OCR Interpretation


The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, January 19, 1906, Image 7

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1906-01-19/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

; n 1 -? If t t a ..-x -v
r V (l -'t 1 Kr' k ft 5 - i It,? i X " y t
-J
-SgC 5rpi "r1
oocoocooeoooooooo
Cantain Josselyn of the
American
bark Nuuanu, has written a letter to
Captain Isaac Bray of this city, stat-i
ing that it took him no less than six
days to make the run from Honolulu
to Kaanapali. He says that his craft
acted rather crank, there not being
enough sugar in her for stiffening. He
sent down his royal yards. Captain
Teivn Pvnialns Tiis Inns- beat bv the
fart that he went to windward of Mo-
lokai when he ought to have gone to
the leeward of that island. The har-
bormaster at Kaanapali bears him out;
in this conclusion. The skipper of the
Nuuanu characterizes his crew as
smart willing and intelligent. He re-
marks that h is alreadv lonesome for,
. jut ti ,
OLD WOMAN'S RUMOR.
The Call of January 10 says: The
Army transport Buford left Guam yes
terday, bound for Manila. She sailed
front this port December 15th with the
Third Cavalry, except Troops B and M.
When three days out of Honolulu ru
mors were circulated at the Presidio
and in thi3 city that she had foundered
In a gale with all on board. The ru
mors traveled and caused much anxie
ty among interested persons. Major
Duval, superintendent of the Army
transport service, was aroused after
midnight and asked about the disaster.
He quieted the fears of his questioners
by telling them that no such informa
tion had been received, nor could any
thing have been learned, if the ship j
had foundered in midocean. three days ;
west of the Sandwich Islands. Upon
investigation he learned that the ru
mors originated with an aged woman,
who had a dream or presentiment. He
allayed the fears as much as possible,
and the announcement of the Buford's
sailing from Guam proves the fallacy
of the rumor of her foundering.
CLAUD INE AND A WATERSPOUT.
Last Monday morning when the
steamer Claudine was two miles north
west of Mahukona and bound frohi
Kawaihae, a big waterspout was sight
ed heading directly for the steamer.
The course of the vessel was changed
and danger avoided, the mass of wTater
passing on the lee side of the vessel,
at a distance of about two-thirds of a
mile. The base of the waterspout ap
peared to be about 200 feet in diameter
and branched- out at the -s top like the
cup of a flower. The waterspout
struck the shore between Mahukona
and Honoipu, the land in the neigh
borhood being flooded. This is the sec
ond waterspout reported off the islands
by local mariners in recent years.
THE SUGAR SITUATION.
Purser Everett of the steamer Kau
ai, reports the following sugar on hand
on Hawaii: '
Kukuihaele on hand 2500 bags, Ho
nokaa starts grinding January 17, Paa
uhau on hand 4000 bags, Kukaiau
starts January 17, Ookala no report,
Papaaloa starts next month, Hakalau
on hand 5900 bags, Honomu starts Jan
uary 16, Pepeekeo starts January 17,
ELECTION OF OFFICERS.
BENSON, SMITH & CO., LTD.
At the annual meeting of the stock
holders of Benson, Smith & Co., Ltd.,
held at the office of the corporation,
Wednesday, January 17, 1906, at 8 p. m.,
the following officers were elected to
serve for the ensuing year:
Geo. W. Smith.. President and Manager
S. L. Rumsey Vice-President
J. C. McGill Treasurer
A. J. Gignoux Secretary
J. A. Kennedy .. Auditor
W. C. McGonagle Director
A. J. GIGNOUX,
7316 Secretary.
NOTICE
We take this method of notifying
the public that all accounts due us
which are not settled within sixty days
from date will be placed in the hands
of an attorney for collection.
(Signed)
THE PORTER FURNITURE CO.
Per K.B.PORTER.
Honolulu. January 2, 1906. 158
NOTICE.
During my absence from the Ter
ritory. Mr. L. C. Abies will act for me
under full Power of Attorney.
(Signed) K. B. PORTER.
Honolulu, January 5, 1906. 7305
ELECTION OF OFFICERS.
At the annual meeting of the Kwong
Tee Society held in Honolulu on De
cember 30, 1905, the following officers
were elected for the ensuing year:
C. Winam President
Chock Sing Vice-President
Lau Yin ?. English Secretary
Paul G. Tai Chong 1
Assistant Secretary
Chong' Jack Lai Chinese Secretary
Ching Chow
Assistant Chinese Secretary
Lee Wah Seu Treasurer
Ho Chun Assistant Treasurer
Yuen Mun Auditor
LAU YIN,
Secretary.
Honolulu. Jan. 8, 1906. "311
WW
3
i
, Papaikou on hand 900U Dags, iiiiik.u
on hand 1S00 bags, Waiakea on nanu
liiOO bags.
MEADE IN SEEVldE.
The transport Meade is now on the
drydock undergoing a thorough over
hauling to fit her for sea service again.
For three years she has been lying here
' in the stream without doing a stroke of
work. Some months since she was
i hauled alongside the Risdon Iron
"Works, where she went through ex
j tensive repairs to her boilers, engines
an(j machinery. She also had an en
tirelv new deck put on. Now she is
; to have the plates of her hull tnor-
j oughly overhauled and is to be put In
first-class sea-going shape.
The Meade was placed on the dry-
dock at Hunters Point late Saturday
afternoon, being taken there in charge
of Major C. A. Devol. When she had
settled down into the dock and the
water had been pumped out her lower
plates from below the water line to
the kel were covered with a mass of
mussels and barnacles. The mussels
predominated. There were millions of
them, many being three and four inch
es long.
The Meade will be taken to the trans
port dock Tuesday afternoon. She will
sail February 1 for Manila, taking the
Second Infantry, now stationed at Fort
Logan, and the Sixth Provisonal Bat
talion of field artillery, composed of
the Eighth and Thirteenth batteries,
now stationed at Fort D. A. Russell.
These troops go to Manila, but wheth
er they are to remain in the Philip
pines or whether they go there to be
in call for any emergency that might
arise in China is a question which
irmy ornciais stationed here are un
able to throw, any light upon. Call.
BANGALORE 'S PILIKIA.
xne ship Bangalore has had a nar
row escape from the fate which had
befallen many a sailing vessel engag
ed in the dangerous occupation of
carrying coal, a cargo which has a
bad habit of warming up and breaking
into flames at inconvenient times. The
Bangalore, Captain Blanchard, has put
into Valparaiso with her cargo on fire.
Although well known at this port, it
is some time since the Bangalore
dropped her anchor in this harbor. She
left this coast April 11, 1905, when she
sailed for Hilo. She left the Hawaiian
port May 15 for Delaware Breakwater
and October 6 sailed from Philadelphia
on the voyage now interrupted by the
conflagration-in her hold.
She was bound for Honolulu with a
cargo of coal and managed to reach
the Pacific before things below got too
hot for comfort. No details have been
received as to the extent of damage
done by the fire, but the fact that she
was able to put into Valparaiso insures
the safety of those on board.
The Bangalore was built in 1SS6 at
Stockton, Me., and is owned by Alex
ander & Baldwin of this city. Call,
Jan. 9.
FISH FAMINE FEARED.
There has been a great scarcity of
fish of late in the local market and
what has been brought in has been
sold at almost famine prices The
Japanese fishermen estimate that the
rough weather which has" prevailed
during the present month has cost
them many hundreds of dollars. On
ly a few of the great fleet of sampans
have ventured outside the harbor this
year. In consequence of no suddIv of
fish
coming from the sea, the salt-,
water and inland ponds have been
heavily drawn upon and if the windy
weather does not speedily let up, a
j fish famine in Honolulu may be a fact
i
HEAVY WEATHER.
The gale which has been blowing
from the south and south-west the last
few days continued with unabated
fury yesterday. Terrific seas were run
ning outside the harbor and the spec
tacle of the surf breaking on the reef
was a particularly fine one. The out
look was so bad last night that it was
decided not to board the S. S. Mongo
lia outside, unless the weather moder
ated considerably, but to wait until
the big liner entered the harbor. It la
a long time since a similar precaution
had to be taken.
SEAECH TOE EIO DE JANETEO.
Divers were out In the bay yester
day searching for the lost steamship
Rio de Janeiro. " They had the launch
Brisk anchored off the point where the
ill-fated steamer was supposed to have
sunk, and about 1 o'clock a diver
dropped down to the bottom and re
mained there for some time. When
he came to the surface he declined to
give any account of his visit under the
sea. Call.
LOCAL STEAMER MOVEMENTS.
The steamer Maul was anchored at
Paauhau on Monday afternoon. She
should arrive here on Saturday morn
ing with 75 head of Parker cattle, 2500
bags of sugar from Ookala and 4100
bags from Paauhau. The steamer Le
hua was, according to last reports at
Hilo, removing the hulk of the wrecked
Martha Davi. The steamer Kaiulani
is laying bubys at Papaikou.
LOOKS LIKE A BIG BLOW.
Captain Parker of the steamer Clau-,
dine which arrived from Maui ports
yesterday afternoon, stated that his
barometer was lower than it had been
! at any time during the past three
vears," between Lahaina and Honolulu.
; lie thinks that a great Kona storm
! brewing.
DUMFRIESSHIRE'S SAILING.
The British bark Dumf riessnire, tav
tain Taylor, which arrived here on De-r--nhT-
d fr.-.-n T.eith. leaves on Tues-
oay next for r.uresa to iukk a. jum
charter to Callao. The Dumfries
will take 600 tons of ballast.
SKIPPING NOTES.
nire
The bark Mohican sailed for Hono
ullu on January 9.
Twn drcdeers are now working near
the railroad wharves.
The steamer Claudine departs at
p. m. today for Maui ports.
The transport Meade sails for the
Philippines on February 1st.
The A.-H. S. S. Texan is expected to
arrive here about February 6.
The schooner Helene left San Fran
cisco for Honolulu on January 4.
A sampan which left here for Kauai
three months ago has never been heard
from.
The S. S. Alameda is d.ue from San
Francisco on Saturday with four aas
later mail.
The steamer Maui will arrive tomor
row from Hawaii ports with cattle and
6500 sacks of sugar.
The barkentine Kohala made the run
from San Francisco to Champerico,
Guatemala, in 28 days.
The fertilizer cargo of the bark Dum
friesshire was not in the least dam
aged by the long trip round the Horn.
The S. S. Mongolia should arrive
from the Orient this morning. She will
probably leave for the Coast this after
noon.
The S. S. Nebraskan is due here next
Thursday and will be followed by the
Nevadan. The last two will take su
gar to the Coast.
The S. S. Alaskan was to have sail
ed for Lahaina yesterday afternoon
but DostDoned starting until the
weather moderates.
On account of rough weather the
steamer Claudine was unable to effect
a landing at Kihei, Nahiku or Keanae
A boatload of freight was swamped
while attempting to land at Lahaina.
The bark Kaiulani, Capiaiit Colly,
will leave for the Coast in a week or
ten days with about 43,000 sacks of
sugar to be shipped by H. Hackfeld &
Co. A number of passengers will go
up on the bark.
The steamer Helene which left last
night took 70,000 feet of lumber for
McGregor's landing near Maalae bay.
Cotton Bros, have the contract from
the Territorial government for the
construction of the landing. A num
ber of men left on the Helene to work
on the job.
The steamer Mikahala had some lit
tle trouble in getting away from her
wharf for the run to Kauai at 5 o'clock
yesterday afternoon. In backing out,
the vessel's stern struck the Hackfeld
wharf, and when she started ahead
again her bow came into collision with
the steamer Kauai,
done, however.
No damage was
LUKE WRIGHT JR.
DYING FROM DRUG
ARKANSAS CITY (Kas.), January
9. Luke E. Wright, Jr., fell uncon
scious in a restaurant here this after
noon, the result of morphine poison
ing, and tonight is so seriously ill
that his recovery is doubtful. From
letters found in his pockets it is be
lieved that he is a son of Luke E.
Wright of Memphis, Tenn., Governor
General of the Philippines.
Wright has been working as a com
mon laborer in a grading gang on the
Midland Valley Railroad south of Sil
verdale, Kas. He came to Arkansas
City yesterday and prepared to go to
his home. He had received a draft for
$100 from his father to defray his ex
penses. Papers show that he was an
ensign on a United States battleship.
Luke Wright. Jr., was an ensign in
the Navy, but resigned in July, 1904,
after a service of eight years. No
cause for his resignation was given.
EVANS MAY BE
COURT-MARTIALED
WASHINGTON, Jan. 8. Admiral
Robley D. Evans is harshly criticized
in naval circles for having had only
one pilot on the vessels of his squad
ron in the lower bay on Sunday at the
time of the grounding and collision.
Naval officials say this undoubtedly
was responsible for the damage to his
vessels. It is the policy of Secretary
Bonaparte to hold the officer in com
mand of a fleet responsible for any
accident, and that officer is clothed
with ample authority to take all pre
cautions necessary to protect his ves
sels. It would not be surprising if Secre
tary Bonaparte should order Admiral j
Evans to answer before a court-martial
after he has received the report
of the court of inquiry which will be
appointed by Admiral Evans to make
an investigation of the accident.
A BAEEOOM SCENE.
CLARKIA (Idaho), January 5.
Made a cannibal despite himself by
being forced to eat the ear which he
had bitten from an antagonist. Brad
Valshaw, a lumberjack from Klinard's
camp, on the upper St. Marie's, paid
a unique but revolting penalty for a
quarrel and fight of his own making
last night in which he was badly
worsted. 1
A dozen men witnessed the fracas
Statement of Assets and Liabilities of
CLAUS SPRECKELS & CO.,
M the Close of Business December 31. 1905.
- s j
f
I
ASSETS.
Loans, discounts and over
drafts.
&12.39.-..20
27.00:1.00
4,200.00
30 170.0J
10S.SS2.46
239.929.73
- - uonds and stocks..
tt,
Other assets
Due from banks...
Cash
$1,342,777.42
I. EDWARD I. SPALDING, Cashier, do solemnly swear that the fore
going statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief.
E. I. SPALDING,
Cashier.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 17th day of January, 1906.
HENRY C. HA PA I.
Notary Public, First Judicial Circuit, T. H.
PREMIER DE WITTE ON HIS
EFFORTS TO SAVE RUSSIA
ox. x -Ci-taiteKLKG, January 10,
interesting statement to a delegation
requested a relaxation of the orders
in the interest of the electoral campaign. The Premier could not promise to Jude of the Circuit Court of the SJ
do anything until after January 22. While personally he did not sympathize UtteTtf C,rUit
witn the harsh measures of Interior Minister Durnovo, he regarded them as
essential. The Premier could not assume the responsibility for a course which
if it resulted in bloodshed would make
of the failure of the Moderates to give the government support, saying that
upon their shoulders largely rests the burden of compelling the government
to repression. He added:
The Emperor in the manifesto
people more rights than any monarch
atruuue which Russian society assumed. The government's appeals for con
naence were rejected and every liberty granted was abused by the revolutionists.
The permission to hold meetings was translated into license for street dis-
turbances and assemblages to plot against the life of the government and claims against the Estate of said do
to the industrial ruin of the country. I have always- been opposed to repres- dent V Present th sam? du,y "
: vx i o4.u . . , , , , , thenticated and with the proper
won, but the attitude of the Moderates compelled me to adopt harsh measures, vouchers, if any exist. . whether suck
1 am determined to save Kussia."
While the Emperor wanted the
ooaoioie, premier v nte said tnat those charged with the election feared it
will be impossible for it to assemble
Speaking of the innumerable difficulties with which the government was
confronted, the Premier openly stated
continued to act independently, instancing Moscow, where before the revolt
neither the Governor General, the Governor nor the Prefect informed him of
the conditions prevailing there? He
than people generally believed.
Recounting a remarkable incident
Premier said:
"At one time all the stations except
of the revolutionists. The latter in desperation started a train hauling two cars
loaded with dynamite at full speed for the station with the intention of blow
ing it up. A frightful disaster was averted by a timely warning of the plot,
which enabled the authorities to have a military train with steam nn ready
on a parallel track.
Ail the dynamite
rain running alongside fired at the end
the locomotive, stopping the train before it reached its destination."
In St. Petersburg the Premier
been captured to destroy the entire
laws were being prepared to define the relations of the Council of the Em
pifeand the National Assembly. The former would be composed of 176 mem
bers, half of them appointed by the Emperor and half elected. The latter
would include 34 Zemstvoists, 18 members of the nobility and 12 representa
tives' of trade and industry, while the clergy, Poland, the Caucasus and the
border province would each have six representatives.
: It is rumored that the revolutionists are keeping a list of land owners who
have fled or are fleeing abroad with the intention if the revolution is success
ful, of confiscating their estates. The news from Trans-Caucasia is that a com
plete revolution prevails in Mingreli and Georgia. The Viceroy is withdraw
ing all the troops obtainable north of Vladikavkaz for service in the revolu
tionary territory.
KUHIO'S
:
(Continued from Page 1.)
Washington; there is hardly a prominent official in the entire executive de-
partment of the government" who was here when Mr. Hatch was here. Many of
, , , . ... . . . , , - ,
the prominent heads of committees in Congress are also strangers to him, and
he does not even know them by sight.
"I" DID IT
i
"Mr. Hatch was at first opposed to having a delegation come, and it was
only because of my urging it that he consented to the plan.
"But I am frank to say that if a delegation is to come on with the idea
that they are to work wholly or even chiefly through and with Mr. Hatch, they
would much better remain at home; for they would simply create dissension
that would be very likely to defeat the main end that we all desire to achieve.
DOESN'T ENVY HATCH.
"You will believe me when I say
of Mr. Hatch, with whom my relations
of any personal desire for public credit
done for this measure. It is because the opportunity is an unusual one and
the entire matter one requiring such carefulness of handling, that I can not
see its prospects threatened without speaking out frankly. I accordingly send
this personal line to you in order that you may fully understand the situation."
THE PEESONAL FEATUEE.
i
As to the "personal line," the letter is, as already stated, addressed offi.'
cially and contains nothing "personal" to the addressee apart from his public
relations. It need not be stated in view of its tenor that the letter is highly
"personal" subjectively. In fact, it is vividly picturesque in personalities.
Mr. McClellan concludes: . I
"The Delegate has increased prestige
, , t..
me time nas gone uy wiieii ue cau saicir
desire legislation."
which occurred in Floss' saloon, near
Clarkia, and, according to their ver
sion. Valshaw, who had been drink
ing, attacked "Lank" Franigan, goug
ing out an eye and biting off one ear,
at the same time saying: "I will chew
you down to a dwarf."
Franigan rallied, and. after kicking
Valshaw in the head, forced him to
eat the ear he had bitten off. though
not until he had beaten Valshaw near
ly into insensibility in a second af
fray. Franigan spiced the ear with
the bar pepper and salt before serv
ing. The lumberjacks who witnessed
the affair seemed to regard it as a
glorious rather than a horrible affair.
A MONKEY MAEEIAGE.
HARRISBURG, 111., Jan. 7. A mar
LIABILITIES.
Capital paid in
Surplus and profits
Deposits
Due to banks
5it0.0C0.tMl
79, "35. 00
759.560.42
3.SS2.00
$1.342,777.2
1:43 p. m. Premier Witte todav made an
headed by the Mayor of thig city which
of the Prefect of Police against meetings
him scapegoat. He sock hitterW
of October 30 at one stroke eranted the
had ever before eiven. but vou know the
National Assembly to meet as early as
before April 28.
that many of the provincial authorities
said the Moscow revolt was more serious
j
that heretofore had escaped notice, the
l
the Nicholas Depot were in the hands
train arrived, soldiers from the military
and managed to pierce the boiler of
further remarked, enough dynamite had
city. In conclusion, he stated that two
VALET.
that this is not written out of any envy
are very friendly; neither is it because
for the work so far done and to bfl
in his second term in the House, and
v. ; a k v1D n
ue jguucu mu uuuicu uv "
riage ceremony out of the ordinary has
taken place at Mount Carmel, in which
a. number of local business men took
part. Bismark, a large ape which made
his home at the Lotta Hotel for some
time, was married to Miss Evolution, 1
another one of the kind. The bride j
arrived on the evening train and was
looking her best. Judge H. J. Hen-
ning officiated and the ceremony was
very solemn and impressive. George
Laubender was best man and John
Keieh was maid of honor. Sheriff
Harry gave the bride away. Refresh
ments were served after the cere
mony. Announcement cards have been
sent out.
Mr. and Mrs. Bismarck will begin
housekeeping at once at Lotta, where
hev are at home to their many friends.
ESTATE OP PA ALU II I.
IX
THE CIRCUIT COURT OK THD
SECOND CIRCUIT, TERRITORY
OF HAWAII. AT CHAMBERS
IN PROBATE.
In
the Matter of the Estate of Res.
Z. S. K. Paaluhi. Late of Waialu,
Molokai, Deceased. Order of N-tU-e
of Hearing Petition for Ad
ministration. On reading and filing the Petition ot
Rev. D. Kaal, a creditor of said de
I,
ceased, of Kalaupapa, Molokai. alleg
ing that Rev. Z. S. K. Paauhi, of Wai
aula, Molokai, died intes-tate at Wai-
lua aforesaid, on the 8th day of Oc
tober, A. D. 1903, leaving property la
the Hawaiian Islands necessary to fe
administered upon, and praying thX
Letters of Administration issue t
some suitable person.
It Is Ordered, That Monday, the ith
day of February, A. D. 190$, t M
o'clock a. m., be and hereby Is ap
pointed for hearing said Petition in tt
Court Room of this Court at WallX.
Maui, at which time and place all per
sons concerned may appear and show
cause, if any they have, why said Peti
tion should not be granted, and thast
notice of this order be published
the English and, Hawaiian langaatrea
for three successive weeks In the Pa
cific Commercial Advertiser anl N-
published in Honolulu.
'f at WalIuku- MauI- Thxenbat
! (Signed) A. N. KEPOIKAI.
(Signed) EDMUND H. HART.
Clerk of the Circuit Conrt
of the Second Circuit
7298 Dec. 29. Jan. 6. 12. 19.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
ANNIE ISABELLA FORBES.
The undersigned, William J. PorVss.
having been duly appointed Adnaiois-
Forbes, of Honolulu, deceased, hrebr
sives notice to all persons bavins'
rlalma hA securer! hv mnrtei. r
otherwise, at the office of the under
signed, lioom mi juaci uuiiaing, Ho
nolulu, Oahu, within six months from
the date hereof, or they will be for
ever barred.
Dated, Honolulu, T. 11., January .
1906.
WILLIAM J. FORBES.
Administrator of the Estate of An&Jw
Isabella Forbes, Deceased, .
7303 Jan. 4, 11, 18, 25, Feb. t-
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
ESTATE OF GUSTAV KUNST.
The undersigned,' having been ap
pointed executor of the Estate ot
Gustav Kunst, late of Hamburg, Em-
pire of Germany, hereby gives notice
to a11 Creditors having claims against
!. T Pf ft."1
Minnev. McCIanahan & Cooner. attor-
neys at law, Judd Building, Honolulu,
within six months from date hereof
Parties indebted to the Estate are
requested to make immediate payment
t'' the undersigned at the above office.
xated Honolulu, T. H., January C
x906.
ADOLPII JULIUS BAETCKE,
Executor of the Estate of Gustar
Kunst, deceased.
7304 Jan. 5, 12, 19, 20, Feb. 2.
NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEET
ING OF SHAREHOLDERS
ALEXANDER & BALDWIN, LTIX
Pursuant to call of the First Vice
President, a special meeting of th
shareholders of Alexander & Baldwin,
Limited, will be held on Tuesday, the
30th day of January, 1906, at 2 o'clock
p. m. of said day, at the office of the
corporation in the Stangenwald Bulld-
S, Honolulu, Hawaii, for the pur-
pose of considering a proposition to
the capital stock of 8ald cor.
poration, and such other business as
may be brought before the raerfjtfms '
ELMER E. PAXTON,
secretary, Alexander & Baldwin, Ui'b
Dated at Honolulu, January 13, 1306.
,
ELECTION OF OFFICERS.
ESTATE OF S. G. WILDER, LTD.
At the annual meeting of the stock
holders of the Estate of S. G. Wilder,
Ltd., held in this city, January 18.
1906 the following officers were elect-
ed to j,erve during the ensuing year:
G. P. Wilder President
J. A. Wilder Vice-President
S. G. Wilder.. .Secretary and Treasurer
H. D. M. Cobb f Auditor
Directors E. D. Tenney and J. R
Galt.
S. G. WILDER,
7316 Secretary.
ELECTION OF OFFICERS.
At a meeting of the See Tap Benev-
ent , " evening or
December 30, 1905, the following offl-
cers were elected to serve for the year
1906:
Chu Gem President
Lee Let Vice-President
Lum Toi Li Treasurer
Chun Leong Vice-Treasurer
Ng Gang English Secretary
Tung Sue Lung Chinese Secretary
NG GANG.
Secretary. See Yap Benevolent Society.
7314
ADJOURNED ANNUAL
MEETING.
CALIFORNIA FEED CO, LTD.
The adjourned annual meeting of thi
stockholders of the California Feed
Co., Ltd., will be held at the compa
ny's office. Queen street, on Saturday,
January 20, 1906. at 10 a. m.
L. C. KING.
Secretary.
Honolulu, January 17, 1S06. 731i

xml | txt