OCR Interpretation


Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, January 26, 1920, Home Edition, Image 12

Image and text provided by Indiana State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047611/1920-01-26/ed-1/seq-12/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 12

12
v.
Making Money
is a matter of saving, not of earning ability. YOU
are “making” more than your neighbor who is
perhaps earning more than you, if you are spend
ing carefully and saving regularly more of your earn
ings than he is doing. Save first 1
*
jFletctier
failings atft Crust Company
Capital Largest in Indiana.
BLOOM’S SUGAR
SALES TRACED
Fair Price Official Checks Up
All Warehouses.
Every •warehouse in Indianapolis is be
ing- checked today, Stanley Wyckoff, fair
price commissioner, said, in an effort to
trace the dealings in sugar of O. H.
Bloom, pawnbroker and proprietor of the
Central meat market, East Washington
street. There still is approximately 200,-
000 pounds of sugar purchased by Bloom
unaccounted for, Mr. Wyckoff stated.
Bloom’s dealings in sugar started about
Oct. 15 when federal control over sugar
was released, Mr. Wyckoff stated. Since
that time he has handled 387,000 pounds
of sugar. Bloom has no wholesaler's li
cense.
Investigation of Bloom’s dealings was
started last week as a result of a sale
of sugar by a downtown jeweler." It
was shown that the jeweler purchased
his sugar from the C. D. Kenny com
pany through Bloom and resold It at
less than he paid ror It.
The case has been laid before United
States District Attorney VanNuys.
Pneumonia Fatal
to Mrs. Kent Cooper
The body of Mrs. Kent Cooper, for
merly of Indianapolis, who died of pneu
monia in her home in Brooklyn, N. Y„
Sunday evening after an illness of three
weeks, will be brought to this city for
burial, It was stated today.
Surviving are Mrs. Cooper's parents.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Mcßride. 1434
Park avenue; a daughter, Mrs. Wales L.
Deßussy, of Meriden, Conn., a son, Rob
ert, and a daughter, Jane, of Brook’yn;
a sister, Mrs. James Perry Hoster, 1612
Central avenue, Indianapolis, and a
brother, Herbert Mcßride. Private fu
neral services will be held In Brooklyn.
Mr. Cooper is chief of the traffic de
partment of the Associated Press, and
formerly was a well-known Indianapolis
newspaper man, having at one time been
city editor of the Indianapolis Sun, and
later with the United Press association.
\ *
Hurt 10 Years
Ago Commits Suicide
Ten years ago Mrs. Marguerite Drunkut
waa leriously injured by a fall from a
borseA Today she lies dead of her own
band m a result.
Bicycle Policemen Finney and Lansing
•were galled to the Drunkut home, 609
South New Jersey street, Saturday eve
ning. There they found Mrs. Drunkut
suffering from the effects of poison. They
rushed her to the city hospital, but she
died late Saturday night. Relatives said
she became melancholy at times as a re
sult of her injury of ten years before.
She was 40 years old.
Tomato Growing in
Indiana on Increase
Indiana is developing into one of the
greatest tomato producing states in the
middle west, according to officers of the
Indiana Federation of Farmers’ Associa
tions, who have arranged for a state
wide conference on tomato production to
be held at the Claypool hotel Thursday.
Practically every county in the state
will be represented at the conference,
according to Lewis Taylor, general sec
retary of the federation. The object
of the conference is to establish an agree
ment between producers and canners be
fore large crops of tomatoes are planted
this year.
Goodrich to Speak
at Lodge Banquet
Gov. James P. Goodrich i\as accepted
an invitation to be toastmaster at a
banquet Tuesday evening at the Clay
pool hotel in honor of James J. Davis
of Pittsburg, Pa., director general of
the Loyal Order of Moose. The Indian
apolis lodge No. 17, Loyal Ord£r of
Modse, Is giving the banquet. Among
the speakers will - be Mayor Charles W.
Jewett, United States District Attorney
Fred VanNuys, E. C. Toner of Ander
son, Dr. A. A. McCain and others. Dele
gates from all Indiana lodges of the
Moose will attend the Initiation serv
ices of 300 candidates preceding the
banquet. -
Albert H. Morris
Funeral Tomorrow
The funeral of Albert H. Morris, 39, a
•well-known auctioneer of 2922 North Del
aware street, who died late Saturday at
the Methodist hospital, will be held at 2
o’clock tomorrow afternoon from the
Kregelo & Bailey„chapel, 532 North Penn
svlvania street. Burial will be at Crown
Hill.
Mr. Morris had been an auctioneer at
swine sales for about fourteen years. He
is sarvived by e. widow, three children
and his parents, In addition to two Bis
ters.
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA.
Legion Post to Give
Musical Show
A musical entertainment will be
given in Caleb Mills hall in February,
by the St. Mihiel Post of the American
legion. The post will bring the Ameri
can Syncopated orchestra here for the ;
event, In which Irvington Pest No. 38
will join.
J. C. Caperton Is the new president ,
of the St. Mihiel Post, having been
chosen Saturday night. Other officers
are: J. H. Bookwalter, vice-commander;
G. R. Clapp, record adjutant; E. F.
Osborne, corresponding adjutant; J. W.
Ebaugh, district representative; L. M.
Bryant and J. A. Murphy were elected
to places on the executive committee.
Legion to Help All
World War Veterans
The American Legion will . help all
former Yanks out of their troubles with
the government.
Franklin D’Olier, national commander,
has issued a statement saying that the
war risk Insurance officer of every post
will take up directly with officials at
Washington all questions of insurance,
back pay, failure to receive Liberty
bonds or similar questions.
If the question necessitates further
consideration, the local officer may pass
it on to the state war risk officer and
he in turn may pass it to the national
war risk insurance officer, who is Charles
F. Sheridan, who formerly was connected
with the 'war risk insurance office In
Washington.
Baker’s Shortening—Glossbrenner’s.
IliiiiiifH.^'iiiiiiiiifiHiiiiiiinifiißiiißnitinnniniiiiHniiLiiiinfflißHiiiiunuiiHßUßiiiiifliiiiiiumiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiHiitniiifi'iii'HitiiiinMiiiiiHHJiunwjiiiiiiiiniijflßiQiiiiiniiiiiiiitißMiiiiHiiWiiiui^
j The Home of the $4.50 Eye-Glass jj
(j Lenses with any desired Kryptok Invisible bifocals for FAR
, . , and NEAR vision (ground to
mounting in stock, case gether> nQt cement ed), complete
and cord £ wlth your choice CIO
complete of mounting vO to via
A splendid complete assortment of mountings to select from.
IHoosier Optical Company
148 N. Illinois St. Open Saturday Evenings.
Manufacturing Opticians. No Charge for Examinations.
11l j I
CLOTHING ON CREDIT
PEOPLE’S CREDIT CLOTHINO CO.
46 N. PENNSYLVANIA ST. 2nd FLOOR
IF IT IS IN THE LINE OF HARDWARE
YOU CAN GET IT AT VONNEGUT s S
120 TO 124 EAST WASHINGTON STREET
ALL INTERURBAN ROADSLEAD TO
D. N. FOSTER FURNITURE COMPANY
U7-ÜB-UU. Wnt HmJul ML. ifsiM HmM affinal
A* > • . i \ I V
U.S. MAY RELY
UPON BANKS IN
DEFICIT CRISIS
Congress Leaders Anxious
Over Meeting 1921 Indebted
ness of $3,000,000,000.
NEW BOND ISSUE LIKELY
WASHINGTON, Jan. 26.—Congressional
leaders are today looking to the Amer
ican banks to carry the government
through a period of financial stress dur
ing the fiscal year 1921.
With an almost certain deficit of three
billion doHars for the fiscal year 1921
leaders In congress are hopeful that thl^
may be carried by short-term treasury
notes sold to the banks.
If the banks are unable to absorb
short-term notes to the extent of three
billon dollars, there are but two alter
natives, new taxes or anew bond issue
and both democrats and republicans in
congress are opposed to such means of
meeting the deficit.
WAR TAXES HAVE
BECOME UNPOPULAR.
Already there is a popular cry against
war taxes, and to make new taxes would
bring a storm of protest against congress
that would be reflected in the elections.
The same holds practically true of anew
bond issue.
Congressional leaders do not feel that
the public wants another bond issue. *
“I do not know how congress is going
to meet the 1921 financial problems of the
government,” said Representative Henry
T. Rainey of Illinois, a veteran of the
house ways and means committee, today.
‘‘Facing us In the next fiscal year we see
expedltures piling up to a huge total of
approximately nine billion dollars. We
know that revenues from all sources Un
der existing law will not exceed In all
probability six billion dollars. There is
a certain deficit of about three billion
dollars facing the government
GOVERNMENT MUST
CONFRONT DEFICIT.
; ‘The government must make up this
deficit in some way. Ways open are by
increased taxes and new taxes; bond is
sue or shoTt term treasury certificates
sold to banks. But the banks mav be
unable to lend to the government all the
mopey It needs.”
Congress today faced one of Its busi
est weeks both In committees and on
the floors of the house and senate. In
the senate the bl-partlsan treaty confer
ences were to be resumed In Senator
Lodge’s office; the Russian Investigating
committee was to proceed with the hear
ing of Ludwig C. A. K. Martens; the
commerce committee was to hear western
shipbuilders regarding a permanent mer
chant marine policy; the military affairs
committee was expected to finish its
work on the army reorganization bill;
one navy subcommittee was to Investigate
the morals of the Newport, R. 1., train
ing station and another was to continue
its investigation of the navy depart
ment. The appropriation committee has
three appropriation bills before it which
have passed the house and expected to
put them all iu shape within ten days.
The agriculture committee hoped to hu
ish its deliberations on legislation to reg
ulate the packers.
WARNS OF NEW
GERMAN DRIVE
CHICAGO, Jan. 26—Prusslsan propa
ganda has become very active again in
the United States, in the opinion of Dr.
William J. Johnson, secretary of the
board of temperance and moral welfare
of the Presbyterian church.
"Pan-German propaganda has become
very active once more because of the let
down since the war,” he said. "Today
German efforts are directed chiefly to
ward South America, where it Js planned
to send five million German youths as
emigrants
3taiftatra ©aito Sitttes
WILSON CALLED
‘NAME ONLY’NOW
Rome Paper Says Politically
President Doesn’t Exist.
ROME, Jan. 26—" Politically, Presi
dent Wilson doesn’t exist,” the Popolo
Romano said today, commenting on the
Jugo-Slav request to the allies for an
extension of time to consider the allied
proposition for a settlement of the
Adriatic dispute.
The allies granted the Jugo-Slav pe
tition for extension, the newspaper said,
but it warned the Belgrade government
its hopes that President Wilson will
Intervene for Jugo-81avla were In vain.
"Wilson is only a name now, as even
the cobblestones In Washington know,
owing to bis Illness,” the newspaper
said.
Besides, the newspaper continued, the
American senate has warned that deal
ings with President Wilson will not be
recognized. The Jugo-Slav plans, the
newspaper hoped, thus are due to fail
and Dalmatia will be saved to Italy In
the end.
Engineers to Hold
Conference in March
A conference of engineers In which the
Indiana Society of Engineers Is expected
to take a prominent part. Is expected
to be held In French Lick, Ind., In
March. This announcement was made at
the close of a state convention of In
diana engineers held in the Claypool
hotel Friday and Saturday.
The following officers for 1920 were
elected by the Indiana society: William
J. Titus, bridge engineer of the In
diana state highway commission, presi
dent; O. C. Ross, Indianapolis, vice
president; Charles Brossman, Indianapo
lis, secretary; John W. Fulwllder, Leba
non, elected to board of trustees for one
year; Prof. D. D. Ewing, Purdue uni
versity, and A. P. Melton, Gary, Ind„
elected members of the boards of trustees
for two years.
HIGH COSTS GETS HIM.
SPRINGFIELD, 111., Jan. 28—The H.
C. of L. forced H. O. Brown to sleep In
the police station. He failed to pay his
hotel bilL
ATTENTION
Churches, Schools and Housewives,
Save Your Old Faper. Ranted, old
books, magazines and newspapers.
If you have an auto bring them to
our place. You will receive a good
price for them. If you can't deliver
call Main 6080.
American Paper Stock Cos.
340 West Market St.
DETROIT VAPOR BTOVES
PENINSULAR STOVES
GURNEY REFRIGERATORS
CHENEY PHONOGRAPHS
For Sale by
HOOSIER OUTFITTING CO
443-5 E. Wash.
An Unusual Display
of High-Grade
Used Cars
We are pleased to call special attention to a dis
play of Rebuilt and Renewed Motor Cars which, we
believe, possess more real value at the prices offered
than any assortment ever previously brought before
a motor-buying public.
This display presents an exceptionally wide variety
of choice from which to make selection, ranging from
Sedans and Roadsters of the more expensive types
to Touring Cars and Coupes in the moderate price
Significant of the classes.
rial worth of tin j n v j ew 0 f this fact and the advancing tendency of
cars offered is the prices throughout the motor car industry, we feel
faet that since our called upon to urge an early inspection if you con
first announce- template the purchase of an automobile within the
memos this dis- next twely e months.
play, sales have
far surpassed all E. IV. Steinhart Company
anticipations. Meridian Street at Eleventh
Army Goods Sale
Special Tuesday and Wednesday only— Thcge are
WOOL UNION SUITS Cm 19]
An opportunity of a lifetime to buy at these prices—
.■■■— " 1 N /" - *
Reissue O. D. Reclaimed Overalls WOOLEN SOCKS
Wool Shirts an( | j um p ers Light weight—
Practically new— " ggmu sn
S3 OO Each 7sc 4oc
W■ W W * Heavy weight, 60ch
- Lw—L
Also on sale it very low prices, army shoes, reclaimed underwear, new
blankets, new/sweaters and army slickers and raincoats.
QUEEN CITY SALVAGE CO.“
I UUlllll Nlllllvld Oil GO I When uMompanltd by cash, certified check or mcney order.
Store open from 8:00 a. m. till 8:00 p. m.
$40,000 CHURCH
TO BE ERECTED
Heath Memorial Methodist to
Have New Home.
Anew $40,000 church will be erected
on the east side this year.
Rev. Elmer St. Clair, pastor of the
Heath Memorial Methodist Episcopal
church, announced that anew church
would be built at the corner of Winsdor
street and Commerce evenue, just across
the street from the Spades library.
The present frame church and site
at East Fifteenth street and Arsenal
avenue, has been sold for $5,800, he said.
The new site cost $3,800.
Preliminary plans for the new church
call for a brick structure, ninety-eight
feet long and sixty-four feet wide. The
basement will have a gymnasium, with a
basketball court, shower baths and other
rooms to be used as community head
quarters.
LEAVES 102 DESCENDANTS.
COTTONWOOD FALLS, Kas„ Jan. 26.
—Mrs. Louisa Naylor, deceased, left 102
descendants. She married in 1858 at the
age of 16 years. There are ten children,
fifty-five grandchildren and thirty-seven
great-grandchildren.
YOUR HEART’S DESIRE
May be a Home.
May be a Business of your Own.
May be a Good Vacation next Summer.
May be an Education for your Children.
May be an Income when you are sick or too old
to work. *
ALL these and many other things can only be
had if you have money in the bank.
DON’T wait until you need them before you
start to save.
Start NOW and be ready to seize your oppor
tunity when it comes.
Open an accoupt TODAY. One Dollar or more
will do it, and
Pay 2% On Savings
Meyer-Kiser Bank
136 East Washington Street
BABY DISFIGURED
BY CRAZED NURSE
Yank Officer’s Son Victim of
Deed in Lucerne.
BERLIN, Jan. 26. —A demented nurse
has been arrested at Lucerne for dis
figuring the year-and-a-half-old son of
Col. William N. Hensley of the United
States array with acid. It is charged the
nurse attempted to take the boy’s life.
Among the papers found among the
nurse’s possessions was a paper read
ing: “The lions and tigers are hungry,
so why shouldn’t the children of the
bourgeois be fed to them?”
The attending physicians say that the
baby will recover, but that he will bear
the scars all his life.
Col. Hensley Is chief of the American
army balloon service. He came to Europe
upon the British dirigible balloon R-34.
Fall on Ice Fatal
to John Hickman
John Hickman, 70, of 521 West Twelfth
street, died Sunday as the result of a
fall on the ice a week ago. His thigh
was broken by the fall. Coroner Robin
son is investigating.
MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 1920.
Children are made to
feel so much at home
here that it’s no wonder / A
we are able to secure
such splendidly typical
character studies of , VAaJ
Ninth Floor Kahn Bldg

MELLETT PRINTING CO.
Particular Print or b
\ ' ’ ;•'
4th Floor
CENTURY BUILDING
Main 4756 Auto. 23-241
QUALITY AND SERVICE
' , ■ .. ~ ~ —I
GREER-HANKINS LBR. CO.
Appllers and Retailer*
VULCANITE ASPHALT SHINGLES
and ROLL ROOFING
„ <24 HASS. AYR.
Main “47. Phones. Auto. 22-21S.
Cups and Saucers ISC up
Dinner Plates up
Fancy hand-painted Plates.
25-piece Dinner Set $4.9,5
Little Furniture Store
211 E. Washington St.
Send 10c for this sample hox of
f 7S#Hotl SYnton
jo u I*4 jevi Candies
The Best Made Candies in America
*n e contents of the sample box will
give you some idea of the rare qual
ity and delicious flavor of these
candies.
*o'" ™ ™ ™ i i " ■■ mi i ■■ i■ i ■ iO'
Outsorted ch ocolates and real
French bonbons atsl.so fierfound.
Chocolate covered nuts at sl.7sfier
found. The finest Taffies in Amer
ica at 80c fier found. Plus the war
tax. Post free to any address in
Qfmerica. .
O 1—" ■
(v Send your name and address, and ioc in money
w or stamps with this advertisement, and we will
J send you the sample box of our fine candies post
paid.
<—'*— ~ ' L. —O—■
HOTEL SINTON
Management of J. L. Horgan
CINCINNATI
■K
Booklet explaining Income Tax We have a copy for you
Sending Money
to Europe
Prompt, efficient service in forwarding
money to practically all parts of Europe.
FOOD DRAFTS
can be exchanged for food by your relatives and
friends in central Europe at the American Re
lief Administration Stations.
For full information call or address
FOREIGN DEPARTMENT
Steamship Tickets Foreign Exchange
Letters of Credit
Merchants National Bank
Frenzel Brothers
c&k MODERN DENTISTRY
/fajPJLI s Absolutely Painless
11. .]f There was, of course, a time
when some dental work could
not be done without considerable
pain. But, in these days of anesthetics and scientific methods
pain has been driven from the dental office. Os course, ex
perience apd equipment enters into dentistry to a great extent.
Better choose a dentist who has a large practice. He generally
knows every .phase of the business a little better.
EITELiIORG & MOORE " r n r
( DENTISTS JZ'mSZ*
MEN’S REGULAR $1.29
Jersey Sweaters,
97c
—Come in navy blue only. Sizes
36 to 44. While they last, 97^.
Panfela
©OUTLET©
1 1 ■
'TGnkumfL
310417-ftft K. Washington St.

xml | txt