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The Honolulu republican. [volume] (Honolulu, T.H.) 1900-1902, August 04, 1900, Image 3

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THE HONOLULU REFUBEKUS, SATEBPAT, AUGUST lt 1908, i i
g SriST i jMmjr ror;rrw Sgryarft Siu riFTilirinifiiiriltfii
ALLEY'S
IKE
ITS
ay3NHWiMHIHIHIH
K
TELEPHONE 39S
P. O. BOX 441
STEARNS BICYCLES
FIRST CLASS AT SAX FEANCISCO PRICES.
50,(? ie,?t ai?d Iepretytative of tf?e
Qompaoy 19 jauanap Islands.
Morae & Wright
DistributorHack Tires,
Ruber Goods,
Pneumatic Tires
And Representative Here.
yu . 1 ift 1 ri f
BAILEY'S HONOLULU CYCLERY COMPANY, Ltd,
227, 229, 231 King Street.
REOPENING OF
Mean Bit Goods is
Special
420 FORT STREET.
Offer For
openm
socMi
g Week.
Latest Designs in Shirt Waists Pique and
Covert Cloth Skirts,
Tho new management wish to call attention to the, fact
that it will carrv a full line of Dress Goods.
Come
and See for Yourself,
Walker,
BEVERAGES
SUPERIOR
ANIMATING
GOLD
LUSCIOUS
CARBONATED FOUNTAIN DRINKS
(SODA WATEP)
NUTRITIOUS DELICIOUS REFRESHING
IN THE HIGHEST DEGREE PERFECT
GrcatVaricty of Flavors Novelties Added Frequently
Our Yichy a Special Feature
Natural Fruits Our Own Selection
Our Ice Cream "par excellence" The Finest
FOUNTAIN, COR. FORI HOI EL 57 5.
Noted as the Coolest Corner m Town
Benson, Smith & Co., ltd.
SHIPMENT OP
GOLF and STANDARD SHIRTS
JUST OPENED,
IWAKAMI'S,
ROBINSON BLOCK, Hotel Street.
-i.
mnm
! OF IDE RFPuIIH.
Great Baltimore Sun
Copies From. Our
Files,
GOOD IDYERTISING FOR HAWAII.
SPEAKS OF CITY'S GBOWTH
HT COiTHEBCIAI, IMPORTANCE.
Slakes Copious Extracts of an
terview About the Possibilities
of Growing Fruits
Here.
DEATH OF ATJGTJ5T SHAFT.
In-
iaS OKTeepaorfenoe ol Tie flwjmhltciii
WASHINGTON, July IS. The Baltimore
Sun, probably the greatest news
paper printed in the South, has the
following editorially today:
"The Honolulu Republican is the title
of an excellent newspaper which starts
its career concurrently with the establishment
of the Hawaiian Islands as a
Territory of the United States. Files
of the paper which we have received
give interesting accounts of local affairs
and the effacts of changes in conditions
which have come with the
change in government Some of these
changes are not, apparently to the liking
of the people. "The new system of
red tape Introduced in the custom
house. The Republican complains,
makes it practically imposible for a
merchant- to get possession of the
goods awaiting him without the expense
of employing a broker at considerable
cost- There is also much confusion
upon the question of citizenship
and eligibility to office under the organic
act. Attorney General Dole, who
is a nephew of the Governor, has given
an opinion upon this subject which has
made a stir. Of it The Republican says:
" 'Whatever Attorney General E. P.
Dole had in mind when he rendered h's
opinion on the question of citizenship
in Hawaii perhaps that gentleman jan
tell, but certainly no one else can tll
by reading his letter to his uncle, the
Governor. The opinion shows a most
marked absence of knowledge of Uip
law, and any clerk in a reputable law
office who would be guilty of writing
such a paper for publication would be
deemed fit to be informed that he hid
better drop out and go to hoeing sugarcane
"It seems that the organization of
the Territorial government was signalized
by a public ball in Honolulu.
The Republican contends that as the
cost of this ball was paid by the government,
it should have been open to
the public instead of being limited to
invited guests. The invitations, The
Republican complains, savored too
much of monarchical timeo.
"The city of Honolulu bids fair to
have a 'boom' Jn consequence of annexation.
The Republican says thp
city has 'reached that period In her
history that might well be termed the
parting of the ways. From a slow,
plodding town she has become a live,
bustling city. Her harbor is filled vsith
shipping, as never before, and she has
suddenly jumped from an insignificant
calling port to a great commercial center.
The march of progress has reached
Honolulu, and the old conditions must
give way to the new order of things.'
"Among proposed improvements are
a sewerage system, the onpnlng and
paving of streets, the numbering of
houses and the construction of an electric
street railway.
"A leading fruit shipper in an interview
condemns the policy of Hawaiian
farmers in devoting so much of their
energy to sugar growing. He believs
that the present hij;h price will not
be maintained, and that there is more
profit in fruit growing. The whole of
the Island of Oahu is devoted to the
production of sugar, rice and taro, the
first being the money crop and the others
for domestic use. The fruit shipper
urges the cultivation of limes. Ho
said:
" 'The duty on limes is $1.75 per case.
This has been removed by annexation.
is the natural home for the
lime. It does better here than any
where in the world. It is a perennial
bearer and In Hawaii Is very prolific.
It takes from three to four years for
the lime to bear from the seed. I have
three small trees on my place at
They net me S15 each. The United
States Imports from Mexico annuallv
from 300.000 to 400,000 cases of limis.
These limes could be easily raised
here. This is a great pineapple country
The pineapples that we raise are
very juicv, of fine flavor and free from
pulp. From 4.C00 to 5,000 pineapples
can be raised on an acre. The price to
the grower will average S1.75 per dozen.
I have six acres of pineapples on ay
place. Two men do the entire work
and 1 pay each $20 a month. The crop
matures onco a year Figuring on onlv
4,000 pineapples to the acre, the net in
come would be. ?6S7.75 and the profit
5442.75,-or 65 per cent profit Does anyone
want a handsomer profit for his
investment than this?'
"The same gentleman declares thnt
there is a pro3t of 1200 an acre in bananas
at 25 cents a bunch, and
produce two crops a year.
"An article or.jthe weather snys that
on June 25 the thermometer in Honolulu
registered SS the hottest Juns
dav on record. The nsual average temperature
for June Is 7d, but in June of
this year it was 7SVr
An Old Bssideut of Honolulu Passed
Away Yesterday.
August Kraft, one of Honolulu's old
citizens, passed away yesterday at his
residence corner of
streets. ATr. Kraft came here many
years ago and engaged in watch-making !
and jewelry business with his sons on.
jmg street, uearxorr. lae suup was j
I Read The Honolulu Republican. 3&Sd.fiErSi"2XSa tS
$ . ., .. .. .. ?: he gave up the pursuit of his trade, he
3&SSariiS turned his attention to the cultivation
of plant? and ilowers. As years rolled The
on he gathered around hira trss and '
, plants of numerous varieiles from al-
I most all ! parte of the wcrH. DfHSCOT
his plants his laost intim&ie friend- J
t Although he loved them he was cener
' oc with them, and many people ta j
towa were eivea slips from his garden.
llr. KrsSt was a man of simple life.
When he was taken sick several weeks
ago he called for Dr. 3IcGrew. who
told him he had bet a little time to
live. The doctor advised removing the
Exact Terms 'by Which Prelates Axe
Able to Deal Personally
'
With Officials.
Here are the exact terras cf the
agreement entered into between the
Chinese Government at Pekins; and the
papal Secretary of State, Cardinal
del Tindaro, acting through the
vicar apostolic of Peking, Mg. Fa-vier:
"The imperial government, having
for a long time authorized tne propagation
of the Catholic religion, and
Catholic churches having in consequence
been established in all the
provinces of China, we are desirous to
see our people and Christians iivi in
harmony. To insure a readier protection
It has been agreed that tho local
authorities shall exchange visits with
missionaries according to the conditions
specified in the following articles:
"First In the ecclesiastical hierarchy
bishops shall be entitled to the
same rank and dignity as viceros and
governors, and shall be privileged to
interview viceroys and governors.
"In case a bishop is called away or
dies the priest in charge shall he privileged
to interview viceroys and governors.
Vicars general and archpriests
shall be privileged to interview Measurers
and judges as well as inteuuants.
Other priests shall be privileged to interview
prefects of the first and second
class, prefects independent,
fects and other functionaries, all of
whom shall return courtesies, according
to rank.
"Second Bishops shall make a list
of the priests appointed to take charge
of affairs and interview the authorities,
giving names and locations of missions.
This list shall be sent to the
viceroy or governor, who will direct
to receive them
to this regulation.
"Priests requesting an interview, cr
those especially appointed to take
charge of affairs, should be Europeans.
If, however,' a European priest be not
conversant with the language of China
he may be accompanied by a OhuKse
priest acting as an interpreter.
"Third It would be useless for
bishops living away from cities to visit
the provincial capital for the purpose
of being received by the viceroy or the
governor if they have no business in
hand. At the installation of a new
viceroy or governor, upon the arrival
of a new bishop, br upon any occasion
of ceremony, as New Year's day
and the principal feasts, bishops shall
be privileged to write private letters to
the viceroys and governors, at the same
time incloaing their cards. Viceroys
and governors shall return the courtesy.
Before leaving or upon their
arrival other priests shall, providad
they have a letter from their bishop,
be privileged to interview, etc., according
to their rank.
"if any grave, or important matter
concerning any "mission in any province
should arise the bishop and missionaries
in office shall appeal to the
minister or members of the council
which the Pope has appointed as a religious
protectorate, the latter shall
have the right of deciding, together
with the Tsung-11-Yamen, or the local
authorities. If a mandarin is consulted
on an official question by either a
bishop or a missionary he must give
the matter immediate and polite attention
and institute an investigation.
"As occasions arise the local authorities
shall counsel the people, exhorting
them to unite with the Christians.
They shall never encourage hatred
or countenance dissension. Bishops
and priests shall likewise exhort
all Christians to strive earnestly toward
maintaining the good repute of
the Catholic religion, so that the people
may be content and appreciative.
In any suit between the peoplo and ths
Christians the local authorities shall
judge and rule with equity, that .he
people and the Christians may live in
peace. Missionaries shall neither interfere
nor give their protection with partiality."
Tne purpose of the concordat was to
give Catholic prelates official standing,
to enable them to overcome curious
Chinese etiquette and to deal personally
with -officials rather than, as
in the" past, with the consuls. It was
a step in the direction of good government
and not of necessity a religious
propaganda.
The Roman Catholic Church has no
missionaries from America in .China.
Almost all of its missionaries there
are from France, a few from Italy ani
Belslum. and a- very few from Hollan-L
All are members of orders, since it
is found that orders can act as mis
sionary societies, raise funds and main-
tain discipline r better than could
continued for many years and the pro- J aling wcutan . i
bevje wealtar by strict at- ares from UxeMisafoato Catnolieae.
sned by the Propande Fide at Rome
Several vears aso he jeHred from and covering the Chinese Empire, are
,n?no nnrt trfnt f n lir on ih Plains, 'nearly twenty months old. They esti
mate tne poputauoa 01 an unina 10
he 449,153,000, giving- their figures by
districts, and give the Catholic population
as Kevr York Sua.
Publishing Co. Ltd.
VTTLL xTTEXISS
objected, saying he wanted to die llmSflG rFUltinO"
i cause of his death was consumption.
.Ueeeasd was a native of Germany and -over
70 years of age. He leaves a for- '
tone of about ftXUXJO, which is be-
qaeethed to his son and daughter living
in New York City.
The funeral will take place from the
undertaking parlors of H. H. William,
this morning." at 10 o'clock. The
interment will take place at Nnuaan
cemetery.
DEMOCRATIC TrRADQTJABTEaS.
Commodious Suit In the Chicago
Auditorium Engaged.
CHICAGO, July 23. Headquarters
for the campaign will be established by
the Democratic National Committee at
the Auditorium here. Senator James
K. Jones arrived today and completed
arrangements whereby the national
headquarters will be established on the
second door of the Auditorium, in the
rooms which were occupied by the
Pari:. Exposition Commissioners. There
are fourteen rooms in the suit, providing
j.mple space for the campaign committee.
ROHAN G&TH0L1CS IN CHINA.
AGREEMENT BETWEEN" I2IFEHIAX
G0YEBN2IENT AND CHT7ECH.
WE FRIIM"r
&J
Firs! Glass Job Work
Plantation
Stationery r;:?;,
Letter Heads
Bill Heads
Statements
Envelopes
Programmes
Invitations
Cards
Circulars
Posters
Etc., Etc
WE RULE
W
e
A
Bill Heads
Statements
Pay Eolls
Expense Accts
Manifests
Pl'tn. Blanks
Agency BPnks
Calendars
Diaries
Bank Blanks
Etc., Etc.
irsiD
Ledgers
Cash Books
Journals
Blank Books
Check Books
Pay Rolls
Invoices
Bank Books
Stock Books
Eecord Books
Etc., Etc.
established business of tiie
late Eobert Grieve, it will be
our aim to uphold the
first class work in everv
the Propaganda Fide acting direct and department of the printing
i
I tation so long held by him for ,
i
i
Plem Bicycles
ICHATSXESS at 75.00, $63.00 and $60.00.
CHAIN at $50.00. $43.00. $40.00, $33.00, $25.00.
Acetylene Gas Lamps,
LIBRARY $9.00. LANTERNS $4.00. BICYCLE $sA
DASH $4.00. CARRIAGE $15.00 pr. "
II i- ni -" ""; tuiug nu toss moreiieresnnff items, as meat
w
Up fO Date indiflg, bicycle department ot
HALL &
SON
rJvlI i
Limited, King Street
GRIMW00D, RICHARDSON & CO.
arm.
Office,
MECHAX1CAL, ELECTRICS EXGINEERS,
, AXD COXTHACTOJRS.
AGEXTS FOR
PARKE & LACY CO..
PELTOX WATER WHEEL CO.,
H. N. COOK BELTING eO.
WHITTIEE, COBURX CO. Lubricating Oils, Grmso
and Paints.
BYRON JACKSON aIACHTNE WORKS, Whirlpool
Centrifugal Pumps.
CALIFORNIA ANTI-CALORIC CO.
Anti-Caloric Pipe and Boiler Plaster.
Anti-Calorie Boiler Blocks,
Anti-Caloric Covering.
PACIFIC AMMONIA & CHEMICAL CO.
JUDSON DYNAMITER POWDER CO.
MEESE & GOTTFRIED CO. LINDE ICE MACHINE.
Telephone 613.
P. 0.
JUDD BUILDIXG
Box 450
NEW SUMMEE GOODS.
k Elegant Line of Ties, Shirts, Pajamas, Silk and
Crepes, Kimonos, Etc., Efe
4 Large Stcok of Ladies', Gents' and Children's STRAW
HAIS un hand.
K. ISOSKIMA,
King Street, Below Castle & Cooke's.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
DR. W. J. GILBSilTH.
Office and Residence:
Corner Beeetania and .Alakba Sts.
OFFICE to 10 a. m, '2 to
t p. 31., nnd 7 to S p. m.
to 10 . ji., 7 to S. r. .it
TELEPHONE 20L
DAVIS & GEAH.
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law.
Booms 202, 203 302, JuddBldg.
Co. Fort and Merchant Sts., Honolulu.
GEO. A. DAYIS. GEO. D. GEAR.
FREDERICK m. HANKEY.
Attorney-at-Law.
Corporation and Maritime Law,
Campbell Building,
COR. FOKT AND TiIERCHaNT STS,
Honolulu, H. T. P. O. Box 315.
AMERICAN
HEMOER SERVICE.
Telephone 444.
HAS03STC TEMPLE.
SRHO OMEE
Watchmaker & Jeweler,
to. 8 "king st. seas ?ojtja2ru
P. 0. Box 1020.
SHE
fi.HisonlMGoIitd
Katvaiabao Street. Kewalo.
mill Work ik all its bbahches.
Having succeeded to the old Telephone White 121 : : P. O. Box 552.
office, while our increased facilities
enable us to fill orders
at much shorter notice than
heretofore.
Orders Solicited. Prompt Service.
1 Wbrirm
When Buying a IVJteel
BUY RIGHT,
andAltcays be BigTit.
The Cleveland
does iV.
HONOLULU BIKE CO.
i
Creat Bargains in Real Estate
1. Business lot on Fort sL; corner
lot; about SQ0Q square feet
2. Fine house and lot; 100x100;
road.
3. One lot, McCully tract; 5xl5;.
King st.
4. Two lots, Kawaiahao St.; SOxlW
each; Kewalo. t
5. House and 3 lots at Kalulanl traet
6. Four lots, Walkikl addition, near
Camp McKinloy; 59xl(,. each.
7. Nine-year lease, with 2 houses;;
Punchbowl.
S. House and lot, Hanlwai st,
25x100. . j
9. Ten-year leeso and 2 hoeae;;
Punchbowl; 60x110.
10. Four lots, Kalihl, near King st.
50x100 each.
11. Three lots near Diamond Head;
55x35 each.
12. House and lot, with staWes; 53x
133; Upper PunchbowL
13. House and lot, Queen St.; 50x100.
14. Ten-year lease, with 2 cottages
and store doing good business; 80x100.
15. One share VTalmea. Hui land.
10. Eleven and a bait years lease,
with 3 couagee, grapes and other
plants; 75x200.
17. Beautiful lot on Fort st., between
school and Vineyard sts.
IS. Lot 100x110, with 2 new eottagss.
Wilder ave.
13. Two ioi3, "Walkiki road; SOxliO
eaeh.
20. Five lot3. Beach road, near tho
sea; 60x102.
21. Two acres land at KaMhi, with. 2
houses; beautiful coentry residence.
22. Hocse and lot, Daniwai st, Kewalo:
50x100.
23. Lot oa Fort st extention.
24. Lot corner Wilder ava. and
225x221.
25. Lot S0r27S, King 3t, near
tract
26. Three lots at nnlihi; 20x35.
7. Fifteen acres land above Kaicfanl
tract; Juat the land for country residences.
For further particulars apply to
Sfe & Tim,
Opposite Post 03ioa
4$

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