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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, January 03, 1899, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1899-01-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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Established July 2, ISoG.
VOL. XXIX., XO. 511S.
HOXOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, TUESDAY, JANUARY, 3, 1SD. TEN PAGES.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
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7
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
J. Q. WOOD.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. Office: Corner King and
Bethel Streets.
DR. C. B. HIGH.
DENTIST. PHILADELPHIA DENT-
al College 1892. Masonic Temple.
Telephone 318.
SR. A. C. WALL DR. 0. E. WALL i
to 4 p. m. Love Building, Fort
M. E. GROSSMAN, D.D.S.
DENTISTS 98 HOTEL STREET, HO
nolulu. Office Hours: 9 a. m. to
4 p. m.
DR. A. J. DERBY.
DENTIST CORNER FORT AND
Hotel Streets, Mott-Smith Block.
Telephones: Office, 615; Residence,
789. Hours: 9 to 4.
GEO. H. HUDDY, D.D.S.
DENTIST FORT STREET, OPPO
site Catholic Mission. Hours:
From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. F. E. CLARK.
DENTIST PROGRESS BLOCK, COR
ner Beretania and Fort Streets.
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
OFFICE No. 537 KING STREET,
near Punchbowl. Hours: 8:00 to
9:00; 2:00 to 5:00; 6:00 to 7:00.
Telephone No. 448.
DB.SWALTER HOFFMANN.
CORNER BERETANIA AND PUNCH-
- " bowl Streets. Office Hours: 8 to
10 a. m.; 1 to 3 p. m.; 7 to 8 p. m.
Sundays: 8 to 10 a. m. Telephone
510. P. O. Box 501.
t. B. CLAPHAM.
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN-
tist. Office: Hotel Stables. Calls,
day or night, promptly answered.
Specialties: Obstetrics and Lame
ness. Lorrin A. Thurston. Alfred W. Carter.
THURST0H& CARTER.
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW. MERCHANT
Street next to Post Office.
,W. C. Achi.
Enoch Johnson.
ACHI & JOHNSON.
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS
AT LAW. Office No. 10 West King
Street. Telephone 884.
T. McCAHTS STEWART.
(Formerly of the New York Bar.)
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
. Law, Spreckels Building, Room 5,
305 Fort Street, Honclu.
CATHCART & PARKE.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 13 KAAHU
manu Street.
CHAS. F. PETERSON.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. 15 Kaahumanu Street.
LYLE A. DICKEY.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. King and Bethel Streets.
Telephone S06. P. O. Box 786.
J. M. KANEAKUA.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
Law. Office: In the Occidental
Hotel, corner of King and Alakea
- Streets, Honolulu.
CHARLES CLARK.
ATTORNEY AT LAW 121 MER
chant Street. Honolulu Hale. Tel
ephone 345. Up Stairs.
0. G. TRAPHAGEN.
ARCHITECT 223 MERCHANT ST.,
Between Fort and Alakea. Tele
phone 734. Honolulu, H. I.
P. SILVA.
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG
ments to Instruments, District of
Kona, Oahu. At W. C. Achi's office.
King street, near Nuuanu. .
: jJnd
Will buy for you
AIM
Stock or Bond
In this market or abroad.
GEORGE R. CARTER, Treasurer.
Office In rear of Bank of Hawaii. Ltd.
GUIDE
THROUGH .
HAWAII.
PRICE, GOc,
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED, a
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMEN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
(Makes a specialty of ancient Hawai
ian, Curios, and also carries the best
assortment of modern Hawaiian work
to be found in Honolulu, including
Mats, Fans. Leis. Bamboo. Lauhala
and Cocoanut Hats, Etc., Etc. Tel. 659.
ANNOUNCEMENT.
MISS E. CLARK. OF B. F. EHLERS
& Co., has left for the oast to be ab-
! sent about six weeks. Those desiring
(the latest in fashionable dressmaking
will do well to await 'her return.
5114
DRESSMAKERS.
MISS FREIBURG KNOKE, DRESS-
making parlors, corner School and
Nuuanu streets.
C. S. RICHARDSON.
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER , AND
Typewriter. Expert work at low
est prices. Telephone 313, with H.
Waterhouse & Co., Queen street.
MORRIS K. KE0H0KAL0LE,
LOUIS K. M'GREW.
UNITED STATES CUSTOM HOUSE
Brokers, Accountants, Seachers of
Titles and General Business
Agents. Office: No. 15 Kaahu-
manu street, Honolulu. Formerly
A Rosa's Office. Telephone 520.
A. J. CAMPBELL.
STOCK AND BOND BROKER. OF-
fice Queen street, opposite Union
Feed Co.
M. W. M'CHESNEY & SONS.
Wholesale Grocers and Dealers in Leather and
Shoe Findings.
Agents Honolulu Soan Works Com
pany, Honolulu, and Tannery.
Robert Lewers. P. J. Lowrey. C. M. Cook
LEWERS & COOKE.
Importers and Dealers in Lumber and
Building Materials. Office,
414 Fort St.
LEWIS & CO.
is
" 111 FORT STREET.
Telephone, 240 : : P. O. Box, S9.
H. MAY & CO.
male and Reiaii G
-:- 9S FORT STREET. -:-
Telephone, 22 : : : P. O. Box, 470.
What Say You
To an arrangement
by which one oiling
Vlf I eeP yur bicycle
season. We've got it.
&EVELANDS Jeakp;"0 bother,
1IU UUUU1C i
You get this when
you buy a CLEVE
LAND LI B
209 HOTEL STREET.
Telephone 909.
Ill : in
III : .
TniimriTn
Bleie in
an
Grace
62
I
SEND A LETTER
Note From the PMlafleloMa
Mm People.
WHY NATIVES WERE SHOWN
No Reflection On Hawaii Was In
tended Simply Wanted to
Interest Populace.
The Philadelphia Commercial Mus
eum, 233 South Fourth Street, Phil
adelphia, December 16th, 1898.
EDITOR P. C. A. We have at hand
your issue in which you refer editor
ially to the Peace Jubilee celebrations
in this city and to the part taken in
the parades by this institution. The
tone of your editorial is such that we
feel called upon to explain the circum
i
stances to you to alter, if possible, the
impression which you have formed of
the affair.
There have been a number of jubilees
in different cities of the United States
to celebrate the cessation of hostili
ties between this country and .'Spain,
and of these jubilees probably the
most elaborate was the one held in
this city. There was a great naval re
view of war vessels, and two large pa
rades on two successive days, the one
being entirely military and the other
civic, in tne civic parade there were
a great number of fanciful and em
blematic tableaux, arranged on floats
in order to suggest to the eye some of
the products and some of the natural
wealth of the territories recently ac
quired by the United States. Among
these floats were the ones furnished by
this institution, to which your editorial
refers. In each case the floats were in
charge of natives, or rather aborigines
of the country in review. This was
not with the slightest intention of giv
ing the empression that the Islands
were solely or even principally peo
pled by races of this kind, but merely
in order to appeal to the interest of the
populace here, which is always pleased
at the sight of races different from its
own, but which certainly never derives
a wrong impression of the proportion
ate power and influence of such races.
We have in this country, for instance,
a traveling show, which is patronized
everywhere, called Buffalo Bill's Wild
West Show, made up namely of In
dians, buffaloes and wild horses. This
show, as we have said, is largely at
tended wherever it has been brought
and has created a great interest even
in London and other European cities.
We do not suppose that one out of the
hundreds of thousands of . spectators
who have witnessed this show have any
notion that the western part of this
country is principally peopled by. In
dians and buffaloes. They are relics
of the past which must appeal to every
body, and which in a way belong to the
education of everybody; so in the same
way now that the West India Islands,
the Hawaiian and the Philippine
Islands have come under the control
of the United States their destinies are
forever linked with those of this coun
try, yet there can certainly be made no
complaint if our citizens show some
interest for the peoples which have in
habited them in the past. They will
not be led thereby to believe that the
same peoples are responsible for their
management and control at present, or
that they will be in the future. They
will not think of these peoples as cit
izens of the United States any more
than they will think in that way of our
own Indians, yet because a race is sta
tionary, or going backward, we see no
reason why a general public desire to
be informed about it should not be sat
isfied. - This desire in regard to our
new territories is still greater, in view
of the fact that they are to a great de
gree unknown to the American public.
As far as concerns the article in a
Philadelphia newspaper, which is re
printed in your issue, we must disavow
all responsibility for it and for the
statements contained in it. We can
not be held accountable for a descrip
tion given, evidently in a spirit of fun,
by a newspaper reporter, to whom we
did not grant an interview or make
any of the statements which are at
tributed by him to our director, or any
of our staff. Our action in including
Hawaiian natives in an exhibit of Ha
waiian natural wealth we do not con
sider to be reprehensible, nor do we
believe that you on second thought will
thing so either. At any rate, we should
very much appreciate a word in your
columns as summary of what we have
endeavored to explain to you.
Trusting that the bad impression
which you had perhaps justly formed
of the proceedings will now cease, and
holding ourselves always at your dis
posal, we remain,
Very respectfully yours.
THE PHILADELPHIA COMMERCIAL
MUSEUM.
The mischievious article of the paper
referred to cannot be taken as a joke
at all. The people here have heard of
Buffalo Bill's show. A good many of
them have seen it. The Hawaiians are
not a "relic of the past," but are very
much in evidence in the life of this
country. The explanation of the Mus
eums people is received in the spirit in
which it is sent.
An Earthciuake Register.
Professor XV. D. Alexander expects
to establish in or near Honolulu
at an early date an earthquake obser
vation station. A wealthy scientist in
England has offered to supply the in
struments required and it is believed
the looai government will provide a'
building. A register of the most ex
quisite delicacy will be used. It is
likely that there will be considerable
trouble in having blasting operations
showing on the records.
oooooooooooooooooo
o
O
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A FAMILIAR FACE.
This is an excellent likeness
of that charming and talented
villian Julien D. Hayne, erst
while the petted darling of the
invective section of the local
political discontents. Hayne
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
O
o
O
O
O
O
O
JULIEN D. HAYNE.
(Alias Jas. D. Hallen.)
o
o
O first came to these Islands in
O 1S93 as an attorney. He met
O
O
O
o
O some of the leading citizens by
O attending a meeting of the So
O cial Science Club. These gen-
O tlemen wrote to the States about
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
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o
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o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
O him and learned that he was
O. under cover and dropped him.
O However, he borrowed money
O from more than one of them.
O As a rule, with Julien, to bor
O row was to keep. In 1896 Mr.
O Hayne came back here -with a
O 'bride and plenty of money. On
O this trip he cut a swath as
O wide as the harbor. He pub-
CD lished a royalist magazine, was
O prosecuted for libel, made fin-
O ished and forceful addresses in
O the Courts and elsewhere. He
O wrrote ably with a venom that
O was a bit too apparent. His
O strictly literary productions
O were fine. He used his wife's
O money here and in trips to San
O Francisco till a grown son of
O the woman's by a former mar
CD riage induced her to return to
O the States. There Hayne be
came a fugitive by absconding
O Mvith securities that constituted
O the remainder of the deluded
O wife's fortune. The next heard
O of Hayne is as "Jas. D. Hallen,
O Attorney, New York City." He
O is charged with swindling a fe
O male client out of $16,000, and
O there is a bigamy indictment be-
O hind this. Julien D. Hayne is
O a freak, a study in criminology,
O He is a man of exalted mental
O attainments and of most engag-
O ing manners. Remarkably eift-
O ed and an industrious student,
O handsome, graceful and affable,
O he would shine anywhere. But
O as nearly as can be learned he
O has all his life been a high class
O bilk and fraud. In conversation
O at times Hayne would almost
O admit his glaring, faults and
O rather smile at them.
O
o
o
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
They Had Wheels.
About half of the whole number of
the young men of the Kamehameha
schools were about town yesterday.
The uniformed students seemed to be
thoroughly enjoying their holiday. For
one diversion they resorted to the
wheel. A number of them have ma
chines of their own and others chart
ered mounts. The result was a fine
wheel parade about the streets.
POPULAR PRICES.
L. B. Kerr has a fine display of mil
linery goods at his Queen street store,
and is quoting prices upon other goods
that cannot fail to attract buyers.
AT THE CONCERT
Hall
Prove! Too Small
the ' Patronage.
For
Mi ENTERTAINMENT OF MERIT
Program That Was Liked Many
Encores Orchestra An
Address Made.
The New Year's concert given in the
Y. M. C. A. hall last evening was a
financial and an artistic success. The
concert hall was crowded with people.
Long before 8 o'clock all of the seats
were taken. Though chairs were placed
in the aisles, about 100 people were
standing in the rear of the hall. At
least 500 people were present.
A few minutes after 8 the Amateur
Orchestra came on the stage which was
prettily bordered with palm plants.
Under the direction of Wray Taylor the
large orchestra of twenty-fourj pieces
played The Venus, by Carl Bigge. The
selection was well rendered and re
ceived hearty applause.
Mr. C. A. Elston, the tenor, has es
tablished himself with the music-lovers
of Honolulu. The quality of his
voice was well suited to the words of
the song which he selected. Mr. Els
ton responded to an encore.
It is not often that one hears a mas
ter hand sweep the strings of the harp.
Madame Le Munyon gave two selec
tions on that difficult instrument and
won appreciation from her hearers.
There is a gracefulness in her execu
tion and a sweetness of tone that can
not but please.
Mrs. F. w. Bosworth possesses a
beautiful soprano voice and sang with
good effect last evening. At the wish
of the audience she sang an encore,
which showed a voice well trained and
capable of reaching the higher notes
and sustaining them with ease.
The orchestra gave for its second
number, captivating, Dy 'loDani, a
beautiful conception, which captured
the audience, who demanded its repe
tition.
The bass soloist, Mr. F. W. Beardslee,
a stranger to 'Honolulu audiences, won
great popularity last evening. Mr
Beardslee played the guitar in accom
paniment to his songs, which were
simple melodies of emotion and yet,
when sung by him, they seemed to
awaken into power. Mr. Beardslee has
a voice deep and full, yet peculiarly at
tractive. The audience called him
back twice and then by a long applause
expressed a wish to hear his voice
again.
The mandolin and guitar duet by
Miss Frazier and Chas. R. Frazier was
a successiui renuuion or a aimcuit se
lection. Coming before the audience
again in response to a long applause
they gave a lively selection Which put
the audience into a good humor.
Miss Jenne M. Long gave two read
ngs. Miss Long interprets with abil
ty, being especially good in the strong
emotions. Her work as Hagar was im
pressive. .
After a march played by the Amateur
Orchestra, Mr. T. Clive Davies ad
dressed the audience. Mr. Davies
gracefully thanked those who had tak
en part in the program. He made
special mention or Mr. Wray 'layior,
who had labored with energy and abil
ity in organizing and training the Ama
teur Orchestra and to him was due the
credit for the splendid music furnished
by that organization. Mr. Davies
spoke of the past year, its successes
and defeats, its sorrows and joys. He
layed stress on the thought that the
young men of the present should live
worthily that they might fill the places
occupied by those who go before. He
spoke of the word "good-bye and its
meaning of "God be with you." With
that wish for all he believed that it
would in reality be a "Happy New
Year."
The money received for tickets of ad
mission to the concert will be given to
the Amateur Orchestra organization,
and will be used for purchasing a piano
and defraying necessary expenses.
aneu .uuiiwer iiuiuu. .
John M. Vivas was at the head of a!
delegation of C00 Portuguese citizens
i
1 V
Makes the food more
ROYAL BKIWQ
calling on Minister S. M. Damon early
yesterday morning to tender to that
official the greetings of the New Year.
The Concordia band led the marching
column. An address was made by Mr,
Vivas, who reierred 'most earnestly to
ths many kindnesses that had been ex
tended to the colony as a whole and to
individual members by Mr. Damon.
The Minister of Finance responded
feelingly and then there was a season
of handshaking. ;
later-Island Luau.
The annual luau of the employes of
the Inter-Island Steam Navigation
Company was held at noon yesterday
in the restaurant at the corner of Nuu
anu and Queen streets. About 100 ot
the native sailors were in attendances
and enjoyed the feast immensely.
Frank Harvey, the shipping master,
was the presiding genius and settled
all disputes, besides seeing that the
service of the big meal was proper in
every way. The wives of a few of tho
men were present on special invitation.
The luau continued for a couple' of
hours and the proceedings included
cheers for the Inter-Island Company
and for about all the officers of the
corporation, name by name.
WATSON'S LUCK.
Husband of Emma Spreckels
Heir to Many Millions.
Thomas Watson, the well-known
grain broker, and his wife, formerly
Emma Spreckels, are preparing to
make an extended tour of the world,
and will sail, says the San Francisco
Chronicle about the middle of January
for New Zealand. From there they
will proceed to Hawaii, Australia, Tas
mania, South Africa, and then to Eu
rope. An extended tour of continental
Europe will he followed by a visit to
England, where Watson expects to re
main some time and devote this atten
tion to a legal contest, which he hopes
wiil bring him a princely fortune.
Watson has been telling his friends
that he Is the heir of property In Ens
land valued t 9,000,000. He has pa
pers in his possession, he declare, that
show him to be entitled to nearly one
aa.it of the town of Carlisle. He dis
likes litigation very much, and he hae.
been telling his friends, .but they have
urged him to assert his rights, and he
has at last determined to see what can
be done to secure the big fortune. The
property is said to have been formerly
owned by a great-great aunt of Mr.
Watson.
JVIr. and Mrs. Watson expect to be
gone about a year. They have given
jp their residence at 2260 Franklin
street, and, pending their departure,
are residing at the California Hotel.
Odd Fellows Install.
Harmony Lodge, I. O. O. F.. in
stalled, last evening the officers elected A
recently to serve for this year. The ex- 1
ercises were not completed till 10:30.
Then the banquet was served. The '
toasts and responses, with J. Light-
foot in the chair were:
Noble Grand J. D. McVeigh.
Vice Grand C. T. Cottrell.
Odd Fellowship H. H. Williams.
Excelsior Lodge Geo. L. Dall.
The Indies J. LIghtfoot.
The occasion was in every way
pleasant one and there was a large
tendance of members and guests.
Fine Fellows.
"Them Eyetalians is a fine lot of
young fellers,"-remarked one of the
harbor policemen yesterday in speak
ing of the officers and men belonging:
to the cruiser Etna. "They're polite
and give us a regular Eyetalian opera
down here on the waterfront every
night, and talk about dancin, well,
those boys have a sort of dance like
the Russians. They join hands, give a
double shuffle and a break away. It's
Immense." "Hard to talk to?" "I
reckon. Took me half an hour to tell
some of them where King street was
the other day. But they're fine fellows
just tho same."
CAVALRY AND ARTILLERY.
Carefully collected figures show that
the proportion of cavalry to the other
arms has been steadily diminishing for
a long period. The artillery has been
x ,i iirolrw ! 1 m i n ? c Vi Ctrl
iii i; i caaiu iv
Augtria Turkey and Spain are the only
countries whose cavalry exceeds their
artillery force.
delicious and wholesc:
POWP6 CO., EW YORK.
1
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