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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, February 09, 1920, Home Edition, Image 6

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Juifiana Uaitß STitties
, INDIANAPOLIS, IND. J
Daily Except Sunday, 26-29 South Meridian Street.
Telephones—Main 3500, New 28-351
MEMBER OF AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS.
Advertising Offices—Chicago, New York, Boston, Detroit, O. Logan Payne Cos.
Entered as eecond-class matter at the postofflce at Indianapolis, lad., under the
act of March 3, 1879.
Subscription Rates —By carrier, Indianapolis, 10c per week; elsewhere, 12c.
By mail, 60c a month, $1.25 for three months, $2.50 for six months, or $5.00 a year.
THE TAX LAW is coming in for some long-needed explaining.
PREPARE for an exciting summer. Outdoor checker games at the
city parks:
AS COMPARED with wood alcohol and ripe olives the flu seems to be
an also-ran.
DR. ABBOT says Venns may be sending us wireless messages. Very
likely. This is leap year.
WHERE IS THE MALE of the species going to come out with a
binatlon of leap year and the high cost of living?
THE POLITICIAN who intends to go through the campaign standing
up for the tax law will have to be a glutton for punishment.
THE SIMS FAMILY is getting a lot of publicity. Fred Sims defends
the tax law, Dan Simms attacks it and Admiral Sims is raising Ned down
in Washington.
FRED SIMS’ ALIBI for the state tax board’s increasing of taxes that
it was the “only way out” doesn’t do much good for the candidate who
wants to find the way in.
CHARLES C. ORBISON, prohibition director for Indiana, says there
are not as many bootleggers in Indiana as formerly. Maybe the wood
alcohol scare had something to do with their disappearance.
A “SPONTANEOUS BOOM” for Senator James Eli Watson for the
presidency has been started in Rush county. If all reports are true It is
hard to see where any more “spontaneous signers” of presidential petitions
can be found unless some of them sign two petitions.
Assessing Personal Property
County assessors at their annual meeting laid special stress, as they
always do, on the necessity for Improved methods of valuing personal
property, especially household goods. The practice in Marion county has
been simply to leave a blank at the home or place of business of each tax
payer, trusting him to fill it out, and then to collect the blank later.
This method trusts to the taxpayer’s honesty for a full and correct
report of his property. The trouble with this method is that not all tax
payers are as honest as they might be. There is especially a tendency to
“fudge” a little in the matter of taxes, for undoubtedly there are many
persons who omit a part of their property or who place ridiculously low
valuations on It year after year who would not under any circumstances
think or making dishonest statements concerning other matters. In fact,
ihere are many persons who do not consider the making of a false tax
statement in the same light they would the making of a false statement
concerning any other matter.
It is generally the rule for assessors, when they know statement* to
be incorrect, to increase them, but this is at best only guess work. In
Marion county, at least, there Is little effort made to determine the amount
of a taxpayer’s personal property. The law requires the taxpayer to make
an affidavit that his list is correct, but the administering of an oath is gen
erally dispensed with. It would appear that this simple formality would
have considerable effect, because it would call attention to the fact that the
statement is an affidavit and there are few persons who would deliberately
make a false affidavit.
The new arrangement whereby more detailed lists of personal property
are to be made out would help matters considerably. Assessors themselves
could help improve conditions if they would refuse to accept valuations of
personal property which are obviously low.
As the result of the common practice of taxpayers in valuing their
property too low, taxpayers who place correct valuations on their property
must suffer. In the first place, a low total of valuation makes necessary a
high rate and obviously the taxpayer with the highest value on his prop
erty must pay more taxes than the one whose valuation low, although
the property of the latter may be worth more than that of the former.
Again, with the tendency of the state tax board to order horizontal increases
on the least provocation, the assessment of the property of the taxpayer
who gives in correct valuations is far above what it should be and he is
compelled to bear an unjust share of the burden of taxation.
Talking to Mars
Scientists who are experimenting with wireless telegraphy are report
ing what apparently are communications, the source of which can not be
determined. They say the communications either may or may rot come
from another planet.
Whtte this sort of thing seems fanciful, so many fanciful ideas have
become practical In the last decade that the public is no longer inclined to
scoff but rather to take things for granted and wonder what will happen
next. No one is ready any more to say anything is impossible.
If Venus or Mars or some other planet actually is signalling the earth,
there are infinite possibilities. The strange inhabitants of the other
planet must live in a state of progress that has not been reached upon the
earth. At least Inventive genius must have reached a higher point to make
simple communications possible.
If at some future time there should be actual intelligible communica
tion between the earth and another planet, What might not be the results?
The civilization of the earth is built up on long centuries of tradition.
Even the red men, who Inhabited the Americas when Columbus arrived,
showed signs of having at some remote period been connected with the
people of the eastern hemisphere.
But If human beings or creatures resembling the human animals of
the earth really inhabit some other planet ft is natural to suppose that the
scheme of things is entirely different from that on the earth. It is hard
to conceive many possible resemblances.
This leads to the question of what the earth might learn from another
planet and what another planet may learn from the earth. Communication
of an intelligible nature could conceivably bring about changes which
might alter the entire life of the world. Mechanical and scientific discov
eries as yet undreamed of among the nations of men might be transmitted
and put into effect with results that can not even be made the subject of
speculation.
Who can say but what our grandchildren may live In a world so differ
ent from this that It would not he recognizable as the same? These are
dreams which stagger the imagination, but dreams have been knofm to
come true.
Woods “ Qualifications ”
The prevailing pastime of many Indiana republicans, it seems, is point
ing out, in the public prints, the qualifications Leonard Wood is supposed
to possess that make him the ideal candidate for the presidency. Mr.
Bookwalter, for instance, declares that "Wood’s election, which beyond
question would follow his nomination, would be notice to the world that
red-blocded Americanism still lives." Dr. Jameson goes so far as to say
that "perhaps there has never been a candidate for the presidency who
Is as many-sided, with all good sides, as Leonard Wood.” Others explain
how “practical” and “far seeing” Is the general.
But really how "far seeing” was this "sore thumb candidate,” as Gov.
Cox termed him at a banquet in Indianapolis the other night. *
It will be recalled that, though it had been proved In England that all
the German merchant shipping could only transport 80,000 soldiers for an
invasion of England, only 300 miles away, Gen. Wood, out o£ sublime ignor
ance, committed himself to the statement in 1916 that America was open
to attack; it would be easy, he said, for some power or other to put "400,-
000 men on our shores within three months,” a statement which shows the
utter incompetence of the man whom our republican friends now insist is
the "practical” man of the hour.
FOOLING
INDIANA VOTERS
No. 7. —The Public Voice.
Copyright, 1920, I. P. B.
The republican state committee admits
the right of the taxpayer to control bond
issues and tax levies. It says:
"No one will deny the inconvenience of
a visit to Indianapolis to obtain per
mission to issue bonds to build a road
or with respect to fixing of local tax
levies. Most of these visits, however, are
unnecessary. They are of no help to the
tax board and the whole matter can more
definitely and etfectlvely be presented In
writing and by mail. Lawyers have
learned this and personal visits are be
coming less frequent. Finally, the tax
payers will have to decide whether they
desire to avoid the inconvenience of
whatever personal visits are necessary by
vesting control over bond issues and tax
levies in local authorities or endure the
inconvenience for the sake of economical
local government. It Is the taxpayer’s
business and his voice should control.”
It is refreshing to find that in this
"best tax law that could be devised” the
republican party finds that there are "in
conveniences" that must be "endured.”
One would naturally think that in the
“greatest achievement since the Civil
war” the administration had evolved a
law that would not have to be “endured”
but would be welcomed.
However, the candid way In whteh the
committee admits that the question of
local or state control over bond Issues
and tax levies is "the taxpayer’s business
and his voice should control," is re
assuring.
The question now is in what manner
the taxpayer’s voice may be heard and
In what way he shall control.
The republican committee declares that
the taxpayers’ visits to the tax board in
support of their right to be heard and
to control are “unnecessary” and "in
convenient.” It suggests letters to the
board as a much more efficient way to
express the public opinion.
Waiving the qnestion of whether a let
ter is a more desirable way of expressing
desires than a face to face meeting, there
remains to be considered the manner
In which the letter will be received.
There Is today nothing in the pro
cedure of the state tax board to Indicate
on what it bases fts decisions as to bond
JOY AND YOUR JOB
Maybe you’re one of the famous few,
Maybe you're one of the moiling mob,
But It’s little difference what you do,
If you put joy into your Job.
And the joy comes back to others and you
With a zest which shall long remain,
For its quality lingers through and through
Asa wood is marked of its grain.
The rewards of the world are parceled out
In a crude, rude way we may not trust.
For we give a crown to a crazy lout
While a shivering genius gnaws a crust.
And the only wage which is safe and sure.
The only reward which non© may rob,
Is the everyday effort to make secure
That joy goes into the job.
No. I am not acclaiming a calm content
For a pocketed, put-upon, pent-In- folk;
I do not hold it a life well spent
Which hardens its neck to the needless yoke
But I say that a Shakespeare’s lines are lies
And a Rafael’s colors a dreary daub,
Unless in his effort the workman tries
To put joy Into his job.
BRINGING UP FATHER.
JERR't- do VOU " \ KIN t>E£ TOU NOW .. HOW HAPPv t>HE WA*3 f~ j . to fNiFTT ,
REMEMBER THE DO ° HOLT ( LEADIN’ HER TO THE ( YE*> AN’ L. WHEN TOO STARTED l
2 mackerel- Lr altS; ° there my on yoor. honey moon - I | OUT TO BE A U
@ sao mr Inn Piatum Smvici. Inc. _________________________
ABIE THE AGENT.
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HOW DO THEY DO IT?
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Mfc ** T I I— Aftlor _,- :
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1920.
Being an an
alysis of “The
O p e r atlon of
the 1918 Tax
Law"—A Book,
let in General
Circulation Is
sued by the
1n and i ana Re
publican State
Committee.
issues or tax levies. It may receive
delegations and give no heed to their
pleadings. It may formulate Its de
termination concerning a bond issue on
the expression of one taxpayer or a thou
sand. No one knows what motive
prompts Its decision. No one can un
derstand the basis on which these three
men, a hundred or more miles away,
arrive at the conclusion that a taxing
unit should or should not issue bonds.
It is the taxpayer’s business and bis
voice should control but the "best tax
law that could be devised” provides no
way by which the taxpayer may attend
to his own business and It certainly
can not be argued that “his voice con
trols” a board that thinks his visits to
It for the purpose of expressing himself
are “unnecessary and inconvenient.”
Article No. 8, “An Open Confession.”
High School to Hold
Big Birthday Party
The silver anniversary dinner of the
Emmerich Manual Training High school
will be held Wednesday evening, Fob.
18, in the Riley room of the Claypool
hotel. Dinner will be served at 7 o’clock,
followed by short talks, dancing and
other nmusemeuts.
Frederick E. !?chortemeler, acting sec
retary state republican committee; Supt.
C. B. Dyer, C. E. Crippin, roesldent of
the Indianapolis board of rehool com
missioners; E. IT. McComb, principal of
the school, and Milo H. Stuart, principal
of the Arsenal Technical schools, will
give short talks. C. B. Dyer, president
of the Alumni association, will be the
toastmaster.
Many graduates of the school now
living In other cities are expected© to
attend the anniversary dinner.
SWEDISH RAILROAD BRIDGE.
A Swedish railroad has built a reln
foreed # concrete bridge with fln arched
span 'nearly 300 feet long, designed to
cnrry trains at a speed of sixty miles
an hour.
Unde AMD
A Column Conducted Under Di
rection of Dr. Rupert Blue of
U. S. Public Health Service.
Uncle Sam, M. D., will answer, either
in this column or by mail, questions oi
general interest relating only to hygiene,
sanitation and the prevention of disease.
It will be impossible for him to answer
questions.of a purely personal nature, or
to prescribe for individual diseases. Ad
dress :
INFORMATION EDITOR.
U. S, Public Health Service,
WASHINGTON, D. C.
MALNUTRITION SHOULD BE
- TREATED.
Unless recognized early and measures
are taken to remove it, the effects oi
malnutrition in childhood may last to
adult life. It may show itself as pro
longed ill health and feeble resistance
to disease; the individual may grow up
undersized and underweight, not strong
enough to do the average work of a man
or woman.
How common the condition of malnu
trition is may be shown by the result of
the selective draft, where nearly 40,000
of the young men examined were re
jected because of developmental defects,
principally underweight.
Careful Investigations which have been
made show that fully 20 per cent of the
ehilren in our schools are at present suf
fering from malnutrition. Is your child
one of this number?
WHAT TO DO.
In order to prevent malnutrition, or
at least to recognize it before serious
consequences have followed, the most
important thing is, watch the child’s
weight. This can best be done in school,
where monthly weights of all children
should be taken and recorded and special
attention should be given to those who
do not make a normal gain by the par
ents, teacher or school nurse Op doctor
if there Is one. It Is essential that every
child of the school age should receive a
full medical examination once a year.
A child who Is suffering from malnu
tritlon—that is, one who is much below
normal weight or one who is steadily
losing weight or one who is not making
a normal gain—should at once be taken
to a physician and examined to see if any
disease is developing. In the case of
children residing In areas in which ma
laria or hookworm prevail the physician
should search for the purasites of these
and similar diseases. The child’s whole
daily life should be carefully gone into
to see which of the rules of health he is
violating, and whether this pertains to
his food, his habits of eating, his hours
of play, of school work, or of sleep.
Malnutrition is cured by correcting the
habits or removing the causes already
j mentioned upon which it depends. Often
it Is a matter of enforcing discipline in
i home. Attention to diet Is, of course
important.
Rotarians Prepare
for Ft. Wayne Trip
Indianapolis Rotarians will hold a
“pep" meeting tomorrow noon in prep
aration for their trip to Ft. Wayne to
tbo Eleventh district convention, Wednes
day and Thursday.
The Rotnrtans will boost Waller Titts
ford for the positiou of district gover
nor. Several applications for membership
also will be considered tomorrow, and
the public affairs committee will make a
report.
Columbia Club Dues
Boosted 20 Dollars
An increase of from SOO tn SSO per
year in dues of resident members of
the Columbia rlu.h was placed into effect
at a meeting of stockholders Saturday
night. The increase will become effective
March t. An initiation fee of SSO was
also adopted.
NEW KIND OF rEN-WIPER.
An Englishman has Invented a pen
wiper consisting of a glass cup flj>i
with a sponge saturated with glycerin!
v. hich has a preservative effect on pens!
Daily
306-312 East Washington Street, Just East of Courthouse
SATISFACTION ALWAYS GUARANTEED
New Suits
Approach of Spring
The less adorned the suit the more it
l \ \\\ relies on fabric and workmanship for
\ 3,1 its beauty.
WjUjOga In these suits elegance of tailoring
f£tj 1 IjY'X emphasizes beautiful simplicity, and
(uj I| I/ Uji the fabrics are those worthy of the
CDnl if most painstaking workmanship.
1 il ''/// jam To be sure, among the loveliest are
A 1| If suits embellished by embroidery and
'->. \ '// I Ij, p braiding that are also beautifully tai-
* k li/ / lored, but in many the prevailing
\ [ % 7 simplicity of line is apparent.
k / k n The fabrics are tricotine, poplin and
/W' jersey and very fine serges, mostly in
\ME7TA / navy or black and some in tan and
iflam taupe.
W'flfflm ( In general the outline is that of the
‘ini semi-fitted tailored model, box, semi
'W box or blouse with individualizing
14 variations.
$24.50 to SBS
All Alterations Free
This Means Another Saving of $2 to $5
Lingerie and
Underthings
Never have the styles seemed to
us quite so pretty as in this 1920
showing, and the prices are so
reasonable.
SILK ENVELOPE CHEMISE, in
flpsli or white, Ib.cg trimmed*
some hand embroidered; $3.98
SEES §2.98
V-NECK OR SLIPOVER MUS
LIN GOWNS, $l4B to $175
qualities, OC
special A.ArfCJ
MUSLIN SKIRTS, embroidery
trimmed, regular and extra sizes,
$1 98 to $2.50 quail
ties, special tl/JL* vJ
EXTRA SIZE GOWNS, V-neck
or slipover styles; $1.75 and
f $1.48
MUSLIN SKIRTS, embroidery
trimmed, regular and extra
sizes; $2.98 04 Qfi
quality JL *7 C 5
ENVELOPE CHEMISE, lace
trimmed; $1.25 to AQp
$1.48 qualities wuv
MUSLIN DRAWERS, embroid
ery trimmed; $1.25 QCr,
quality. vOt
Notion Specials
5c COLLAR STAYS 1*
5c DYALL DYES 3*
5c SNAP FASTENERS 3*
5c PAPER PINS 4*
5c SAFETY PINS 4*
5c BASTING THREAD 4e
5c DARNING COTTON ....4*
10c STEEL CROCHET
HOOKS 5*
10c WHITE PEARL BUT
TONS 5*
10c TAPE LINES 5C
FANCY BUTTONS, up to
50c 5*
10c DARNING EGG TJ/ 2 *
10c SILK THREAD 7 </ 2 C
15c SEWING NEEDLES ...10c
15c MACHINE NEEDLES..IO*
15c WHITE PEARL BUT
TONS 10*
10c SNAP FASTENERS .7/ 2 <?
10c SAFETY PINS 7/ z p
10c HAIRPIN CABINETS. .7J' 2 *
10c WIRE COAT HANG
ERS 7'/ 2 #
10c SHOE POLISH 7'/ 2 *
!2'/ic RICKRACK lOC
15c LISLE ELASTIC 10*
FANCY BUTTONS, up to
SI.OO 10*
15c BIAS SEAM TAPE lOC
20c SILK THREAD 15*
25c ALUMINUM CLOTHES
SPRINKLER 13*
ABIE NEARLY FORGOT THE LAST PART.
JUST WAIT TILL DOC GETS BILL AS A PATIENT.
THINGS AIN’T WHAT THEY SEEM.
Domestic Specials
r \
WINDOW SHADES, 3x7 feet,
| mounted on strong spring roll
ers, dark only, opaque
! cloth, special, complete. .09
v J
CRETONNEB, new patterns for dra
peries, box covers, comforts, etc.;
regular 50c grade, 39c
CHALLIS, full yard wide, assorted
floral and scroll designs, for dress
ing sacques, kimonos, etc.,
regular 39c value, at
COTTON BATTS, 72x90 Inch, 3-
pound rolls, pure white cotton, only
one required for full size *7Q/
comfort, special I 9v
BLEACHED MUBLIN, soft finish
for general use; regular
UNBLEACHED MUSLIN, yard
wide, soft, round thread, |Qa
regularly 25c, at ...... Xfv
LONGCLOTH, yard wide, soft nain
sook finish, for fine under
wear, regular 35c grade, at.. AWv
BLEACHED OUTING FLANNEL,
double fleeced, for women’s and
children’s gowns, regular A/I a
30c grade, at MTv
ROMPER SUITING, 32 inches wide,
assorted stripes for rompers, play
Buits, women’s dresses, reg
ular 50c value, at )#C
CANTON FLANNELS, unbleached.
heavy twilled and fleeced, A
regular 30c value, at 44C
Bedding
Os Known Merit
at Savings
FANCY PLAID BLANKETS, double
bed size, heavy fleeced, fast colors,
regular $4.00 An
value, at
COTTON BLANKETB, 66x80 inches,
gray only, colored border, heavy
fleeced, regular $3.48 ftA
COMFORTS, full bed size, fancy
figured silk, plain border to match,
filled with pure white cotton, regu
lar $7.00 value, 48
Bargain Table
Special
15c AUDITORIUM BATH ft
SOAP, special, a cake es C
JAP ROSE SOAP, £1 -
special, a cake C/3V

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