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The Pacific commercial advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, December 08, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047084/1910-12-08/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE PACIFIC COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER. HONOLULU, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1910.
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We Can Show
You the Largest and Best
Assortment of
esn Baas
AND
Coin Purses
They Make Very Appro
priate Christmas Gifts
PRICES FROM $2.00 TO
$40.00 EACH
J, A, ft, Vieira & Go,
Jewelers
113 HOTEL STREET
Bromide
Enlargements
of your photographs make very
acceptable Christmas presents,
especially when framed.
Our Sepia effect is very at
tractive. Consult us about the framing.
We have a large stock of beau
tiful frames and moulding.
Hi Phi Sill Co
"Everything Photographic"
Fort, below Hotel.
GOLD COIN
FOR
Christmas Shopping
The woman who opened a Sav
ings Account and deposited reg
ularly each month a small sum
now has
Plenty of Money
for Holiday Gifts
Bank of Hawaii, Ltd
Capital and Surplus, SI, 000,000
FRESH FLOWERS
ONLY ONE JESUIT
LEFT iNPORTUGAL
He !s Too ii! to Leave Priest
Arrives in America With
Story of Exile.
I religion, the
f i ho kin. I.
her- of our
'! ii 1 1! g III.
in',;.
. . :
-; i t ,
ha v.
Th.
i .
1 T ; i J
It..
I iv.
r u- -i
1 .ru
ha t'
t;i n Tit.
.' in Tl;t
while
i.r ciu-m
along the
M N'T!i KA L. No
. ti i v desalt remnitiin
sick .1.- :i" .-a.,i !;.
iii w . t h ? 'r. re. L'li
t!;e ft l..y(
; ii.-i r i: a i o la :
If V -.iHtioU ill
who ; l 1 1 i ci
m i.er :. i :.e
in Portugal i- ;i
;e Ifi.-v. Fat her Diaz,
iij.lr.-.l or move of
were torced to leave
ind as a resui; of the
iat u i; n t r . F:itli. -r Diaz,
:i Montreal with Imn
To
w (
Th:
.
ppo-
ii.. w ;it the
I n: iiia.-u u ; c ( one ept .on
si-, n au.l Mnihi' ouite fr
ati.iti .a his native Sand. They ha.l a!
! roubles.. me lime of it all t hrough. and;
as the pres. nt government is lurioiisj
against the Jesuits, they were forced i y
te leave. most ef who'll went to P.rnii,
where, up to the present time. Fat her ; c
Diaz sav- the ('athohc Church eiiiovs;.-.
perfeT't iil.ei'tv.
1'nli-h lcnlges do nothing
I iiave been toi i by ir.em-r.i-
r win. have .studied the
: l.iiu'.ssa f rcemas.-inrv is
nr less than a so-iefv to
ibel'S al..!!U ii; ; VN'ori i.
.- have i.ee'i cen-
ne, our frien Is
1 1 Si i: ;i t e. - dtllli'T Hut hi ft"
even advised i :it ii-ii.-s ii
: v.'tii.o- and not to ...ir-i.'-i-
:e rranageiiu-nt of loil.Iie af-
the i nen:y ha- ar.v:n I -ea
We have tried to induce our
1 e up an.! deine., to the
say. -aiid try to eie.-t u'eod
s ;s vvliat the 'at holir jiro-
:n I'nrtngal fro'!, h - o-i.-'
-iiir a tip unr: i 'at'n.F
ooetiire ant i ( atiio'or were eun
wao would von advi-e h,- (,ei-
i'-dlv the moderate- mnn -f
w re i'o ( 'athoii.-s in t he ( m,
was the .leiiit's prompt repv.
Illiteracy.
- 'jnetion of rortuguese iliiterao-"
rhen diriissod. ami altlmu-'h lie
iest said that the statement that nniv '
ie wa-! t weut v ' 'AO iiiit of everv liun.lie,! nf il...
of the fcitu-j J'piiint;..ti were able to read and write
rol aldv evae-erated. lie admitted
MEMORIAL DESItf F'-' -"-S
i
:i a. i :
didat
e
urv
. th
tie
T;
v a
(Continued frotn Pa'.'e One)
Intren j.ri.pi.iti.'n and voted their
;h:i:iks to iiini for hi personal interest
iu the enterprise.
Tne reidiea vvili stiinl three feet, ten
inches liiirh, and is two feet ten inches
wide. Il wilt be placed in the corridor
with the memorial bas-relief of the
hit.- . X. Cattle and 'Mother Castle.
Other models preeiit ed for conidera
ti.ia was n e. unbi nat ion statuette and
i.a- relief by (.ordoi: l.'sb. .rue. the llu
aoliihi sculptor.
General Armstrong's Career.
i M-hool
tllll'll jl
J.eV.
Mr.
where 1
f
va
that education was in a verv backward
-tiite.
"Have you not had the education in
Mauds.'
; "il-ere tiie situation. We. of
; c.'.iire. are not numerous enough to edu-
.-ate tin- whole people. I'at trovern-
I ments have ordere.l the i liildren to fre
iint interfere in poii-; 'pii'itt the -chools vvliicli had been ettib
t he Jesuits so disliked; liHiod. but the passive- resi-tance was so
-'at her Diaz w;is asked, j strung and the teachers were so incom-
This ipiesiioii brought a smile to;peteiit that both the parents and the
the lips of the priet, who said: ' Yes, i eicryy were against send ng the chil
we did interfere iii public matters ofjdren to these schools. This was a very
late. We had a duty to j.orl'onin dlllieult matter to discuss. Xn doubt
when matters were going so badly. We j th clergy had been at fault, for, as in
pointed out which course we felt should j Frame, when the national .-lergv are
be pursued by the people and we have j dependent upon the statt slaves of the
no regrets for having done so.' i civil power, if you will they become
inilokMit and otten vote tor the h'epub
j li.-an or the aovernmerit parte.''
"Will all relio-ious denominations be
"As you .11.
tics vvhv were
in i "ortugai .' ' '
(ieiieral Aiatrolig began .
career in l'unaho'i and was a
tin. father of Judge Dole and
j'.e.kwilh. lie M-cuied his college prep
ara; ion at i'uuuiiotl and entered W'll
iiutiis t 'ollege. Just as he was about to
graduate ur jut after his graduation,
the l ivii War broke out and lie enlisted
in the Lniou army, lie rai .-d a com
pany in New Yor.-i ttate. ro--j gradual
y to a colonelcy, and was made a
brev et brigadier-general.
lie vva deeply interes-ted in tile work
of the l-'i e .linen 's liuivau alter the
war, and he reso.veil to establish a
school for negroes, Hampton Institute
being the result. He raided funds tor
iu the i
Discrimination.
"Are all the religious orders
same portion ' '
"No, the Franciscans and Domini
cans were allowed to remain. In fact,
the former published a review and they
were against us and. of course, 1 need
not say that they were allowed to stay
in the country."
The Jesuit father says there is no
truth in the story that certaiu mem-, ,.),.,
ber ot their order hoisted the J.rit-
ish rlag and were allowed to remain
unmolested, but he stated that he was
far from Lisbon at a place called San
1'iel.
In sjiite of the fact that Father
Diaz and his companions have been
driven out of Portugal, have lot their
property, their libraries and their
churches, lie believes that good will
follow and in the end that it will be
better for the Catholic Church in gen
eral. "1 am convinced." lie added, t
"that the republic, has come to stay:
and although it is not at all probable,
that the men at the head of affair in.
Li-l.on Today will remain long in power,
the republic, I think, will last in Por
tugal. In fact, this is what the Cath
olic leaders now think, and they are:
advising Catholics to support the new;
order of things and to endeavor by
free in Portugal?'' Father Diaz was
asked.
"That is what they pretend; but
whi!- there are Protestant churches and
Jewish synagogues being opened in Por
tugal, T am afraid that it will be bar I
for some time for the l.'oman Catholic's
1 have strong hope, however, that a
e will come, and that everv on.,
j in time, will be perfectly free under
tne repui.iic.
P0ST0FFICE IN HANALEI
MAY BE DISCONTINUED
KAXALFI, November 20. Unless
some citizen. endowed with more
patriotism than common horse sense,
and who is willing to busy himself
three or four days out of each week
in the interests of Uncle Sam's post
otlice service for the magnificent sum
if twenty or twenty-five dollars per
month, is found pretty shortly, it is
not unlikely that we will soon find
ourselve without a postofiico. Accord
ing to current rumor, the resignation
...tt- . 1 . . i . . ,
everv honest ettort to secure a re;iuon vi me iiiciiiiiu.-ni was piaceu
honest lv .and fairly administered. !'.- with the postoiiice department son
fore we left this' was the watchword time ago. with the understanding that
amongst the Catholics and you will see , "s soon as a successor could be found
that this is the policy which the ( ath
Lowest prices. Wagon, Fort and IIoti.
streets. Visitors welcome to garden
Kalihi, net to Thomas Pineapple Com
pany. Oku bo Garden, telephone 2790
olic leaders will strive to carry out.
"And do von think that in time you
will be able'to return?"
"Not for some years; but when the
people return to their better senses,
then we may be able to return to our
country. ' '
Father Diaz says that although P.raga
is president of the republic, flie nioving
spirit is Costa, the minister of justice.
The president, he says, is but a mini of
straw-
justice, but he runs the whole govern
ment. He is furious against the Jesuits
and the Human Catholic Church, and is
the personification of F.urojan free
masonry, "but, as 1 have just said, 1
don't think his personal reign will last
long. ' '
The Portuguese bishops tire united,
and now that the church will be inde
pendent of t'ne civil power, a better day
should be in store for Portugal, espe
cially when the pope will be able to a -point
the b -ho;.- irrespective of civil
behests.
"In genera!, however, the sitnati.in
of the athoiic Church in Latin Furop;
is bad. is it not ,' ' '
Not ordv bad. but verv bad," wis
Father Diaz' answer. "There are two
rey-ons the persistent fury of the ene
mies of the church and the al.so'nte
I iloloiellce ot t tie ( atiioilc
ailed, and even the national
uianv i us' a rice. Furope.ia
v is tie sworn enemy of .he
ut I should say that
between l.'ig-
Whiie
omb.i ;
the same would became effective. A
no further action has been taken b
the Honolulu ollice, it now seems th:
the incumbent will, within a I
. i
few drys, ,'igtiin notify the authorities j
of her intention to clse the otlice. The ;
closiiio- of our postoiiice is food for ;
serious thought upon the part of resi- ,
dents here, as it will necessitate iheir'
oing to Kilaueu or Wainiha for mail. '
Postmistress Mis. S. ',. DeyerilJ, de-
sorves much praise for tlie very satis-
and Costa, is not only minister ot ''" '".' Il:'11""1 " s,,eo.ts
iiii'-te.i: tne ottice, ami is resigning can t
!y on account of the work requiring i
ton much of her time. fiarden Island. ,
a oaf I
pa i t v
a i!
fit
re i g ) on ,
I great dMl'.-re
incn'i.l t r .
! : : 1 - O ! ! S Oil tl'f
Ml il S.
oli! !
SMOKERS FOR MEN.
If a woman wishes to remember a
man at Christmas time o'iie will make
no mistake, if he is a smok t, i:i buying
a '.i ..i" cigars from M. A. C.inst &
"(... al the corner of F'-r
s't'ce!.-- Doing thv "Hoi:-"
it i-- teasonabie to belie1 e
1 e g -'.j. i s sold at this pi:,
a: I There is ev cry sha 1
in t'.e cigais s,,hl there an
'I,', si ,i pes that appe I 1
ii a d King ,
.f Staples" i
tl a: all of !
a :v stand- j
of tobacco '
it is made
n et. who
Uii.w cigar-, there is a :?., and ;-hai.e .
i
to- ..iter dinuei and otli".- for otner ;
;.e!io..s of the twenty-foir ton'-;, when!
t. n -moke. Pesides t h-' ig: ir cigar- '
( !li - and tobacco sold at this establish-j
meat, there is an assortment of pipes. ;
eigar and cigarette hold.-rs that com-'
mend themselves for their beauty and
nt i lit v. Mai! orders for anything scold :
a' '! Mouse of Staples" will have j
plump! and careful attention. !
its maintenance, and it became an in
stitution of national renown. He had
J n T i a ns brought to the school, and the
educational work on their behalf at
tracted the federal government, which
sid ey ted Ceneral Pratt to establish a
school at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and
this school is now one of the foremost
institutions in the United States. Hamp
ton Institute was organized on lines
suggesting a combination of methods at
Lahainaiuna and the Hilo Hoarding
school.
Work Lives After Him.
In connection with yesterday's meet
ing in Honolulu, the following account
from tiie Washington Star of November
lid, of a meeting of prominent negro
educators in the Capital City is inter
esting, showing how tiie work of Gen
eral Armstrong lives and prospers after
him. Tin- star says:
"An audience that taxed the capa
city of the Metropolitan A. M. E.
Church listened last night to addresses
in praise of Hampton Institute, the
large colored institution of learning in
Yirgiuia, ami incidentally helped sjvell
the fund that is being raised here to
establish another scholarship for de
serving students at the school.
"Ti.e meeting was held under the
joint auspices of the Hampton Institute
Alumni Association of the district and
the Bethel Literary and Historical So
ciety. "Among the speakers were Dr. Hol
lis Ii. Tr'sseli, president of Hampton
Institute: Hev . Dr. W. I'. Thirkield.
president of Howard University; H. K.
Morton, commander of the Hampton
Institute Cadet Corps; Prof. T. P.. Wil
liams, field agent of the school, and
Miss Floise P.ibb. president of the local
colored social settlement association.
History of Institution.
"Doctor Trissell's address was con
fined tii a review of the circumstauces
leading up to the establishment of the
institution by Gen. Samuel C. Arm
strong, Mid its subsequent history. He
descri! i'd tiie academic and manual
training courses offered by the school,
and the hope, for enlarging the curric
ulum in the future. He told his hear
ers that in just sudi schools as ll'itup-
ton lay the hope of the negro race.
Major Mor'on and Professor Williams
e:tch spoke of what the institution has
aceomplishe.i in advancing its student
body.
"Doctor Thirkield told of the cordial
relations "V hi ii have always existed
between Hampton Institute and Howard
University.
"He .-aid the latter institution took
up : he work where jhe former left oif
in gi 'ing the colore, youth of the coun
try the advantages of professional and
higher education.
Work Among the Poor.
"Miss Bibb spoke on the work among
the alley poor of the colored race in
the district, and what was being done
toward alleviating the conditions under
which they have been living. F. D.
Lee, president of tiie Hampton Institute
Alumni Association, pros: led. During
the evening a nnmlwr of musical selec
tions were tendered hv Cue Hampton
;:, e Club. "
. .......
'Willi is tins 'wanderlust' you read
,,j s,, of tin as compelling people TO
ie.-iv.- horn.'.''' "I don't know." re-pii'-o
M:. ( umrox: "but. .judging from
t.v observation of people who have it.
u a ;; -rk.-T ' i- C.-rinau tor 'creditor-,'
" '--Washington Star.
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JUST A LITTLE BIT BETTER THAN
ANY WE HAVE SEEN IN OTHER
SHOPS. THEY ARE LONG, CUT
FROM GOOD MATERIAL AND ARE ;
SOFT AND COMFORTABLE NEXT
THE SKIN. SOME OF OURS HAVE
THE MONKS COWL AND THE CON
VENTIONAL GIRDLE AND NECK
CORD. ALL OF THEM PRICED
FAIRLY NONE TOO HIGH WHEN
MATERIAL AND WORKMANSHIP ARE
" " CONSIDERED -
Good Things to Give
For Christmas
si
Mclnerny, Ltd.
Fort and Merchant Streets.
I
CP
n
Planning the Christmas Dinner
' REMEMBER THAT EVERY ONE OF
DilEDNZ'S "57"
IS ABSOLUTELY PURE AND FREE FROM
PRESERVATIVES
There is the Mince Meat that you must have. Among the
others is something to add zest to every course.
Ask Your Grocer
j I , I DrVFJOPlrT. &' I y vvpm rp I I
i
Ideal Gifts
Typical Hawaiian Subjects Pic
tured and Mounted on Material
Resembling Hawaiian Tapa.
GURREY'S LTD.
Fort Below Hotel Street
CEDAR
I SHIRT WAIST BOXES
1 BOX LOUNGES
Honolulu Wire Bed Co., Ltd.,
KING AND A LAKE STREETS.
PREPARE FOR THE COLD WEATHER
WHITE WOOLEN
THE STORE FOR CHRlSTMASSHPPERSj
LADIES' MUSLIN UNDERWEAR AND mmmmsmmanmrn mm i "'"MMMMB"M BEAUTIFUL NEW HATS (
CHILDREN'S GARMENTS . . f" .. I Are now being shown in our Mi'!h:crv Department.
T.. . .. 1 T-:'" talking Hats. I
fi MIFQ' A m n run nnc-M-c wflT5 I
S . . . . s' nnu yj 1 1 I 1 1 l sJ liniv m
A ii,'ii,.,'i,,.. :.-..itmeiit in cone.-! s x ie- a nd .- i .. -. 'A : '' l-:- " ' ! 1 '. .,-,, . ;;: g ... . I.;--.- :,nd B v . ,,,,,.. ... -, .,,? nivarii.
-(.To. -;.o. is ; ,,;. (.; H i f..,,. m ir.,,-. l'i'v .-..id l-'inicv Wimi.I mount in:'-. n 1
Ij;..g!;,rPr, :-: , ia 1 ! " :- .'. K ..V. - 7', NEW SILK GOWNS (
::.- " " " - " " In Messa!i,i(,. Satin and Diagon:,! '!.. :,!; the popular J
. - ' --, lAnni CM taii nocn CIMTQ
I. 'i " II twviim I HILUnLU wWI I w
' 1 -' " " - ' ! ,- " " I Very i;ai;dsome iu the :,: ,s. i - , - colors and I
" ' " "-' II f C-: v-rv !ish ,.-f- p,i - :. and I
" ' 1 1' " ' " '; Ii .:,ci,.'
J.t-., f i . 1..;.-, II MARQUISFTTF DRESSES 1
II .
m . 1 . .... ti.,,- ' i 'i':. :,!:, - 11
I' Ol.e e-l 1 I V o 1: il o: I .. i ..'. o - .. -
I
RED WOOLEN" BLANKETS .
WHITE COTTON L'LA N I E'TS 7
GREY COTTON BLANKETS 7 7.
COMFORTERS Sl.77. pcr pnir,
CRAVENETTE COATS
A n.-.v !.i"- '.m- :,;,- - ,: ....
I 'ochet , ; '; i : o , . , : ... i , . r . u- :
WHITE CROCHET AND KNITTED SWEATERS
MARQUISETTE DRESSES
Another conigniii.-t t .:- ; - : ' ve-.
HANDSOME NET DRESSES
FORT AND BERETANIA Z
DRY
ANY
OPPOSITE FIRE
STATION
STREETS
: .",
I I
71 1:

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