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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, May 05, 1899, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1899-05-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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Kst4lliHnil July 2, lH.Ki.
.VOL. XXIX., NO. 6224
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, FRIDAY. MAY 5, 199. TWELVE PAGES.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
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PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
J. Q. WOOD.
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Honolulu, H. I.
DR. C. B. HIGH.
DENTIST. PHILADELPHIA DENT
al College 1892. Masonic Temple.
Telephone 318.
OR. A. C. WALL. DR. 0. E. WALL.
DENTISTS OFFICE HOURS: 8 A. 11.
to 4 p. m. Love Building, Fort
Street.
M. E. GROSSMAN, D.D.S.
DENTIST 98 HOTEL STREET, Ho
nolulu. Office Hours: 9 a. m. to
4 p. m.
GEO. H. HUDDY, D.D.S.
DENTIST FORT STREET, OPPO
. site Catholic Mission. Hours:
From 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
DR. A. N. SINCLAIR.
413 KING ST., NEXT TO THE OPERA
House. Office hours: 9 to 10 a. m.;
1 to 3 p. m.; 7 to 8 p. m. Sundays:
12 m. to 2 p. m. Telephone 74L
DR. W. E. TAYLOR.
OFFICE AND RESIDENCE, CORNER
Richard3 and Beretania Streets.
Office Hours: 10 to 4 o'clock and
evenings. Telephone 517.
C. L. GARVIN, M. D.
OFFICE No. 537 KING STREET,
near Punchbowl. Hours: 9:00 to
12:00 a. m.; 7:00 to 8:00 p. m.
Telephone No. 448.
DR. WALTER HOFFMANN.
CORNER BERETANIA AND PUNCH
, bowl Streets, Office Hours: 8 to
10 a. m.; 1 to 3 p. m.; 7 to 8 p. m.
Sundays: 8 to 10 a. m. Telephone
510. P. O. Box 501.
T. B. CLAPHAM.
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DEN
tist. Office: Hotel Stables. Calls,
day or night, promptly answered.
Specialties: Obstetrics and Lame
ness. Lorrin A. Thurston. Alfred W. Carter.
THURSTON & CA1TER.
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW, MERCHANT
Street next to Post Office.
CATHCART & PARKE.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, HAVE
moved their law offices to the Judd
block. Rooms 30S-309.
LORRIN ANDREWS.
AT TOR NE Y-AT-LA W. OFFICE WITH
Thurston & Carter, Merchant
street, next to post office.
F. M. BROOKS.
ATTORNEY AT LAW, (FORT AND
Hotel Streets) Over Fairchlld's
Shoe Store, Honolulu, H. I. 5158
FRANCIS J. BERRY.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
Law. Wrill practice in the U. S.
Federal and State Courts. Pro
gress Block, corner Beretania and
Fort streets, rooms 5 and 6.
W. C. Achi. Enoch Johnson.
ACHI & JOHNSON.
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS
at Law. Office: No. 10 West King
Street. Telephone 8S4.
CHAS. F. PETERSOM.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. 15 Kaahumanu Street.
LYLE A. DICKEY.
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY
Public. King and Bethel Streets.
Telephone 806. P. O. Box 786.
I. M. KANEAKUA.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
Law. Office: In the Occidental
Hotel, corner of King and Alakea
Streets, Honolulu.
0. G. TRAPHAGEN.
ARCHITBCT 222 MERCHANT ST.,
Setweea Fort and Alakea. Tele
phone 7t4. Homoiml, H. L
GUIUE
THROLGII
HAWAII.
PRICE, 60c.
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.
FOR SALE BY ALL NEWSDEALERS.
WOMEN'S EXCHANGE.
215 Merchant St.
Makes a specialty of ancient Hawaii
an Curios, and also carries the best
assortment of modern Hawaiian work
to be found in Honolulu, including
Mats, Fans, Leis, Bamboo, Lauhala
and Cocoanut Hats, Etc., Etc. Tel. 659.
D. HOWARD HITCHCOCK
HAS OPENED A SATURDAY
morning sketch class.
Those desiring to Join can corns
to the Stndio in the forenoons.
Model Block, corner Fort and
Beretania.
MUSIC.
PIANO THOKo oajHLY TAUGHT,
theory and practice, by a graduate of
the Leipsie Conservatoire. Terms $5
per month. Special attention given to
adulte. Address "Music," Advertiser
office.
ELOCUTION.
PERSONS DESIRING INSTRUC
tion in English Literature, Elocution,
Etc., should communicate with Miss
Prescott. Queen Hotel. 5209
MISS F. WASHBURN.
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER AND
Typewriter. Office: Room 202, Judd
Building. Telephone 1086.
FRED WEST.
STOCK BROKER. FORT AND HO
tel Streets. Will buy and sell for
you any stocks or bonds on this
market. P. O. Box 771.
P. H. BUBHETTE.
STOCK AND CUSTOM HOUSE BROK
er, Real Estate and General
Agent. Office 639 King street, near
Alakea. P. O. Box 262. Telephone
641.
A. J. CAMPBELL.
STOCK AND BOND BROKER. OF
fice Queen street, opposite Union
Feed Co.
P. SILVA.
AGENT TO TAKE ACKNOWLEDG
ments to Instruments, District of
Kona, Oahu. At W. C. Achi's office.
King Street, near Nuuanu.
W. H. BRADLEY.
PIANO TUNER AND REPAIRER
(Late of W. H. Glen & Co., Mel
bourne and Sydney). Sixteen years
experience, London and Australia.
Representing Hawaiian News Co.
P. O. Box 6S4. Yearly tunings con
tracted for.
WM. T. PATY.
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Good work. Reasonable Prices. Res
idence 720 Fort street. 5195
H. MAY & CO.
lolesi ill Rei Grocers
-:- 98 FORT STREET. -:-Telephone,
22 : : : P. O. Box, 470.
S.'E. LUCAS, Parisian Optician.
Office: Love fcuiliin?. Fort street.
pectacles at All Prices.
Will buy for you
ANY-
tockorBon
In this market or abroad.
GEORGE R. CARTER, Manager.
Office: 409 Fort street.
III : TRUST : M
: CO.
SUIT FOR PEACE
BcM Chief of Staff kite for ai
Cessation.
THE CALLAHT KAHSANS ACAIH;
Col. Funston and Men Perform
Deeds of Daring Insurgents
Put to Rout. v
v
'and fought for half an hour. The Am-
jericans continued to shell them, and
after a time got within effective rifle
J range. Soon afterward the enemy re
sje . ' " sumed their retreat, but retired in ex-
MANILA, April 2S. Gen. Uellent order.
Luna, Aguinaldo's Chief of i The American advance continued,
Staff, has sent an insurgent col- and three lines of trenches were taken
onel through the lines under a j before Apalit was reached. This place
flag of truce to aek for a cessa- waa taken, and it was found that two
tion of hostilities. insurgent trains had been abandoned
Col. Funston was overcome by !a short distance beyond town. These
heat. trains were probably destined for San
JOHN. F. BASS. Fernando, which ha3 been the rebel
sic ' capital since the fall of Malolos. San
;i ;Jc Fernando is now in plain sight from
the American lines, but the town is at
NSW YORK, Lpril 27. A cable to present ibeyond the range of our guns.
the Sun from Manila says: The opera
tions against the insurgents were re
sumed with undiminished activity and
vigor this morning and with small loss
to the Americans. The Filipinos were
driven to San Fernando, about nine or
ten miles 'to the northwest of Calum
pit, where they remain at present.
The day's fighting was marked by
anether American deed of daring,
which had much to do with the defeat J
of the rebels. The fighting began as
soon as there was light enough to per
mit effective firing. The battle was be- 1
tween Gen. Wheaton's brigade, whichJ;jc
was ot the south bank
of .... the
Grande de la Panpanga, and a strong
force of insurgents on the north -bank
of the river. The Filipinos used old
muzzle-loading cannon, but failed toj
do any execution with them. The en
emy were in a strongly intrenched po
sition, and the fire from our artillery
failed to penetrate their defenses; con
sequently the battle was -waged chiefly
by the infantry. The Filipinos appar
ently suffered little loss from our rifle
fire, and the .prospect of dislodging
them -was not very .bright, as the river
prevented our troops from making
their usual charge and driving the en
emy from the trenches.
At 10 o'clock the insurgents still held
their three miles of trenches along the
river. At this time Col. Funston, of
the Twentieth Kansas Regiment, de
termined that it was necessary to give
our men an opportunity to get into
closer quarters. He called for volun
teers to cross the river, and a number
cf his men responded. Two men were
finally selected, and they jumped into
the river and swam across with the ob
ject of establishing means for an Am
erican force to follow them. Prior to
calling for volunteers Funston had ob
tained a long rope, and this the two
men carried with them, no easy task
under any circumstances, but particu
larly hard and dangerous when the
line had to be slowly dragged through
the water in the face of a heavy fire
from the rebel trenches.
The men seemed to bear charmed
lives, and though bullets fell'all around
them, kicking up little jets of water,
neither of them was hit, and they
landed safely on the opposite bank,
and there secured their end of the rope
to a tree.
While this was being done our troops
kept up such a hot fire on the trenches
that the rebels did not dare to leave
their shelter either to capture the two
Ten or to cut the rope. A raft had
been hastily made with any material
that would answer the purpose, and on
it
Col. Funston, with two companies
of his regiment, crossed the river, the
rope being used as a guiding line to
hold the raft against the current. Sev
eral trips were necessary to land the
men, but they all got ashore unharmed,
the marksmanship of the enemy being
extremely poor.
Once ashore the Kansans formed and
were ordered to attack the trenches
with an enfilading fire. This was
more than the rebels could stand, and
the backbone of the defense was brok
en, the main body of the Filipinos re
treating northward, while the remaind
er escaped up the railroad under a
heavy fire.
The left flank of the enemy reformed
on the plain north of the river, and
part of them took up a new position in
the second line of trenches, where they
made a futile attempt to hold their
ground. Meanwhile the remainder of
the Kansans and first Montana volun
teers slowly crossed the bridge, that
had been badly damaged by the enemy,
and then advanced on the trenches,
from which the Filipinos were speedily
driven. The insurgents then retreated
iin the direction of Apalit, four miles
Itiorth of Calumpit.
While our troops were engaged in
i driving the rebels from their second
line of trenches a force of 2000 insur
gents advanced in skirmish formation
serve two miles distant. When they
got within 2000 yards of our line Gen.
Wheaton ordered the artillery to fire
on them. Shrapnel began to shriek,
'and the rebels apparently did not rel
Lsh it.-for they at once stopped their ad
jvance, and, after delivering an inef-
- ; - ;
probably Antonio Luna. Aguinaldo's
chief general, was seen to dash along
the line, waving nis sword and evident-
j !y urging his men to return to the at
itack of the Americans. He succeeded
in his effort, and the Filipinos rallied
A heavy thunder-storm which pre-.
vailed this afternoon prevented any j
further operations by our troops today, j
our losses touay were one Kiiiea anu
six wounded. Among these latter are
three officers. The insurgents lost
forty killed and wounded. Thirty-seven
of the enemy were captured with
their arms.
KAUTZ INDISCREET.
Washington, April 27. Rear
Admiral Kautz has been
"warned" and narrowly escaped
recall for writing from Apia to
cousin in Cincinnati:
am iioi. King nere, out just,
plain boss of the ranch. The
German Consul had that posi
tion up to my arrival, 'but since
then he has been a very silent
partner. I am very much afraid
he does not like me; in fact, I
am not at all popular with the
Germans."
5
OLA A IS FAVORED.
Substantial Men Applying for the
New Stock.
The great Olaa plantation enterprise
is being floated in thr business-like
way which its presentation to the pub
lic by the promoters indicated would
be the case.
Up to the noon hour yesterday some
thing over half a million of the capital
stock had been subscribed for in per
son by investors at the office of Mr.
Dillingham, in the Judd building.
Among those who signed were a num
ber of prominent business men for
large blocks and agents representing
out of town people.
It is evident thus early that those
who are going into Olaa have studied
the prospectus carefully and are seek
ing the ultimate profit. Much of the
money that has been hoarded for the
past month is going for Olaa shares.
A large amount of the stock is to be
taken in Ililo and there have been a
number of applications from 'the
United States for the shares.
The Dillingham office was a scene of
great activity yesterday and the clerks
were more than half the night straight
ening out or arranging the business ac
cumulated. The books will be open
again today. On Monday next the ap
portionment of stock will be an
nounced. .Memorial Day.
At the regular meeting of Geo. W.
De Long post, No. 45, G. A. R., last
evening committees were appointed to
arrange for the observance of Memorial
Day, the 30th inst. A general invita
tion will be extended to all soldiers
and sailors to participate.
The invitation of Rev. Mr. Gardner
of the Christian church (a G. A. R.
comrade) to attend services the Sun
day evening preceding Memorial Day
was accepted by the Post.
Two Fine Residences.
Among the new plans of H. L. Kerr
Sc Co. are those for a new $7000 resi
dence on Thurston Avenue for Auditor
General Austin, and for a residence to
be built at Hilo for J. R. Wilson. The
feature of the latter is a large social
hall on the second floor.
DEATH AND RUIN
They Mark the Path of a De
vastating Cyclone.
PROBABLY 100 WERE KILLED
KlrksvMle, Mo.. Suffers From the
Fury of the Storm "Send
Surgeons" Rescue Work.
0 X t f- mfa
KIRKSVILLE", Mo., April 27.
The sky emptied its fury in a
cyclone upon Kirksville at 6:20
o'clock tonight, when the east
side of the town was wiped from
the map. A broad, clean path,
nearly a quarter of a mile wide,
lies through the town as smooth
as the virgin prairie. Probably
400 homes, where an hour. ago
families were asking the divine
blessing upon the evening meal,
are now scattered as fragments
somewhere beyond the town in
woodland and prairie.
It is probable a hundred peo-
pie were killed, the known list .
at G o'clock reaching twenty-
one, and a thousand were in-
jured. It will be long after day- "
light 'before any adequate con-
ception of the destruction to
life can be had.
CCii;C: j. jjj jjj
It is the record of the St. Louis and
Louisville cyclones all over again. The
fatalities are upon every one's lips.
Each blanched face on the street re
ports new calamity.
In the havy rain following, the cy
clone the balance ot the people who
escaped the calamity have turned out
to rescue the injured and hunt out the
bodies of the slain, and the surgeons,
professors, operating staff and stu
dents, men and women, of the Ameri
can School of Osteopathy, which. Is lo
cated here, together with all the regu
lar doctors resident in the town, have
formed a rescue and hospital corps,
and in the darkness and rain are hunt
ing out the unfortunates to set frac
tured bones, bandage the lacerated and
ease the pain of anguished hearts.
From every locality the cry comes
up, "send surgeons.' There are men,
women and children in agony, and the
rescuing corps are lifting roofs and
searching the basements of houses all
along the edge of the storm's track for
the forms of the bleeding, dying and
the dead. Cabs, express wagons, pri
vate conveyances and stretchers are all
in service, yet the supply is wholly in
adequate and many needy ones are
limping out of the wreckage and mak
ing their way as best they can to
asylums.
Half a dozen wrecked buildings took
fire immediately after the cyclone had
passed. The fire bells rang out a call
for help for Kirksville's needy, but
there were none with time to stop these
isolated fires. They were left to their
own lesser work of destruction. Lurid
lights from these bonfires now illumi
nate death's wake and help the res
cuers to carry on their errand of mercy.
Kent's undertaking establishment is
being used as the charnel house, and
a score of the dead are now there,
some of them unidentified.
The homrs just outside of death's
path are open to refugees and people
filled with gratitude for the deliverance
of loved ones and themselves are do
ing a vain work to give comfort to
other hearts bleeding with bruises of
the flesh and immeasurable woe for
fathers, mothers and children who are
gone.
The storm king drove his chariot of
wind and cloud in awful grandeur. His
coming was announced with a roar
like a fast mail train crossing a rail
way viaduct, with the deep, muffled
rumble of distant thunder behind it. j
Absolutely
a A f
Makes the food mere delicious and wholesome
ROVl 6ta POWOfR CO., HEW VTMMC.
There was a suction from both sides
and lefore the advancing column
while a steady crunching, crackling;.
grinding noise, as of a monster mowing
down forests, sounded out of the death
din. These undertones were the houses
and trees that snapped before the cy
clone, and the sound of their grinding;
to powJer was heard distinctly out of
the roar of the elements a mile from
the path of the cyclone.
Miss Carrie Gilman of this city Is
at present in Kirksville and was witht
the rescue party from the American
School of Osteopathy.
Mrs. Jos. B. Atherton and others or
this city are well acquainted in Kirks
ville. IN SAMOA.
Mataafa Forces Beaten by the "Friend
ly" Natives.
AUCKLAND (N. Z.), April 27 Par
ticulars of the fighting in Samoa, con
tained in the advices received hero
from Apia under date of April 18th,
show that the battle between tho
friendly natives and the rebels took,
place at Vailele, and that the latter lost
100 men in killed and wounded.
Further details of the deaths of En
sign J. R. Monaghan of the United
States cruiser Philadelphia and Lieu
tenant P. V. Lansdale of the same ves
sel have been received. A deserter
from the Mataafan forces says Monag
han and Lansdale were retreating
when they were discovered by a chief
and his wife, who were looking for
dead men. They gave the alarm, and
Monaghan was shot w'hile continuing
the retreat. Later, it appear?-, the re
bels returned and killed Lansdale.
Monaghan fought until he was wound
ed, and he was then beheaded. The
doetor's examination of the remains
confirms these statements.
Suatelle, the principal rebel chief,
ran away and told his people a hun
dred British had been killed. Mataafan
deserters assert that the Germans sent
cartridges in bags of rice and sugar
along the coast in December.
Schooner Hiram Bingham.
SAN FRANCISCO, April 28. The
missionary schooner Hiram Bingham
went to Oakland Creek yesterday. The
crew say they had a terrible time from
Kusaie to San Francisco. According
to the captain the Bingham was short
handed,, short of provisions, short of
water, short of sails, and in fact short
of everything. During the voyage the
cook committed suicide. The men had
to make sails out of sacks in order to
get the vessel into port. Captain Tow
ers says it was the worst voyage he
ever made. The Bingham is to be sold
and replaced by a larger vessel. Dur
ing the past four years she has been
in Southern seas.
Senator and Ohio.
The United States transports Senator
and Ohio got away from San vrancisco
April 27th for Manila with the Thir
teenth United States Infantry and a
number of enlisted men and recruits.
The absentees were gathered in quick
ly by a corporal's guard, and when the
steamer sailed away the roll call show
ed nearly everybody aboard.
ATKINSON PLEADS GUILTY.
BOSTON, Mass., April 27.
Edward Atkinson, the famous
Boston millionaire, anti-imper-
ialist and economist, in an in-
terview today defiantly an-
nounced that he was, personal-
ly, the alleged traitor who had
bp'en flooding the American
army in the Philippines with
letters and pamphlets tending
to promote discontent and in-
subordination and to prevent
the men from re-enlisting. He ;
also said he would keep on
sending them.
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