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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, January 05, 1899, Image 1

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Established July 2, 1S5G.
VOL. XXIX., XO. 5120.
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, THURSDAY, JANUARY,
5, 1S91V
-TEN PAGES.
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PROFESSIONAL CARDS,
J. Q. WOOD.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. Office: Corner King and
Bethel Streets.
DR. C. B. HIGH.
DENTIST. PHILADELPHIA DENT-
al College 1892. Masonic Temple
Telephone 318.
an. A. C. WALL DR. 0. E. WALL
DENTISTS OFFICE HOURS: 8 A. M.
to 4 p. m. Love Building, Fort
Street.
M. E. GROSSMAN, D.D.S.
DENTISTS 98 HOTEL STREET, Ho
nolulu. Office Hours: 9 a. m. to
4 p. m.
DR. A. J. DERBY.
DENTIST CORNER FORT AND
Hotel Streets, Mott-Smith Block.
Telephones: Office, 615; Residence,
789. Hours: 9 to 4.
GEO. H. HUDDY, D.D.S.
DENTIST FORT STREET, OPPO
site Catholic Mission. Hours:
From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. F. E. CLARK.
DENTIST PROGRESS BLOCK, COR
ner Beretania and Fort Streets.
DR. A. II. SINCLAIR.
413 KING ST., NEXT TO THE OPERA
(House. Office hours: 9 to 10 a. m.;
1 to 3 p. m.; 7 to 8 p. m. Sundays:
12 m. to 2 p. m. Telephone 741.
C. L. GARVIN, M.D.
OFFICE No. 537 KING STREET,
near Punchbowl. Hours: 8:00 to
9:00; 2:00 to 5:00; 6:00 to7:00.
DR. WALTER HOFFMAHH.
CORNER BERETANIA AND PUNCH
bowl Streets. Office Hours: 8 to
10 a, m.; 1 to 3 p. m.; 7 to 8 p. m.
Sundays: 8 to 10 a. m. Telephone
510. P. O. Box 501.
T. B. CLAPHAM.
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN
tist Office: Hotel Stables. Calls,
day or night, promptly answered.
Specialties: Obstetrics and Lame
ness. Lorrin A. Thurston. Alfred W. Carter.
THURSTON & CARTER.
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW. MERCHANT
Street next to Post Office.
W. C. Achi.
Enoch Johnson.
ACHI & JOHNSOH.
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS
AT LAW. Office No. 10 West King
Street. Telephone 884.
T. McCAIITS STEWART.
(Formerly of the New York Bar.)
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
Law, Spreckels Building, Room 5,
305 Fort Street, Honolulu.
CATHCART & PARKE.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 13 KAAHU
manu Street.
CHAS. F. PETERSON.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. 15 Kaahumanu Street.
LYLE A. DICKEY.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. King and Bethel Streets.
' Telephone S06. P. O. Box 7S6.
J. M. KANEAKUA.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
Law. Office: In the Occidental
Hotel, corner of King and Alakea
Streets, Honolulu.
CHARLES CLARK.
ATTORNEY AT LAW 121 MER
chant Street. Honolulu Hale. Tel
ephone 345. Up Stairs.
0. G. TRAPHAGEN.
ARCHITECT 223 MERCHANT ST.,
Between Fort and Alakea. Tele
phone 734. Honolulu, H. I.
Hill : TRUST : M
mm : CO.
Will buy for you
IM
Stock or Bond
In this market or abroad.
GEORGE R. CARTER, Treasurer.
Office In rear of Bank of Hawaii. Ltd.
GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, 60c.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS
WOMEN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
Makes a specialty of ancient Hawai
ian Curios, and also carries the best
assortment of modern Hawaiian work
to be found in Honolulu, including
Mats, Fans, Leis, Bamboo, Lauhala
and Cocoanut Hats, Etc., Etc. Tel. 659.
ANNOUNCEMENT.
MISS E. CLARK, OF B. F. EHLERS
& Co., has left for the coast to be ab
sent about six weeks. Those desiring
the latest In fashionable dressmaking
will do well to await .her return.
5114
DRESSMAKERS.
MISS FREIBURG KNOKE, DRESS-
making parlors, corner School and
Nuuanu streets.
G. S. RICHARDSON.
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER AND
Typewriter. Expert work at low
est prices. Telephone 313, with H.
Waterhouse & Co., Queen street.
MORRIS K. KE0H0KAL0LE,
LOUIS K. M'GREW.
UNITED STATES CUSTOM HOUSE
Brokers, Accountants, Seachers of
Titles and General Business
Agents. Office: No. 15 Kaahu
manu street, Honolulu. Formerly
A Rosa's Office. Telephone 520.
P. SILVA.
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG-
ments to Instruments, District of
Kona, Oahu. At W. C. Achi's office.
King street, near Nuuanu.
A. J. CAMPBELL.
STOCK AND BOND BROKER. OF-
fice Queen street, opposite Union
Feed Co.
M. W. M'CHESNEY & SONS.
Wholesale Grocers and Dealers In Leather and
Shoe Findings.
Agents Honolulu Soap Works Com
pany, Honolulu, and Tannery.
LEWIS & CO.
II
111 FORT STREET.
Telephone, 240 : : P. O. Box, 89.
H. MAY & CO.
IB 01!
-:- 9S FORT STREET. -:-
Telephone, 22 : : : P. O. Box, 470.
What Say3 Yon
To an arrangement
by "which one oiling
will keep your Bicycle
well oiled for a whole
season. We've got it.
No leakage, no bother,
no trouble !
You get this when
you buy a CLEVE
LAND
209 HOTEL STREET.
Telephone 909.
TAiminm
HUBS
one onfl
Grocer;
o eeioii mm
II
A SUDDEN GALL
Deatr of Rnssell D. WalMdp
of Apoplexy
ILL BUT A FEW HOURS
Life of a Man of Fine Attainments,
Early Training In Hawaii.
Well Liked.
Russell D. Walbridge, a prominent
citizen of Honolulu, died of apoplexy
at his home in King street yesterday.
Mr. Walbridge had been ill only a few
hours when the end came at 8:30 a. m.
Mr. Russell D. Walbridge was born
in the city of Buffalo, N. Y., in 1S49,
RUSSELL D. WALBRIDGE.
(Photo by Williams.)
whence, when ten years of age, he re
moved to Detroit with his parents, and
lived there until some sixteen years of
age, in the mean time receiving a
sound education. He early showed a
decided taste for scientific and mechan
ical studies, and this characteristic
largely developed during a two years'
course in mechanics and civil and min
ing engineering at the Troy, N. Y.,
Polytechnic Institute. In accordance
with the desire of his father, young
Walbridge, having acquired the theory
went to Idaho to perfect himself in
the practice of mining, and engineer
ing applied thereunto. Having accom
plished this object some two years
later he returned to Troy and resumed
his studies at the institute, from
which he graduated as a qualified Civil
Engineer in 1871.
Mr. Walbridge, being then of age,
again went West to engage in his
chosen profession; and for the follow
ing seven years, as mining engineer,
was employed more or less at scienti
fic and milling work in various min
ing enterprises in Arizona, Nevada and
Idaho. In 1878 he first came to the
Hawaiian Islands, at the request of the
proprietors of the Wailuku Plantation;'
his main object being to investigate
the sugar-making industry. In 1880,
upon the death of his father, he re
turned to his native State, and re
mained there until 1884, when he once
more came to the Island Kingdom,
this time to make it his permanent
home.
His knowledge of sugar-growing and
milling, together with his qualifica
tions as a scientific and expert en
gineer and mechanician, secured for
him the position of assistant manager
of the Wailuku Plantation. He her
made himself so valuable to the own
ers that a year afterwards he assumed
full charge of the fine property, with
the title and emoluments of manager.
A man, acquainted with the various
methods in use in sugar-making, he
also possessed much business tact,
skill and managerial ability of a high
order. He was known among sugar
men as one of the most scientific as
well as practical managers on these
Islands.
In 1S90, Mr. Walbridge was elected
to the House of Nobles in the legisla
ture, for a term of four years. Studi
ous, fond of books, he was extremely
popular and well liked, being an in
teresting talker on general subjects,
but more particularly so on his favor
ite theme of science. For the last
three years, Mr. Walbridge has been
interested in the Lanai Sugar Planta
tion scheme.
In June, 1S90, Miss Bernice Parke
became the wife of Mr. Walbridge.
Genial and affectionate in his home
Mr. Walbridge leaves with his wife
a son to mourn his death.
The funeral arrangements will not
Le definitely planned until the arrival
from Kauai of W. C. Parke, a brother
of Mrs. Walbridge, tonight or tomor
row morning. The funeral will prob
ably be held' tomorrow afternoon.
S
GEO. A. DAVIS PARDONED.
During all of yesterday it was
whispered about town that At-
torney Geo. A. Davis, whose im-
prisonment for contempt of
court has caused so much fuss,
would be a free man. And so it
came to pass. The Council of
State was convened at 5 p. m.
and a pardon granted. Mrs.
Davis accompanied Marshal
Brown to Oahu prison with the
order for Telease.
On Monday evening last when
Davis left the police station,
where he had occupied a special
room provided by the author-
ities, it was known that he was
a-sick man. The numerous in-
cidents of the case must be
quite familiar to the whole
community. The strain of the
rushing events, into which the
man threw himself with his
well known impetuosity, proved
too much for his severely tried
nervous system and there were
signs of a physical breakdown.
Justice Whiting on Monday
refused to issue a writ of ha-
beas corpus petitioned for by
Davis and yesterday the full
Supreme Court, in an opinion
by the Chief Justice, Mr. A. F.
Judd, likewise denied a writ to
JMr. Davis. This was, by the
.way, the fourth proceeding of
like character that Mr. Davis
had instituted since December
24th last. All this time he has
been studying his case with the
closest application and on the
one hearing, had some days
ago, when he was defeated in
his object, Mr. Davis made an
extended and impassioned argu
ment, replete with citations ger
main to the case.
The trouble Monday last was
in the matter of carrying out
the two sentences imposed on
Davis. For the initial contempt
he was fined $50 with the order
that he remain in jail till the
same was paid. Next he was
sentenced to serve ten days'
imprisonment beginning at the
expiration of satisfaction of the
first mittimus. Davis did not
pay the $50 till he had a deci
sion in his first habeas corpus
case. It was held by the iMar
shal that the ten day period did
not commence till the first pen
alty was paid. This made Mr.
,
Davis angry and was the cause
of his appeals to Justice Whit-
ing and the Supreme Court.
The writ refusals sustained the
Marshal and his legal advisors.
Dr. C. B. Cooper, the Oahu
'prison physician, reported yes-
terday morning that Mr. Davis
was a sick man, that his condi-
tion was serious. In the after-
noon Minister Cooper went out
to the prison with Drs. Cooper
and Herbert. It was then ap-
parent that unless there was a
change at once Mr. Davis would
collapse completely. He was
hysterical and quite weak. It
was upon the recommendation
of Minister Cooper that Pres-
ident Dole called the Council of
State and recommended a par-
don for Mr. Davis. It had been
suggested on the street that
Judge Prry, before whom the
contempt was committed, would
be willing to vacate the orders
if he was informed of the con
dition of Mr. Davis. But the
law stood in the way. It could
not be done.
It is believed that in a few
days, or it may be a few weeks,
Mr. Davis will recover his
health and be able to enter up
on practice again. All of his
clients who have been consult
ed express willingness to await
his return to his office and
Chas. Creighton and other at
torneys have volunteered to
look after the business of the
sick man so long as necessary.
While at Oahu prison Mr.
Davis has been cared for in the
private quarters of the jailor,
Mr. Henry.
zs zJ o vS vj.
S3
POPULAR PRICES.
L. B. Kerr has a fine display of mil
linery good3 at his Queen street store,
and is quoting prices upon other goods
that cannot fail to attract buyers.
MESSENGER SERVICE.
Honolulu Messenger Service deliver
messages md packages. Tel. 378.
FOR THE SHIPS
The Executive Authorizes Exten
sion of Wharves.
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PLAN
One New DockCall for Tenders
- for Material View of a Stu
dent on the Harbor,
In about twelve weeks from date
work will begin on the extension of
local wrharves for the purpose of re
lieving the present sorry congested
condition of Honolulu harbor. At a
meeting yesterday morning the Execu
tive Council authorized the Superin
tendent of Public Works, Mr. Rowell,
to order the material required to carry
out the plans recommended by the
Chamber of Commerce special commit
tee and endorsed by the Cabinet. As
the cost of the piles, copper, heavy
timbers, flooring, etc., will reach sev
eral thousand dollars and as there
must be advertisement for tenders for
any job involving the expenditure of
more than $500, there will be a call for
bids. Nearly all of what is required
must come from the coast, though it
will in all likelihood be ordered
through local dealers. Mr. Rowell
said yesterday that he would make
every effort that might suggest itself
in the direction of gaining time. When
the material, is once at hand large
forces of men will be employed in the
work to be carried on.
These wharves are to be lengthened
Kinau, Nuuanu and Sorenson. Kinau
wharf will be thirty feet longer and
each of the others 100 feet longer. Ac
commodation will thus be provided for
the discharging or loading of several
more ships than can possibly be hand
led at present.
Another work of the same kind
increase of wharfage is to be taken
up in connection with the above, in
fact is part of the same. A new wharf
is to be built abutting the Youman's
estate land near Lime Kiln Point. As
the slip here will be a wide one, a sec
ond wharf may be added before the
year is out. For the present nothing
will be built about the slips near the
Pacific Mail dock. It is expected that
the United States Government will
undertake some construction in this
locality.
Shipping men who learned yesterday
of the promptness of the Cabinet in
acting on the plan proposed by the
Chamber of Commerce select commit
tee, were much pleased. It was re
marked that the trouble all along had
been that just about the time the Gov
ernment was ready to do something
there would be interference on the
part of private interests. Much of the
credit for the adjustment which is to
bring results is due to a couple of
members of the Chamber of Commerce
committee. One of the heaviest ship
ping factors said yesterday that after
all only temporary work was being
entered upon. "What must de done,
and that without delay," said the ship
ping man, "is to make a beginning
with work for a really larger harbor.
Incidentally, whatever trouble there
has been with the railroad company
should be disposed of for all time. My
idea, and I am led to believe that a
majority of the practical men here will
agree with me, is that the Government
should direct operations or form a
scheme for something bigger than has
been suggested yet. It is clear that
very few, if any of us, have appre
ciated the volume and rapidity of the
growth of Honolulu commerce and it
is increasing by leaps and bounds. The
harbor is simply not nearly half big
enough and while what is about to be
done will be considerable help if com
pleted before the shipping season or
sugar season is over, it is comparitive-
lv nothing. It is making room for say
even ten more ships, when as a matter
of fact, when careful calculation is
made it must be apparent that provi
Makes the food more delicious and wholesome
(KJVAt BKtHO
sion should be made for half a hundred
or an even hundred more vessels. To
my notion that can be done only by
going into the Kalihi basin. The
problem will then be solved. I would
also suggest that for the present more
of the deep water in the neighborhood
of the boat houses should be used for
the shipping. This would he a hard
blow to the yachting fraternity, but it
would be an appreciable advantage to
business. It will be recalled that when
the U. S. S. Olympla was expected la
this port in the fall of 1895, the Gov
ernment dredger was used in. prepar
ing a special basin in naval row, as
the Olympla had greater draught than,"
any vessel before a candidate for the
white line anchorage. Well, at that.
time the dredger bored right into coral
and sent a heavy stream of the same
over in the neighborhood of the coal
bunkers on the railway premises. I
presume the dredger can do that sort
of work indefinitely. If 1 am correct I
see no reason why a good many hun
dreds or even thousands of anchorage
could not be added to the harbor by
cutting into the reef back of naval
row. The time is coming very soon
now when the harbor must to some
extent be divided or set off into sec
tions. Let the lumber all go to one
place, the coal to another, the iron to
another and the general merchandise
to another. Discharging would be
greatly facilitated, as special provision
would be made and maintained for the
handling of the freight designated to
the various localities. , I suggest that
the Chamber of Commerce special or
select committee be made a permanent
body and that the Chamber hold a
series of meetings for discussion of
wharf matters alone. If we are to do
big business here we. must have ade
quate arrangements for it. Now that
the Cabinet has shown a willingness
to do what is right and to act without
parley,, it seems to me that the whole
business community hsts a chance to
do a grand and valuable work of the
lasting quality."
MYSTIC LODGE.
New Officers Installed
by
Pythian Knights.
Installation ceremonies were con
ducted last evening In Mystic Lodge
No. 2, Knights of Pythias, in the Py
thian hall on Fort street. These dep
uty supreme officers were in charge:
H. E. Waity, C. W. Ziegler, C. B.
Gray, J. M. McChesney, Geo. L. Dall,
Ira A. Burgett, A. W. Keech, A. J.
Derby. 1
The following are the officers of
Mystic Lodge for the year 1899:
C. C C. H. Bellina!
V. C S. J. Salter. ,
Prelate H. J. Gallagher.
M. of W. J. A. Mehrten.
K. of R. and S. A. E. Murphy.
M. of F. Cs. Phillips.
M. of E. J. . Eckhardt, P. D. S. C.
M. at O. O. Whitehead.
I. G. A. G. Cunha.
O. G. Sam'l Johnson.
After the installation refreshments
were served in the ante room and a
most enjoyable social held. At first
Dr. Peterson, the retiring Chancellor
Commander presided, and then C. If.
Bellina, the new head of the lodge.
took the chair. Brief addresses were
made by C. H. Bellina, Geo. L. Dall,
J. A. Mehrten, A. W. Keech, S. J. Salt
er, J. F. Eckhardt and others.
The attendance included a number
of the Knights of Oahu Lodge No. 1
and a number cf visiting brothers.
Mystic Lodge is in every way in flour
ishing circumstances, having a large
and enthusiastic membership and a
trong treasury.
Artist Cosgrove.
Artist Cosgrove, whose work is so
well known here on account of being
in the Executive Building, is soon to
again leave Hawaii. He is going to
Portland, Ore., on a special call to paint
ten pictures. Mr. Cosgrove has been
in Portland three times already and
has painted every Governor of Ore
gon. The artist leaves here this visit,
his portraits of Lincoln and Grant.
While in the city he has painted por
traits of President Dole and Theo. H.
Davies and several other prominent
men and probably what is his last
work here i3 a portrait of Prince David
that will be completed in a few days.
POWOCW CO., HEW VCWX.

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