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The Pacific commercial advertiser. [volume] (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, June 28, 1909, Image 1

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U. S. WEATHEB BUBEATJ, June 27. Last 24 Hours' Eainfall, .02.
Temperature, Max. 81; Min. 71. Trades with valley showers.
STTGAe. 96 Degree Test Centrifugals, S.92C Per Ton, $78.40.
88 Analysis Beets, 10s. 5V'4d. Per Ton, $84.00.
ESTABLISHED JULY , ISM.
HONOLULU, HAWAII TERRITORY, MONDAY, JUNE 28, 1909
pnt
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iod-
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son.
JO! RIDE ENDS
IN WOMAN'S
DEATH
Accident on the Koolau
Railroad Saturday
Evening.
In a handcar accident on the Koolau
Tailroad Saturday night, Mrs. Louisa
M. G. Sylvester, of Hauula, was fatally
injured, dying while she was being tak
en to Kahuku plantation for medical
treatment. One side of her head was
crushed and a hemorrhage of the lungs
resulted from 'internal injuries. Others
on the car with her were hurt, but
none fatally or seriously.
Owing to the absence of direct tele
phone communication with the other
ide of the island, only meager partic
ilars can be obtained of the tragedy.
Asfar as the information went, which
Teached town yesterday, Mrs. Sylvester
was aboard a handcar which was be
ing run toward Hauula. At Kipapa,
or nearly ' opposite the Jas. B. Castle
mansion, another handcar was coming
down the grade. The car going up
grada was moving slowly, but the oth
r was running fast. As the two cars
' -rounded a curve, the occupants of both
machines', about eight in number, saw
their danger and everybody began
jumping off to safety.
Mrs. Sylvester is reported to have
made a similar effort, but her dress
caught in a wheel and she was thrown
: down to the rails, the force breaking
V TierHaw. She lay directly in front of
the down-coming car which struck her
in the head and carried her some dis
tance. She was picked up by her com
panions and placed aboard one of the
handcars which was started for Kahu
"ku plantation. ' Before arriving there
she expired.'
The directory gives a Manuel Syl
vester living at Hauula, and. his occu
pation is given as that of a barber.
The Sylvesters formerly lived on
Oueen street. Just how all these peo
ple happened to be out on handcars is
V not explained except that they were
enjoying a moonlight ride over the lit
tle railroad which connects with the
. K. & L. system at Kahuku.
The funeral will take place at 10
o'clock this morning, a casket having
been shipped down from here yester
day. ;
N GONE, BUT
T
John Martin's beaming countenance
and original sermonizing were missed
at the Y. M. C. A. service in Oahu
prison yesterday. Theo. Richards and
Ed Towse were in charge of the meet
ing. Mrs. Grace Crockett directed the
music. Nearly all the inmates gather
ed under the wonderful kamani tree
at 11 o'clock. There were several
hymns, with Mr. Richards at the organ.
Then came the reading of the 27th
Psalib, after which prayer was offered
by the Rev. J. L.vHopwood. The re
mainder of the program was as fol
lows: Song Face to Face.. Miss Aileen Nott
Selection ." . . .O. P. Choir
.Song . . . . Ethelwyn Crockett
Violin Solo Mr. Tallett
Address Faith and Will... Mr. Towse
Address Tests of Life.. Rev. Hopwood
Song Mrs. Grace Crockett
The singing and the violin solo were
especially fine.
This was Mrs. Crockett's farewell
to the prison people, and a number of
the inmates advanced to offer good
wishes for a pleasant trip and safe re
turn and to thank the lady for her
many visits to the prison. Mrs.
Crockett leaves soon to be away for a
year. The prison officials presented her
with two large bouquets.
OtheT substitutes for Mr. Martin will
conduct prison service next Sunday.
FORGOTTEN
SHOW RIOTERS
ATTACK MAN
Strong Prosecution Testimony
in the Case Against
Japanese.
Through the testimony of jEugene M.
Scoville, the" first witness for the pros
ecotion, the Territory is making good
progress in its effort to show the guilt
of the thirteen Japanese who are on
trial in Judge Robinson's department
of the Circuit Court, charged with riot.
Although there has been a continual
stream of objections from Attorney
Lightfoot for the defense, Attorneys
Kinney and Prosser succeeded in show
ing on the direct examination of Mr.
Scoville on Saturday, that the gather
ing of Japanese at Waipahu on June
8 was riotous and that the laborers
committed an unprovoked assault upon
a, fellow countrymen who wished to re
turn to work.
Court sessions were held Saturday
from ten o'clock until noon when ad
journment was taken until two o'clock.
At the conclusion of the day's proceed
ings the court adjourned until ten
o'clock Tuesday morning.
Scoville testified that he had been
seven years at Waipahu, as head pump
engineer. He remembered the occur
rences of June 8, at which time there
vrere twenty strikebreaking Japanese in
the camp and about a thousand strikers.
About seven in the evening there was
trouble between the police and the
strikers, in which he, as a special
police officer took a part. He asked
Mr. Wills to accompany him to the
scene of the trouble.
A portion of the direct examination
and answers follows:
Q. Now when you asked Mr. Wills
to come down with you, what happen
ed then1
A. .Why, we walked down to the
corner of this street and as we turned
the corner we saw a crowd of Japanese
coming up the road from toward the
station, and about thirty feet probably
twenty or thirty feet in front of them
was another Japanese with bundles on
his back, blankets and bedding, it look
ed like a red blanket, coming up the
road, ahead of them. They were fol
lowing him up, yelling at him.
Q. What number were in that crowd
as far as you could judge!
A. I should judge between two or
three hundred.
- Q. Japanese?
A. Yes," sir. They were following
this man up, ;making a great deal of
noise, hollering and yelling, evidently
at this man,
Q. Now what happened then!
A. As we turned the corner, one of
the members of the crowd that was
following broke away from the ,rowd
aud rushed forward and jumped upon
this Japanese who was carrying a bun
dle, tore the bundles off his baek, kick
ed him, and then started hitting him
over the head with his hands.
Q. ' Can you identify ths. man who
did thatf
A. I can.
Q. Where is hef
A. Sitting there in his shirt sleeves,
leaning wifrff his face on his hands, in
the second row.
Q. Do you know his name!
A. Jotaro is his first name. ,
Mr. Kinney:
(Continued on Page Five.)
. .
STREET GAR FUNERALS
The filing of articles of incorpora
tion of the Townsend Undertaking
Company has been done with the in
tention of erecting a mausoleum as a
part of its development. The mau:
soleum will be built somewhere ad
jacent to one of the street car lines
so that a funeral car may be used and
the funeral held on the street car, in
stead of resorting to a long string of
hacks and other vehicles as at present.
The company plans to erect a rein
forced concrete building two stories
in height, 100 feet long by 35 feet
wide, to contain between 600 and 700
vaults, and with niches for urns con
taining the ashes of the cremated.
Hallways will cross the hall and 1 in
every way it will be designed to fill
a long felt want
The project has received considerable
attention on the mainland and the Ro
man Catholic Bishop, while on the
mainland on his last trip, looked into
the matter. It is said that at one
time he planned to have such a mau
soleum ereeed in the Catholic Ceme
tery on King street,,
Such a mausoleum is designed with
airtight compartments for retaining se
cure forever the bodies of the dead and
at the same time providing a monu
ment for them. The interior, if the
plan of mainland mausoleum is follow
ed, will be finished with marble slabs
securely bolted in place, ench slab
neatly covering the face of a crypt.
Plan
MAUSOLEUM
WHITE MAN'S BURDEN
OOOOOOOOCCOO
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TYPICAL FILIPINO OUTLAW.
CK000X0XC
(Associated Press Cablegram.)
MANILA, June 28. Thirty-one Moro bandits have been killed
or captured by the American soldiery during the past month. The
Cavalry on shore has been cooperated with by the mosquito fleet,
guarding the water approaches to the various smaller islands.
NEW STYLE AUTO HAS
OLD STYLE BREAKDOWN
Another automobile accident.
But there was no tragic side to this
one except that it partially dashed the
hopes of the inventor of the machine
which came to grief. It was a machine
to which new principles of propulsion
had been applied and new ideas used.
The whole contraption was the result
of the inventine genius of one Bill
Larsen, well known in the draying busi
ness. .
The machine went out on the road
yesterday a full fledged 40-horse power,
ninety-mile an hour auto, and returned
to the stables a six-horse power wreck,
drawn back by six husky mules.
For months Bill has been working on
his new machine. "I'll show you fel
lows an auto that is an auto," said
Bill significantly a couple of weeks ago.
"Its going to be a machine which will
revolutionize the auto business. May
be I'll start a garage some day.'''
Last week Sunday the machine ap
peared on the public highways. It is
perhaps only a coincidence that there
were several runaways that day, and
one can 't . blame; the horses for get
ting scared when this wonderful ma
chine came by. From somewhere Bill
had procured a set of rubber-tired hack
Wheels. Then C. L. Wight of the gas
company gave Bill a gasoline engine.
Other materials came from various
parts of Honolulu, and Bill assembled
the parts during his spare hours. But
it went. "Why I went out to the quar
ry last Sunday in seven minutes. Wait
till I get it geared up and then just
watch my smoke," he said.
Yesterday morning Bill decided to
take the family out. Everything went
lively for a while. Everybody on the
streets stopped to take a look. And then
suddenly something went bust. The
machine dropped to the ground and the
power tubes sputtered. The rear axle
had given way. There was nothing to
do but send to the stable for a sextet;
of powerful horses to haul the wreck
away. Some people were mean enough
to suggest that Bill obstructed the
street until he could get the auto
hauled away, but Larsen doesn't be
lieve all he hears.
"Well, there's nothing the matter
with the machine anyway, ' ' said Bill
IS GETTING LIGHTER
f Lis. s - " 1 I n
after the accident. "Anybody's axle
is liable to bust. I'm going to get a
locomotive axle and fix it up and then
I'll makeyou fellows green with envy
when you take my smoke. " '
Jimmy Lynch says that Bill can keep
his license. ' .
HONOLULU ELKS CIST
Oil I DESERT SHE
Cast ashore upon the rocky and des
the shores of Eabbit Island, with
out a morsel of food and onlyja keg
of beer to keep life within them, was
the terrible experience of a bunch of
good Elks who returned to town yes
terday afternoon and invaded the
Union Grill, where they allayed the
pangs of hunger. They looked as if
they had been shipwrecked. Their
faces were haggard, many adorned with
hirsute appendages which do not look
well in polite society, but they were
saie and well, and all accounted for.
But how they did eat.
It was the end of the famous
"Cruise of Captain Fib" on the good
gasoline steamer Mokolii, which left
Honolulu port Saturday evening. It
was a lively bunch of Elks who went
out to sharpen up their antlers and
frisk about on the little island off the
eastern coast of Oahu. There was
(Continued on Page Eight.)
J. P. COOKE US
AS PARTY TREASURER
J. P. Cooke has resigned as treasurer
of "the Executive Committee of the
Territorial Republican party and has
been succeeded by John Waterhouse.
The resignation was handed in at a
meeting of the committee on Thursday,
at noon, at which all the members were
present. On request of Mr. Cooke it
was accepted and Mr. Waterhouse was
elected in his place. Mr. Cooke ha3
been of valuable service to the party
in the eapa'city of money rustler and
otherwise, and, although his successor
is a worthy one, his retirement is a
distinct committee loss.'
AMBASSADOR O'BRIE
01 HIS WAY
Announced That He Is Coming on a Vacation
Trip- -Philippine Troops Rounding
Up the Moras.
(Associated Press Cablegrams.)
TOKIO, June 28. Ambassador O'Brien has sailed for America
on the Mongolia. It has been announced that his trip is for vacation
purposes solely.
Quite as sienilicant as the announced trip of the Japanese Am
bassador to Tokio is the trip of Ambassaddor I'Brien to America, at
this particular time. The American plenipotentiary to Tokio will
reach Washington before Takahira leaves, probably. The announce
ment that Japan is considering amendments to the American-Japanese
treaty seems likely to be connected with Mr. O'Brien's vaca
tion. HEAT CLAIMING MORE
VICTIMS IN THE EAST
PHILADELPHIA, June 28.- Eight deaths from heat prostra
tion occured here yesterday.
DEATHS MANY IN BOSTON.
BOSTON, June 28. During the past week, as a result of the
heat wave, thirteen deaths and one hundred and seventy-five ases
of prostration have been reported.
I ONE CAR MOVES IN PITTSBURG
I PITTSBURG, June 28. One car, carrying the mails, was moved
over the street car lines of the tied-up system yesterday. The strik
ers did not clash with the company men.
BELIEF OF SHE THAT THE
' TARIFF BILL MAY BE VETQEI
By Ernest G. Walker.
(Mail Special to the Advertiser.)
I WASHINGTON, D. C, June 10. For
the fourth or fifth time, since consider
ation of the tariff bill was begun, there
has been an outbreak of prophecies dur
ing the last few days that President
Taft intended to veto it. These
prophecies have always appeared from
the same quarters, in two or three dif
ferent newspapers, not especially noted
for their support of the administration.
And yet they have come from men
who have access to the President and
who, under ordinary circumstances,
would be regarded as reliable.
But in every instance the prophecies
have been met with positive contradic
tions at the White House. The leaders
,of the Senate and the House have been
in freque.at conference with the Presi
dent about tariff matters. They say,
as does the President himself, that he
has not decided to veto the bill, in
fact has not contemplated , vetoing it
and does not expect to veto it. The
information is so positive that it can
not be doubted. Nevertheless the as
sertions continue to be made with
tremendous emphasis.
Back of it all there is undoubtedly
a game of polities, the exaet purpose
of which is not clearly understood. .Of
course, it heartens the insurgents, who
are fighting in the Senate for a lower
ing of duties, to have such reports
spread broadcast. It gives the impres
'sion that the President is on their side.
The insurgents have sought time and
again to enlist the President's aid but
have not succeeded. If they could have
had his aid some weeks ago. when con
sideration of the bill began in the Sen
ate, there is no question but what they
pould have made headway and become
exceedingly troublfsome to Senator Al
drich and his Macedonian phalanx.
From another point of view, the veto
talk eases the feeling3 of Western peo
ple, who are represented here as being
np in arms over tariff developments.
.They are less rampant in communica
tions to their Senators and members
of Congress, and accordingly there is
some let up in the popular opposition
to the measure. But no one in Wash
ington, who is well informed about
affairs, believes that the President has
ever seriously thought of vetoing- the
tariff bill and when it gets to him and
he signs it. all the veto campaigns will
likely emphasize the President's atti-
s
BACK TO
THE UNITED STATES
fr
.tude in favor of the standpatters. That
.promises to dampen the enthusiasm of
his Republican support in : several of
the Western States.
I The majority which the Finance
Committee can command for its amend
ments remains Unimpaired during all
the hullabaloo about veto. Indeed, it
is noticeable that often the veto talk
revives after the Senate majority has
tscored an important victory. The lat
est outbreak 01 veto taiK came just
after the Senate had adopted the cot
ton schedule, against which the most
determined opposition by Democrats
and "Western Republicans had been
made, and while the fight on the wool
and woolen schedules, which are espe
cially odious to the Democrats and in
V. Continued on Page Five.)
fl
AND WILL DIE TODAY
Mrs. Nakayama, laundress, swallow
ed a solution of corrosive sublimate last
night with suicidal intent and, accord
ing to- the opinion of Dr. Haida, will
die, probably early this morning. She
was still alive, though suffering terri
bly, at midnight. She is the wife of
a kamaaina Japanese, employed at the
fishmarket.
The eouple live on Keauhou street,
Kakaako. During the evening the
i woman beeame hysterical and while her
j hufband was absent momentarily from
j the room she got hold of the ant" poison
j and drank three-quarters of what was
in the container. Instead of producing
instant death, as she had hoped, she
suffered the most agonizing pain, and
Dr. Haida was sent for immediately by
the husband. He responded and did
what he could to alleviate her- suffer
ings. He then reported the matter to
the police station.
The police, on the doctor's recom
mendation, did not disturb the woman,
and she is being treated at her own
home. Twice before she had attempted
to kill herself.
Ben Poepoe, an employe of Kahukn
plantation, was seriously injured yester
day morning by a fall from the roof
of an engine houe. One of his feet
was crushed. , j
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