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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, July 09, 1906, Image 1

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TJ. S. 1ATHE2 BUREAU, JULY 8. Last 24 hours' rainfall, .02.
Temperature, Max. 82; Min. 72. Weather, valley showers.
SUGAE-96 Degree Test Centrifugals, 3.734375c.; Per Ton. $74.6875.
88 Analysis Beets, 8s 5id; Per Ton, S76.20.
ESTABLISHED JULV 2. 1856,
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22.50
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27.5o
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26.25
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CROSS THE
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COSSACKS Si PEASANTS
CLASH WITH BLOODSHED
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VOL. XLIV., NO. 7462. HONOLULU, HAWAII TERRITORY, MONDAY, JULY 9, 1906. PRICE FIVE CENTS
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LftfA BEOS
Kona's Rich Resources
Many Rare Trees
Flourish,
By Sol. N. Sheridan.
From the House of Choekhoo, Kawai
iiae, Hawaii, June 30. Since I have
een it, the wonder has grown upon me
that more has not been made of the
Kona country. What California is to
the mainland, it seems to me that the
Kona coast should be to these Islands
It is a land of unsurpassed fertility, of
rainfall enough to insure crops, of the
most delightful climate in the world
All nature smiles there, and anything
Ahat grows under the sun will thrive,
let i.ona has done little or man
lias done little with Kona and one of
the few sugar plantations that has
bailed has been that of Kona. Why?
.Ask the sugar men who have taken the
plantation in hand, and who are pre
paring now to build a railroad to go
with it. They say that they will make
a success of it and I'll warrant you
that they will. Indeed, the whole de
velopment of Kona is now more prom
ising than at any time in its history,
because it will be development along
modern lines. Kona is going to take
.advantage of the experience of other
sections, profiting by their successes
and by their failures, too.
A LAND OF RICHNESS.
But it is not in sugar alone that
IKona will thrive. The Bruner pineap
ple cannery, at Napoopoo, has begun
-work for the season, and the crop pros
pects are most promising.
"I have sold the product of the can
nery three times," said Mr. Bruner,
when asked about his prosperity.
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M'KENNA, "THE CABLE-HUT MAN," AT LEFT OF PICTURE, WHO WILL PASS THROUGH HONO
LULU SHORTLY.
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McKenna, the "cable-hut man," who was dumb for a few days. At this end tween and a military cordon surround-
sprang: into prominence at the time of of the line Superintendent Gaines and mg the city prevented people fram
the San Francisco disaster as being his staff remained in constant attend- passing to and fro. Honolulu depend
. " . ance upon the cable instruments await- ed entirely upon Mr. McKenna and ho
up. iu j the first si that communication remained at his post, with his staff.
who was first to get news out of Cali- would be reestablished. Finally sig- day after day and far into the night,
fornia to Honolulu, win probably pass nals came over the wire and it was sending -news' of the disaster, all of
through Honolulu in August on his wav lnen ot-ieea mat me san r rancisco wnien was cnerruiiy given to tne pub-
iorce was eiiaeavonng to get into
ti it
0-
Transport Thomas Floated Drydock Dewey
Three Days From Manila Yosemite Stages
Held UpSlaughter of Zulus.
(Associated Press Cablegrams.)
ST. PETERSBURG, July 9.Serious Agrarian disorders are re
ported. Seventeen have been killed in a conflict between Cossacks
and peasants.
TRANSPORT THOMAS FLOATED.
WASHINGTON, July g. The transport Thomas
floated.
has been
The Thomas lett Honolulu, after a smart passage from San Fran
cisco, on June 23 for Guam and Manila. Three days aKo she
stranded on a coral reef near Guam, but was said to be in a favor-
dme position lor floating. 1 he transport Meade was sent fro
vianna to ner assistance.
m
SUNK BY COLLISION.
' T
do not mean that J have
paid for it three times," he hastened
.to say, when the laugh went against '
to Guam. Mr. McKenna has been the
assistant superintendent of the Com
mercial Pacific Cable Company at San
Francisco, and has been promoted to be
superintendent of the Guam station.
Mr. McKenna was in charge of the
cable office at San IfTancisco at the
I time of the earthquake. He sent out
been ' a few .brief messages to Honolulu from
the Market street office, until flames
encroached upon the building and the
was endeavoring to get
communication with Honolulu from the
cable-hut near the Cliff House.
Then at last a message came over
the cable from McKenna. saying that
he and his. staff had worked incessant
ly and now desired sleep. Then the
cable became dumb again. "When Mc-
Iic by Superintendent Gaines, gratis,
and published and furnished to the
public gratis, by the Advertiser, in
"Specials," which were issued as often
as there was enough news to be
printed.
From the fund which was subscribed
to by merchants and citizens generally
jvenna awose news 01 tne disaster or Honolulu for Honolulu sufferers, a
came in a steady stream from the portion was devoted to a purse which
stricken city, sent by McKenna per- was presented to Mr. McKenna and
sonally. Tne whole story was told, at members of the San Francisco cable
LONDON, July 9. The British steamers Langley and Fishren
have collided in the English Channel. The Fishren sank but her
crew was saved.
DEWEY NEAR DESTINATION.
Jiim. "I mean that I have orders for :' office itself, compelling the office to be first in broken paragraphs, just as the staff as a token of the thanks of the
three times as many pines as I ean put closed- and the instruments removed, news reached the gender, from .the city, people here for relieving their minds
nip." .
That is a different thing, of course
Also, they are making a success of va
nilla, in Kona, and, of tobaeeo, and
there is in prospect the erection of a
great okolehao distillery, which will
manufacture the pure liquor of the Ha
waiians and put it on the market in at
tractive shape. However, it will be
equally potent, in any shape a drink,
thiee drams whereof will make a man
rob his own trunk.
Of course our party visited Captain
book's monument, at Kealakekua Bay,
and then it was to horse again for the
long ride around through Kona to the
homestead of Eben Low at Puuanahula.
That was one of the most notable of all
rides that we took on the Island of
Hawaii. It was a gallop, for the most
part, with freshened horses over the
smooth road along the heights of Kona,
overlooking the sea, and alter we had
passed the Maguire place, and the sun
was beginning to decline, we came out
upon the old lava flow of 1801.
WONDEEFUI. LAVA FLOW.
Also, but on the next day, we crossed
he lava flow of ,1859, by a macadamized
xoad, and that is an entirely different
thing from crossing it by a trail that
seems to lead out into the unknown.
Jt was before we came to this that we
rode across the lava flow that in 1S01
came frcm the small mountain of Hua
lalai. That is one of the most remark
able flows on this island, if not the
most remarkable. To begin with, it I
broke out from
Then Honolulu waited. The cable line for messengers were few and far be- of trie dreadful suspense.
ties in that -forest than are here enum
erated. He built the road through
there, and knows the land like a book.
Also, he is a man who makes friends
among trees. He knows trees and of
course a lot of trees know him:
1. Kauila (Genuine).
2. Uhiuhi.
3. Ohialehua.
4. Aawa.
5. Lama.
6. Aiahee.
7. Mamane.
8. Wiliwili.
9. Xaio.
10. lliahi (Sandalwood).
11. Alaa.
12. Aiea.
13. Aalii.
14. Ulei.
15. Ohe (not Bambod).
16. Haa.
17. Akia.
18. Kokio (Hibiscus, Hawaiian).
19. Halapepe.
20. Pua.
21. Kauila A (bastard Sandalwood).
22. Oa.
23. Ohia Kea.
24. Koa.
25. Olapa.
2tf. Opiko.
27. Kolea.
AN OLDER FORMATION.
Puuanahula, where Eben Low
and j
PROSPECTS ARE GOOD
FOR TOURIST SEASON
The prospects are good for a busy
tourist season commencing, at least,
in September. Secretary Wood of the
Promotion Committee feels assurance
in stating that the prospects are bright
er now than for several weeks or since
the disaster at San Francisco.
The Southern California Editorial
Association, which is scheduled to
come here in September, has over forty 1
people booked. Owing to the increas
T.; Mr. J. E. Knox. .326 Broadway, Xew
York City? Yours truly,
HENRY ASHLEY.
Grand Rapids, Mich., June 21, 1906.
Mr. H. P. Wood.
Dear Sir: Your letter of 14th inst.
and the folder came to hand today,
both of which are duly appreciated.
Very pleasant recollections of Honolulu
and the kindness shown our people on
their visit of 19C1 are brought to mind
again. Your islands are beautiful, and
j I have told this to many people since
i our return and a eroodly number have
ing number of applications to accom-; visited Honolulu as a result. Xoble
pany the association, this organization Pratt, Andrew Brown, Harry Webster,
may be compelled to confine them to RothweH- Wood and many others made
members only.
it iihs suuck secretary u ood that only waitin
the Editorial Association Is coming to visit your
Honolulu just in time to catch a
glimpse of Hawaiian politics. It will
WASHINGTON, July 9 The floating drydock Dewey is ex
pected to arrive at Manila on July 12.
The drydock Dewey was built on the Atlantic coast for the
United States Government and was started under tow of a powerful
steamer lor Manila via buez Canal many months ago. Her arrival
at various points on the Avayjias from time to time been reported.
This is probably the longest" and heaviest ocean towage on record.
- m -
THE KAISER IN NORWAY.
TRONDHJEM, Norway, July 9. Emperor William' of Ger
many has arrived for the coronation ceremonies and been cordially
greeted by King Haakon.
FATAL RAILWAY COLLISION.
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn., July 9. Four trainmen have been
killed in a railway collision.
m-m- '
HEAVY ZULU SLAUGHTER.
1 our visit so pleasant and eniovable
j that, much less than forgetting, we are
: for the opportunity ' to
islands again. Waikiki
beach, Pali drive, we remember so well.
I will take pleasure in telling my
friends and acnuaintances all about it.
be a new study for the newspapermen, and will do you and your committee all
that of sizing up the way in which the the good that I can, for I know that
two places on the moun-' Judge Dole have freehold homesteads, Hawaiian does politics, and the pens of "ou have merit behind your prospectus
tain. Just below the Maguire place, to-' is prouiDiy a part or mat oiuer portion
ward the sea, there is a great hill of , of Hawaii which makes up the Kohala
roup-h lava ruled ud in the plain, and a ! end of the island of a geological for-
Cl A. .
little tui a thfk arnnn of trees mation long antedating the southern
is pointed out where the lava came ' and larger part. The soil is rich and
boiling out of the ground unexpectedly, ! leep, as in Kohala, and there are no
traces ot any recent lava flows. The
only drawback is that rains fall but
seldom, and there is no running water
in the land.
We camped here overnight, being
served by. the Jap man and his wife on
the place and by the natives who live
near there, and in the morning started
for the last lap on our journey to the
and ran down in a flood to the ocean
the while it was coining in greater tor
rents from the summit of the mountain
to cool in a tremendous river that is
seamed now with great' gorges and
tunnels, showing marks of more tre
mendous force- than is seen in any
other fow in Hawaii. The sides of the
lava tnriros nre of varied colors, and
the great arches show how strong and coast at Kawainae.
swift must have been the torrents of I Here it was that evil befel the Post
lire that burned their way through the master. The Postmaster, let it be said
mnvo. c fin- V is not It ia?l IIUCI, Hi l iuui;il lie 15 ail
indiscreet one. So it came that
mile, he hud lagged
e rest
nf i-u;,.h ia Ki -fniiTid nowhereH'1
.1 v.. i v-seven varie- On the ro-id to Kawaihae he got tirci
tb."f, t,.1 named here. 1 of this. Wherefore, when a few mil-?
and of these at least one was a tree , had been paed. he spurred ahead ox,
that ha been said to l o extinct the claiming in his beard of which he ha.t
.hi,! to it i, a straight crow- a quantity at the time as he passed,
ing tree, the woo
gathered seed 1
the editors are certain to scratch off
many stories concerning
situation.
William Glassman, editor and pro-!
Kindly remember me, with nest re
gards and aloha, to the members of
the Political Alona Temple, through Xoble Pratt and
DURBAN, July 9. The Natal troops have killed 747 Zulu
rebels.
Pursuit of the Zulu rebels has been going on for s.ome two or
three months. At the first of the outbreak the Natal Government
look umbrage at certain interference by the Home Government. Oc
casional fights have been reported, with the rebels alvayts worsted.
Whether the above figures are of the latest battle or the whole cam
paign the cable leaves problematic.
WHOLESALE ROA0 AGENT.
j Webster, and believe, very truly yours.
piietor of the Ogden (Utah) Standard,
writes that after receiving literature
about Hawaii, he is planning to come
to Hawaii instead of going up to
Alaska, as he had first proposed. He
suggests, also, starting up a popular
GEORGE F. SINCLAIR.
Aberdeen, S. D., June 22, 1906. ;
H. P. Wood. Honolulu. Hawaii.
Dear Sir: Your letter of June 4. also
circular under separate cover, at hand.
It hardly seems five years since I had
the pleasure of visiting your beautiful
inland, and I assure you that I recall
WAWONA, Cal., July 9.
Yosemite stages.
-A lone highwayman has held up five
voting contest to send two young ladies that trip with a great deal of pleasure.
.mass of the flow that
wiale those fast currents were running
On this slope of Hualalai we passed : for many a weary mile he had 1
throuah a forest of Hawaiian trees, the ' behind and taken the dust of th
)d very hard, and we j that he would take no more dust from
iods from 'it. and any man. We could take his. We did
brought them to Honolulu to be planted
on T:int iii: There were erroves of the
uhiuhi.
FOREST OF HARE TREES.
Still another rare tree was the kauila,
from which the old time Hawaiians
made their spear handles, and there was
ifiniboo- and a
-Tv" t 11 11 II . ilVV - 7
7 rsneciinen of the kokio. or native hibis-
red flowers, and
this
identv of sandalwood. Indeed,
was the second forest of sandalwood
thut we had seen.
Here is a list of the trees, seen from
.11 t 1 i rl.n T rvxt- wbo
tne roan, maue out uy i.ucu .
sai l that there were many more vane-1
not care. e rode along at tne same
comfortable pace, stopping now to
shoot a wild turkey, now to note the
fat cattle that grazed along the way,
now to admire the trees of the forest
land.
THE LOST POSTMASTER.
The Postmaster rode on and on. He
rode on so far that, when we came to
the place where we left the main road
to swing out across the old lava flow
toward i'uako and Kawailiae, we could
see him but faintly disappearing behind
a enterlet in the dim distance. And
he had with him our saddlebags and all
(Continued on page 7).
to Honolulu
Secretary Wood recently wrote to the
Shriners. who visited Hawaii in 1901,
asking them whether they were not
feeling in the mood for making the trip
again, and if not, to tell their friends
that the islands were just about the
best place to visit. He is receiving
many responses. Here are three:
Norwood. N. Y.. June 22. 1906.
Mr. H. P. Wood. Honolulu Hawaii.
Dear Sir: Your letter of June 4 re
minding the members of the Shriners'
pilgrimage of 1901 of their obligations
just received, and I am confident that
on account of the wonderful natural
beauties of your island, and the ex
treme courtesy of its people, every
memoer of that caravan has a strong
desire to again visit that '"Land of
Liquid Sunshine." Among the most
pleasurable experiences of my life was
the visit referred to. and I am contem
plating another in the near future al
though it can not be made under such
favorable conditions. Will vou nlea.e
"iail one of thv folders to Mr. J. tz.
Boynton, F. L. Smtih and P. E. Walk
er. Norwood, N. Y.: Mr. George R.
Fuller, 59 Stone street, Rochester N.
and regret I can not make it again
soon. I have recommended the trip to
a number of my friends and assure you
that I have nothing but praise for the
Hawaiian Islands and the people there
Would like to have you say "Aloha"
to Messrs. J. A. MeCandless. John
Walker, Andrew Brown, Edward Ash
ley and Dr. Gossman. Hoping you will
have the pleasure of seeing many
Americans visit Honolulu, I remain,
yours truly,
WALTER G. JACOBS.
A numbT of bankers throughout the
western and middle states are taking
interest in the islands through having
received conies of the "Lyster let
ter," an enthusiastic letter written by
Mr. Lyser, a banker of Aspen, Colo
rado. The Promotion Committee now has
on its counter a large library of di
rectories of many cities, which are
being found useful among business folk
here. Arrong them are directories of
Sfn Jose. Los Angeles. Salt Lake City,
Butte. Seattle. Oakland. Riverside. San
Bernardino. St. Joseph. Mo., Spokane.
Minneapolis. Tacoma and Portland.
The secretary also has a very complete
'ibrary of telephone exchange directories.
AN UXORICIDE EXECUTED.
BOSTON, July 9. John Schidlaski has been electrocuted for
the murder of his wife.
KOREA REBELLION
NO SMALL AFFAIR
VICTORIA, B. C. . June 19. The
steamer Empress of China brought fur
ther advices of the revolution in Ko
rea, which was spreading. The insur
gents lost heavily in Hongju. When
the Japanese blew up the city gates,
protracted street fighting took place,
but the Koreans were helpless with
their obsolete arms against the modern
weapons of the Japanese. Two Japa-
exeeuted upon the city wall in sight of
the Japanese, who were investing the
place. Sergeant Hjitaka, who was
wounded during the assault, committed
suicide because of his chagrin at not
being able to take part in the entry
of the city after the gates were blown
up.
Major Tanaka, in charge of the Japa
nese, reported capturing S52 rifles, as
many barrels, several hundred
spears, lances and swords, a quantity
of gunpowder and rice. The arms were
obsolete and the ammunition of little
value.
The rebellion has spread to four
provinces being most s'-rious in Kong
wando, Kangneung, Uijin and Yong-
nese were killed and two wounded and j daun, which is looted. At 1 -ijin me
eighty-five insurgents killed and 175 ! government offices were burned and at
made prisoners, including the wound- Yongchun four officials and the magis-
influential ana irate s wilt wtic ".-u
wealthy Koreans were among the r-ris- ! local treasury looted of several thous
oner who wer to be dealt with ac- and yen and a quantity of arms taken
cording to military law. The rebels from the military barracks. In Kong
numbered over a thousand, under Ming : wondo, the rebels are posting procla
Chyongsik before reported killed, but mations that they .will kill all Koreans
it transpires that he escaped to Toku- who have cut off their top-knots or
san where the rebels were in strength, wear their hair in foreign style. Un
Some tragic occurrences took place at rest is general throughout Korea and
Hongju. A Japanese gendarme and fugities are flocking to defensible cen
some police'taken by the rebels were ters.
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