OCR Interpretation


The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, April 05, 1899, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1899-04-05/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

1
-r
fHlllifliff
$$kM&k'M iil At Js1
Established July 3, 1856.
yOL. XXIX., NO. 6197.
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5, 1S99. TWELVE PAGES.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
van
0
91 III ! I I H I I
!i
Vs.
.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
J. Q. WOOD.
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Honolulu, II. I.
DR. C. B. HIGH.
DENTIST. PHILADELPHIA DENT
al College 1892. Masonic Temple.
Telephone 318.
DR. A: G. WALL. DR. 0. E. WALL.
DENTISTS OFFICE HOURS: 8 A. M.
to 4 p. m. Love Building, Fort
Street
M. E. GROSSMAN, D.D.S.
DENTIST 98 HOTEL STREET, Ho
nolulu. Office Hours: 9 a. m. to
4 p. m.
DR. A. J. DERBY.
DENTIST CORNER FORT AND
Hotel Streets, Mott-Smith Block.
Telephones: Office, 615; Residence,
789. Hours: 9 to 4.
GEO. H. HUDDY, D.D.S.
DENTIST FORT STREET, OPPO
site Catholic Mission. Hours:
From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. A. N. SINCLAIR.
413 KING ST., NEXT TO THE OPERA
House. Office hours: 9 to 10 a, m.;
1 to 3 p. m.; 7 to 8 p. m. Sundays:
12 m. to 2 p. in. Telephone 741.
DR. W. E. TAYLOR.
OFFICE AND RESIDENCE, CORNER
Richards and Beretania Streets.
Office Hours: 10 to 4 o'clock and
evenings. Telephone 517.
C. L. GARVIN, M. D.
OFFICE No. 537 KING STREET,
near Punchbowl. Hours: 9:00 to
12:00 a. m.; 7:00 to 8:00 p. m.
Telephone No. 448.
. DR. WALTER HOFFMANN.
CORNER BERETANIA AND PUNCH
bowl Streets. Office Hours: 8 to
10 a. m.; 1 to 3 p. m.; 7 to 8 p. m.
Sundays: 8 to 10 a. m. Telephone
510. P. O. Box 501.
T. B. CLAPHAM.
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN
tist. Office: Hotel Stables. Calls,
day or night, promptly answered.
Specialties:' Obstetrics and Lame
ness. Lorrin A. Thurston. Alfred W. Carter.
THURSTON & CARTER.
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW, MERCHANT
Street next to Post Office.
CATHCART & PARKE.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, HAVE
moved their law offices to the Judd
block. Rooms 30S-309.
E. A. MOTT-SMITH.
ATTORNEY AT LAW. HAS RE
moved his office to the Judd Block,
Fort street.
F. M. BROOKS.
ATTORNEY AT LAW, (FORT AND
-r-.-i : i i
Hotel Streets) over x aircunu
Shoe Store, Honolulu, H. I. 515S
W. C. Achi. Enoch Johnson.
ACHI & JOHNSON.
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS
at Law. Office: No. 10 West King
Street. Telephone SS4.
CHAS. F. PETERSON.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. 15 Kaahumanu Street.
LYLE A. DICKEY.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public King and Bethel Streets.
Telephone 806. P. O. Box 786.
IK
Tfl GUIDE
THROUGH
HAWAII.
PRICE, COc.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS.
WOMEN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
Makes a specialty of ancient Hawaii
an Curios, and also carries the best
assortment of modern Hawaiian work
to be found in Honolulu, including
Mats, Fans, Leis, Bamboo, Lauhala
and Cocoanut Hats, Etc., Etc. Tel. 659.
P. H. BURIIETTE.
STOCK AND CUSTOM HOUSE BROK-
er, Real Estate and General
Agent. Office 639 King street, near
Alakea. P. O. Box 262. Telephone
641.
WW. T. PATY.
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Good work. Reasonable Prices. Res
idence 720 Fort street. 5195
FRANCIS J. BERRY.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
Law. Will practice in the U. S.
Federal and State Courts. Pro
gress Block, corner Beretania and
Fort streets, rooms 5 and 6.
T. McCANTS STEWART.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW, HAS MOVED
into Model Block, Fort street, op
posite Catholic Church.
J. M. KANEAKUA.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
Law. Office: In th Orid Ant.nl
Hotel, corner of King and Alakea
Streets, Honolulu.
P. SILVA.
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG-
ments to Instruments, District of
Kona, Oahu. At W. C. Achi's office.
King Street, near Nuuanu.
0. G. TRAPHAGEN.
ARCHITECT 223 MERCHANT ST.,
Between Fort and Alakea. Tele
phone 734. Honolulu, H. I.
W. H. BRADLEY.
PIANO TUNER AND REPAIRER
(Late of W. H. Glen & Co., Mel
bourne and Sydney). Sixteen years
experience, London and Australia.
Representing Hawaiian News Co.
P. O. Box 6S4. Yearly tunings con
tracted for.
A. J. CAMPBELL.
STOCK AND BOND BROKER. OF
fice Queen street, opposite Union
Feed Co.
U. J. ORDWAY.
-TEACHER OF
Bio. liilin. Guitar oofl Ukulele.
STUDIO Bergstrom Music Co., Ltd.,
Fort and Beretania streets.
HOURS 9 to 12 and 1 to 5.
J. R. Shaw, D.V.S.
Office and Infirmary, - - 863 King St.
TELEPHONE 796.
Modern and Humane Treatment.
H. MAY & CO.
Male and ttii Man
-:- 9S FORT STREET. -:-Telephone,
22 : : : P. O. Box, 470.
Will buy for you
ANY-
Stock or Bond
In this market or abroad.
GEORGE R. CARTER. Manager.
Office: 409 Fort street.
HAWAIIAN : Hi : M
III! : I
STILL ANOTHER
MM Plantation Thrown Upon
the MarM
THE NIULII OFFICERS ELECTED
A Strong List of Names-Lands to
be Amalgamated-The '
Market.
They are coming thick and favt. Yes
terday another sugar plantation was
organized. This last one is the Nabiku
Sugar Company, Ltd. The promoters
are Senator A. Hocking, J. F. Morgan
and Harry Armitage. The capital
stock is $750,000, divided into 37,500
shares of $20 each, $75,000 to be paid
up and $675,000 will be assessable.
The lands are on Maui and about 6000
acres will be taken up. A portion of
this will be occupied by homesteaders,
who will work it on the profit sharing
plan. They have thoroughly agreed to
the plan. A quantity of land which
they have planted in seed cane will
form a part of the plantation.
The land is said to be the equal of
any on the Islands. The water supply
is unfailing and copious. .In connec
tion with the water "the only expense
will be the building of flumes and
ditches, pumps and wells being unnec
essary. One of the features of this plantation
will be that only 15 per cent of the
capital is to be called in during this
year. The first assessment H 1'oj- 10
per cent, and an additional 5 per cent
will be called in between now and the
end of the year.
Although the books will not be
opened until this morning a number of
applications were received yesterday.
The subscription lists will be open, to
day at the offices of Jas. F. Morgan and
Harry Armitage.
The shareholders of the Niulii plan
tation met yesterday morning at the
offices of Henry Waterhouse & Co. The
articles of incorporation were read and
adopted, and the following officers
elected:
President, Henry "Waterhouse; vice
president, F. M. Hatch; treasurer,
Henry Waterhouse, Jr.; secretary, R.
W. Shingle; auditor, Thomas May. In
addition to the officers Francis Gay and
Cecil Brown were elected members of
the Board of Directors. The president
and vice president were appointed a
committee to draw up by-laws.
Mr. Waterhouse spoke upon the new
project. He informed the sharehold
ers that he had secured options on a
large extent of valuable land adjacent
to Niulii proper. These will all be
amalgamated into one plantation. The
expenses of running the plantation un
til the end of April are to be paid by
Judge Hart. This year's crop is to be
turned over to the present corporation,
and the returns go into the treasury.
In addition to this there is about
$SOO,000 available for working pur
poses. This will be used in acquiring
more land, building a new mill, and all
of the latest improvements. Altogeth
er the prospects are very encouraging.
Mr. Waterhouse will leave for the
plantation by the Mauna Loa. He in
tends to make a thorough, investiga
tion of the whole property, and com
plete the arrangements for taking up
the new land.
The stock market yesterday remained
in the same quiet condition that it has
been in for the last few days. There
were very few transactions, as every
body was busy in taking up the Niulii
stock for which they had subscribed.
The most noticeable jump was in Ki
hei. On the day previous a number of
shares had been sold at about $3 pre
mium. Yesterday, however, it went
easily to $15 premium and at 5 o'clock
an offer of $22.50 premium was re
fused. This big raise is due to the fact
that the doubt in regard to the water
supply has been done away with.
A block of Waialua assessable was
sold at $100 net. Both Kona and
Maunalei were offered at par when, the
market closed. Kahuku is holding
firm at $200.
It is expected tha before the end of
the week the prices which prevailed
last week will be reached, as there will
be more money on the market.
The shareholders of the Hilo Rail
road Co., Ltd., met yesterday morning
and elected the following officers:
President, B. F. Dillingham;, vice
president, L. A. Thurston; . secretary,
A. W. Carter; treasurer, M. P. Robin
son; auditor, Henry Waterhouse. Di
rectors, A. S. Hartwell, F. M. Hatch,
Albert Whyte.
The charter as passed by the Govern
ment was accepted. Operations will be
begun immediately.
Registration Boards.
The -following Boards of Registration
for the different Islands have been
appointed:
Hilo, Puna and Hamakua: H J. Ly
man, Harry Rycroft, F. T. Snow.
Kau, Kona and Kohala: Geo. P.
Tulloch, J. K. Nahale, W. J. Yates.
Maui, Molokai and Lanai: F. W.
Hardy, R. C. Searle, F. Wittrock.
Island of Oahu: J. M. Camara, Jr.,
R. H. Baker, Fred B. Oat.
Kauai and Niihau: W. H. Rice, Jr.,
W. .G Smith, Henry Peters.
0
i
I
'
i
'
I
THE VOLCANO.
Fire has appeared at the vol
cano. The news was brought
by the Mauna Loa yesterday af
ternoon. On the morning of April 1st
the people at the Volcano House
were startled to see flames and
smoke rolling out from what
appeared to be the mouth of the
crater.
A party was immediately
formed and started to the scene.
They had not been mistaken.
There was the fire plainly -to be
seen. As they drew closer they
were suddenly greeted with a
loud laugh of derision from a
party-who was concealed near
by. All at once it dawned upon
the eruption seekers that it was
the 1st of April, All Fool's Day.
The joker had built huge piles
of trees and brush in one of the
clefts and then set fire to it. He
must have spent the greater
part of the previous night in
getting the material together.
But he was amply repaid by the
success of his scheme.
Authentic news was brought,
however, that the residents in
the vicinity of the volcano an
ticipate an eruption very soon.
Heavy puffs of smoke are ris
ing from the crater, and jets of
steam are issuing from newly
opened fissures. It is thought
that Madame Pe,le will belch
forth once more before giving
up the ghost.
(:
r. rz-, tm
V V ZJ
Voeller Stock Sold.
The stock of the Voeller grocery
.store was sold yesterday 'by J. F. Mor
gan. The premises, as was stated in
this paper, are to be occupied as a
clothing store by Levingston & Soule.
These parties had 'bought the stock
paying for it the cost price. Through
auctioneer Morgan this was sold to
an outside party who intends to start
a grocery store here in the near future.
He has not yet obtained a building
and for that reason does not wish to
! divulge his name.
Japanese Prince Coming.
( A Japanese prince will arrive here
by the Coptic. He is Prince Konoye
who intends to make an extended tour
of Europe and America, An effort is
going to be made by the local Japanese
of the higher class to induce him to
stay over in this city for a time. It
is said that the prince "has received a
fine education abroad and is an ac
complished linguist.
Fisherman Drowned.
Kane-umi, a native fisherman, was
drowned yesterday morning at Kalua
nui. He had gone out fishing the night
before taking nobody with him. Yes
terday morning his body was found
lying on the beach, where it had been
washed by the breakers. The dead
man was the principal fisherman of
that district,
old.
He was about 65 years
125 CASES MORE.
Another shipment of 125 cases of dry
goods direct from the eastern factories.
This large shipment following so soon
makes an overstock and goods can be
secured at almost your own figures. L
B. Kerr, Queen street
HILO'S PROGRESS
Residents of tie Rainy City are
All Woriina Toietler.
MAKING MANY IMPROVEMENTS
Say They Have no Boom Call
It a "Hilo Hustle" A
Bright Future.
Honolulu might, with profit to her
self, take a lesson from Hilo in some
respects. Laugh if you will, it is a fact
just the same. Hilo people are a unit
in working for the good of Hilo. The
people there realize, most of them, that
what is for the good of the city is good
for its inhabitants, and when they are
convinced that a thing is desirable they
pull shoulder to shoulder and accomp
lish wonders, in what is comparatively
a small town. It will not rest satisfied
to be -called a small town much longer
we may be assured, for at the rate they
are now forging ahead a few years will
see a population of fifteen to twenty
thousand in Hilo, and if they continue
in their present harmonious way it is
hard to tell where they will stop.
Hilo people say they have no "boom."
They call it "a Hilo hustle," but call it
by what name you please, Hilo is cer
tainly making wonderful progress in
every way. New buildings are going
up on every hand, stores, offices and
dwellings. Streets are being opened up
and improved, bridges Luilt, new
wharves put in and residence lots
beautified, while nearly every man you
meet has an alert expression betoken
ing that he is wide awake and ready
for business. Riverside Park is proving
a valuable addition to Hilo's residence
property. It is a beautiful spot and
shows a phenomenal growth.
One great drawback that Hilo has to
contend with, and of which, by the
way, we know considerable in our
owa community, is the "sore-head."
This is the man who feels that the
world owes him a living which it is
trying to cheat him out of or what is
worse, make him work for. This is the
man who is found in all communities
predicting nothing but disaster, seeing
no good in anyone or anything, the
genuine calamity howler of the States.
It is from this class that the constant
flings at Honolulu and the Govern
ment emanate. Luckily for Hilo they
have but few of these men, but they
make up in noise what they lack in
numbers, giving out a wrong impres
sion of the community as a whole and
deterring outsiders from casting in
their lot with them.
The "Hilo hustler" is so busy hustl
ing that he has no time to howl, so
that they have it all their own way in
this respect. The business man knows
that Hilo is sure to profit from advance
ment in any part of the Islands and
the other sections of the Islands know
that Hilo's prosperity must redound to
their benefit.
Kamaainas who have lately gone to
Hilo after an absence of three or four
years, have hardly been able to
recognize the place, so greatly has it
changed and so numerous are the im
provements. Now Hilo wants an Exhibition Build
ing and they do not propose to fold
their hands and wait for some liberal
capitalist to come in and erect it for
them at his own expense, but they have
put their heads together and propose
to raise the necessary funds by popu
lar subscription.
Then all will be interested in the
success cf the exhibitions which may
be held there, thus insuring their suc
cess before the start. There is nothing
like being interested in an enterprise
to make one see that it is a good thing
Makes the food more delicious and wholesome
HOVAi BKNO POWDER CO.. HEW YORK.
and at every opportunity to push it
along. ?
The new railroad is sure to prove a
great factor in the growth of Hilo as It
will bring to them much of the Island
trade that now goes elsewhere and
the new plantation schemes now era
foot will also help them out. It will
be but a very short time until Hilo has
a steamer line to San Francisco with
out transfer and it is, on the boards
that some of the through lines -will
make Hilo a port of call.
Surely Hilo has a great future before
her and we should all rejoice thereat.
eis she has hustled for it and deserves
it.
Kalihi Mission.
A room has been rented at Kallhl,
in which the Rev. W. F. Lane, of the
Episcopal Church, conducts Sunday
School and Divine Service on Sunday
afternoons. The hour for Sunday
School is 3:30; Service, 4:15. As eoon
as it was known that the room was
to be opened Mr. J. F. C. Hagens, of
the Fertilizer Works, generously don
ated a small organ, which is anuch ap
preciated. LAIIAINA LUAU.
It was tne Biggest Affair Held on
.Maui for Years.
LAIIAINA, April 3. The employees
of the Pioneer Mill Co. did honor to
their genial manager and his wife, Mr.
and Mrs. Capt. Ahlborn, last Saturday.
The festivities took place at the resi
dence of Judge Kahaulelio where a
dance platform had been erected for
the occasion. This platform and the
grounds -were beautifully decorated
with Japanese and Chinese Lvnterna
and flags of different nations.'
The Captain and his wife wer con
veyed to the luau in a specially decor
ated carriage. They were literally cov
ered with leis and flowers. Upon their
arrival about four hundred people eat
down to the feast.
After the repast was over the speech
making commenced. After a few re
marks Mr. Wm. Henning proposed the
health of the guests. Judge Kahaule
lio made an earnest address in Hawai
ian which was interpreted 'by F. II.
Hayselden. He paid a high tribute to
the manager for the manner in which
he has 'brought the plantation up to
such a high standard., Music was ren
dered by the Wainee String Bard and
the Lahaina Glee Club. Dancing was
indulged in until a late hour.
It was one of the grandest affairs ,
that has taken place in Lahaina for
many years. The Captain and his fam
ily expect to leave Honolulu by the
Coptic for a six months visit to the
Fatherland.
Will Visit Hawaii
United States Senator Clark of Wy
oming left on the Kinau yesterday In
company with Samuel Parker for
Mana, Hawaii. Senator Clark w'll be
the guest of Mr. Parker for some
weeks, and during that time will be
shown every phase of Hawaiian life.
Exposition Proposal.
eMr. Daily, who is on his way to Ma
nila in the interests of the proposed
Omaha Greater American Exposition,
called on Minister Mott-Smith yes
terday. He is very desirous that
Mr. Clark, who will arrive in this city
soon as the Hawaiian agent for the
exposition, be granted permission to
take the Government Band. to : Omaha.
A colored gentleman was brought to
the station last night and charged with
assault and battery. He had demanded
bread and sardines from a Chinaman
and when given only the sardines he
threw the can and contents into the
Celestial's face.
Mme. Le Vanway wishes to announce
the arrival of a competent assistant
direct from the City of Paris, where
she has had ten vears' exnerience.
Samples of the latest high grade
(novelties for the season. 73 Beretania
street, opposite Hawaiian Hotel.
A
. - .
i......

xml | txt