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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, January 12, 1920, Home Edition, Image 5

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■ill proposes
Rumsory body
FORCONGRESS
Will Call for Industrial Parlia
ment to Aid in Labor and
Capital Problems.
ALONG CANADIAN IDEA
WASHINGTON, Jan. 12.—A parliament
of industry, to assist congress in dealing
with problems of capital and labor, is to
be proposed in a bill now ‘being drafted
and shortly to be introduced in the
senate, it was learned today.
The plan was conceived some time ago,
but held up pending the outcome of the
first and second industrial conferences
called by President Wilson. It was to
be presented as soon as details could be
worked out.
Following the Canadian Idea, the bill
will call for a general Industrial parlia
jpent to draw up a code for Industry.
islation recommended to congress by the
industrial body.
PUBLIC'S representation
TO BE WORKED OUT.
Tentative plans call for 100 labor mem
bers to be chosen by unions and other
groups of employes, 100 representatives
of capital to include business and pro
fessional men. A third group probably
will be added to represent the public,
composed of fifty or one hundred mem
bers. This part of the plan has not
been worked out definitely. It was said.
“Criticism of the proposal' as being too
unwtieldy is anticipated,” the author of
the bill said today, ‘‘but it Is based
on the theory that the industrial con
gress will be a melting pot of all Ideas
affecting capital and labor and that com
plete representation of all groups Is
necessary. Out of the scores of Ideas and
viewpoints represented, legislation to be
recommended to congress can be
formed.”
CADES ON PRESIDENT
TO CAUL PARLIAMENT.
The bill itself will call on the presi
dent to call an industrial parliament as
described. It Is then expected that the
parliament will make itself a permanent
body. Drafting a code of principles re
lating to recognition of collective bar
gaining, living wages and peaceable set
tlement of disputes is tbe first task tbe
organization would have, according to
present plans.
It is also contemplated that a body
similar to the war labor board —to be
the executive body to carry out prin
ciples approved by the congress and en
acted into law—shall be set up.
Discuss Naming of
* Secretary of Treasury
WASHINGTON', Jan. 12.—Secretary of
Treasury Glass conferred with President
Wilson today relative to the appointment
of a successor, when Secretary Glass
takes the oath of office as a senator
from Virginia.
It Is expected *that an auuouncement
as to the new secretary of treasury will
be made tomorrow or today.
Secretary Glass Is the third cabinet
member the president has seen since
his Illness.
The conference between the president
and Secretary Glass gave rise to new
rumors as to the appointee and the
names of Martin Glynn, of Albany and
John Burke, treasurer of the United
States, were mentioned together with
that of R. C. Leffiugwell, assistant secre
tary of treasury.
Says Soldiers Want
. Leagueof Nations
W American soldiers who fought in France
I want the league of nations pact ratified
L by the United States senate, Sarah Mil-
Wred Willmer, war worker and enter-
Bt&lner, declared at the T. M. C. A. Big
at English's opera house on
Sunday afternoon. She served In France
and spoke of her experiences there.
“The league of nations covenant is not
perfect, but neither is anything else de
signed by human hands," she said. ‘ But
even though the league is not perfect, it
is something toward the maintenance of
peace and our boys want It. They de
serve It and for this reason alone we
ought to push It across."
Price Peril Seen
in Grain Change
NEW YORK, Jan. 12.—Warning of
price hazards which may confront wheat
and flour handlers after the withdrawal
of government control when the activities
of the grain corporation are brought to
an end next June, Is contained today in
an official bulletin Issued by Julius H.
Barnes to 42,000 licensees of the wheat
director in all parts of the United States.
Emphasis Is placed on the fact that
“the reduction of commitments to the
minimum required for the conduct of
necessary purrent business" will be a
wise commercial policy for the grain
trade upon the etrrainatlon of two years
of official stabilization and in view of the
present world situation.
DOWN IN BED
AND SO WEAK
Lady Suffered Terribly for Eight
Weeks But Her Case Showed
Wonderful Improvement
After Taking Cardui.
Johnson City, Tenn.—Mrs M, R.
Scott, living near this town, states:
’ “About three years ago I was down
in bed , . . terrible and so weak I
couldn’t bear the sight of food. This
condition continued for about eight
weeks ... I thought I was go
ing to die, and knew' I must get some
thing to do me some good. 1 had
heard all my life of Cardui and the
good results obtained from its use.
So I decided to try it
“After about a half bottle of Cardui
my appetite Improved, then I was less
nervous. I kept it up until I had
taken five bottles—and such an im
provement! I gained flesh and now
am the picture of health, due, I be
lieve, solely to the use of Cardui. I
am the mother of ten children and
feel well and strong.'’
Cardui is a mild, medicinal tonic
for women. It has stood the most
severe of all tests—the test of time,
having been in use for over forty
years. It is composed of purely veg
etable ingredients, which have been
found to help build up the vitality,
tone up the nerves, and strengthen
■he womanly constitution.
Try Cardui.-—Advertisement.
GRAND CLEAN-UP,
NEW REFORM CRY
Pure Democracy by 1930 Ob
ject of *Anti-Sin' Drive.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 12.—Treat ten
derly the vices you h-ave left. It may
not be long before they are taken from
yon—one by one legislated out of exist
ence.
“Make our democracy pure by 1930,”
is the slogan of reformers gathered in
Washington today to unite on plans for
a grand drive against sin. Reformers
of every kind and from everywhere—the
biggest collection over seen in these
parts. They represent the gathering of
ali notional reform organizations.
The assembled reformers are hot for
action against all manifestations of
wickedness, from prize fighting to po
lygamy. They will hold “purity” mass
meetings, addressed by William Jennings
Bryan and Attorney General Palmer. All
of the senators and congressmen have
been given reserved seats.
Among the organizations represented
are the International Reform Bureau,
tbe W. C. T. U., the National Temper
ance Union and the Intercollegiate Pro
hibition association. They are holding
separate and joint meetings. They have
dedicated tbe week to joy and thanks
giving because of the prohibition victory.
The International Reform Bureau,
which boasts of a board of directors
that Includes such distinguished charac
ters as Senator Poindexter and Senator
Sherman, has an elaborate “anti-sin” pro
gram. it is out to reform everything
from marriage to labor leaders.
This year being the 300th anniversary
of the landing of the Mayflower, Rev.
Dr. Wilbur F. Craftr, superintendent,
says it should be a fine year for puttiug
purity across. However, he advises
against ordering the 1921 advanced styles
in wings. It may be another century
or two before- the program of the high
cost of dressing is solved by wings.
TREATY CAUCUS
AROUSES HOPE
(Continued From Page One.)
press, the Taegllsche Rundschau, says
that "the aim now must be a removal
of this work of peace.”
“Under the Peaco Yoke,” is the head
placed by the Lokal Anzelger upon Its
comment.
The Allgemelne Zeitung dwelt mostly
upon the limitations of German sov
ereignty.
“Germany must set her hope in the
British workers,” said the newspaper
Freiheit. This newspaper mentions tbe
“peace yoke,” and laments “the imprac
ticability of the peace.”
DEPLORE ABSENCE
OF U. S. IN LEAGUE
LONDON, Jan. 12.—Regret that the
United States did not participate In rati
fication of the treaty of Versailles is ex
pressed by today’s newspapers. Some
editorials strike a doleful note.
“The omission of America's signature
to the ratifyiug document,” says the
Telegraph, “stands for the bitter disap
pointment of the hope that glowed with
promise for humanity a year ago. It Is
true the league of nations exists by the
terms of the treaty, but the world knows
that unless and until the United States
adheres to the league and participates In
its actions not a tithe of the usefulness
and moral authority it should possess
will belong to It.”
The Telegraph also cites the absence
of Russia from Saturday’s ceremony and
says: “Until the sky in that direction
grows clearer there can be no world
peace nor any hope of it.”
Doubts of the reality of peace, behind
the formal act of ratification are ex
pressed by the Daily New*.
“There is not a nation which can not,
if it wishes, manufacture uew grievances
out of the settlement to trouble the
peace of tbe world,” it says. “Occa
sions of offense are so numerous they
obscure the very fact of peace.”
Report Plot to Sink
Ships Allies Demand
LONDON, .Jan. 12.—An Exchange Tel
egraph dispatch from Berlin today
quotes the newspaper Freiheit as assert
ing a high German naval official had
Informed the government of a plot to
sink the ships demanded by the allies as
compensation for the Scapn Flow sinking.
There was no confirmation of the al
leged plot from any other solin'*
DETROIT VAPOR STOVES
PENINSULAR STOVES
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CHENEY PHONOGRAPHS
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443-5 E. Wash.
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RUBBERS. They come in medium
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SYMONS WON’T
SUBMIT TO GAG
Says He’ll Ask Special Session
to Act on Legion Bill.
A bill providing for the establishment
of a headquarters at Indianapolis for the
American legion will be introduced in
the proposed first special session of the
legislature, Luther Symons, representa
tive from Henry county, has promised a
committee of the legion. Mr. Symons’
promise is the first indication that there
would be a definite effort to bring about
the consideration of other measures be
sides suffrage by the legislature.
Representative Symons has Informed
the Indiana Woman’s Franchise league
that he will not consent to .the considera
tion of the suffrage amendment only,
because be believes the consideration of
a bill to provide headquarters for the
legion to be necessary at this time. He
pointed to the fact that Indianapolis
must have a permanent headquarters
building well under way before the na
tional convention of the legion in Sep
tember of this year or the national head-
will be taken away
from InaNmapoils.
The national executive committee of
the legion has not decided whether it
shall give its approval to the presenta
tion of a bill of this nature to the first
rpecial session, according to Dr. T. Vic
tor Keene, Indiana member of the com
mittee. Dr. Keeene takes the stand that
it probably would be more advisable
to wait until the second session.
Representative Symons was urged to
support the measure by a committee
appointed by a Henry county post of
the legion on instructions to Raymond
S. Springer, state commander. The in
structions were sent out before* a locat
committee called on Gov. Goodrich nn<l
obtained a statement from him to the
| effect that the measure could not be
taken up before the second session.
The letter sent to post commanders by
t the state commander asked that each
: member of the legislature be pledged to
support such a measure. All posts with
! the exception of Attica post No. 52 ex
pressed approval of the plan to have
the state fluanee the construction of a
headquarters building. This post took
the stand that the legton should build
its otto home and not ask one state to
build a home for an organization cover
ing forty-eight states.
Burial Services Held
for Mrs . Herrington
I The funeral of Mrs. Mary A. Herrlng
| ton, 82, was held this afternoon from
I the late home at 3528 Salem street. Burial
was at Crown Hill cemetery. Mrs. Her
rington was the widow of the late Isaac
Herrington, a harness manufacturer, who
died several years ago. Surviving her
are two sons. Edward J., of Washing
ton, D. C., and F. L. Herrington of
Chicago, and a daughter. Miss Belle II
Herrington of this city.
Your Grocer Has —
E-Z-Bake Flour
Used by more house-
I wives in Indiana
i yUj - any other two
evans'
E-Z-BARE
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH CO.
Opportunities for Young Women in the Long Lines
Department of the Bell System
The Long Lines Department offers attractive positions to
girls who will be paid while learning. Rest and lunchroom,
quarters provided for employes. Please call at 3001 North
New Jersey street or telephone North 9807. Miss LeForge.
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 1920.
Porto Rican Governor
111; Family Called
SAN JUAN, Torto Rico, Jan. 12,—Gov.
Arthur Yager Is critically ill, following
a severe intestinal hemorrhage, which,
his physicians announce, was the result
of a complication of diseases from which
he has been suffering for several months.
A bulletin Issued by the doctors says:
“Gov. Yager’s condition Is serious. Ab
solute repose Is Imperative.”
Last night the governor's condition
was such that Mrs. Yager and the mem
bers of his family, who are in the United
States, were advised.
Order Doctor’s Arrest
in Poison Mystery
MARKESAN, Wis., Jan. 12.—A warrant
ordering the arrest of Dr. A. Freuden
burg, charging him with the murder of
his wealthy mother-in-law, was ordered
served here today. Dr. Frendenburg Is
accused of killing the aged woman, Mrs.
Hattie Duffles, by an injection of mus
tard. He and his wife received the en
tire estate of Mrs. Duffles at her death.
CHARGE IT
At King's
Remodeling
Sale
Big Reductions
WOMEN’S COATS,
1 SUITS, SKIRTS,
BLOUSES, FURS.
MEN’S OVERCOATS,
SUITS, CORDUROY COATS
TROUSERS, MACKINAWS
Our entire stock at gener
ous reductions.
SI.OO A WEEK PAYS THE BILL
Troops Leave Gary
After Riotless Duty
t
GARY, Ind., Jan. 12.—After three
months’ riot duty in Gary without a
riot,. 1,000 regulars of the Fourth divi
sion counted army transport trucks this
morning and the young army moved* out
/ output and cut down unit costs by the constant
$ f investment of new capital.
II \
With fair prices for the work they do. the 1
railroads are able to attract new capital for
Out of accumuteicd capital expanding their facilities.
have arisen all the successes
of industry and applied sd- m , 1 * 1 i , _ • 11 t r • • nt
,„c. ,H th. comfort. „„<i Rates high enough to yield a fair return will
insure railroad growth, and prevent costly traffic
depend for the proca o/ congestion which invariably results in poorer
construction in which all have
to,hare * service at higher cost.
—JAMES J. HILL
National wealth can increase only as our raiP
roads grow.
Poor railroad service is dear at any price.;
No growing country can long pay the price of
inadequate transportation facilities
I ' . fj
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'' ~ n 1 '' ■' 1 ■!. T'’T.' 1 ' 1 * a lJ‘* ia^^C —■ , 1 u tiryi
of Gary as it moved out of Germany
little more than a year ago—victorious.
The first of the tricks left at C a. m
and expect to arrive at Ft. Sheridan at
2 o’clock this afternoon. Col. W. S.
Mapes, commander, expects to be at Ft.
Sheridan only a few days before they
proceed to their home camp at Ft
Dodge, Des Moines, la.
The soldiers were sent to Gary by
Maj. Gen. Wood, commander of the cen
tral division of the war department,
to quell expected outbreaks of striking
steel and iron workers. Not one shot
was fired while the troops were here.
HUNTER LOSES FINGER.
VINCENNES, Ind.. Jan. 12.—Careless
handling of a shotgun which he tried to
pull through a wire fence while out hunt-
ing resulted in one of the fingers bein?
shot from tbe right hand of John Cham
bers, a young Bicknell man, Saturday
afternoon.
FAINTS, FALLS AGAINST STOVE.
Will Bell, negro, fainted and fell
against a stove In the Reeder sales barn,
416 West Maryland street, today, end
was badly burned about the face.
5

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