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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, January 27, 1920, Home Edition, Image 12

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CERTIFICATE OF OBFOSTT WQT SUBJECT TO^CHECK
C) vol- *U .P-~-.3^.—Z.vft.SL= * ....'' :~_DolUr
ua fuutja gwrttas* n* ™ Camprap, which, oh demand and tm* suhmndir
SID or Tvtw ctirnncAT* frofsrly ewDonsao. wiu. hefay said son and wnx fay in
j v 1 TERCST thereon from date untr. at the rate of three p€r centum
I PER ANNUM.
I I Jftrtttrr ftsttnp sat, Stall Cißtanr
la.
Every Day Counts
- when -your surplus funds are at work in our Demand
Certificates of Deposit. Your money earns interest
at the rate of 3 per cent per annum from the date
of deposit to the date of withdrawal, whether the
time is three days or three months.
£ftetcSer
anti Crust €otiqais?
Capital Largest In Indiana.
Love Left Out in Whirlwind
Courtship Involving $75,000
Gold Plays Leading Part in
Ohio Leap Year Event and
Heir Is Bridegroom.
CANTON, 0., .Tan. 27.—One girl
dreamed of a home with love.
The second girl dreamed of a home,
but didn’t underline the love part of it.
The man had to have a wife by Feb.
1 to Inherit $75,000, left by his mother’s
will.
The result was a whirlwind leap year
courtship, which began when William
Hoffman, 31, a railway repair shop
plumber, advert! sed for a w'ife and ended
when be married Miss Ida E. Hinton.
22, a waitress, after Miss May Gertrude
Dean, 10, a rubber factory worker, gave
him the cold shoulder because he talked
money and not love.
The Hoffman-Dean-Hinton adventure In
machine gun matrimony breaks Ohio
records, it Is said, for rapid proposals
and speedy ceremonies.
CHANGE MIN’D
IN TRITE STYLE.
Hoffman wrote to ’a newspaper. He
received ten letters from Canton lassies.
He called on Miss Dean and she says he
metaphorically “jingled the money he
would get.” Dazzled, she says, at the
promise of riches, she accepted Hoffman
and the next day he called with the Rev.
Ira D. Warner and a license.
But Miss Dean, with her wedding
gown across her shoulders, orange blos
soms In her hair and the usual tears In
her eyes, cnlled down the stairs and
told him to go the way he came.
“I don’t love him. I never would love
him and he doesn’t love me,” she walled
to her rather peeved mother.
Miss Hinton telephoned Hoffman at his
hotel at 6 o’clock the following morning.
“If you’re not married yet, I’ll wait
in the lobby,” she said.
MISS DEAN WANTED
LOVE, NOT MONEY.
Hofftnan and his bride-to-be sat in the
lobby until the county auditor’s office
opened two hours later. Rev. AVarner
wouldn't marry them for another hour.
The 9 o’clock courthouse chimes were
the Hoffman wedding bells.
“I wouldn’t have been happy with
money and no love,” says Miss Dean.
‘‘l wanted a* home and sensible bus
band and I got them,” says Mrs.
Hoffman.
‘‘Marriage is what you make it," Hoff
man Thinks. “We’ll learn to love each
other. Miss’ Dean wouldn't do because
she didn’t take things seriously—too ro
mantic. Anyway—we’ve got the money.”
TEACHERS PUT
BAN ON JAZZ
Dance, Don’t Wrestle, Latest
Warning of Professors.
NEW YOUR, Jan. 27.—01 d-fashioned,
keep-your-distanee dances, are to dis
place the jazz steps, if the na
tion-wide reform movement undertaken
by the American National Association
of Masters of Dancing proves success
ful.
The dancing masters, it is announced
here, count on the support of mothers,
fathers, daughters, sons, teachers and
hostesses —and if necessary, the polic-p
department—to exterminate the “half
Nelson,” ‘‘body hold,” “shimmy lock"
and other Imported ballroom grips, which
are practiced by some dancers.
Cheap and vulgar music is also to
come under the ban and, according to
a circular just issued by the association,
those in charge of community or public
dances are urged to show their opposi
tion to undesirable dances by distribut
ing “You will please leave the hall" cards
to those who persist in offending.
WOMEN TO BLAME
IN MANY CASES.
The women, it is charged, are often
as much to blame as their partners and,
in some eases, dance hall proprietors., are
advised to pick out ten or n dozen ob
jectionable couples, and if a warning is
disregarded, to oust them at once.
‘‘You will soon see,” the circular reads,
“that you have raised the standard of
your establishment and that the loss will
be more than made up by double the
number of persons who have x-espect
for you and your dances.
“Dance music should be bright and
cheerful, properly accented and the
j'hrases well divided,” the circular adds.
'‘Cheap, vulgar music of the extreme
jazz type invites cheap, vulgar, mean
ingless dancing. It is useless to expect
refined dancing when the. music lacks
all refinement for, after all, whaL is
dancing but an interpretation of music?'*
TEMPOS ADOPTED
BY ASSOCIATION.
The association has adopted the fol
lowing tempos, it being impossible, the
masters say, to regulate fast dancing.
Waltz 48 measures to minute
Two-step 54 measures to minute
One-step 66 measures to minute
Fox trot , 50 measures to minute
“Dancers should assume a light, grace
ful position,” say the masters. “There
should be no jerky half-steps, for these
cause undesirable variations. Partners
should not dance with cheeks close or
fouchlng. nor should the clasp be tight.
•Neck holds’ are positively unpardonable.
The gentleman’s arm should encircle bis
partner’s waist, his hand resting lightly
dust above the waist line. The lady’s
■?ft arm should not encircle her part
w'i shoulders or neck.
HfSteps or movements that can not be
oiled should not bs taught by daae-
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA
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Top to Bottom—Miss Ida Hinton, now
Mrs. HofTmaji, who wanted a home; Wil
liam Hoffman, who wanted a wife so he
could get ?<5,000; Miss May Gertrude
Dean, who wanted love.
ing teachers. Short side steps, first
right, then left, when done continuously,
are not conducive to refined dancing ana
should not be permitted. ‘Shimmy danc
ing,’ a shaking cr jerking of the upper
part of the body while taking short
steps or standing still, should not be
tolerated.
“The proper dancing step should be
the same as a natural walking one,
except in exhibition dancing, which prop
erly belongs to the stage, not the ball
room. Exceptionally long or short steps
are not in good form
“Dancing should be from the waist
down, not from the waist up. Copying
of the extremes used on the modern
stage is in bad taste. Remember that
the majority of dancers desire to dance
according to the best accepted standards,
thnt is, without the slightest, trai-e tn
offense to dignity or decorum.”
“Fire Eater” at
“Slippery Gulch”
The citizens of the wild and wooley
west village of Slippery Gulch at Tom
linson hall will be entertained by the
“Great Dante the Fire Eater,” who will
also work in the “Spirit Cabinet Act. - ’
These additional attractions will be like
the Slippery Gulch paper, “The Howler”
free. This 1 is something very unusual for
it uslally costs the tenderfeet who visit
Slippery Gulch a thousand “bucks” to
turn around if the sheriff's deputies are
standing by.
The jail is becoming one of the most
popular loafing places in the community
and Judge Hoffman is by no means
a piker when it comes to meting out
fines.
Mille Castilanos' trained lions are
proving one of the most popular amuse
ments in the village and unlike most
of the features they are not of the frtv
ilohs nature, but stand out as a marked
contrast with the rest of this wild
frontier village. ,
Twenty-five years ago, when raccoon
coats were selling at ?10, many poorly
paid workers possessed them, 'Taut In the
short interval of time elapsed, they
have risen in prices to 51,000 for a coat
of matched skins.
tour Seven* Iloujr—Glosabraanct L*.
BELGIUM FAST
BUILDING UP ITS
TRADE STATUS
Merchants of War-torn Coun
try Quickly Renew Ante-
Bellum Standards.
SIGNS BRING HAPPINESS
WASHINGTON, Jan. 27.—Heroic
Belgium, war ridden, almost ruined by
the depredations of the invader, appar
ently is going to be the first of the
European nations to fully rehabilitate
herself. This Is foreshadowed by the
nature of her Imports from the United
States, as well as the fact that on no
occasion since the cessation of hostilities
have her merchants overlooked an op
portunity to renew and restore to pre
war standards, their trade with this na
tion. Figures made public by the de
partment of commerce give proof suf
ficient of Belgium’s plans to build again,
on the ruins of the old, her homes, her
commerce nd her Industries.
For the first nine months of 1919 Bel
gian imports from America included:
Household goods and personal effects,
$1,505,000; cattle and horses, $790,000;
lumber, $1,215,000; iron and steel prod
ucts, $9,524,000; electrical machinery and
appliances, $048,000; hinder twine,
$387,000; refined copper, $908,000; alu
minum manufactures, $233,000; zinc
spelter, $416,000; hops, $91,800, and malt,
$2,732,000.
All of these to Belgiuii, whose total
area is only 11,373 square miles.
LATHES AND OTHER
MACHINE TOOLS HUM.
Conspicuous among the iron and steel
products, and indicative of the energy
put forth by the stricken people to re
gain a lost commercial ranking, are
lathes and other machine tools, sharpen
ing, grinding and metal working ma
chinery, together with countless items of
lesser importance. All, however, will
serve to replace in Belgium factories the
machinery and equipment carried away
or destroyed when the German hordes
drove across tliehittle nation with only
a desire to wreak havoc and lay a path
of waste.
Arteries of transportation must needs
be rebuilt If the country is to thrive.
Thus, Belgium has come into American
markets and has bought up railway
equipment; she lms bought m l or trucks,
she has contracted for vast quantities
of iron and steel hillets, bars, rods ami
fittings, generally. The assortment
shows plainly, officials explained, what
depredations were committed on the na
tion's rolling stock and motive power.
FOOD PRODUCTION
A LITTLE TARDY.
Along with all of thee articles have
gone immense supplies of food commodi
ties. Belgium’s food producing districts
have not yet regained their potency.
Belegian buyers have been in the mar
kets for every;king that goes on the
dining tatde, and the quantities pur
chased give a feeling of confidence among
American dealers that Belgium’s re
cuperative powers are fully able to-meet
demands which must, of necessity, be
placed on them.
Witness these figures: Meat and dairy
products exported to Belgium duritn
the first nine months of 1919 aggre
gated $95,084,000. Os this sum, $,400,090
consisted <>f butter, cheese and evapo
rated condensed milk. Included In the
meat consignments were 127.466,000
pounds of lard, which is valued at S3B.
000,000 —seventeen pounds for every per
son in the nation.
There were also lard compounds to
taling 21,970,000 pounds and worth $5,
131.000 sent over in the same period.
Bacon shipments amounted to 72,973,000
pounds, worth $23,133,000, and bams an.
shoulders aggregating 28,853,000 pounds,
worth $5,507,000. Edible vegetables, oil
and fats and other articles of food also
were included 'n the heavy shipments.
Garrigus Funereal
Set for Tomorrow
KOKOMO, Ind., Jan. 27.—Funeral serv
ices for Milton Garrlgus, aged 88, vet
eran of the civil war, will be held
here tomorrow morning. He died Sun
day. Services will be In charge of the
G. A. R.
At the first chill! Take Genuine Aspirin marked with the
“Bayer Cross” to break up your Cold and relieve the Headache,
Fever, Stuffiness.
Warning! To get Genuine Aspirin prescribed by physicians for
over 19 years, you must ask for “Bayer Tablets of Aspirin,” and
look for the name “Bayer” on the package and on each tablet.
Always say “Bayer.”
Each “Bayer package” contains safe and proper directions for
the relief of Colds —also for Headache, Neuralgia, Toothache,
Earache, Rheumatism, Lumbago, Neuritis and for Pain generally.
fayer-TaMefs^Aspirin
Boxes of 12 —Bottles of TA —Bottles of 100—Also Capsules—All druggists
▲■ptrin Is the trade mark of Bayer Manufacturo of Monoacetlcacidester of Sallcyllcacid
/t*CL
rf t L.'4~&~4^tryL>
44r*jL£,.
* /
. ‘
Jutoatia iaihj mmz
ENTER, MAN!
Or Throw Him Out for
Bawling a Heap of Things
All Up.
By LORRY A. JACOBS.
NEW YORK, Jan. 27.—It’s usually the
women who dig up things to prove that
women are always right, but this time
It's a man—Dr. Stephen Langdon, pro
fessor of Assyrian language In Oxford
university, and his deductions a:re borne
out by Dr. A. M. Boyce of the University
of Pennsylvania.
Just between you and me, I think he
might as well have kept quiet about It,
since he’s dumped over the one thing
which we were able to convince Friend
Wife that women were wrong.
Anyway, Dr. Langdon says he’s de
ciphered some ancient Babylonian tab
lets that say that the story about Eve
tempting Adam to eat the apple was all
wrong. They even go so far as to say
that there wasn’t any Eve at all. Or any
Adam. And to make it worse, they claim
that man was created by a woman Deity.
And that Noah was the bird who did the
apple eating and that when he did it,
Mrs. Noah wasn't along at all.
So, therefore, Mrs. Noah couldn’t be to
blame for It since she didn’t even see
Noah sink his teeth into the mealy ap
ple.
But that isn’t the worst of it. Dr.
Langdon. aided and abetted by Dr.
Boyce, declares that the Babylonian tab-
VOW DID
EVE V ) V •’ / NOAH
lets reveal that Noah traveled about un
der two names, Noah and Ziuggidu.
Think what that means!
Instead of being able to win one argu
ment with your wife, and convincing her
that even if Adam did eat the apple. Eve
tempted him, the best you can do now
Is to admit that It was Noah's fault about
the apple and furthermore that he was
in the habit of staying out nights or
else be wouldn't have been traveling un
der the double cognomen.
CHANCES “SLIM”
FOR COLLECTING
CHICAGO, .Tan. 27.—Charles H. Wor
den, president of the First and Hamil
ton National bank of Ft, Wayne, "will
have a slim cnance of colievtlng the
$15,000 he xvas awarded in the circuit
court here yesterday from ‘Yellow Kid'
Well,” Randolph Thornton, attorney for
Weil, said today.
Worden Mas "fleeced" out of the money
by Weil two years ago. Since that time
Weil has been apprehended and is now
serving a term in the Joliet state prison.
Worden sued Weil for the money he lost,
plus tile accrued interest, totalling $2,336.
Judge Walker of the circuit court
granted Worden a judgment.
Oh, Skinnay, Look!
TeacheCs on Strike
SAND LAKE, Mich, Jan, 27.
School pupils of Sand I.ake and vi
cinity were enjoying an unexpected
holiday today. All the school teach
ers went on strike, demanding a 30
per cent Increase _ln salary. The
school board refused their demands
and ordered them to return to their
classrooms, but the teachers de
clined.
STOCK UNABLE
TO GET WATER
Farmers Carry Water to Ani
mals—Several Persons Hurt.
BEDFORD. Ind., Jan. 27.—Ice covers
the countryside in Lawrence county so
solidly and thick that livestock Is un
able even to get to watering troughs
farmers stated here today. Many are
carrying water to their stock.
From, several parts of the county have
come reports of the loss of livestock as
the result of falls. Cattle have broken
hips and legs and have had to be
butchered.
GREENSBURG, Ind., Jan. 27.—Miss
Goldie Willey broke her arm when she
fell on the lee here today.
MUNCIE, Ind., Jan. 27. —Mrs. Leona
Snodgrass Is in a serious condition at a
local hospital today as the result, of a
fall on the tee yesterday. One of her
legs was broken and she lay on the lee
three hours before she could attract
the attention of a passerby.
France Pays Honor
rto Col. Gignilliat
Col L. R. Gignilliat. superintendent of
Culver Military academy, has been
awarded the highest honor in the gift
of France It Mas learned here today.
The French government has conferred on
him the cross of the Legion of Honor.
News of the award to the Hoosier edu
cator reached Col. Gignilliat. in a letter
from Gen. Charles Jean Payot, etat
major to Gen. Foch. Gen. Foeb Mill
formally present the cross when he visits
tb United States in the spring.
Col. Gignilliat went to France as as
sistant chief of staff of the 84£h divi
sion. Later he M-as attached ’to Gen.
Pershing’s headquarters and the 37th
division.
Men, Attention!
* Repaired
U. S. ARMY
SHOES
(Russet)
t ■
With new soles and heels
$2.75
AND
$3.50
Just the thing for
comfort and work
151 N. ILLINOIS ST.
4 Doors South of Ohio
MAIL ORDERS Promptly Filled
Write Name, Address and Size plainly
No Extra Charge .
Abdominal Supporters ■
For Stout and Thin People
You need not be stout to wear
expert try one on you and no
vj^|itice the relief obtained for
V® heaviness of the stomach and Hi
Prices from $3.50 up No Charge for Fitting II
Wm. H. Armstrong Cos. I
(Indiana's Leading Truss and Supporter House.)
34 W. OHIO ST.
Table Sale ol Shoes
DURING
Our Annual Shoe Sale
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Infants’, Child’s, Misses’ and Little Boys’ School Shoes, Dress
Shoes and Fancy Shoes.
ALL SIZES, ALL STYLES, ALL PRICEB, FROM
95c to $2.95
In blacks, browns, whites, grays and colored tops.
You can’t afford to miss this sale. Sale lasts from
8 a. m. to 5:30 p. m.
Children's and Growing Girls' Dept., 2nd Floor.
FELTMAN & CURME
Shoe Stores Cos.
38 E. WASHINGTON
Aluminum Tea Kettles
$2.98
This is the regu- .
lar size 7 pure
aluminum tea V js /
kettle. A splen- _
did kettle, good
looking and light \CSBE”SEjB
to handle. Priced qgßgjgSgP
each, $2.08.
Soot-I-Cide
The ideal preparation for
cleaning dues and removing
soot. Makes soft coal as
clean to use as hard coal.
Price per can—
-25c
B Fahrenheit High-Grade
Spirit Thermometers
49c
Registers from 40 de
grees below to 120 de-
MgfijN grees above. A necessity
Hyi in every home and office.
LILLY HARDWARE
COMPANY
114-118 E. Washington St.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1920.
Nt bett thing to h*v-
Ing your dear onw with / h
you 1* to have their pho- T
to* rap hie portrait* as WLM&
made by
Ninth Floor. Kahn Bid*.
pO
FACTORY?
We will fit correct lenses In your
old frames, insuring you good
glasses at about half price.
DR. BOYER & CO.
417-41$ Occidental Building;.
®USE
the
Best
Auto.
27-397
WETO GRAPH Secret Writing System
invaluable tor lovers and lor keeping
recipes, addresses, secret memorandum or
other Information safe and private. No
stranger can read your postals if you use
the Weto Graph. Great fun for lovers or
friends. Don’t mtss It. Send 10c and we
will send the Weto Graph by malt with
full Instructions. Address PENN PUB
LISHING CO.. Blalraville. Pa.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Car Load Fresh Caught Fish
to be Sold Direct to
Consumers
FIRST CAR TO ARRIVE THURSDAY
East Coast Fisheries Products
Company, producers and packers,
located at New York, Boston and
Rockland, Maine, doing business
all through the eastern states,
and at this time having a large
distributing plant at 1250 South
West street, Indianapolis, pro
poses to sell direct to consumers
at wholesale prices. This move
ment will begin at once and the
first car for Indianapolis will ar
rive to go on sale Thursday,
January 29th„ car to be open
from 6 a. m. to 6 p. m. Also,
Friday, January 30th, at same
hours. These sales will con
tinue weekly, providing the peo
ple of Indianapolis will co-oper
ate with us in this work to re
duce the high cost of living.
We will also gladly give a sup
ply of fish to all Charity Organ
izations of the city upon appli
cation at our car.
The fish sold from our cars
will be absolutely fresh caught,
taken from our own steamers
and vessels at the old historical
"T" wharf, at Boston, and
shipped direct to Indianapolis
by American Railway Express,
on fast through trains. All va
rieties sent in season. Haddock,
Smelts, Cod and Flounders, 36
hours from their home in the
ocean to the consumer, at 12c
to 16c a pound. It doesn’t seem
possible, but nevertheless it is a
fact.
See Wednesday and Thursday Papers for
Assortment and Prices.
East Coast Fisheries Products Company
ROCKLAND, ME., BOSTON, NEW YORK, INDIANAPOLIS
Office Furniture f aaaaiiOfl
assortments of every style ♦
desk needed for the office. Let H h"™""*
us hfelp you in the proper se
lection. Fire and burglar proof
safes and vault doors. 1 | I mmhm
Safes for home or office. • 8
FIXTURES FOR STORE, OFFICE AND BANK.
AETNA CABINET COMPANY
Display Rooms, 321-29 W. Maryland St., Indianapolis
. '■■■ 1 " 1111 "IJL . . - -S
ALL INTERURBAN ROADS LEAD TO
D. N. FOSTER FURNITURE COMPANY
UMIM2I West Market St. Acton Market Street From the Terminal Station.
Our Famous Semi-Annual
CLEAN-SWEEP SALE
Now On in Full Swing.
Our Regular $2.39
Fleece Lined and Woolmix
Union Suits, £1 QC
Sale price P 1 • t/
JBaitielas
©OUTLET®
I INCANDESCENT
LAMPS
Fill your sockets
for the long winter nights.
Convenient place to buy.
THE DAYLIGHT CORNER
Merchants Heat & Light Cos.
C. O’B. Murphy, Gen’l Mgr.
GIRLS’ COATS
SIO.OO VALUES €£ /■ Qfi
Sizes S to 14
PXWiS 1
COR. WASHINGTON & ALABAMA
TIMES SPORTS are Correct.
These cars will be handled
Thursday and Friday of each
week by the company’s repre
sentative, who will take up per
manent residence here. It re
mains with the people of Indian
apolis to help us in this cam
paign. We want to stay with
you, and with quality the first
consideration, and the prices
right, we feel that we are as
sured of success. Pamphlets on
preparing these several varieties
of fish will be distributed at an
early date.
It gives us great pleasure to
announce that we have the
hearty co-operation of Mayor
Charles W. Jewett and of the
Food Administration, provided
we sell strictly fresh caught, and
no frozen fish. It has been
called to our attention that fish
delivered here last year was out
lawed in New England states and
could not be sold for food. We
do not want our product or
methods confused with the prod
uct and methods of former ship
pers of fish to Indianapolis. We
will positively handle nothing
but fresh caught fis#, which will
have their natural flavor and can
be depended upon as our very
best product.
These fish will be on sale at
the Big Four Railroad track on
South Alabama street, near Cen
tral Transfer and Storage Com
pany’s building and also at our
plant, 1250 Sou(h West street.

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