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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, February 20, 1920, Home Edition, Image 13

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HARBORD PARTY
, SAVED IN PERIL
BY U. S. FLAG
Attacked and Detained in Ar
menia by Tartars, but
Not Robbed.
NEAR EAST LAWLESS
i
NEW YORK, Feb. 20.—The attack on
and the detention overnight of the Har
bord mission to Armenia by bands of
Kurds, Tartars and Turks is illustrative
of the lawless condition existing through
. out the Black sea countries. A corre
spondent, who accompanied Gen. Har
ford and the American mission, writing
Erivan, Armenia, under date of
P*ct. 20, described the experiences of the
1 arty, saying that while fraught with
jbteame danger, the members of the par
|Hn>r<> neither robbed. trlp:'d of their
and turned adrift to make the best
f their way to some friendly city, nor
< ven killed, as happens to other cara
• ans. because of the magic name of
.\merica. It was the mind of Shamil Beg,
thleftaln of the nomad band lntrenehed
against the Armenians at the village of
Kulp. which saved tlie lesser members
of the mission from the customary fate
of captured caravans.
Shamil Beg came to the knowledge of
the mission members after this fashion.
For three weeks they had been traveling
from Constantinople, intent on really see
ing the lands of Asia Minor, ns these
lands have probably not yet been wn
by outsiders. They had come up from
dusty Aleppo by train across the north
strip of the shimmering Mesopotamian
desert, until reaching Mnrdin. the mag
nificent stone city set upon a mountain.
There the seven automobiles of the party
had been taken off the flat cars of the
Bagdad railway, and after countless ad
ventures with impassable roads, bridg
ing the unbridged Euphrates and the j
Tigris, eliming and descending the Tau- j
ms range of moutains whteh gradually 1
climb thrice their height to the plateaus j
of Ararat, the party crossed the Turkish j
frontier Into Russian Asia Minor, or Ar- !
menia, as parts of the country are now J
called.
SAVED BY \
AMERICAN FLAG.
A few miles out of Kagizman, in the
almost dry bed of the Araxes, Gen. Har
bord's car was stopped by a humble
patriarch offering melons carried by his
son and the latter's strangly beautiful
little girl, dressed in n bundle of rags.
Then the mission’s forward machines
met a wild old man on horseback, who
talked volubly, possibly to disguise his
spy character.
Following the lonely valley, while
“Billy” Poland of the commission for
Belgian relief discoursed on its mineral
richness, next the mission rolled around
i gigantic bend of the road to behold the
river bottom covered with cattle and
tents of some nomad tribe. Then MaJ.
H. W. Clark of Boston declared he heard
shots from the mountainside to the right.
At the same time Gen. Harbord's car was
seen to stop and the truck in the rear
began to hasten speed.
The Harbord car had been stopped by
a much alarmed rifleman dropping to his
knees and starting to fire point-blank.
The rifleman's gun was shoved aside
by a graybearded chieftain when he saw
the American flag borne by the car.
Directly the whole bottom was swarm
ing with a motley throng of tribesmen
dressed in sheepskin turbans, ragged
white shirts overmantled by short jack
ets of dark cloth, armed with long squir
rel rifles and curiously carved knives or
short swords. Jn the background aitood
their women, all in a group.
Gen. Harbord left his machine and
walked over to the chieftain, an old man
of scrawny beard who proudly gave his
name as Abdf Beg. When he learned the
party was composed of Americans he
told a story of having been driven," to
gether with his band, from their moun
tain homes by the Armenians, saying that
now they know not what to do; that
winter was coming on and he feared they
would starve. lie had appealed In vain,
he said, to the British and the Turks,
and if he thought the American would
come to establish peace he would sacri
fice the sheep of his tribe in a grand feast
of rejoicing. He gladly offered to let
pass the rear automobiles and took a
note which he said he would deliver when
they came.
WHERE NOAH'S
ARK LANDED.
After warm leave taking the automo
biles proceeded to higher grohnd and a
wider valley, when the glistening snows
of Ararat came suddenly in full sight.
The party had come on a Sattath, the
first day of the week, near the place of
fabled flood where the human race had
been preserved by Noah’s Ark landing
until the waters cleared.
Next the saddened ruins of Kulp were
reached. As the party swung through
the picturesque spot, a short halt was
made to speak to a startled horde of
Moslems, thronging with their rifles
about the machines, while hundreds of
their women and children sprang up In
the rear, staring curiously. They told
a brief story of having no bread, of be
ing hunted by the Armenians, of having
had their homes destroyed and of having
■ OLD GIBRALTAR
WIICH-HAZEL JELLY
IT SOOTHES AND SOFTENS THE SKIN
Old Gibraltar comes to you in a jelly form, never
successfully imitated. You take just as much as
you want, on the tip of the finger, and rub it in—
no waste from pouring out too much.
Gibraltar 'Witch-Hazel Jelly is beneficial to the tenderest
skin. It 1b a scientific mixture of witch-hazel, glycerine and
other supplementary compounds of recognized merit as anti
septics and emollients
FOR MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN
Softens the skin, beautifies the complexion, soothes abrasions, re
lieves irritation and sunburn. Sold by druggists and toilet goods
dealers, 30c. Manufactured by
KIEFER-9TEWAPT Ga. Indianapolis, bid.
Davenports
Golden oak davenports, up
' Ilf;'' p! holstered in pood leather, well
eonstmcted, and beautifully
finished; specially priced,
$65.00 to $87.50
ROCKERS
We can save you money on anew rocker, as we have a large
stock and a complete assortment.
Specials for Saturday and Monday
Blue enamel dish pans 99^
Blue enamel coffee pots 99^
THE ALBERT HUTCHINSON STORE
Prospect 581. 312-314 VIRGINIA AVE. Auto. 24-560.
THE BOYS IN THE OTHER CAR
( T~ 7 hp QUTH t Jp* =D^: 'l
x MOP - e HAD SOK)&THJN /
■ •
. destroyed the Armenian village of Kulp
in retaliation.
The two forward machines, the first
carrying Gens. Harbord and Moseley,
went twenty miles further, climbing out
upon the bare, homeless brown plain
above which Ararat now shone in sunset
splendor, the creeping shadows of copper
vaguely remindful of the delicate beauties
of Venice's green church domes.
As this was again Armenian territory,
a cavalry squadron came out to greet Gen.
Harbord and then went away, finding
he was striking camp beside the river
instead of going to their village for the
night. After waiting an hour without
the truck arriving, Gen. Harbord sent
back in their automobile MaJ. H. W.
Clark, together with Mr. Poland, Hussein
Bey, Turkish interpreter and professor
>f history at Roberts college, Constan
tinople, and the Associated Press corre
spondent, to find it.
When the machine returned to Kulp.
its -streaming lights announced its ar
rival. In a moment the valley resounded
with rifle shots, cries in the darkness
from hundreds of men and dozens of
fierce figures leaped ijbout the machine as
it stopped. Hussein Bey, being the only
one who spole Turkish, sprang from
the machine and walked courageously to
ward the tribesmen with his right hand
on hie heart shouting, “peace—we are
friends.”
SUBTERFUGE TO
GET HARBORD.
Soon came op a short, acitve Turk,
afterward known as Riza, whip In hand,
driving back his fellows, lashing them
mercilessly with a short whip; next an
old crippled chieftain, Alexander by j
name, and a quieter chieftain, Shamil
Beg. It developed that the truck with
its three men, one of whom was the
party’s chief, M. T.utard, formerly witii
<>en. Petain in France, was being held
x; tit 11 the American general wonid re
turn and vouch for it as American. The
members of the searching party also
; were informed that they too must re
j main until the general htd vouched for
| them. It was explained that the pre
carious military situation of the band
made this necessary, though 1? was sus
pected to be a subterfuge to get pos
session of the person of Gen. Harbord.
After much wrangling and argument,
with many differences of opinion, it was
agreed that Chiefs Alexander and Rlzu
would return with the automobile to the
camping place of Gen. Harbord and
ascertain for themselves then that tiie
party had come for the purpose of in- j
vestlgatlng the political difficulties in
Armenia and other neighboring coun
tries.
When they got In the machine a voice
out of the darkness denounced Hussein
Bey as an Armenian and the argument
was begun anew. Finally the two
leaders departed, saw Gen. Harbord, totd
him their wrongs and pleaded with him
to have the Americans settle the troubles
of the land and left, promising to free j
the prisoners and let pass the other
four machines, which had as yet not ar
rived.
Meanwhile Shamil Beg took the prison
ers to the center of his camp, had spread
rugs for them to sit upon, a lire built and
a sheep killed in their honor. Taen he
entertained them with stories of the life
of his band, of the troubles growing out
of the war and declared the only way to
bring peace to Asia Minor was through
a strong foreign hand. More than this,
he promised protection for the party ami
volunteered to rescue the other machines
from the Kurds.
SAYS “WE ARE
ALL THIEVES.”
"We are all thieves; we must be to
—qT— Advance Showing oi 1
craTmS Women’s Spring Suits mi mi
c?eVrfniiv* CC o o p"ned, Newest, Most Stylish Models in
pTSSr weeV'Tf yon Various New Fabrics. I'X 1
wish, but when credit Rite's customer who
charges *more| Hot FINAL REDUCTION ON
with this small added WINTER SUITS AND COATS cash prices. If credit
charge Rite sells for is given, RITE
loss. To prove it to CTTTTC CHARGES MORE, but
your satisfaction, shop WHO V/V/ALO only t he small added
"o°re" and then tb 'ome th to Various styles, Exceptional values, X-fuXLX *tl>s* u
PURS, DRESSES AND SKIRTS
Women's UPSTAIRS Apparel Shop
j ■ r 43 South Illinois Street
| > \ Entrance Through Rite’s Jewelry and Gift Shop. Take Elevator
/■JV Open Saturday Evening Till 9:30
MOTION PICTURES.
77us is Shan Tung,
All Next Week, Starting Sunday
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1920.
live,” he said with a sorrowful smile.
"And remember this, neither we tier the
Armenians are tit for self-government,
and we will not be for many long years.
Besides, we hate each other too much to
rule together."
Short, dark-eyed, determined, yet po
lite, Shamil Beg sat through the night
guarding the party Hgainst his own
robbers. The party by the fire was bro
ken up when the lights of the other four
automobiles came In sight. The men of
these machines had a terrible story to
tell. They had Just missed death. Be
fore coming to the friendly Kurds they
had been suddenly attacked from ail'
sides by rifle fire. Capr. Boring's ma
chine bad run for it and escaped, Loring
receiving a slight head wound. The ma
chine behind him had been stopped
by huge boulders across the road, and
ail had received several volleys until the
machines halted.
When the chief of the tribe bad fully
persuaded himself that the automobiles
were American and not part of an Ar
menian attacking party he restored their
belongings and let them puss to the
friendly Kurks, who were beside them
selves with rage at this treatment.
The problem of getting away from
Kulp was not easy. Shamil Beg said the
1 party must spend the night or else bo
robbed of their rifles by his own uncon
trollable men along the road after leav
ing the camp. But at dawn he gave the
signal for the party to proceed. The
automobiles started, Shamil Beg riding
in the lead to guarantee safe passage. He
j h id planned to ride to the camp of Gen.
Harbord, riding on horseback, but he
i nc~ er came. Was he killed by his own
mea toj letting the prey escape? A few
shots were her.rd after he quit the party
at the v brow of the plain of Ararat.
The party waited awhile for him out
upon the plati and then rolled along un
| der the silent protection of the mighty
! mountain to report “All here, sir,” to
Gen. Harbord, who, too, had spent a
sleepless, watchful night, anxious for his
party, and. too, suspecting an attempt
might be made to capture him by the
I men of Shamil Beg.
HELD FOR SUNDAY SCHOOLS.
: BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Feb. 20. —A
! school for instruction of Sunday school
j leaders, similar to that at Lake Geneva,
Wisconsin, will be established at Wln
nepesaukee, N. H., the executive com
mittee of the international Sunday
School association decided. Plans fer
ten additional schools at various places
were discussed.
!STOMACH ON ]
! A STRIKE!
* r
j [
| “Pape’s Diapepsin” puts f
t Sour, Gassy, Acid Stomachs I
in order at once !
Wonder wbat upset your stomach—
which portion of the food did the dam
age—do you? Well, don't bother. If
your stomach is iu a revolt; if sick,
gassy and upset, and what you Just ate
has ferineuied and turned sour; head
dizzy and aches; belch gases and acids
and eructate undigested food—Just eat a
tablet or two of Pape’* Diapepsin to
help neutralize acidity nnd In five min
utes you wonder what became of the in
digestion and distress.
If you stomach doesn’t take care of
your liberal limit without rebellion; If i
your food is a damage instead of a help, I
remember the quickest, ‘ surest, most;
harmless antacid is Pape's Diapepsin.
which costs so little at drug stores. Ad
vertisement.
Britons’ Gold May
Pay Debt to IL S.
LONDON, Feb. 20.—1 tis understood
This is
ROUND-UP NIGHT
at the
OPTIMIST SHOW
Tomlinson Hall
Learn how to use “Lester’s All-wool Clothes-line” to help you “Lasso” and “tie
up” the bully-good things in life.
Political current events —the administration “Lansing” a democrat. The G. 0. P.
advocating “Wood-in-general” to help “Uncle Sam” keep the “home fires burn
ing.”
Snnthinp Sav<r We are all “ pilots ” on th< ? “Ship of State.” Let’s put
... „ our “shoulder to the wheel,” and, like the Bov Scouts,
“ s ‘ 00 ’ r> “do a good turn daily.” Sonshine suitings are always “on
deck” and w’ill dock you at any “avenue of success”—social, diplomatic or “real
business.”
Plac yoor Eas A. G. LESTEIR Our mad, to-,
i lace your *.as- measure sale on
ter order now Cititimirf medium and
for Spring Son- UptiTTllSt 1 dlldr „ winter weight
shine suitings. 2 n d Floor Kahn Building -
(Kahn Tailoring Company)
r-Egmn
Just Two More Days
The Thrilling and Spectacular Production of RICHARD HARDING DAVIS’
Romantic Adventure Novel.
“SOLDIERS OF FORTUNE”
Ernest Truex Comedy, “TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE.”
The Clrclette of News. Ruth Chase, Soloist—Circle Orchestra.
LAST TWO DAYS
5 1 BTlffckl MARGUERITE
Sr l H nr w i clark
“ALL OF A SUDDEN PEGGY”
A PICTURE SPARKLING WITH FUN.
Mutt and Jeff Cartoon—Topics of the Day—Hall Room Boys Comedy
Current News Weekly.
EDITH ROBERTS
tllitaitwta “The Triflers”
LYONS-MORAN FARCE FOX NEWS WEEKLY
AMUBEMENTB.
jwsrwj Dai, y at 2 * 15 and 8:15 p - m.
Mat. 15c-50c —Eve. 15c-$l
VA I cd i r lady tsen meT
V ALLIULi Chine— Nightingale
Frank Sabini and Harry Goodwin
P n n r n r Beatrice Morgan & Cos.
K b K ( P f* I 1 Raymond & Bchram
MJ Li JL\ VJ Ll J,\ Ll Alfred Farrel & Cos.
“Jackie” and “Billie” Klnograme
and Her Company Present ~ ~ “
Tur bg/-v<T'ii)} Vftllccita s Leopards
I HK |V|fl I H World’s Best Trained Wild Animal*
Send the Kiddles to the
A Comedy Drama by Emmet Devsy Bargain Matinees.
0 CONTINUOUS VAUDEVILLE
b-ameaican girls-s i
JF MILILO SISTERS „
MERRIMAN SISTERS
FRED * MAE WADDELI.. ROMM A HANEY. BECK * STONE, BRY- 11
IST A STEWART, JOE BENNETT A CO. FOX COMEDY, “SHERIFF
NELL’S RETURN.” p, ftff.
Dancing In the Lyric Ball Room Afternoon and Evening.
THE OPTIMIST CLUB, which is backing this
Industrial Show at Tomlinson Hall this
week, is an organization of business men, its
membership comprising one man from each
kind of business or professional pursuit.
At the regular Friday noon meetings of the Opti
mist Club these men, its members, develop friendships
among themselves, hear good/music, hear good talks,
enter Into discussions concerning Important business
and civic problems, and grow bigger under the kindly
influences of companionships with other Optimists.
The Optimist Club and the members individually
have put their interest and energies into making this
first Optimist Industrial Show a successful enterprise.
This Show 113 a success. It is a GOOD show There
are more than sixty exhibits—no two alike —all good.
Admission is free, bat by ticket. Tickets may be pro
cured at the haU, or from any Optimist Club member.
Doors open from 11 a. m. to 10 p. m. Today and Saturday
are the last days. You'll regret It If you miss it and, also,
YOU’LL ENJOY A VISIT TO THE
|]| Optimist Industrial Show
j] Tomlinson Hall * - February 17-21
this government is considering the ques
tion of inviting the public to hand over
it* gold trinket* and plate In return
for bond* in order that Greet Britain
may liquidate Its indebtedness to Amer
ica. The advisability of instituting
nickel coinage is also being looked int&J
bnt no decision on thin matter has beenj
arrived at.
REPUBLIC SINCE 1889.
Brazil became a republicinlßß9.
*MUS£Nfc.NTS7~ r
I Last Three Performance* I
llif SHI BERT rp
MuraT-111 p^|
I MATINEE TOMORROW. 8:15 P. M. I
■ Hammerntein Presents
frank TINNEY
SOM ETI M E
b .' V u Mueic by
pnirr2 bn^ on , \° un * Rudolf Frlml
£ s* ™ lon,KhI on,Kht ’ t0 ' 75c * *l. *l-50.
ii'ne , Tomor ™" Matinee. 50c. 75c.
SB-00. Seats Selling.
| next week Seats Now Selling
COM, MON. *
Direct and Intact From
Sliubert-Studebaker Chicago Run
Cecil LEAN
In the Season’s Biggest Musical
Comedy Success
LOOK WHO’S HERE
with CLEO MAYFIELD
PRlCES—Nights, 50c, 75c. *I.OO, 51.50,
58.00. Mats. Wed.. Sat.. 50c, 75c, ?1.00,
#1.50. B—BOV OFFICES—2.
ENGLISH’S—Tonight
Sat. Mat. and Night
"IT’S A BIRD OF A SHOW *
C~mn Oumsmohs Afcwr* Cc*oaySm*s
Sanderson
gSn •MOSWR'M
E AWTNORN
- CAMYAi&yZn,-
sAjyLE & D/XO.V*S MAUHEEBURNE
AVOWS ST Jury CKWS-SAMOMy '/OHWeS*
Prices—Nights, 50c
Mat., 50c to $2.50. Seats Selling.
NEXT MON., Tl KS.. WEd|“"
MAT. WED.—SEATS TODAY
Cohan and Harris Present
The Funniest American Comedy
In Recent Years,
ti/ATAILOR
<A MADMAN
Prices—Nights, 50 c to #2.00.
Mat.. 50c to #1.50. .
ALL THIS
THE
CRACKER JACKS
WITH
Harry (Irish) Bernard
This coupon and 10 cents entitles
lady to reserved seat at any matinee
during week.
I RIALTO
VAUfIEVILIE-PICJKS
*. ,o M. mmm
6 ALL STAR
VAUDEVILLE
ACTS
—INCLUDING—
PEGGY urn; |LSS
riYLAND ,N idlUl
Continuous uTV
8 BIG
FEATURES
ENTIRE NEW SHOW
EVERY MONDAY
13

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