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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, October 26, 1905, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1905-10-26/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER, HONOLULU, OCTOBER 26, 1905.
1 1 1
, -JJSigma
BELCHER
FIRMS TO
COIISflLID
There Is Only One
Jt
We have just taken the sole agency
for the celebrated
AUSTRAL A
ATE
w
i
IL4 IV Ji
CIGAR
Be sure that your CREMO CIGAR has the word CREMO
fnta,l in thp TrpnnriPT nf thf rifrar. The CREMO has no
X band. It has only its perforated
at - . ' -1 1
smoking qualities to aistmguisn
Wholesale
A match,
the valve
I H. Hackf e
Gcis
and you're instantly ready for the din
ner's cooking.
No waiting for the fire to burn up.
No fuel expense when the cooking's
finished.
Sold by Dealers and
1
HONOLULU GAS
Is a refreshing and strengthening
family Tonic That purifies and-
Makes the system strong
It has the unaniiTmis endorsement f
Of theMedical profession Ask f?r it
RAINIER BOTTLING WORKS,
Phone, White 133 1, Honolulu.
mil .wjui ji! yiwMMwiiwi!Ji.Miiiiiji.)Wiiiii.iiii 11.1,11 .immmammmmmmtrf
)
4m
0
P
D
The Wonderful MAN
that Distress after Eating: or Drinking.
Cures where all else fails
CATARRH of the STOMACH
Indigestion, Excess of Mucus, Fermentation, Acidity, Gases,
Distention, That Lump, Distress, Nausea, Anaemia.
For sale by your druggist or by
W. C. PEACOCK & CO., LTD.
SOLE AGENTS
Dor
Spring:
and
, Summer
Stock
Belts Suspenders Trunks Glovea
Neck- Hanck'fs and Under
wear Duck Valise wear,
Hats Pants Shirts Etc.
Z054 Fort Street, I. O. O. F.
. IM. Sanford.
Optician
BOSTON BUILDING, FORT ST., OVER MAY & CO.
IF YOU
mark and the best flavor and
' j .il. AU 4 ro
ix irom any umei- .
Distributors.
a turn of
on the
COMPANY, LIMITED.
VMUMnii.. .mi juiil jj.ifij.nqn i;a
5:4
- GA - NESE WATER,
Building and 15a Hotel Street.
ARE
Id &"Co., Ltd.
.Range
I
Fugitive Evades Cops
Detective and
Saunders.
The following dispatch indicates that
Belcher, the fugitive ex-Mayor of Pat-
erson, N. J., slipped through Honolulu
after all on his way to the Colonies:
NEW YORK. Oct. 15. William Hen-
ry Belcher, Mayor of Paterson, N. J.,
fugitive from justice and embezzler or
more than $200,000 from financial in
stitutions, has been located at Yebri,
Queensland, Australia. He is residing
there -with his old friend, James Rob
ertson, a former Patersonian, who left
home under similar circumstances more
than fifteen years ago.
Leaving Paterson on July 31 last,
Belcher boarded a train at Little Falls,
three miles from Paterson. At Newark
he boarded a train for the West, ar
riving in San Diego, Cal., five days
later. He had shaved off his mustache
and otherwise attempted to disguise
himself.
Belcher passed several days at San
Diego, and this fact assisted him in de
feating an attempt at capture at the
instigation of Governor Stokes and
Prosecutor Emley, when the ship on
which he had engaged passage as
"William H. Pitcher" was searched at
San Francisco and Honolulu. When
placed under arrest in San Francisco,
Belcher called upon his San Diego
friends to prove his identity and they
did so, claiming him to be a business
man of that city. When the ship was
en route to Honolulu, Governor Stokes
cabled the Sheriff at Honolulu, in
forming him of the suspicions of the
local authorities.
Again the vessel was stopped. Bel
cher had made a friend on board the
shiD or taken a confederate with him
from San Diego.; This man informed
the authorities that the man they had
picked out as Belcher was a San Diego
business man on his way to Australia.
The storv was believed and Belcher
once more escaped arrest.
The Call also has the following con
cerning Captain Saunder's alleged con
nection with the Belcher matter:
Captain J. W. Saunders of the Man
churia, who is in trouble with the Fed
eral authorities over his naturalization
nora n-ViiVi sro n iiAp-pri to nave been I
" , , . . , .
forged, may also find himself in trouble
with the police when he returns from
his present voyage to the Orient.
When William Henry Belcher, the de
faulting Mayor of Paterson, N. J., who
has been located in Western Australia,
came to this city he took passage on
the Manchuria, representing himself as
a preacher named Pilcher. Detective
Ed Gibson was watching the passen
gers boarding the steamship and ar
rested Belcher from a photograph sent
from New Jersey. Belcher was indig
nant, claiming that his name was
Pilcher, a preacher. He appealed to
Captain Saunders and the captain told
Gibson he had made a mistake, as he
had known Pilcher for several years.
On that positive statement Gibson al
lowed Belcher to leave with trie steam
ship. If Gibson had held his prisoner he
would have been entitled to a reward
of $25,000, which was offered for Bel
cher's capture.
f-
OLD FISH MARKET
FOR A NATAT0RIUM
That large iron and glass pavilion
once called the Honolulu Market, built
at a cost of many thousand dollars,
is now a source of . revenue amount
ing to $10 a month, derived from a
lonesome Japanese fish seller. The
Legislature of 1903 caused an almost
complete abandonment of this valuable
property when it conceded to a Chi
nese hui the right to sell fish on Ke-
kaulike street. The wily Chinese
euchered our unsophisticated Territori
al fathers out of a handsome annual
income. In order to make the best 01
a bad bargain it Vias been suggested
by a resident of Honolulu to turn the
structure into a natatorium, where the
people can be given full indulgence in
salt water bathing without growing to
out-of-town places. Sea water could
be pumped from a point near the reef
and one or two plunge baths con
structed in the center of the pavilion.
Fifty or more private rooms for shower
or tub baths could be introduced and
a wide observation gallery at an ele
vation of 20 feet made to run around
the inside , of the entire structure. A
salt water bath is a tonic in the morn
ing and a sedative in the evening. It
would be an ideal place for swimming
exhibitions, with band concerts to en
liven the events. Prices could be scal
ed from 25 cents down to a nickel to
reach the most indigent or to accord
with the class of accommodation. Some
private company could perhaps carry on
such a business better than the Gov
ernmentParadise of the Pacific.
-
THE MAILS.
Mails are due from the following
points as follows:
San Francisco Per Coptic, Oct. 27.
Victoria Per Moana, Nov. 18.
Colonies Per Sierra, Nov. 7.
Orient Per Mongolia, Oct. 27.
Mails will depart as follows:
San Francisco Per Mongolia. Oct.
28.
Colonies Per Ventura, Nov. 7.
Orient Per Coptic. Oct. 27.
Victoria Per Aorangi, Nov. 13.
. .
Sam Johnson finds the automobile
does belter than the three horses he
formerly used up daily in the inspec
tion of road work, at present going on
at twenty-eight different places, with
from 300 to 400 men and 160 horses em
ployed.
The Coyne and Porter
Furniture Comnanies
May Unite.
A consolidation of the firms of The
Porter Furniture Company and the
Coyne Furniture Company is being
negotiated, to take place about the
J first of the year.
Should the deal be reached, a new-
company would be formed with a cap
ital of about $50,000. The business
would probably be conducted in the
corner store in the Alexander Young
building now occupied by the Porter
Furniture Company,
The plans are to make a big con
cern.
HEALTH BOARD
WILL VISIT
(Continued from Page 1.)
Board of Health respected and obeyed,
they should only refer to those things
that are cf grave importance and
which, in a measure, public sentiment
would assist; in other words, I mean
those that can be practically enforced.
Most of the regulations set forth in
this paper might , prove very service
able printed, on cards and distributed,
the public being requested to comply
with them in order to do away with
the mosquitoes. But if they are made
part of your Rules and Regulations
and there is no way of enforcing them,
would they .not then cause a loss of
respect for the Board?
On the other hand, an expression of
the" Board of Health's opinion by a
regulation which provides that all
ponds and pools of water, tanks, re
ceptacles, vases, cans, or anything
capable of holding water, or other
places in which mosquitoes are breed
ing are causes of sickness and, there
fore, declared nuisances would be to
my mind a better course to follow.
I do not see how you are going to
invoke the authority of law you have
. . ... .
against a person if he vacates a prem-
lses without emptying all the contain.
ers of water or protecting the water
closet or tank so that the mosquitoes
can not breed therein. They are cer
tainly not nuisances at the time he
vacates the premises. But on the oth
er hand, if you have a regulation which
provides that, in case mosquitoes are
breeding there, then it is a nuisance, t
upon such an issue you might win out.
Your Section 10 attempts to delegate
the authority of the Board to sub
ordinate officials, including the police
officers of the counties. I doubt wheth-
-W 1. f,l.l K UU C. UIMV1 IkJ,
Your Section 11 provides that all taro
fields found to be breeding places shall
be reported to the Board of Health
by the owners, occupiers, or officers
of the Board of Health or counties,
Such a regulation will hot make the;
owners report any further than they
do at present., and you have a statute
already making it the duty of certain
officials to report such matters.
The remaining regulations in regard
to the larvae-eating fish might be tak
en by some to be a usurpation of leg
islative functions, although, of course,
they are excellent in themselves.
G. R. CARTER.
Governor.
THE TERRITORY'S WARDS.
Plans were submitted by the presi
dent for three small cottages on the
grounds formerly occupied by the Ka
piolani Girls Home, adjoining the Ka-
lihi Receiving Station. He said there nurnoer or ennaren tnat must be sup
was probably sufficient lumber in the POIted.
old building to furnish two-thirds of
the necessary material. The Legisla
ture appropriated $2000 for this pur
pose. The object was to provide sax
independent rooms where suspects
could have complete privacy, if they de
sired, until their condition was fully
determined under the 'rules of the
Board.
It was voted that the president be
authorized to proceed with the erection
of the buildings.
, On the advice of Mr. McVeigh, the
Board denied the application of Lui
Hoolapa to have his eighteen-year-old
daughter sent to the Settlement as his
kokua. She was not needed, the ap
plicant's wife being now his kokua.
Mrs. Kanamu Mokuhau's petition to
have her married daughter, about
forty years of age, as her kokua was
granted. The petitioner had a com-,
fortable home of her own at the Set
tlement, she was a worthy woman and,
being over seventy years of age, not
likely to live much longer.
Mrs. Hawea's petition for a kokua
was also granted, as the relative she
wanted was a butcher whose services
were needed.
Mr. McVeigh, in answer to ques
tions, said he would forward a list of
the kokuas at the Settlement. Many
of them were useless, but could not be
allowed to starve. "We can ndt eret
rid of them," the superintendent said.
"The Lunalilo Home won't take them.
Some have been at the Settlement 'or
twenty or t.weny-five years. What cm
we tic with them?"
The Kalaupapa Fishing Co. was al
lowed on motion to establish a bakery
at the Settlement. Mr. McVeigh said
there were three bakeries there already.
yet he did not see how the application
should be refused. Many of the peo
ple required soft bread rations. The
new bakery would keep its owners
Thomson's
"Glove Fitting
Corsets
and have now a complete line in stock.
We will be pleased to show this ex
cellent line to our customers.
R. BL0M
anfers
The Hawaiian Gazette Co. has, at considerate expense, succeeded
in completing a limited numoer of sets of Planters' Monthlies from Vol.
1 of 1882 up to the first of the present year.
Of the earlier numbers, long since out of print, many issues were
entirely exhausted, making it necessary to reset and reprint all such
numbers, thus adding materially to the cost. This extra expense was
more than justified, however, by tlo valuable nature of much of the
matter contained in the&o old numbers, matter that cannot be found
elsewhere than in these books and that is valuable really beyond price
to the plantation interests.
These Planters are uniformly bound in full law sheep, giving them an
attractive appearance in addition to their durability.
Anyone desiring a complete set, or any part of a set, would do well
to communicate with the Gazette Co. at an early date, as there are but
very few sets available at the present time, and in order to complete
more sets it will be necessary to reset and print more back numbers,
thus increasing tht cost still more.
I ' -V ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' I
- 11 ' .
' ' , . , .
. working. It would mean a survival
of tne fittest and probably cheaper
bread.
president Pinkham reported that the
t T-0,,
"iC "
na, Almost entirely by tneir own er-
i forts and their common employes, en-
larged tne accommodations or
the
Home and were now prepared to re
ceive all the girl children at the Set
tlement. He had directed Dr. Goodhue
to make an examination of the chil
dren, and that all found clean be sent
to Honolulu within sixty days. "This
course will strain the resources of the
Home," the president's message read,
"for the appropriation granted by the
Legislature never contemplated the
"The Boys' Home should have our
attention at the earliest possible mo
ment. We are obliged to delay a few
monins, as tne appropriation win not
carry through the fiscal period."
SANITARY MATTERS.
The president gave a summary of
sanitation work in Honolulu and Hilo
for September. The reports of Dr.
J. S. B. Pratt, chief sanitary officer
and Inspector of cemeteries, for Au
gust and September were read. For
the past month, of seven nuisances re
ported five had been abated. Seven
applications for restaurant licenses
were approved. A lodging house li
cense, with room for 63 persons, was
approved. There had been thirty-six
inspections of graves, with several ex
posures of old coffins noted. One con
viction for nuisance was obtained and,
while sentence was under suspension,
the nuisance was abated by the of
fender. Praise was bestowed by the president
on the excellent work done in Hilo
during the month.
The w-ork of the Honolulu inspectors
for September consisted of 7350 in
spections, 1531 orders finished out of
1622 given, 16 permits for keeping 415
pigs granted, also four permits for
keeping 600 ducks, and 36 1-4 days of
special duty performed.
Under Inspector Bowman at Hilo 1200
inspections were made and 262 orders
given and carried out. The number of
traps set in Hilo was 1820 and pieces
of poisoned food placed 3338, and 281
rats were caught, 1729 pieces of poison
ed food taken and 50 rats found dead.
There had been 960 inspections under
the mosquito crusade, in Hilo, 534 ap
plications of oil made. 165 gutters
cleaned, eight pools filled in and six
d rained off.
The Nuuanu water had received the
department's attention and, the presi-
99
THOMSON'S
GLOVE-FITTINST
HABIT-HIP
CORSETS
.J
fh
FROGPFS3 BnCLZ,
FORT STivriET.
1 -W 1 ' T 1 ' ' ' ' T ' ' ' T T T
m . .... ""-?
dent said on this subject, "there is a,
proper understanding between the De-
partment of Public Works nnri th5
department"
to VISIT PEST HOLES.
i. . lttin ms.tf
president wrote:
"There are a number of places the
officers of the board have been trying
to have put into sanitary condition,
I suggest" the board adjourn to to
morrow, Thursday, afternoon, and visit:
the several places and take such ac
tion as is, in their judgment, proper."
From an informal talk on this sub
ject, it appeared that the insanitary
places are two in the neighborhood of"
Liliha and Vineyard streets and one
in the Kewalo section.
The president said a visitation of the
places would take an hour and a half.
He had the papers already prepared for-
i the condemnation of one place. They
. coum t vtkrv . .ff.
l
' j 4 vv. v. v. vjl rv ilii vuu
demnations until the board had seen,
the places.
It was agreed that the board should
go out in a body at 3 o'clock this,.
Thursday, afternoon to fee the places
Sanitary conditions generally were
talked over, with the result that three
additional inspectors are to be employ
ed this morning.
AN OFFER ACCEPTED.
Dr. Judd, Just before adjournments
announced that Dr, W. G. Rogers had"
offered to give free attendance, one
hour each week, at the Free Dispen
sary to treat diseases of the eye, ear
and nose. The offer was gratefully ac
cepted. With L. E. Pinkham, president, there
were present at the meeting Fred C.
Smith, Dr. J. R. Judd, Dr. J. T. Way
son and A. Fernandez, members, also
jr. J3. McVeigh, superintendent of the
Leper Settlement.
mm READING
The LATEST POPULAR BOOKS
are always obtainable at our store,
at prices remarkably low.
A.
HAWAIIAN NEWS CO., LTD.,
Alexander Young BKlg.
K. FUKUR0DA
Dealer In
JAPANESE AND AMERICAN
Dry and Fancy Goods,
Straw Hat Manufacturer.
Robinson Block, Nos. 28-32 Hotel St.
HEAD THE ADVERTISER
WOEXD'S NEWS DAILY.
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