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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, February 23, 1920, Home Edition, Image 3

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BIG HDUSTRIAL
HARMONY PLAN
" TO BE OFFERED
filial Report of Wilson Board
to Suggest Protection of
Public.
FITS CAPITAL AND LABOR
By HARRY B. HOT.
Staff Correspondent Newspaper Enter
prise Association.
WASHINGTON*. Feb. 23.Tbc most
Specific recommendations, pointing to
ward Industrial harmony, that have yet
been made, are expected when the final
report of the industrial conference is an
nounced, probably, some time before
March 1.
The conference, convened by President
Wilson in Washington Dec. 1 to frame
a program by which relations of capital
.and labor could be harmonized, and the
pftdfare of the public be protected, is
now drafting the report.
Present expectations are that the re
port avill carry the unanimous endorse
ment of the seventeen members of the
conference. It will outline new machin
ery by which it is believed the rela
tionship of employers and employes may
be restored to a more riersunal basis than
now exists in large industries and de
velop a sense of responsibility on the
part of both capital and labor toward
each other and toward the general public
that has in recent years largely been
lost sight of.
For most part, it may be stated, the
report will present specific recommenda
tions, not generalizations. It will pre
sent In detail the design and specifica
tions for machinery of adjustment which
it will recommend to be set up to weave
Industrial harmony from the woof of
capital and the warp of labor.
RILES EVOKING ON
H< XLVN ELEMENT.
in touching ou the human elements in
volved in our present industrial tangle,
however, the conference has been un
able to formulate any such definite rules
of action.
In general terms, it will bold that the
development of the human relationship
is the most important factor iu every
Industry, will *urge that "leadership be
substituted for mastership,” that the
public interest be recognized and con
sulted in a guiding factor in every dls
pute. and that capital and labor alike
recognize their community of interest
and puli together as a team rather than
as opposing rival forces.
It is on the basis of these general
ities that the machinery of adjustment
to be presented in detail is founded.
It is admitted that if this machinery
is to lie effective there must be a sin
cere effort for mutual understanding—
diich today is largely lacking. The plan
re-ognizes labor's claim that labor is
not a commodity and does not question
the right to strike.
It also recognizes the employer's right
to maintain an open or closed shop as he
m:y decide, and to hire and fire as he
aces fit.
But, within these unquestioned rights,
it attempts to furnish a means by which
all interested parties may give calm and
cool consideration to any questions aris
ing within a given shop or industry, but
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without direct interest in the outcome,
other than the public -welfare.
T ACHIN'ERY THAT
OUTLINED AT FIRST.
For most part, the machinery to be
recommended will be that outlined in
the preliminary statement of the con
ference late in December, which followed
closely a plan presented by Secretary
of Labor Wilson to the round table con
ference last fall.
It will provide for a national indus
trial tribunal and regional boards of
inquiry and adjustment. All existing ma
chinery for concllliation, adjustment and
arbitration would be left in fcce.
Whenever disputes arise which are
not settled by agreement of the parties
directly interested or by existing ma
chinery. it could be brought before the
regional board of adjustment, the mem
bership of which would be chosen
equally from panels of emplosers, em
ployes and public respectively. Decision
would be only by unanimous vote.
When a unanimous vote % could not be
secured, decision could, by agreement, be
left to an umpire, whose decision would
have the force of a unanimous decision
by the board. The national tribunal, con
sisting of nine members, equally repre
senting employers, employes and the pub
lic, would constitute a board of appeal.
DECISIONS TO HAVE
FORC E OF AGREEMENTS.
Decisions, eitber by the regional board
or the national tribunal, would have the
force of trade agreements, which the par
ties in dispute would be bound to carry
out.
Probably no conference ever called In
Washington, certainly none ever extend
ing over so long a period, has been so
effectively insulated from publicity as
this industrial powwow.
It has been In session for two of the
three months since it convened. Secre
tary of Labor Wilson, as its chairman,
has presided over about half its sessions.
The remainder have been directed by
Herbert Hoover, vice chairman. Former
Attorneys General Gregory and Wicker
sham, both members, have served as legal
advisors.
Special recommendations will be made
covering the fields of public utilities and
of public employes.
Rainbow Elements
Enter Court Case
TACOMA. Wash., Feb. 23.—Court offl
cials here consider wearing smoked
glasses to prevent becoming color blind
while Sam Patros, a Greek, sties Lew
Bow, a Chinese for allcgeed alienation
of his wife's affections. A negro Is the
chief witness for the prosecution, while
Mrs. Patros is said to be living with an
Indian squaw. Patros says his wife's
desertion made him suffer SIO,OOO worth
of mental anguish.
Little Chance for
Smokers in Heaven
SPOKANE. Wash., Feb. 23—A smoker
can go to heaven, but be will have to
visit hell to spit.
Take it from Evangelist E. .T. Rulgin.
who took a whach at nicotine victims at
St. Paul's Methodist church Wednesday
night.
“A man who uses tobacco ran be a
Christian, but he’s a dirty one,” said
Bulgin.
Anybody got a match?
Hence , *Look What
Mouse Dragged In 9
LONDON. Feb. 23.—"1t is not rare
to find mutton bones and sometimes
a whole soup bone dragged In a grand
piano by rats.” says XV. E. Batchelor,
a piano tuner in a newspaepr here.
FIRE DESTROYS
U.S. FOOD DEPOT
Eighty Tone of Eatables Are
Burned in Vienna.
VIENNA. Feb. 23. —Fire has destroyed
part of fthe largest American relief ad
ministration food - kitchen from which
14,000 poor children dally were fed.
Eighty- tons of food were burned.
Bo dependent on the noonday meal
from this kitchen have the starved kid.
flies become that distracted mothers
swarmed to the scene begging to know
when and how they could get something
for the children. Despite the fire Ameri
can representatives together with Aus
trian colleagues on the job, promised
tho women that every child would be
led that day as usual.
This actually was accomplished by
emergency effort at other kitchens, after
Hje debris had been removed, gas pipes
repaired and undamaged soup kettles
cleaned the kitchen was again in service.
An architect is now preparing plans
and in a week contractors promise a
habitable structure. Meanwhile, “busi
ness as usual."
Vicuna regards the quick work with
amazement, hut despite the miracle ft
uninterrupted service, the destruction of
the kitchen and food supplies means a
great financial loss.
Will America replace this kitchen and
food?
Clemenceau 111
in Fourteen Points
PARIS, Feb. 23.—“ My pleasure trip to
Egypt has mitigated the necessity for
careful diet, for I have fourteen infirm
ities, one for each of President Wilson's
points,” says Georges Clemenceau, for
mer premier of France.
“I am tired of politics and intend to
follow Roosevelt's example by going far
into the heart of tbe desert for big game
hunting nnd incidentally to seek a for
tune in rubber. An adventurous French
business man and eminent chemist, who
will accompany me, has discovered a
new process of refining and we expect to
start anew enterprise, using the gum of
the eucalyptus."
Cops Lay for Fooler
PORTLAND, Ore., Feb. 23. Who fools
the cops, he goes to Jail! Thus speaks
the ehief cop here. t'ow bones mas
querading as human remains have g'ven
the police several "murder" mysteries of
late.
Jl Ue PAYS XIAN'S FINE.
LOS ANGELES, Feb. 23. After finding
f'nterino Juarez, a one armed Mexican,
guilty of selling firewater to Indians, the
jury made up a purse of S7B to help pay
bis fine.
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, MONDAY, 1-EBKIAKI 23, 192 U.
RUSSIA TRYING
TO OPEN TRADE
TERMS WITH U.S.
Berlin Agent Feels Out Ameri
can Officials on Possibilities
of Business.
BERLIN, Feb. 23.-Efforts of the Rus
sian soviet government to establish trade
relations with the United States took a
new turn here when it was learned au
autboritatlvcly that Victor Kopp, the so
viet agent, has attempted to feel out
American officials in Berlin on tbe propo
sition.
Kopp has been in direct communication
with American officials and business men,
it was learned, but apparently his ef
forts have met with little success. The
Americans, it is said, assumed the atti
tude they could express no opinion until
they were informed of the position of the
Washington government with regard to
Russian trade. Tbe belief prevailed that
at present America is opposed to any ne
gotiations to bring about trade with
Russia, so far ns American representa
tives are concerned.
Meantime negotiations between Kopp
and German business men were proceed
ing. XVhile the government was striving
to conceal any part It may have in the
negotiations, it was understood the
movement has at least tbe tacit approval
of the authorities.
Announcement that a commission of
German business men will go into Raa.it
to investigate the feasibility of trade re
lations was considered likely.
Allied officials here were keeping in
close touch with the Russian trade sltua
More and More
People
are <lrii\ktn.§
Instant
POSTUM
Instead or coffee.
Health value, a
standard of flavor
and con
venience make the
Charge popular-a/icf
The Price Is The
Same As Before
The War
Sold by Orocara Cvi'i-yrims
‘WHY?’
tion. From an entente source it was
suggested that the United States might
find It feasible to combine with the en
tente in insisting that a national assem
bly, representative of all classes in Russia,
be convened to discuss the matter of
trade with the allies.
Such a move, It was pointed out,
might render business dealings possible
without recognition of the Lenlne-Trot
sky oligarchy.
"When good fellows get together,
I’m right there”
—Chesterfield
TALK about close harmony—you
ought to know how good tobac
cos get together in the Chesterfield
blend.
For Chesterfields contain selec
tions from the four finest Turkish
varieties bought on the ground V
by our own resident buyers—and *■'B^
the mildest of thoroughly aged 3
Domestic leaf. a J
And in the blending of these
choice tobaccos, our experts have (II
produced new qualities of flavor— VjA
new taste-delighfs that bring to
your smoking an enjoyment so
complete, so full, so rounded out
that only one phrase seems to de
the ’extra, moisture-
<ijj The Easier Kind of Coffee —No Coffee-Pot Needed >
\JO boiling, no straining, no muss, no bother, no grounds, no waste, no
coffee-pot, Scientifically refined by Mr. Washington’s refining process.
It comes to you in concentrated powder form, and all that is necessary
is to add the water —hot or cold. Dissolves instantly, Any one can J
make absolutely pure, delicious coffee, with strength to „
suit individual taste. Made in the cup at the table. [| j
Send for Free Recipe Booklet
G. Washington Sales Cos., Inc., 334 Fifth Avenue, New York /Ml I
Some German business men saw in the
British Indorsement of the decision of
the supreme council in Paris to resume
trade with the Russian co-operative so
cieties a move toward eventual overthrow
of the bolshevik regime:
Through the co-operatives these men
believed Great Britain hoped to drain
Russia of her supplies of raw materials
without giving the essential manufac
tured products Russia needs In return.
If the Leninc-Trotsky government is to
survive, they said, it must find some way
to obtain farm implements, railway sup
plies and other necessary products which
can not be manufactured iu Russia. The
soviet government, according to these
men, realize this fact and will not allow
Russia to be drawn into any plan that
will trade her food and raw materials
supplies for goods other than those urg
ently needed.
rWHY?’
3

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