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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, January 20, 1906, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1906-01-20/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER, HONOLULU, JANUARY 20, 1906.
AMTEHTED.. Cy
Scriven's Improved
Elastic Seam
Drawers . .
This scientific drawer is worn
by over a million careful dressers
and it costs no more than ordin
ary drawer made of good ma
terial. It fits snugly and follows the
lines of the hips and legs. Waist
sizes from 28 to 50 inches.
None of our patrons are more
delighted than men of unusual
build. It makes no difference if
you are slim, stout, short, tall or
of perfect proportions, you can
alwavs secure a CORRECT FIT.
The SCRIVEN'S DRAWER
will yield to any strain or pres
sure after which it will return to
its original shape.
Only the very best material is
used and in comfort and durabil
ity it KNOWS NO EQUAL.
M. Mclnerny, Ltd.
MERCHANT AND FORT STREETS.
Make Your
" BREAD "
Taste Better
By adding a little good Apple But
ter! It makes you forgive indifferent ;
bread, while good bread and good ap-
pie butter make an irresistable combi
nation. We do not hesitate to recom- 1
mend ' '.
Heinz Apple Butter
The manufacturers authorize us to ' 'e-r
refund your money if you do not like
it, but no one has ever asked us to ' '
make that guaranty good. We sell a
great deal of it too.
In stone crocks of convenient sizes. M'' ' '"
M. Hackfeld & 2o., Ltd.
Wholesale Agents.
Get
Your
Gas Range
Now
It means all-year-round relief from unpleasant
kitchen duties building fires, carrying coal,
unnecessary cleaning, etc.
A Gas Water Heater will supply hot water in
any quantity.
Both for sale by dealers and
HONOLULU GAS CO., LTD.,
Alexander Young Bldg.
jJ yv
mm
THAT YOU CM DRINK
IF YOU TKZLXT TO -
PRTTCKrV
PAINTER BOTTL'G WKS,
Sewalo. Pione U hite 1331
For Sale or Lease!
l Lots in Gulick Tract, Kalihi,
5' ON CAR LINE.
$350.00 and Upward
' terms. Particulars of MRS. 5. A. GULICK.
1820 GULICK AVENUE, KALIHI.
IMPOBTM
T DATA FOR
THE HAW
FARMERS
Circular Xo. 1, Division of Forestry, of the Board of Commissioners of
j Agriculture and Forestry, has been issued over the signature of Ealph S.
Hosmer, the superintendent. It is entitled "An Offer of Practical Assistance
to Tree Planters." The Division of Forestry will render practical and personal
assistance to individuals or corporations desiring to establish forest plantations,
wood lots or windbreaks or to do other forest work. The circular, which
may be had free on application, will give all the particulars.
THE JAPANESE BEETLE.
Circular No. 2,' Division of Entomology, of the Board of Commissioners of
Agriculture and Forestry, is by Jacob Kotinsky, assistant entomologist, and
deals with the Japanese beetle fungus. A supplementary note by Brother
Matthias Xewell tells how to get rid of the beetle by inoculation. Brother
Matthias' method is described as follows: Take a box about six inches deep
and fill about one-half with damp soil. Keep this soil moist, not muddy, by
occasionally sprinkling with water. Dry soil will not work. Collect a lot of
beetles and place them in this box. Be sure to feed the beetles for they must j
not starve. The best time to place the food in the box is during the day, be- j
cause then the beetles are mostly hidden in the ground. If the box be opened
in the evening they will try to escape.
Valuable plants need not be taxed for their food, for any one may have
noticed that even certain weeds are eaten by them. The so-called "honohono"
grass is found in many places and beetles eat it readily.
Keep the lid of the box well down. Xo special precaution need be taken
about air holes. Keep the box in a dry, shady place.
Beetles placed in such a box and properly cared for will die of the fungus,
for the fungus which destroys them is now found in all localities.
A whitish substance grows out of the joints of the dead beetles, which
after a few days turns green. The substance is the fungus. When a number
of beetles have developed the green fungus, mix them well with some dry or
nearly dry earth or fine sand, and scatter this mixture over and around the
plants attacked.
U. S. PUBLICATIONS.
Uecent bulletins from the U. S. Experiment station here include a valuable
treatise on the Avocado Mealy-Bug with directions how to combat it with a
kerosene emulsion. The bulletin by Edmund C. Shorey, on Lime an Essential
Factor in Forage, has already been noticed in these columns.
Biggest Bargain Ever Offered
WE ARE PUTTING OX SALE THIS WEEK ABOUT
300 PIECES
OF
T0RSH0N LRSES
FROM i TO 5 INCHES WIDE AT THE REMARKABLY
LOW PRICE OF
50c Per Dozen
THESE GOODS ARE EASILY WORTH ALL THE
WAY FROM 75c. TO $1.25 PER DOZEN.
WE ARE ALSO SHOWING THIS WEEK A NEW
LINE OF CHILDREN'S DRESSES AND HATS, IN
FANTS BONNETS, ETC.
A
OM
PROGRESS BLOCK,
FORT STREET.
tig BBAflD BEATS
HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLES
One hundred and forty acres of pine
apples are being planted at "Wahiawa
by A. "W. Eames, who Is also about to
put in a pineapple cannery of his own
there. Mr. Eames recently returned
from a visit to California, where he
Inspected the different brands and
grades of pineapples on the market
there.
"I was shown some twenty different
brands," said Mr. Eames yesterday,
and but one of these had points of
superiority over the Hawaiian product."
However, there need be no fear of
the one brand. Hawaiian pines have
been pronounced by experts .to be the
finest in the world, and there is no
reason why they should lose their place
in preparation for market.
'AHALA TOBACCO
DECLARED GOOD
Samuel G. "Wilder informed an Ad
vertiser reporter yesterday that some
tobacco being raised on the sugar plan
tation of the Hawaiian Agricultural
Company at Pahala. Hawaii, is giving
excellent promise. Cigars made from it
seem to be as good as those made from
the tobacco raised at the United States
sub-experiment station in Hamakua.
Very fine wrapper tobacco is included
in the Pahala growths.
T. J. Fitzpatrick, the cigar dealer,
states that he has not yet received any
cigars back from the Hamakua tobacco
sent to Tacoma for experimental man
ufacture. It is hardly time yet, as the
three cases of tobacco forming the lot
were only shipped by the steamer be
fore the last Alameda. Mr. Fitzpat
rick knows of the Pahala tobacco and
says it is good.
PAYNE HOT SO BITTER,
(Continued from Page 10
land near Pearl Harbor land bought
by the government of the United
States, but now under the control of
the owners on a certain leasehold ar-
"8 -4
m uoii
1 am m
oiner
The season's first cold
may be slight may yield
to early treatment, but the
next cold will hang on
longer; it will be more
troublesome, too. Un
necessary to take chances
on that second one. Scott's
Emulsion is a preventive
as well as a cure. Take
T'8 EJIMSIOJi
ivhen colds abound and
you'll have no cold. Take it
vvhen the cold is contracted
md it checks inflamma
tion, heals the membranes
the throat and lungs
aid drives the cold out.
Send for free sample.
SCCTT & BOWSE. Chemists
409-415 Pearl Street, Sew York
JCc and $1.00 ... All drugUt
Mhl
1 ranerement where they told me that in
one year they had produced eleven and '
twelve tons of sugar per acre. The ,
managers of that plantation say thatj
they do not think that the extra
amount of sugar pays for the extra ex-;
Ipense in cultivation and in fertilizing. " j
Mr. McGavin -I would like to ask
the gentleman from New York what the
; reason is for excluding sugar from the
absolutely free list?
Mr. Payne I am sorry that my
friend was not here when I commenced.
I said that the only reason was for the
sake of revenue. They need the rev-j
enue. nere is no otner reason, tiiat 1
know of.
The gentleman from Xew York then
touched upon the amount of revenue
I produced by sugar, and continued: "1
; remember now that I was talking about
Hawaii, and free sugar there, and the
result. Mr. Hatch, who is retained by
, the business people of Hawaii to look
' after their interests in Washington, ap
peared before the committee. lie does
not want this bill to pass, and they do
not want this bill to pass. They are
afraid that it will jeopardize something
in Hawaii if this bill passes. Still, he,
I tells about the result there. While
these lands that I have referred to pro
duce eleven to twelve tons per acre on
this one plantation, they are able to
produce but from two to three tons per
acre on the average land in the Islands.
And they say that on their investment
of $65,000,000 in plantations the last
two years, the return was 2.7 per cent,
profit in the whole Island. Now, if
with American capital and Hawaiian
capital, if with the best machinery in
the world, if with steam plows and the
highest and best methods of cultiva
tion for producing sugar in the world,
this is the result after thirty years of
free trade with the United States,
what in the name of common sense has
any interest in the United States to
, fear from the Philippine Islands?
j ' ' Why, Mr. Chairman, I visited one
of the plantations in the Philippines
and saw 'a sugar mill. They had cara
bao power with which to grind the
cane. They had a carabao at each end
of it, and a boy to drive the carabao.
They had a three-roller mill, and they
fed the rollers with one stalk at a
time. Now, you expect that
these people, with these crude methods,
without any understanding of the mod
ern means of producing sugar, to walk
at once into the position of the Ha
waiian Islands, and to be able to come
into your market and sell sugar at the
extravagant profit of 2.7 per cent,
profit on the capital invested. That is
what all this bother is about in resist-
ing the passage of tiiis bill at 25 per
cimit. or tne i.'ingJoy uuties. "
Mr. Mondell The gentleman persists
in referring to the case of Hawaii. 1
suppose from the gentleman's numer
ous visits to that Island he discovered
' that the plantation owners have long
since capitalized our duty, and that the
Hawaiian plantations are capitalized at
four to six times what they cost, and
they are making less than three per
cent, upon the cost of the plantation,
but it is because of the enormous over-,
capitalization there. 1
Mr. Payne The gentleman does not
know any such thing, and that thing
is denied by gentlemen whom I met
there, with all the apparent candor of
my friend from Wyoming.
Mr. Mondell I happened to be in Ha
waii at the time this process was go
ing on. I
Mr. Paynes Does the gentleman say J
sugar plantations in Hawaii were capi
talized four to six times their cost?
Mr. Mondell I was saying that 1
happened to be in the Islands at the
time when the bill passed making Ha
waii a part of the United States, when
the business of increasing the capital
of Hawaiian sugar plantations was go
ing on at a very rapid rate, and one
plantation had its capital multiplied
four times in less than two months.
Mr. Payne Well, now, Mr. Chairman,
it may have been true about one plan
tation. The gentleman mav have been
there. lie may have been
there and seen one thing of the kind
done. But, of course, Mr. Chairman,
one swallow docs not make a summer.
I believe the gentlemen who have lived
there all these years have had an oppor
tunity to know better than my friend
from Wyoming on a single visit. I
know thnt they know more than I lid
on one visit. I admit it for myself,
and I am willing to acknowledge it for
him.
Am.- nu"u
WIHECO.'S
CELEBRATED
i2S5.j- -j-emi.- TABLE
WINES
You can get wines higher in price; but quality and price con
sidered, it will be hard to surpass this brand of table wines
that have taken the FIRST PRIZES at both the St. Louis and
Lewis & Clarke Expositions.
RED WINES g
ZINFANDEL (light pleasant wine) '
CABERNET (old and meUow) (St. Julian Type) H
BURGUNDY (full bodied Bouquet) g
EL MO UNO (Bordeaux character) g
MEDOC (elegant, rich) W
WHITE WINES 2
GUTEDEL (fruity dry wine) S
JOHANNISBERG REISLING (Rhine wine character) g
VINE CLIFF (Moselle type) frj
SAUTERNES (very mellow; palatable)
HAUT SAUTERNES (medium sweet, delicate)
CHAUTAAU YQUEM (very rich type) W
SPARKLING WINES B
SPARKLING MOSELLE w
SPARKLING SAUTERNE H
SPARKLING BURGUNDY "
LEWIS & Co. Ltd , s 169 Kinff St., 'Phone 240.
Dresses
Carefully
gleaned
We make a specialty of carefully cleaning Silk Waists,
Dresses of -all sorts, Gloves, Ostrich Plumes, Feather Boas,
etc., etc.
We have special machinery and facilities for doing dry
cleaning and dyeing- in the best possible manner and guar
antee absolute satisfaction to our patrons.
We solicit your custom. Please give us a trial and be
convinced of the superiority of our work.
Sanitary Steam Laundry.
Ring up Main 73 and our wagon will call for your work.
The
PLUMBER
At 85 King Street
Gas and steam fitters. Estimates in work cheerfully given.
Clean, Sweet
F
:ath
PsLLOWS
l J If
J. Hopp & Co.,
Young Building Furniture Store-1053-1059
Bishop Street
ft-'
Ill
4:
IS :
1 r.
1

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