. Cooke
LEWERS & COOKE.
m porters and Dealers In Lumber and
Building Materials. Office,
414 Fort St.
111 FORT STREET.
Telephone, 240 : : P. O. Box, 89.
0
Goodhue Steel
Windmills
REDUCED IN PRICE TO
8 Ft., $30; 10 Ft. $40. 1
H. E. WALKER
Masonic Temple Block.
Stock
8J "t i
BUM
LEWIS & CO.
Mie and Hell Gu
HE FACT
Historical
Sketch of Hawaii's
War Attitnfle.
3 RECORD AS IT WAS MADE
Early
Dole
Abandonment of Neutrality
Government Was Keen to
Assist United States.
The existence of the treaty of annexa
tion between the United States and Ha
waii, fully executed on the iart of Ha
waii but unexecuted and in abeyance on
the part of the United States, caused
much discussion in President Dole's Cab
inet as to the relations of the two coun
tries in the event of a Spanish-American
war.
So
Ions? as Congress had not declared
the discussion was tentative and
war.
speculative. The press of the city paid
slight attention to the matter.
On the 14th of April, eleven days before
Congress declared war against Spain
President Dole addressed to Mr. I M
Hatch, Hawaiian Minister in Washington
a letter on this subject, of which the fol
lowing is a portion:
'Honolulu. II. I., 14th April. IS!.
"Dear Mr. Hatch:
'In relation to the prospect of war be
tween the United States and Spain, this
Government would be pleased to receive
suggestions from the Washington Gov
ernment in regard to our attitude toward
the United States and Spain in case of
war."
This letter was followed by another,
dated April 30th, seven days before news
of the declaration of war was received in
this place. The following is an extract
from it:
"Honolulu, 30th April. 1SJS.
"Dear Mr. Hatch:
"We, of course, are deeply interested in
the fact of war existing between the U.
S. and Spain. Would be glad to aid the
authorities of the U. S. in some way. Jf
you see your way to it, 1 should be glad
to have you convey to the President my
sympathy for him in the serious respon
sibilities which the Spanish question has
placed upon him."
On the 7th day of May news of the
actual" declaration of Avar by Congress on
the 2.1th of April, was received by the
steamer Rio de Janeiro. Up to this time,
although it was generally believed that
war was inevitable, the attitude of Ha
waii towards the belligerents was care
fully discussed by President Dole and his
Cabinet.
The situation was embarrassing, in this
respect, that the Republic of Hawaii had
acted promptly in ratifying the treaty of
annexation with the United States, and
Congress, either by the action of the Sen
ate alone, or by the joint action of both
Houses, could, in no longer a period of
time than was required to record the
votes, make Hawaii a part of the United
States.
The question of declaring neutrality, or
abandoning it in favor of an open alli
ance with the United States, was consid
ered by the Government, but as notice of
the declaration of war was not received
until "May 7th, no action could be taken.
One of the important features of the dis
cussion was, whether or not an alliance
with the United States would not embar
rass that country in some way. The
prudent course to pursue was to wait
until President McKinley had made some
suggestions in reply to President Dole's
letter of April 14th.
The Bulletin, a local annexation journ
al, published on tne Cth of May, four
days before neutrality was abandoned,
interviews with leading citizens on the
question of neutrality. The majority of
the citizens interviewed were "annexa
tionists" and loyal Americans. These in
terviews are republished herein. Although
the Government had been discussing for
some days the matter or abandoning neu
trality, and President Dole was waiting
for some response from the Government
in Washington to his letter addressed to
Mr. Hatch on the 11th of April, the pop
ular feeling among "annexationists" was
that the Government should re
main neutral. In no case, how
ever, did the annexationists, either
as Individuals or as a party, nor
did any body of American citizens in any
manner whatsoever suggest or urge, the
Government to abandon neutrality up to
the time news of the declaration of war
was received on May th. And after that
time until the Government sent, on the
10th of May. three days later, the letter
and despatch offering an alliance with
the United States, neither did the annex
ation organization, or any persons repre
senting that body, nor, did any Ameri
can permanently residing here, take
enough "interest in the matter of aban
doning neutrality to suggest or urge the
Government to abandon it. The American
Minister, Mr. Sewall, was in favor of
abandoning-it.
At this time the draft of a law, pre
pared by the representatives of the Re
public in ashmgton. and approved by
high officials of the American Govern
ment, was received by President Dole.
This law, if enacted by the Hawaiian leg
islature, would have given President Mc
Kinley the authority to raise the Ameri
can Hag on these lsianas, ana use mem
for war purposes. President Dole and his
Cabinet felt that if it was enacted it
would be inoperative for several reasons.
and might delay annexation mdehnitely.
They also discovered on approaching
members of the Legislature that the pro
posed law could not be passed, although
it would be a practical abandonment ct
neutrality, in the event or war. Citizens
nd political bodies took so little Interest
n the matter mat tne press pain n nine
mention. The Bulletin, an "annexation-'
journal, declared that the proposition in
volved in the law. If it eminated from
Washington, should have "been brought
here (to these Islands) by a strong
squadron that would stay Jy it." It
censured the Hawaiian representatives in
Washington for their action in "promot
ing a scheme of initiative on the part of
this Government." And it asked: "How
dare this helpless and defenseless little
ONLY
REY. IR. USBORNE 18 BACK.
4- -f
The Rev. John Usborne. who
the staff of the Bishop of Honolulu and who in a few months cut awav
from the Rt. Rev. Alfred and started St. Clement's Mission in Punahou,
is again in Honolulu. He is back to the Islands after attending the Rpis
copal Congress of the United States at Washington, D. C. The Rev.
Mr. Usborne is a man of education, training and has a large amount of
indopendence, most likely commingled with a degree of combativeness.
With it all he is a sturdy churchman and puts the work of his life as
a clergyman ahead of any other consideration. When Rev. Mr. Us
borne fell out with the Bishop it was at once known that there had been
a difference. Rev. Mr. Usborne issued several letters here and in the
United States and further proceeded without delay to erect a. Mission
Church in the Punahou district. Services have been held regularly in
the pretty little miniature of a cathedral. There is always a fair sized
congregation and the music is good. The Bishop of Honolulu has issued
u number of proclamations re Rev. Mr. Usborne and the Punahou
church. These have been to the effect that Rev. Mr. Usborne had gone
far beyond the bounds of church regulations in rising in revolt and that
the Chapel was irregular in every way on account, as alleged, of being
on ground not owned by the Anglican Church in Hawaii, through its
trustees.
In a short time now, the Rev. Mr. Usborne will make to the people
here a complete statement of his relations with the Bishop of Honolulu
and of the trip to the United States. Rev. Mr. Usborne said yesterday
that the American House of Bishops at Washington had treated him
most cordially. He was given a chair in the Congress and had access
to all the committees of the gathering. In one way and another he
placed before the ruling dignitaries the story of the church in these
Islands and after making known his desires received every encourage
ment. Rev. Mr. Usborne is quite confident concerning the outcome of
the purposes of his trip to the States, as well as the final result In the
differences with the Bishop.
It is not in the very highest regard (officially) that Alfred Honolu
lu is held by the Rev. Mr. Usborne. The Rector of St. Clement's speaks
plainly respectfully, but clearly. He declares earnestly that Bishop
Willis has no color of authority for ruling the church in Hawaii. The
Rev. Mr. Usborne asserts that no one should pay the slightest atten
tion to Alfred Honolulu in an official way. The Rector says the Bishop
simply assumes power that he does not at all possess. Rev. Mr. " Us
borne continues that Alfred Honolulu, in the exercise of rule, Is exact
ly like a man who, as an outsider, would walk up to a military com
pany and begin issuing orders and expect obedience. The Bishop, says
Rev. Mr. Usborne, has been accepted as supreme here for mo many
years that he has in a way established himself, but that when the
situation and the facts are known, as they are soon to be presented, the
Bishop will be utterly disregarded.
4-
It was only briefly that Rev. Mr. Usborne would speak of the new
quarrel between the First and Second Congregations of St. Andrew's
Cathedral. He said that the great mistake made was in having a con
tention over the property. He points out that in a religious affair prop
erty should be the last thing to be thought of by the disputants or oth
ers interested. Property, in church 'work, should be a minor matter.
The duties imposed upon those of the faith to spread the Gospel should
take first place.
country now try to force the hands of
that great nation?" "This language used
and published by the Bulletin, an annex
ation journal, on the day before and the
day neutrality was abandoned by the
Government, is reprinted as an appendix
to this historical sketch.
The Star, another journal representing
the annexation political party, could say
no more on the subject than these woras,
used on May Gth: "There is a great deal
or nonsense talked about neutrality, it
is absolutely impossible for the Govern
ment to take cognizance until official in
formation arrives."
The Advertiser advocated the mainten
ance 01 neutrality on the ground ot in
ternational obligations, and for the fur
ther reason that Hawaii had already put
herself completely at the disposal of the
nited States, by ratifying the treaty of
annexation. The editor of the Advertiser
privately urged the Government to pass
the law which Mr. Hatch and Mr. Thurs
ton had recommended, giving President
McKinley the power to use the Islands
for war purposes, under a protectorate.
The language used was do everything
that the Government at Washington
wishes or asks you to do."
The views of the Advertiser re
garding neutrality were entirely dis
sented from by President Dole, in
private, and not assented to by any
member of the Government. As this jour
nal did not. ask for, ar.d never had any
confidential relations with the Govern
ment It expressed its own views without
any reference to Government opinion.
The notice of actual war was received
at this place on May 7th. On May loth,
three days later, and by the very next
outgoing steamer, President Dole, ad
dressed to Mr. Hatch the following let
ter:
Honolulu, May 10th, 1MS.
Dear Mr. Hatch:
By this mail a telegram will be sent
you in regard to a prolfer ot our support
to the American Government in the ex-
sting hostilities with Spain.
I have as yet received no reply to ray
letter of April 11th expressing a desire to
have suggestions from the American Gov
ernment as to our attitude in the pending
hostilities.
Under the circumstances we feel at a
loss as to the course we should pursue.
While we have no thought of proclaim
ing a state of neutrality, we recognize
he possibility that an outspoken adher
ence to the fortunes or the u. fc. mignt
for the time being be an embarrassment
to that country in some way or other.
aa for instance, causing an increase 01
its war responsibilities.
We feel that it is desirable for this Gov
ernment to follow a definite and consist
ent course under the circumstances, and
that there should be no unnecessary de
lay in the matter.
We have therefore decided to forward
the telegram mentioned. Instructing you
to confer with the President of the U. S.
and ascertain if possible what action he
would like to have us take, and If he ex
presses a definite desire, looking to a
treaty of alliance, you are authorized to
negotiate such treaty.
Of course the assistance which this
Goernment can afford to the U. S. under
the circumstances may be slight, yet it
is of a character that may be important.
The obvious Items would be: asylum for
American armed, ships and prizes in our
ports, privilege of refitting and provis
ioning armed ships and prizes, privilege
of maintaining a coal supply on shore and
the privilege of recruiting soldiers and
sailors in our territory.
Beside the guarantees of protection on
the part of the U. S. in such a treaty, T
have no suggestion to make as at present
advised. Verv sincerely,
(Sig.) SANFORD B. DOLE.
President Dole did not even wait for
any reply to his letter addressed to Mr.
Hatch en x'vpril lith asking him to obtain
suggestions from President McKinley as
to the attitude that Hawaii should take.
While the two representative journals of
the annexation political parties had eith
er remained indifferent, or as it was in
the case of the Bulletin, had declared
against any alliance with the United
States, unless it was backed up by the
presence of a "strong squadron," and the
Advertiser had differed with the Govern
ment in its view of the matter, the Gov
ernment acted with such celerity that
only three days after the news of the
declaration of war was received it for
warded by the first outgoing steamer, an
offer of alliance.
On the ISth of May, 1S9S, Mr. F. M.
Hatch. Minister in Washington, sent the
following dispatch to the Foreign Office
of Hawaii:
4- -f
came down from Canada, tn wrvo nn
"The President appreciates highly the
offer of Hawaiian Government. Will
communicate wishes as circumstances
arise."
President McKinley, in response to
President Dole's request for suggestions
regarding neutrality, contained in his
letter of April 14th, made no reply immed
iately to Mr. Hatch. The request was too
promptly made, and premature.
President McKinley finally accepted the
offer or alliance, without submitting It
to the Senate, and within a short time
American troops en route to Manila were
landed here.
Hero the historical sketch closes.
On the 12th of August, upon the occa
sion of the formal transfer of these
Islands to the United States, Mr. Harold
M. Sewall, the American Minister charged
with the duty of assisting Admiral Jos.
X. Miller in conducting the ceremony,
took occasion in his capacity as Minister,
to deliver an address on that occasion.
He addressed the audience as "Fellow
Countrymen," and alluded to their ac
tion in the abandonment of neutrality as
follows: "You refused to listen to
the suggestions of the selfish and timid,
and at. your peril, offered up all that these
Islands had to offer as a sacrifice on the
altar of devotion to a country you had
no right to call your own." These re
marks were regarded by many as ill
timed, impertinent, and not in accord
ance with the facts.
Before this event Mr. Sewall announced
himself as a candidate for the highest
office in the territory, whatever it might
be called. He was supported by a com
mittee of the Annexation party, without
any reference of the matter to the indi
vidual members of the party. President
McKinley, however, continued President
Dole in office until Congress should pass
an organic law for the government of
the Islands.
After this appointment was made, Mr.
Sewall announced himself as a candidate
for the office of Governor, as soon as
Congress should create the office.
The Bulletin, a local journal, became at
once his recognized mouthpiece. It was
the same journal that had denounced the
proposition to allow President McKinley
to use these Islands for war purposes, at
the moment when President Dole had of
fered an alliance to the United States.
That journal, ignoring its pronounced
stand against the abandonment of neu
trality on May 10th, began a campaign
of abuse against President Dole for not
having abondoned neutrality at once, al
though it was done three days after the
receipt of the news declaring war. The
action of the Government, the letters of
President Dole, were readily accessible.
But either of its own motion, or more
probably inspired by its candidate, Mr.
Sewall, it has commented upon President
Dole's course as one that was "cowardly,"
"cringing," "shifting," "a neutrality
record of cowardice and treason."
In the foregoing sketch the writer has
relied upon documentary evidence to the
largest extent, in order to avoid contro
versies regarding opinions spoken only,
and liable to be misrepresented or for
gotten. Any comment on the events is
carefully avoided. It is intended to be
a presentation mainly of facts which are
proved by documents or personal knowl
edge. In order to show the attitude of an
nexationists lure on the question of
neutrality, the interviews published on
May Cth are now republished. These do
not contain a single declaration in favor
of abandoning neutrality:
QUESTION OF NEUTRALITY. SYM
POSIUM OF VIEWS BY PROMINENT
BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL.
MEN. JUDGE HART WE EE DEEMS
NOTICE OF NEUTRALITY WOULD
BE WISE HE QUOTES THE SPAN
ISH TREATY WITH HAWAII.
A representative of the Evening Bulle-
(Continued on Page Two.)
ii
Makes the food more delicious and wholesome
fOVAL
FOR MORE WHARF
(taller ; of Commerce
Cabinet.
Case to
A .. SECOND DREDGER WANTED
Lengthening of Three Wharves Ad
vocatedGovernment Control.
To Relieve Pressure.
There was a good attendance for tho
Chamber of Commerce meetinir held vrs.
terday to hear the report of the commit
tee appointed to draft a series of harbor
improvement recommendations for the
consideration of tho Government. The
document was produced at onco and was
a paper in regular business style. In Its
entirety it cannot he published till it has
reached Capt. Kins. Minister of tlm In
terior. These are the noints:
That Nuuanu wharf be extendi 200 fet
into the harbor.
That Sorenson wharf bo extendi ton
feet into the harbor.
That Kinau wharf be extended 30 feet.
That dredglntr for a new slm near 1m.
Clflc Mail dock bo continued.
That a second dredger bo Installed iv-
the Government at once.
That the Government control nil
wharves.
That the Government brimr to a deter
mination so soon as practicable all letrnl
actions against nrivate narties In whioh
water front land is Involved.
That the Government build wharvra at
Limekiln point.
There was not a great deal of discussion
on the report. All recognized that it had
been prepared most carefully and that its
provisions were calculated to relieve the
ressure upon the harbor in the best vav
that can be devised at present. The re
port was adopted unanimously. It will
be sent to the Government today. There
was some expectation that attention.
would be called to the private w liar faro
of Allen & Robinson, but it was deemed
wise to omit any suggestion on individual
holdings if such suggestion would be In.
the line of causing litigation. The plan
that has been adopted Is very like on
thaat was recommended by CaDt. Klnsr.,
the minister of the Interior, some months
ago. For that reason it is believed all tho
recommendations will meet with the ap
proval of the Cabinet. There has been
talk for some time that a second dredger
was required. The one in use at present
is often called from harbor enlargement
work to deepen anchorage that fills front
the Nuuanu stream and from sand drift
ing. It is realized that (here must be
another dredger Here in time anyhow to
make the Pearl Harbor channel avail
able. Said one of the shipping men after the.
meeting yesterday: "If the Government
will do at once what is recommended, we
can get along fairly well during the ap
proaching sugar season. To lengthen the
wharves referred to should be the work,
of but a few weeks. This will greatly re
lieve the pressure. As it is now the har
bor is simply jammed like a railroad
yard in a wheat country during the busy
season. Unless operations are inaugu
rated without delay and pushed to a fin
ishing point, there will be great delay
and enormous loss to all the plantations
and the whole shipping interest. We have
purposely avoided recommendations that
would in any way make matters complex.
The course pointed -out is a simple and
easy one and we have a firm belief that
it will be followed. The Government has.
the men and the money and it cannot be
insensible to the needs of the shipping
and sugar interests, which form tho
backbone of the country."
KINAU ARRIVAL.
The Roderick Dhu reached Hilo last
Sunday, sixteen days from San Francisco.
J. R. Wilson and family were aboard.
The schooner John G. North, is "off
and on" at Honoipu, weather being too
rough for anchorage.
Andrew Moore telephoned to Kawalahae
that he was seeing at Paauhau the
roughest weather he had ever known
there. The landing lower works had
been carried away and the rest of the
structure was in danger.
The pleasure yacht Josephine, fifty
three days from San Diego, is at Hilo.
It is about seventeen tons burthen.
The S. S. Maui will be here at noon.
She carries lO.WiO bags of Paauhau sugar,
CSO Kukalau, SO head of cattle for Hono
lulu. 4" head for Molokal settlement.
The weather was ho rough at Iahaina
that the Mauna Loa transferred her
freight to the Kauai, but Capt. Clarke
and Purser Beckley are proud of the
fact that the Kinau's boats went in
through the breakers and brought off
everybody safely.
The Claudine will be here early this
morning. She had a large amount of the
roughest sort of weather, could not work
at Kahului, where the sailing vessels at
anchor -were in danger of being swept
ashore.
Capt. Lydig is much struck with the
fertility and beauty of the Island of Ha
waii. He believes it capable of becoming
highly productive.
Jas. Thompson, clerk of court, is horn
from I.ahaina court just in time for
Christmas fun.
Sailor Drowned.
A native sailor of the Iwalani crew lost
his life at Kilauea landing, Kauai, on
Thursday morning. Rough weather. One
of the sugar boats capsized. The body
had not been found when the W. G. Hall
left.
POWDER CO., NEW YORK.
J
- t J.I.
Ai r
i r
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