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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, February 24, 1920, Home Edition, Image 4

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LABOR THINKS
WILSON WILL
VETO RAIL BILL
Measure Passed Yesterday Ex
pected to Receive Presi
dent’s Attention Today.
SENATE FOR IT 3 TO 1
WASHINGTON, Feb. 24.—Railroad
union men today are confident the
president will veto the Esch-Cummlns
railroad bill.
The measure, passed bp the senate late
yesterday and by the house Saturday,
was expected to be sent to the white
house today.
The president has drafted a reply to
<ue request of the representatives of
the railroad workers that he appolrt
at once a tribunal of employer ? and em
ployes to adjust railroad wage demands,
end it will be transmitted to the rail
road conference now In session. It Is
understood the president will state that
he can not appoint 6uch a commission
until he has acted upon the Cummtns-
Eseh bill, which provides for a labor
adjustment board.
DEPEND ON PROMISE
OF “SQUARE DEAL."
The railroad men's confidence of a
presiedntlal veto is based on what they
interpret as promises of a “square deal”
made by the president last summer when
he asked them to postpone pressing their
wage demands pending result of the gov
ernment's efforts to bring down prices.
What action Mr. Wilson takes on the
railroad bill probably will be influenced
by the advice of Rail Director Hines,
whose attitude toward it is more or less
o? a mystery. Both opponents and
friends of the measure claim his sup
port. In Louisville recently Hines spoke
in defense of government control. The
Plumb plan league had this speech
printed and mailed to thousands of per
sons, ajs they regarded it an argument
for cotninuation of federal control. Then
at a recent meeting attended by congress
men and union men Hines was accused
of being the author of the labor section?
ofthe measure. Hines denied this In a
letter which was put into the congres
sional record.
PRIVATE CONTROL
TO BE RESUMED MARCH 1.
On the other hand, notification was
sent-to all railroads through Hines yes
terday that the roads would go back to
private control March 1 and friends of
the bill took this' to mean that the
president would sign the bill. Hines
sent this notice two hours before the
6enate voted on the conference report.
What would follow a veto is uncertain.
It Is generally believed that not enough
votes could be mustered In the house to
pass the bill over the. veto. But the
senate apparently would override It.
The vote vgaterday was 47 to 17. One of
the principal objections the president
probably will take into consideration in
ieclding whether to veto the bill is its
juarantee to the roads of f>Vj per cent
let operating income. Some congress
nen consider this provision unconsti
tutional. Petitions have been received
rora farmers objecting to it.
Several hundred railroad union officials
vere here today to direct wage negotia
4ons with President Wilson. Each of
:he fourteen big rail union* is represent
td by local officials from all parts of the
;ountry.
Conferences will continue all day, offi
cials expected. The conferences were sec
donal. Officials of each union met in exec
utive session to pass on the negotiations
vith the president and devise new plans.
4 general conference of ail the unions
was to be called as soon as the sectional
'neetiDgs were finished. Chief executives
>f the unions expected this general con
ference would be today.
?ASSED BY 3 TO 1
VOTE OF SENATE.
By a vote of nearly 3 to 1 the senate
last night passed the measure.
Thirty-two republicans joined with
fifteen democrats In voting for adoption
of the conference report, while three re
publicans apd fourteen democrats com
prised the seventeen voting against It.
There was never any doubt ns to what
the senate would do. in view if the Wide
margin by which flic Cummins Mil. more
drastic than the compromise measure,
was passed.
During the five hours of debate, led
by Chairman Cummins of the Interstate
commerce committee, senators expressed
varying opinions as to how the public
and the railroads would fare under the
bill, which was warmly defended and
attacked. But the intense interest,
which characterized proceedings Satur
day in the house, was lacking, frequent
quorum calis being necessary to get
members In the chamber. Around 0
o'clock (he patience of the senate ap
parently was exhausted after the long
season of speech making and fnsistent
demands for a vote cut short the desire
to prolong the presentation of individual
views.
lABOR AND RATE MAKING
CHIEF DISCUSSION.
Discussion yesterday related largely to
the labor and rate making provisions.
Senator Cummins, with great feeling, de
nounced widespread claims that in fix
ing freight and passenger charges cal
culated to give the roads a return of
•''4 per cent meant taking huge sums
of money from the public treasury. The
bill, he declared, would not take one
dollar In that way. Such reports, he
said, were merely a part of the propa
ganda put forth in an effort to defeat all
legislation on the eve of return of the
roads to their owners on March 1.
Announcement was made that if Sen
ator Hitchcock, Nebraska: Stanley. Ken
tucky, and Chamberlain, Oregon, all dem-
had been present they would have
v< Ned in support of the conference report.
Senator Myers, democrat, Montana,
attacked organized labor for its attitude
toward the railroad bill and other meas
ure*.
Organized labor is thoArreatest men
ace before the country today," he said.
“Labor had gono Into politics and if you
get through one out of ihree bills op
po*.d by Gompers I should think the
country Is doing well.”
HOW SENATORS
VOTED ON MEASURE.
The vote in the senate on the railroad
conference report follows:
FOR THE REPORT.
Republicans.
Ball, Lodge,
Brandegee, McLean
f 'alder, McNary.
Capper, Nelson,
Colt, New,
Cummins, Page.
Curtis, Phipps,
2**°®' Poindexter,
WRluald, Smoot,
Frelinghuysen, Spencer,
®al e * Sterling,
.Tones (Wash.), Sutherland,
Kellogg, Townsend.
Kenyon, Wadsworth,
Keyes. Warren,
Lenroot, Watson.
Total republicans for, 32.
Democrats.
Beckham, Roblnsotr,
Fletcher, Shields,
°ay, Smith (G.),
Glass, Smith (Md.),
Meyers, Underwood,
Phelan, Walsh (Mont.).
Pomerene, Williams.
Kansdell,
Total democrats for, 15.
Total for adoption, 47.
AGAINST THE REPORT.
Kepublirans.
Rorab, Grouna.
France,
Total republicans against, 3.
Democrats.
Ashurst, King,
Dial, McKellar,
Gore, Nugent,
Woman, 104, Walks
All Night in Slush
NEW YORK, Feb. 24.—Hannah
Klein ran away from home yester
day, forgot her address and walked
all night in the slush until a police
man found her. Despite the fact
Hannah is 104 years old, she suffered
no ill effects.
Harris, Overman,
Harrison, Pittman.
Johnson (S. D.), Sheppard,
Jones (N. M.), Trammell.
Total democrats against. 14.
Total against adoption, 17.
Faired.
Bankhead (for) with Culberson
(against), McCormick (for) with Hen
derson (against), Dillingham (for) with
Swanson (against), Fall (for) with Ken
drick (against), Simmons (for( with
Kirby (against), McCoumber (for) with
LaFollette (against), Harding (for) with
Walsh of Massachusetts (against), Edge
(for) wi(h Owen (against).
RISK IN RACE
FOR GOVERNOR
(Continued From Page One.)
exchange the confidence, appreciation, ad
miration and respect of the thousands
upon thousands of good men and women
of Indiana.
“You and I know, personally, the real
opposition to the Jones primary bill,
the direct primnry was a democratic plat
form measure and had the endorsement
of eleven democratic congressmen, two
United States senators, the president of
the United States and the secretary of
state, and yet, the democratic machine
organization was willing to repudiate
th?ir own platform and to disregard the
advice of eleven congressmen, two Unit
ed States senators, the president of the
United States aaid the secretary of stnte.
Is ity any wonder that the" democracy
of Indiana felt outraged at the action
of the machine?
OPPOSITION TO
VICIOUS LEGISLATION.
“The citizenship of Indiana are in
debted to you, Mr. Jones, and to the
twelve or fifteen members of the 1916
legislature that stood with you, not only
for the direct primary law. but In op
posing much vicious legislation.
“I desire to digress from my sub
ject, in order to say that the greatest
and most effective influence behind the
primary tight was The Indiana Daily
Times. To The Times, the citizens of
Indiana owe much for the passage of the
primary law, and the advancement 6f the
great moral questions that are sweeping
the nation. lam glad that The Indiana
Daily Times is on the democratic side.
Every real democrat in Indiana should
appreciate the service that The Indiana
Daily Times is rendering to the party.
“You say there is a real demand in In
diana for me to become a candidate for
governor. I believe there is a real demand
within the rank and file of the demo
critic party to espouse democratic piln
ciples.
"I briicve the great majority of the
men and women of Indiana will Insist on
candidates, in both political parties, de
claring openly for principles that mean
the perpetuation of the liberties pre
scribed by our federal constitution.
•'Thp man aspiring to the office or
governor should not only have strong
convictions, but should enter the race
with a full determination, if nominated
and elected, that he will devote his entire
-lervice to the state of Indiana.
“Many men capable of making useful
public servants hare been div< rted from
their well defined course by the crafty
politician, who desires to prevent th<-
public servant from rendering a service
by pointing out the short distance from
the Indiana capital to Washington.
PUBLIC SERVICE
AND BUSINESS.
“Another common practice is inducing
the public servant, occupying a high
position, to become interested In busi
ness enterprises, possibly, prevailing
upon flic public servant to accept both
common and prefernd stock in su<-ii en
ter;.rises without cost, therefore, 1 think
it the duty of any man, becoming a
candidate for governor of Indiana, f<.
assure the voters of the state that lie
will, without fear or favor, r devote Ills
entire service to the office.
“Four years ago, I was requested to be
come a candidate, before the primary,
for governor. .Serious illness prevented
my filing petitions and there are many
good and sufficient personal reasons why
I should not become a candidate, nt this
time, but no democratic candidate, at
Ui's time has openly declared his pur
pose of leading the people's light and.
believing that I know the desire of the
Indiana voters and believing that they
went a man who is willing to present a
program.; a man with convictions, who
is willing to defend them and who is
more interested in the principles of gov
ernment than be is in his own persona!
success, I will enter the race as a demo
cratic candidate, in the coming primary,
and in a few days will present to the
voters f the state a platform on which
I desire to'stand.
‘‘l appreciate the fact that John B.
Jones, author of the direct primary law.
and a man who devoted his energy as ft
member of the Indiana legislature, in
the interest of the common people, has
volunteered his services to manage my
campaign.
"Thanking you for your long and con
tinued support and inviting all voter*
in the state who stand fur real dem
ocratic principles, to enlisc tinder our
banner, I am
“Very truly yours.
“JAMES K, RISK.”
LETTER URGES
SERVICE TO PUBLIC.
Tile letter from Mr. .Tones, to which
the foregoing is a reply, readsr a* fol
lows :
My Dear Kirby—As you know, T have
insisted for the last two years that you
should become a candidate for governor
in the 1920 primaries.
“My opinion 1* based on your qualifica
tions and your broad acquaintance of
Irfdiana men and women, and on the
existing sentiment in all parts of the
state. My business has compelled me to
cover a considerable portion of Indiana
in thn Inst two years, and I have found
the Risk sentiment growing stronger as
(he political discussions of available
candidates become more pronounced.
"In the very early pnrt of February
I addressed a few hundred letters to
Indiana democrats, telling them why 1
thought you should be a candidate.
With one exception every reply that I
received was not only friendly but the
writer expressed enthusiastic desire to
render assistance In every way possible
in behalf of yoor candidacy and I want
to assure you that a very large percent
of m•• letters were answered.
"Kirby I immediately began calling on
these democrats personally as the oppor
tunity permitted and found a greater
interest in your candidacy than I had
anticipated. I was requested to hftve pe
titions prepared and was assured that
(hey would be circulated and signatures
would be easily obtained.
“I wanted to be absolutely sure that
there was a real Risk sentiment and I
had petitions prepared and visited a
number of Indiana cities personally,
placing the petitions in the hands of
‘WHY?’
aJL JL •
democrats and was immediately con
vinced that they were in earnest.
DESIRE OF VOTER
FIRST CONSIDERED.
“Knowing how closely your business
has required your attention for the last
three of four years and yeur desire to stay
out of politics, so far as desiring to be
come a candidate, I did not feel that I
had the right, neither did I have the de
sire to Insist on your becoming a candi
date, without first putting myself In a
position of knowing what the desire of
the voters was.
“Kirby Risk, there Is a real demand in
Indiana for your candidacy for governor
and, as a democrat with sufficient experi
ence in politics to enable me to Judge
political conditions, I am willing to say
to you that you have better than a fair
chance to be nominated. The thousands
of democrats that know yon personally
are familiar with the service you have
rendered the party in the last quarter of
a century and will support you In prefer
ence to any other candidate.
“The democrat, known as a part of the
machine, respects you and admits that
you are a hard and open fighter. Their
outspoken opposition to you is due en
tirely to your pronounced views on the
temperance and woman's suffrage ques- ,
tions, but their real opposition, in my
opinion, is due to the demoralizing defeat
of the machine in the direct primary
fight during th 1915 legislature.
“The machine realizes that your man
agement of the primary fight had
much to do in securing the passage of
the bill, but while you incurred the in
creased enmity of the machine in the
fight, you in turn won the confidence,
appreciation, admiration and respect of
thousands upon thousands of good men
and women of Indiana, and they are
ready and willing to enlist under your
banner. They know you have made the ;
fight. They know you have kept the j
faith. They want you to become their j
candidate for governor.
“Knowing you as I do and knowing
your desire to render service, honest, j
efficient service, and knowing bow badly
Indiana needs a real executive in the
governor's chair, and. on behalf of the
real democracy of tndiana, I ask you to
become a candidate.
“Yours truly,
“JOHN R. JONES.”
STOP ANARCHY
RUSSIA IS TOLD
(Continued From Page One.)
lieved. Is that the Moscow government j
will fall, or at least be so reorganized j
that France can execute an about-face
without apparent Inconsistency or arous j
ine trouble at home.
With this background, diplomats said. '
the allied attltnde toward Turkey ne- es- j
sarllv bad undergone a considerable t
change. Premier Lloyd George, thov i
pointed out. in view of the Russian ques- j
tion. has backed down on Ills position
that the Turk must not remain in Con- ;
•tantinople.
The premier, they believed, realized
that Russia’s vital interest In the j
Turkish capital has not changed and
that be plans to show the Russians lie
is keeping their Interest In mind by
following out the Russian Idea that no
disposition must lie made of the city
without Russian agreement.
The diplomats were agreed that I.en
ine understands the whole diplomatic
chess game. They pointed out that in
a recent Moscow wireless he gave a
general outline of the entire situation,
siresslng Russia's position of ad van
luge. Dulse realized fully, they said,
that Russia would "sit tight" and let
Britain and France play against one
another, secure in the knowledge that
her position would lie benefited. no
matter which of the allied leaders came
out on top.
1 \
World
War Veterans
Indoor Circus
and Fun Festival
All This Week
—IN—
Tomlinson Hal'
10 Big Circus Acta
DANCING EVERY NIGHT
Admission, 50<*
Wednesday Matinee
Adults 25c, Children 15c
AMUSEMENTS.
toadum, \
OH BILLY”
12-F*eopSe-12 I
MOSTLY GIRLS
30 Minutes of Musical Comedy |jj
Q new features” O M
Q EVERY MONDAY Q M
Ladies’ Bargain Matinee |
Every Mon., Wed. & Fri. j||
ummo
to A. M. TO 12 P. M.
• CONTINUOUS
All This Week
Double feature Program
Shirley IVlason
“HER ELEPHANT MAN”
Wm. Russell
“SHOD WITH FIRE”
6- BIG ACTS-8
Ladles, Get Coupons at Thla
Theater, Good at tbe Broadway
Mon., Wed. and Fri Matinee*.
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1920.
NATION UNITING
TO BACK McADOO
(Continued From Page One.)
regard it. They realize that if It gains
In strength It will! tend to "scrap” the
methods they have always used and in
so doing may easily “scrar” them.
OTHERS SEEKING
JOB FOR HIM.
A Washington correspondent expressed
the situation when he said:
“Mr. McAdao is a candidate. He won't
seek the joo himself. Others will try
strenuously to do it for him.”
The “others” to whom this corre
spondent referred constitute an organ
! ization that is new to party politics,
j They are men of all occupations, of all
| parts of the country and frankly of ail
| parties w-ho have been impressed not
| only with the ability of Mr. McAdoo to
I do a big job well, but with the necessity
j of offering to the voters this year a
man on whom ail classes of people can
unite.
It is a fact that in many different parts
! of the United States there is a strong
Reeling that the democratic party can
win with no else than McAdoo. There is
also a feeling that there is going to lie
a great deflection of the voters from
both old-line parties unless McAdoo is the
democratic nominee. There is much talk
in some sections of breaking away from
the old parties. It almost always fades
ns soon as McAdoo Is mentioned as a
democratic possibility. His nomination
will do more to preserve the present
party alignments than anything else
that, could happen this spring.
NOMINATION WILL
PREVENT NEW PARTY.
McAdoo Is the candidate the representa
tives of the masses of voters want to
support. If they do not get him they
will show no interest in the candidates
of either party, and there is a large pos
sibility of this apathy being developed
into a demand for anew party, if not
this fall. In two years from now.
It is this great feeling of satisfaction,
with McAdoo as a prospective candidate
for the presidency, that Is keeping alive
activity In his behalf without organize
Mon or artificial stimulation such as has
been applied In the republican ranks.
McAdoo will have the largest Billowing
in the Kan Francisco convention, whether
or not a single delegate is pledged for
him. And It is now very evident that
he will win that following without an
effort on his part. It will he a whole
some demonstration of the high regard of
the people of the country for the man
who financed the war as secretary of the
treasury and saved the allies by his
transportation of food and ammunition
as director of the tallroads.
WOMAN DIED TO SAVE SON.
SCRANTON, Pa., Feb. 24 —Mrs. Julia
Debro gave her life that her 7-year old
son might live when she threw herself
tn front of t train on the Delaware A
Hudson railroad in order to push the
child to safety, she was instantly killed.
The child was saved.
MAYOR SLANDER DEFENDANT.
JANESVILLE. \V!a , Feb. 24.—Thomas
E. Welsh, mayor of Janesville, was made
iefendant in a SIO,OOO slander suit
irongiit against him by Daniel W.
Itrlggs, former member of the police de
partment.
WWfiY?’
l — /
* AMUSEMENTS.
MuraT —IOSIGBI --I
Matinees Tomorrow and Saturday. |
CECIL LEAN
In tl" reason's I isget musical coni- I
r>ly hit, E
•LOOK WHO’S HERE’,
with CLEO MAYFIELD
coming direct from Studebaker, I
Chicago, cn route to New York run. I
PRlCES—Totstght, sc, 75c, *!, *1.50, $2 I
MATS. TOMORROW AND SAT., i
,10c, 7.1 c. gLOO, SLOO. ‘
(All Next Wrek— Scats Thursday 9 a. ni.
Matinee* Wednesday and Saturday.
I THE St** N.Y ORIGINAL
SHRINK PARTI MONDAY.
MEMBERS ONLY.
PRICES—Eve., Sat. Mat.. 50c to S2oft.
Wednesday Matinee. 50c. 75c, ti, 91.50.
iTWsTprj^!^ 7 *'"'! • Daily at 2:15 and 8:15P. M.
v Mat. 15c-50c —Eve. 15c-$l
Noted Actor-Comedian
CHARLESKING
Former star under management of
George M. Cohan.
Now offering his fnseinating company
of feminine talent In the Musical and
Scenic Masterpiece,
DREAM STARS
With Marl* Hollywnll—*lan4 Cafttle—
Josephine Acl am B—Kvelynß—Kvelyn Grieg
CONTINUOUS VAUDEVILLE
Brown’s Masieal 1
HIGHLANDERS “
JE.NKS & ALLEN. HI GO LUTGKNB, JOHNSON A CRANE. EVER- "■
KTTR’S MONKEYS, BEAT KICK SWEENEY & CO., WAItREN S V M
FROST. I.
EXTRAS—“LOG OF THE U-35”-EXTRA
THE GREATEST MOTION PICTURE SENSATION THAT HAS COME OUT
OF THE WAR.
Dancing In tha lyric’s Bail Hoorn Afternoon and Evening
•_ MOTION PICTURES.
rAI J IStroheim’s
Wonder Play
BLIND HUSBANDS
A Love Btory—An Adventure—A Scenic MaiVel—A Human Drama.
SHOWS START 11:30, 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30 AND 9:30.
DOROTHY DALTON ~
wMimttma. “black is white”
9™ CHRISTY COMEDT FOX NEWS
ROB 2 OFFICES,
HOLD UP STORE
(Continued From Page One.)
sent from police headquarters and Sergt.
Huston and a squad of police, who were
making an investigation in another case
in the northeast part of the city, were
also sent to the drug store.
Harvey Parker, 07, n jewelry salesman,
75614 West Michigan street, was walking
in an alley in the rear of 1417 Alvord
street and knocked down and brutally
beaten by two men. He was taken to the
city hospital. It is believed the men
thought Parker had a large amount of
jewelry with him.
An unknown woman was knocked
down and robbed of $25 “arly in the
night in front of the home of Frank
Lee, 527 East Twelfth street. She went
into Lee's home and called her husband
by telephone and departed without giv
ing her name. When the police arrived
the woman bad gone and the officers were
unable to find her.
FINDS HIS HOME
IS RANSACKED,
When Athel U. Smith, 618 Parkway, re
turned home Monday night he found his
house ransacked. Only a small amount of
money was missing.
Ed Huckleberry, 543 Berwick avenue,
reported to the police that bis house
was entered by a burglar. Two liberty
bonds, a watch and other Jewelry was
missing.
Ernest of Pittsburg, Pa., who :
is visiting a relative at 617 East Me- i
Carry street, was robbed of 970 last;
night. He told Patrolman Bloomberg ;
(hat he met a stranger at Washington
street and Kentucky amiue last night,'
and later he found that his money was j
missing.
Declares Capital Is
in Grip of Luxury
WASHINGTON, Keb. 24.-The natlona
cnpltal is afflicted with luxury. You
may take it from Representative Nelson
of Missouri.
“Stand on F street almost any Satur- j
day aftomoon and In an hoar's tims you
will gee SIOO,OOO worth of fur costs worn ;
by women, mostly girls who work. Take
your place on Sixteenth street on a fair
Sunday afternoon and you will see in a
single hour a million dollars' worth of
autos. There is no let up on luxury."
Luxury Is the capital’s great affliction,
the Missouri legislator is convinced.
AMUSEMENTB.
ENGLISH’S Tonight
HKD. MAT. AND NIGHT.
BACK AGAIN! COHAN A HARRIS' i
BIG COMEDY HIT
f/ATAILOR
ILmariman
I SUPERB CAST OK 35 PEOPI.E.
I Prices: Night. 50e-$2 ; Mat.. 50e-1.50.
TUI RS.-FKI.-SAT., FEB. 86-27-28.
Matinee Saturday.
CHARLES FRO It MAN Preeents
WILLIAM GILLETTE
In J. M, Carrie's best comedy
“DEAR BRUTUS”
Direct from one entire year at the
New York Empire Theater.
Prices, 500 t 91.50; seats ready
WJ CF If Commencing March 1.
“ L- L- *N- Mats., IVsd. and Sat.
BARONIN MAT.. WED., 25c to *.
John Golden
Producer of “Turn to the Right,’’
"Lightnin'," "Three Wise Fools”
und "Dear Me," presents
HOWDY
FOLKS
Anew romtd) of the faith. feuds
and fun of the Blue Ridge
Mount al ns
By PEARL FRANKLIN
Seats Thur.day. Price*. Night*. 50c
to 92; Bt. Mat. 00c to SI.OO.
GIRLS FROM JOYLAND
WITH
Funny Billy Gilbert
Thi* coupon and Ift cent* entttle
indy to *e*erved .cat at any matinee
during week.
DAISY NELLIS
American Piuni*t of Dltinctlon
BEN BERNIK
"Thl. 1* not a movie"
A Comedy Plnviet by George Kelly
MRS. WELLINGTON'S SURPRISE
With it Clever Company. Ineluding
Lottie ItrUcoe—Walter Wll*on—Jean
Barrett—Frederic Sumner
FINDLAY *'HILL
“Vodvll ala Mode”
NATHANS BROS. '
Daring and Difficult Doing*
' ROYAL GASCOIGNES
And Their Somer*aultlng Dog
HI NOG ItAMS AND DIGEST SAYINGS
40WednesdayBargain
SQUARES
Square No, 1.
Silk Hosiery
Women's “Notnseme” silk
Hosiery, with slight im
perfections, some hardly
noticeable; In black or
gray: up to $2.50 value,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$1 Pr.
Main Floor.
Square No. 9.
Rag Rugs
Hit and mist design;
washable, made from new
rags; regular $1.25 value
always,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
85^
Third Floor.
Square No. 9.
Dresser Scarfs
Wide lace trimmed dresser
scarfs, size ISx6O, good
cotton centers; regular
75c to ssc values
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Each
Main Floor.
Square No. 18.
Women’s Suits
Just 35 women's fall
suits, value* to SIOO. with
mole, Hudson seal and
other fur-trimmed,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$29.50
Second Floor
Square No. 17
Curtain Nets
36 Inch curtain nets, in
white or ivory. . "ew
uprlng filet pt
terns. 4e value,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
27<* Yard
Third Floor
Square No. 91.
Boys’ Suits
Made of brown, gray,
green, novelty easslineres
and' all-wool blue serge
qpd flannels; sizes 0 to
18; sls values.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$12.65
Main Floor
Square No. 98.
Boys’ U. Suits
Boys' medium weight un
ion suits, cotton ribbed,
ecru and gray, ages 2 to
16 year*.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
89^
2 Suit*. 91.75
Main Floor
Square No. 29.
Crepe de Chine
40-lnch pure allk, heavy
quality, in peach, cham
pagne, Quaker gray and
others; Worth $2.09 yard,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$1.67 Yard
Main Moor
Square No. 33.
Mercer. Pongee
82- inch mercerized pon
free; fine, lustrous qual
ty. In sky, Copen, rote
and wine; worth 59c
yard,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
39c 1 Yard
Mai n Floor
Square No. 87.
School Hose
Children's black ribbed
school hose, sizes 6 to
9V4, double heel and toe.
seconds of a 39c value.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Pair
Basement
8 Arh.
Square No. 2.
Worn. Silk Gloves
Kayser's double tipped,
elbow, whtta silk gloves,
Paris point back, clean,
fresh stock; big values,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
12-button length. 91.35
16-button length, $ 1 .50
Main Floor.
Square No. 6.
Window Shades
Size 36x7 window shades,
dark green only, mounted
on dependable rollers, ex
tra big value for
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Each
Third Floor.
Square No. 10.
Hair Switches
Finest quality material,
wavy hair, with threo
separate stems, 24 inches
long, all shades except
grav ; $2.50 value,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$1.25 Each
Main Floor.
Square No. 14.
Jiffy Pants
Jiffv baby pants, Klein
crt>, medium or large
sizes, regular price, 50c;
special for
WEDNESDAY ONLY
39d Pair
Second Floor
Square No. IS.
Women’s Hats
T'ntrlmmed hats for wom
en. assorted shapes, large
styles, sailor, poke, etc.;
Tallies to $5.95,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$1.79 Each
Second Floor.
Square No. 22.
Suits, Overcoats
Young men's SEAM mod
el suits and overcoats,
sizes 33 to .AS, regular $35
and S4O values,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
.$23.65
Main Floor
Square No. 2S,
Men’s U. Suits
Heavy wdlght fleeced
lined cotton union aults
(seconds of a standard
make), sizes 34 to 44, Tal
lies to $3.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$1.65
2 Suits, 93.25. Main Floor
Square No. 30.
English Nainsook
Fine finished quality Eng
ltah nalnaook; our regular
50c value, (limit 10 yard*
to n customer),
WEDNESDAY ONLY
39* Yard
Main Floor
Square No. 34.
In the Basement
Last call on underwear,
while quantities last,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Women * 59e Separata
Garment*, 29c
Women'* 59c Union
Suit*, 29c
Men’* $1.50 Union
Suit*. 9fte
Bjufinmt
Square No. 38.
Cotton Batts
Three-pound comfort cot
ton bfttts. opens tn ft
sheet 72x90 good grade
cotton; $1.15 value, (lim
it 3).
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Each
Basement
MOTION PICTURES.
No Phone, C O . D. or
Mail Orders on These
Bargain Squares
Square No. 3.
Union Suits
Children's bleached cotton
Union Suits, drop seat,
age* 4 to 10; elastic ribbed,
with medium fleecing,
slightly Imperfect; to $1
value*,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
55^
Main Floor.
Square No. 7.
Handkerchiefs
For women, one corner
embroidered effect, white
or colored patterns; our
regular 15c value, special
for
WEDNESDAY ONLY
3 for 25 £
Main Floor,
Square No. 11.
Women’s Coats
Os polo cloth, wool ve
lours and silvertones, half
lined, 36 Inches long,
various colors and models,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$16.95
Second Floor.
Square No. 15.
Worn. Dresses
Gingham dresses for wom
en, for porch or street
wear; plain, striped or
checked ; $5 to $5.95 values,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$3.98
Second Floor.
Square No. 19.
Worn. Boots
Women's $6 value boots,
odds and ends of our reg
ular and samples, broken
size*, but ail sizes in lot,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$2.95 Pair
Main Floor,
Square No. 23.
Men’s Pants
Made of fancy dark wor
steds and cassimeres; also
heavy corduroys, sizes 2S
to 44; special for
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$4.65 Pair
Main Floor.
Square No. 27.
Men’s Sox, 59c
Fine gauze mercerized
lisle and fiber plated sox,
pjaln colors, fancies and
polka dots, extra quality,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
59^
2 nalrs, $1.15.
Main Floor.
Square No. 31.
40-in. Fren. Serge
In navy. wine, black and
every other desirable col
or for skirt*, dresses,
etc., about 60 per cent
wool,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$1.37 Yard
Main Floor.
Hqunr No. 35.
Sauce Pans
Ture aluminum Sauce
Fans, heaviest weight,
long handle; regular 59c
value; special for
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Each
Basement.
Square No. 39.
Muslins, 21c
36-inch blenched and un
bleached muslin, heavy
round thread quality,
lengths to 10 yards, val
ues to SOc,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
21d Yard
Basement.
Square No. 4.
Women’s Hose
Fast black, fine gauze,
mercerized lisle hose, reg
ular and out sizes; also
Burson seamless fashioned
white feet hose—seconds
WEDNESDAY ONLY
35^
3 Pairs $1
Main Floor.
Square No. 8.
Boudoir Caps
Women's boudoir caps,
made of pretty laces, nets
and silk; ail colors, up to
SI.OO values
WEDNESDAY ONLY
39£ Each
Main Floor.
Square No. 12.
Dresses
Women's all-wool serge
and Jersey dresses, in
navy, black, tan and
brown; sizes 16 to 44,
Talues to $25.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$11.95
Second Floor.
Square No. 16.
9x12 Rugs
Axmlnster rugs, rich, deep
pile, handsome colors,
floral and oriental pat
terns, $59.50 values,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$37.50
Third Floor.
Square No. 20.
Pumps, Oxfords
Women's pumps or ox
fords, Easter styles. Cu
ban or French heels,
brow or black kid and
patent colt.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$6.95 Pair
Main Floor.
Square No. 24.
Overcoats
(19> Men's black overcoats,
sizes 37 to 40, and (17)
young men’s seam belted
overcoats, dark colors,
size* 32 to 37,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$13.65 -
Main Floor.
Square No. 28.
Men’s Sox, 17c
Durable Durham, nation
ally advertised fine eauze
lisle finish sox; black,
gray, navy, brown; 25c
grade.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
17c Pair
Main Floor.
Square No. 32.
Turkish Towels
Fancy plaids. In one and
two-color weaves, slightly
soiled; 79c to $1 values,
(limit 6)
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Each
Main Floor.'
Square No. 36.
Tea Kettles
Nob. 7 and 8, gray gran
ite teakettle, cool handle,
best quality; tight fitting
lid; to $1.39 values,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
87£ Each
Basement.
Square No. 40.
Dress Percales
36-ineh Genuine Scout
dress percales, light, col
ors, In stripes and plaids,
35c value, (limit 15 yards)
WEDNESDAY ONLY
21<* Yard ,
Basement.

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