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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, December 31, 1898, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1898-12-31/ed-1/seq-1/

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M.I IB
Ke.t4bllslif-Hl July 'J, 15i.
OL. XXVIII., NO. 5116
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, SATURDAY, DECEMI5ER, 31, 1888.
PIUCE FIVE CENTS.
If ill iOI Ji MlA
PROFESSIONAL CARDS,
J. Q. WOOD.
ATTORNEY Y AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. Office: Corner King and
Bethel Streets.
DR. C. B. HIGH.
DENTIST. PHILADELPHIA DENT
1 College 1892. Masonic Temple.
Telephone 318.
3R. A. C. WALL DR. 0. E. VALL
DENTISTS OFFICE HOURS: 8 A. tt
to 4 p. m. Lovo Building, Fort
Street.
M. E. GROSSMAN, D.D.S.
DENTIST 98 HOTEL STREET, Ho
nolulu. Office Hours: 9 a. m. to
4 p. m.
DR. A. J. DERBY.
DENTISTCORNER FORT AND
Hotel Streets., Mott-Smlth Block.
Telephones: Office, 615; Residence,
789. Hours: 9 to 4.
GEO. H. HUDDY, D.D.S.
DENTIST FORT STREET, OPPO
ite Catholic Mission. Hours:
From 9 a. m. to 4 p.m.
DR. F. E. CLARK.
DENTIST PROGRESS BLOCK, COR
ner Beretania and Fort Streets.
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
OFFICE No. 537 KING STREET,
near Punchbowl. Hours: 8:00 to
9:00; 2:00 to 5:00; 6:00 to 7:00.
Telephone No. 448.
, DiUWALTEB H0FFMAHH.
CORNER BERETANIA AND PUNCH-
bowl Streets. Office Hours: 8 to
10 a. in.; 1 to 3 p. m.; 7 to 8 p. m.
Sundays: 8 to 10 a. m. Telephone
510. P. O. Box 501.
T. B. CLAPHAM.
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN
tist. Office: Hotel Stables. Calls,
day or night, promptly answered.
Specialties: Obstetrics and Lame
ness. Lorrin A. Thurston. Alfred W. Carter.
THURSTON & CARTER.
Attorneys-at-Law. Merchant Street
next to Post Office.
W. C. Achl.
Enoch Johnson.
AGHI & JOHNSON.
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS
AT LAW. Office No. 10 West King
Street. Telephone 8S4.
T. McCAHTS STEWART.
(Formerly of the New York Bar.)
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
Law, Spreckels Building, Room 5,
305 Fort Street, Honolulu.
CATHCART & PARKE.
ATTORNEY'S AT LAW. 13 KAAHU
manu Street.
CHAS. F. PETERSON.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. 15 Kaahumanu Street.
LYLE A. DICKEY.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. King and Bethel Streets.
Telephone 806. P. O. Box 786.
J. M. KANEAKUA.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
Law. Office: In the Occidental
Hotel, corner of King and Alakea
Streets, Honolulu.
CHARLES CLARK.
ATTORNEY AT LAW 121 MER
eha.nt Street. Honolulu Hale. Tel
ephone 345. Up Stairs.
0. G. TRAPHAGEN.
ARCHITECT 223 MERCHANT ST.,
Between Fort and Alakea. Tele
phone 731. Honolulu, H. I.
HAWAIIAN : 111 : In
mm : ii.
Will buy for you
-ANY-
Stock or Bond
In this market or abroad.
GEORGE R. CARTER. Treasurer.
Office in rear of Bank of Hawaii. Lti.
! GUIDE
THROUGH .
HAWAII.
PRICE, 6Qc.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMEN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
Makes a specialty of ancient Hawai
ian Curios, and also carries the best
assortment of modern Hawaiian work
to be found in Honolulu, including
Mats, Fans, Leis, Bamboo, Lauhala
and Cocoanut Hats, Etc., Etc. Tel. 659.
DR. MILAN SOULE.
LATE S. S. AUSTRALIA HAS RE
e umed practice at N. E. corner
Sutter and Kearney streets, San
Francisco. f
DRESSMAKERS.
MISS FREIBURG KNOKE, DRESS
making parlors, corner School and
Nuuanu streets.
C. S. RICHARDSON.
J?UUIia 4STJ3NOGRAPITRR ANT)
' "Typewriter.'- Expert "work "at low
est prices. . Telephone 313, with II.
Waterhouse & Co., Queen street.
MORRIS K. KE0H0KAL0LE,
LOUIS K. M'GREW.
UNITED STATES CUSTOM HOUSE
Brokers, Accountants, Searchers of
Titles and General Business
Agents. Office: No. 15 Kaahu
manu street, Honolulu. Formerly
A. Rosa's Office. Telephone 520.
A. J. CAMPBELL.
STOCK AND BOND BROKER. OF
fice Queen street, opposite Union
Feed Co.
M. W. M'CHESNEY & SONS.
Wholesale Grocers and Dealers In Leather and
Shoe Findings.
Agents Honolulu Soap Works Company
Honolulu and Tannery.
P. SILVA.
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG
ments to Instruments, District of
Kona, Oahu. At W. C. Achl's office.
King street, near Nuuanu.
Robert Lcwers. F. J. Lowrey. G. M. Cookt
LEWERS & COOKE. .
mporters and Dealers In Lumber and
Building Materials. Office,
414 Fort St.
LEWIS & CO.
R
111 FORT STREET.
Telephone, 240 : : P. O. Box, 8f.
Oil! OF
Goodhue Steel
Windmills
REDUCED IN PRICE TO
8 Ft., $30; 10 Ft. $40.
H. E. WALKER
Masonic Temple Block.
illmnTn
none i
niixiufss
JAS.R.RENTON
Manager of the Hamate Mill
Company Bead.
HIS ILLNESS A BRIEF ONE
One of the Prominent Kamaainas
of Hawaii Nel-Young In
Years.
James Robert E-enton, manager of
Hamakua Mill, Hawaii, died at that
place on Tuesday morning" last at 5
o'clock. The said news reached Hono
lulu by the Inter- Island Company's
steamer Mauna Loa yesterday morning.
The intelligence had been telephoned
from Hamakua Mill to Kailua. Word
was received -in Honolulu by Theo. H.
Davies & Co., Tom May and others, and
letter came to Manager Geo. Itenton,
of Ewa plantation, a brother of de
ceased.
Announcement of this death comes
as a genuine shock for the reason that
exactly a week prior to his demise, Jas.
R. Renton left this city for his Hawaii
home and was in excellent health in
every way and in his customary good
spirits. He had been visiting here
with friends a'nd relatives for a fort
night. The illness of Mr. Renton was of but
a few days duration and its nature is
not positively known. Several of the
passengers by the Mauna Loa said that
they heard an attack of apoplexy
brought on the end. Another report
was that there was an old intestinal
trouble. The latter is probably correct.
James Robert Renton was one of the
best known residents of the group and
was p:nwm-eTtnstitjoy all Tor Lis In
tegrity and his many manly qualities.
Those who were close to him by kin
ship or association will long and sin
cerely mourn his taking off in the Drime
of life. He had already made a success
which was due entirely to his own in
dustry and intelligence. I)v the nla.n-
tatioa men he was considered one of
the . -ablest managers in the business
and those in his employ and those do
ing business with him always spoke of
him with appreciation of his fairness
and sense of justice and right. He was
a Mason of the thirty-second degree.
Deep sorrow came into the life of
Jas. It. Renton just a year ago to a
week. His wife had gone abroad on a
trip for the benefit of her failing health.
As the months sped by tidings of her
condition became alarming and the
husband crossed 2,000 miles of the Pa
cific, the American continent and the
Atlantic ocean to be at the bedside of
his ailing loved one. Two days after
Mr. Renton reached his wife in Kn?.
land, she died. He felt the loss witha
keenness that was apparent and pain-
rui.
As a boy Mr. Renton attended school
in Honolulu. He was said tn -haw Iipah
the brightest scholar of his day in the
academy conducted by Mr. A. T. Atkin
son in the years agone. As a lad de
ceased, with his continuous good
numor, was a general favorite. James
tioDert uenton was CO years of am on
July 4 last. He had been manager for
tne Hamakua . Mill Co. for sixteen
years. Before that he had been on the
cane estates of his father in Kohala,
wmcft place may be called the family
home. Such was the nonularitv of de
cedent in Kohala district, that all holi-
uay celebrations announced were post
poned indefinitely on the fact of his
death becoming public." The remains
were Drought to Kohala for interment.
Mr. Ronton was a true friend of the
Hawaiians. He had strong sympathies
for the Islanders and gave all within
reach practical assistance. He was not
a son of the country. He was born in
Australia and brought here when a
small child.
AGUINALDO'S TROUBLE.
MANILA. Dec. 23. The refusal of
Aguinaldo to recognize the rank of the
poorer class of rebel officers has led
to serious trouble. Many of the troops
have deserted the banner of Aguinal
do, taking their arms and equipments.
They have attacked several towns and
murdered the native officials. The lat
ter, in many instances, made them
selves very unpopular with the troops
by the abuse of their positions, and
the soldiers were seeking revenge.
IN SAMOA.
LONDON. Dec. ' 2 L The Washington
Government, according to a dispatch
from Auckland has instructed the
United States Consul at Apia, Samoa,
to act with great vigilance and not to
entrust his duties to his British and
German colleagues. It appears the
German agent has taken advantage of
his colleagues' confidence to land guns
MR
and munitions ol war. without their
k a now lodge anil also to obtain import
ant advantages for German firms.
GOING OUTSIDE MANILA.
NEW YORK, Dec. 23. A Sun's
Washington special says: Secretary
Alger today sent orders by cable to
Mjor-General Otis at Manila to send
a force of United States troops to Ilo
ilo, the capital and principal port of
the Island of Panay. This action is
first taken by the Administration tow
ard extending its authority over the
Philippines beyond the city, harbor
and bay of Manila, and is important
as an indication of the intention of the
Government to place the archipelago
under American control sooner than
was originally intended.
Cs 5'
THE YOUNGER HERO.
The short war with Spain
added to the American list of
naval heroes two names that
will hold place on the scroll
pretty well to the end of time.
The first is that of Admiral
George Dewey. For him let all
noises loudiy peal. He opened
the war, he closed the war, he
VI-
LIEUT.. R. U. HOBSQN, .
U. S.N.
never missed a meal. Since war
fare on the water began no man
has succeeded in gaining for his
record such an achievement as
has been put to the credit of
Admiral Dewey for the demoli
tion of the Spanish tleet at Ma
nila May 1.
The second hero is Lieut.
Richmond Pearson Hobson, who
is aboard the S. S. Gaelic, en
route to Manila to undertake the
floating of Spanish ships sunk
by Dewey. Lieut. Hobson was
in the construction department.
He was before Santiago on
special duty while Cervera's
fleet was bottled up in the har
bor. Hobson thought out the
plan of sinking a vessel in a
narrow point of the entrance
and thus effectually "corking
the bottle." For originating the
idea he was given the assign
ment. He took the collier Mer
rimac, with a small volunteer
crew and in a maelstrom of shot
and shell carried out his plan.
All escaped on a raft from the
Merrimac and were under the
fire of forts and ships half un
hour before they surrendered to
Admiral Cervera in person.
They were imprisoned, released
and rewarded by their country.
L-ieut. Hobson has had a tri
umphant journey over the con
tinent, being greeted every--where
with unbounded enthus
iasm. His trip to San Fran
cisco was one series of ovations.
The young hero now in Hono
lulu is a tall, slight man of
handsome appearance, of pleas
ing manner. He is modest in
both expression and demeanor.
On board the Gaelic Lieut. Hob
son said his mission was well
understood and that he was am
bitious only to accomplish it and
.to take the resurrected fleet
back to the States. He will be
at Manila several months.
Mention of the kissings to
which Lieut. Hobson has been
subjected by hysterical females
at different towns is distaste
ful to the officer. He will be
is)
(?)
shown not a little attention
while in Honolulu and may pos-
sibiy be induced to make an ad-
dress under the auspices of a
well known societv. r.
POPULAR PRICES.
L. B. Kerr has a fine display of mil
linery goods at his Queen street store,
and is quoting prices upon other good3
that cannot fail to attract buyers.
SOUVENIR CALENDARS.
If you have not purchased one of
those handsome calendars at the Wo
man's Exchange, do so at once be
fore the supply is exhausted. 25c.
- . -
QUESTION OF
SHIP FLAGS
Latest Phase of Island Law
Ii the House.
HASTY ACTION OF OWNERS
Bennington to Take Wake IsIancS
Senator Morgan's Good Work.
Outside Manila.
REGISTRATION OF SHIPS.
WASHINGTON, Dec. 23. Many ef
forts by Pacific coast men are being
made to have changed the date in the
Hawaiian bill which makes effective
all changes of the sovereignty of the
republic before the time of the raising
of the flag. One of the protests which
has come to Senator Perkins sets forth
that there were purchased and put und
er the flag of the Republic of Hawaii
several ships, which, if the date of the
American supremacy is made July 7th,
when the President signed the resolu
tion, instead of August 12th, when the
flag was raised, will be without any
flag. These purchases are 'said to have
been made between those dates, and
made in good faith.
There is another point which is to be
taken up in this relation. Under the
bill of the committee there are named
three sub-ports of entry which will be
opened when the bill becomes a law.
These are not the only ports which are
now in receipt of business that is,
there is coming to other ports of the
group such an amount of commerce
that there should be extended to ship
pers there all the accommodations
which the sub-ports give. It is pro
posed by Senator Perkins that there
be given to the Secretary of the Treas
hit power to name such sub-ports of
entry as may be deemed necessary in
the future, and this will accomplish the
ends aimed to be reached by the men
of the coast who are now shipping and
clearing cargoes from those parts of
the Islands which are not included in
the bill as reported.. There is said to
be in the bill an attempt to make all
the commerce of the Islands pay trib
ute to Honolulu.
TACOMA, Wash.. Dec. 23 The Ha
waiian flag today displaced the British
ensign on the flagstaff of the ship Star
of Russia. The vessel is owned by the
San Francisco firm of J. J. Moore &
Co., who have supposedly adopted the
Hawaiian flag with the expectation cf
getting the ship under American colors
with the application of American ship
ping regulations to Hawaii. J. J.
Moore & Co. are changing all their foreign-built
vessels to Hawaiian registry
as fast as possible. Several -weeks ago
their bark Euterpe substituted the Ha
waiian for the Chilean flag at this port.
About the same time a similar change
was made on one of their vessels load
ing at Port Blakeley. The ship Star of
France, owned by Moore & Co., is en
route from Santa Rosalia. It is believed
that her registry will be changed from
British to Hawaiian upon her arrival
here. Arrangements for raising the
Hawaiian flag on Moore & Co.'s fleet,
have been conducted by D. F. Ewart
of the firm's San Francisco office. He
was present today when First Officer
Griffith manned the Star of Russia's
halliards, hauling down the British col
ors and running up the Hawaiian.
TO TAKE WAKE ISLAND.
NEW YORK, Dec. 23. A Sun special
from Washington says: The mail
steamer which will sail : from San
Francisco for Hanptkong tomorrow will
carry instructions to Commander E. D.
Taussig of the gunboat Bennington,
now at Honolulu. Commander Taussig
will be intrusted with the important
and interesting duty of seizing an
island in the Pacific ocean and placing
American authority over it. If his in
structions are carried out, Wake island,
a detached and lonely speck in that
marine area known as Micronesia, will
formally become a possession of the
United States, and thus form another
link in the insular chain connecting
The American continent with the new
ly acquired Far Eastern territory em
braced in the Philippine archipelago.
The proposal to acquire Wake island
A&sCLViEUf
Makes the food more delicious and wholesome
bovi eKtNQ
has been under consideration ever sinca
the Spanish Peace Commissioners In
Paris declined the offer of the Ameri
can Commissioners to purchase an
island in the Caroline islands to ba
used as a cable and naval coaling sta
tion. It is anything but a pleasant placo oC
residence, but its geographical situa
tion is such that it affords a natural
relay point for a submarine cable be
tween the United States and the Phil
ippines by way of Honolulu, and the
island of Guam, in the Ladrones. Wako
island is right in a direct line between
the Hawaiian islands and the Ladrones,
and in that ha3 the advantage of loca
tion for a cable station over Strong's
island, in the Carolines. It is distant
about 1,200 miles from the Iadronet
and 2.100 miles from Hawaii.
No international complications are
feared as a result of the annexation
of Wake island. It has been practical
ly a vagrant in Micronesia ever sinca
its existence became known. In in
quiries made by this Government to
ascertain its history, the gratifying
discovery was made that the United
States had a better title to the island
than any other nation. The orders to
the Bennington contemplate her de
parture from Honolulu as soon aa pos
sible after the orders to go by tomor
row's steamer are received.
The orders direct Commander Taus
sig to stop at Wake island on his way
to Guam. It is expected that the Ben
nington will be ready to proceed on her
mission within a week after the ord
ers of the Navy Department are re
ceived. It will take her about eight
days to make the voyage from Hono
lulu to Wake Island.
MORGAN'S GREAT FIGHT.
WASHINGTON, (D. C), Dec. 23.
The advocates of the building of tho
Nicaragua canal are taking heart in
face of the opposition of many Senators
to the Morgan bill, and it is now be
lieved that there will be action in the
upper house before the close of the
month of January. It is rumored to
night that the Administration -will ,
make the bill an Administration nieas- '
ure, and will so secure action before
the peace treaty can be reported to tho
Senate from the Committee on Foreign
Relations.
The plan of Senator Morgan to hold
meetings of his committee during, the
recess and examine into any attempt
to Influence the action of Congress on
the part of any lobby, presumably of
railroad -ni?ii, has noc jet borne iruic,
and there is some doubt whether there
will be any meetings held.
It is the belief that the action of
Senator Morgan was taken as a strong
bluff, and that he has been able to
scarce off any men who might hope to
delay action on the bill.
LONDON ON CANAL.
LONDON, Dec. 24. The question of
the Clayton-Bulwer treaty is freely
discussed in the morning papers. The
Daily New3 and the Daily Chroniclo
published editorials asserting that
Lord Salisbury "ought to get some
concession in return for consenting to
abrogation."
f
REFINED SUGAR FIGHT.
CHICAGO, Dec. 23. At the Western
headqarters of Arbuckle Brothers to
day a cut in the price of refined sugar
was announced. Quotations of 5.14
cents per pound were made to retail
dealers direct, jobbers being ignored
as in yesterday's cut. This is about
three-sixteenths of a cent below the
American Sugar Refining Company's
price. The reduction in prices made
by the Arbuekles has not been met by
the trust.
. BOSTON AND PETREL.
MANILA, P. I., Dec. 23. The United
States cruiser Boston and the gunboat
Petrel have arrived here from Chinese
ports. The steamer Union, which has
returned here from Uoilo, with native
and Spanish soldiers, has been refused
a landing here.
PROSPERITY ARRIVED.
NEW YORK. Dec. 23.--More busi
ness is being done now by merchants
and manufacturers in the United States
than at any previous time in the his
tory of the country. When the ac
counts for December are made out it
will be seen that the total volume of
business for the month was bigger than
that for any month of any other year.
FIRST NEW YORK.
DENVER, Dec. 23. The Denver and
Rio Grande train bearing Companies
H, K and M, of the First New York
Volunteers, left Salida, 216 miles west
of here, at 7 o'clock tonight, expecting
to arrive in Denver between 1 and 3
o'clock a. m.
f .
The Admiral Walker commission ha3
made its preliminary report and esti-
mntce flio Ai:f if r-nn rnr-tinrr t'10 NT 5
aragua canal at $133,000,000.
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