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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, June 28, 1920, Home Edition, Image 7

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H ■ rry wedding of Saturday was ttist
59 Lona LLc<3 P;lTc3, > o£
ill's. J. S. Pavey, and Avery P.
vrMci toot piaca ia Downey
WPn ■ Christian church, Bev. Clarence
HTlieidenbach officiating.
W Mias Hope Bedford and Miss Rufiy
LWlfldars, accompanied by Miss Verna
KwMtman, sang a program of bridal
preceding the service.
Sweennaa played tb> Meadles-
march for the entrance of
party and the Lohengrin
chorus for the recessional.
the adtar Into a June
AfjSß-s Lois Eanne'.s, maid of honor,
a frock of pink organdie and ear
a basket of pink roses and sweet
Miss Violet Hess, ring bearer,
white ruffle! orrardia over pin*,
the ring on a satin pillow.
iße bride's gown was of white satin
ined with silver lace, with a veil
in place by a wreath of orange blos-
arried a shower of Mrs. Aaron
roses and larkspur.
Ralph Stephenson acted as best man
and William Nethercut, Jesse Pavey and
Eugene Weesner as ushers.
Among the out-of-town guests were
Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Morrows, John and
Delight Morrow of Francesville; Mrs.
Mildred Stemble, Mr. and Mrs. W. C.
Goble and Miss Beatrice Goble of Sway
eee; Mr. and Mrs. Berlin Dieder of
Greenfield; Mr. and Mrs. John Paxton,
Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Pavey, Mr. and Mrs.
Allander Wilkinson of South Bend;
Prank Pavey and Venta Pavey of Leba
uon. . (j -|jf|
Mr. and Mrs. Morrow will be at home
after July 1 In South Bend.
• * •
Tha wedding of Miss Elsa Marie Fess
ler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David
Peasler, 326 East McCarty street, and
Everett Stoelting was solemnized at St.
John's Second Evangelical Reformed
church Saturday night.
Rev. Ernest N. Evans read the service.
Miss Jeannette Vaughan, organist,
played % program of bridal airs preced
ing the ceremony, changing to the Lo
bengine bridal chorus for the process
ional.
Miaa Helen Kessler, maid of honor,
wore orchild organdie, with which she
carried * pink roses.
Mies Emma Fesler, Miss Hazel • Geiss
of Chicago, Miss Alvena Held and Miss
Dlsle Leppert, bridesmaids, wore or
gandie frocks in the pastel shades and
carried srm bouquets of Shasta daisies.
Petite Miss Dorothy Stoelting wore a
dainty net frock and carried a basket of
roses in rainbow shades.
The bride wore a handsome gown of
white net over satin, with a veil arranged
cap effect fastened with tiny roses. Her
■hower bouquet was of bride roses and
Valley lilies.
Mr. and Mrs. Stoelting will be at
home at 208 North Walcott street after
Aug. E
* * •
Mr*. William E. Gabe, 4CS East Fif
teenth street, is spending a few weeks
Jißoston and New York.
is announced of Miss
Harriot M. Smith of Fowler, who for
merly I attended the Teachers' college of
Indianjapoils, and Herbert C. Blandford,
son of Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Blandford,
2806 Ruckle street.
• *
Miss Dorothy Rentsch has gone with
the Mile. Tbeo Hewes ballet for a sev
eral weeks' tour through Canada.
• • •
Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Williamson and
family have gone to *aelf summer home
. near Moortsville to spend several weeks.
• * *
The engagement is announced of Mis*
k Kcth Catherine Burrell, daughter of
klttchard T. Burrell, 2COI North New Jer
sey street, to George Reed of Blooming
ton. The wedding will tuk place July J.
Attendants for tbe weddinjr of Mis*
*tbea Denny, dauirhtpr of Mrs. Scott
fMi. -my. and Harrell V. DaMey. which
place tomorrow evening- at
will Include Mrs. Thoma* Han
of honor, and ML* Jar:!(*>
Wn of Monrovia. trldesnirld, and
. H. Cummings, best man. Miss
|H< Griggs of Bethany park, vocal-
.Thomas Hansen, pianist, win
H:;* bridal musical program.
• • •
Dowr.l: Johnson who has
BBtytendlng the National Federation
Hi’ convention ii, Dr-s Moir.-s. has
Hu to her horn-. "9 East Eighteenth
Mrs. Johnson stopped several
Vat Pittsfield, IP., with her mother,
return trip.
B• *
■s Helen Kueeh’er, 3345 College :\ve-
with a luncheon yester-
which the engagement of Miss
Nermann, daughter of Mr.
Hrs. Henry Hermann, l West Dai-
and Kaymond I’tradise was
gf^Bced.
weddiDg will take place next
Hbt* of Dorothy Perkins roses and
< daisies were used through the
and on the table. The covers
by individual corsages of
|H guests inch ded Miss Mary Noe,
Zeph, Miss Kathleen Maurer,
EW 'rgaret Weinsing, Miss Elsa Don
|H Miss Marie Eschenbach and Miss
Hana.
lurch Merg-er
ii Ends in Rumpus
K.ATHE, Kas., June 28.—Merging of
H congregations of the Presbyterian
8 Congregational churches here has
k found to be unsatisfactory.
Ifter a four months’ trial tbe
S’* he* have decided to separate.
Ho merged congregations were known
Hr Federation church of Olathe.
Hiuble arose over a ruling In regard
property.
h ’ INC RUMINATING.
He—l’m not so crazy about Harry
—Why not?
Hie—Because he knows so many
Hkty songs.
—Does he sing them to yon?
Hie— No, he just whistles the tunes. —
Shan's case
AMAZES INDIANAPOLI
■ business man’s wife could not
read without sharp pains in
For years her eyes were
weak. Finally she tried sim
camphor, hydrastis,
I, as mixed in Lavoptik eye wash
n result produced by a single bot
■ amazed everyone. We guarantee
■mail bottle Lavoptik to help ANT
BsE weak, strftined or inflamed
Eis. Aluminum eye cup FREE
fciry J. Huder, druggist.—Adver
fcment
The Young Lady
Across the Way
- ———
I' * '
- rf—J'.-i
The young lady across the way says
no one really knows yet what the tan
tamount issue wfl.l be in this campaign.—
Copyright, 1920.
Wife of Republican
Democrat Delegate
at San Francisco
Two Other Women at Conven
tion Trace Ancestry to
Indian Chiefs.
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. June 28.
Mrs. William H. England of Oklahoma,
Vassar graduate and mother of six chil
dren, is one of more than 300 women
who are delegates to the democratic na
tional convention which opens here
today.
Her husband was a delegate to the re
publican state convention in Oklahoma.
Among the other Oklahoma delegates
are two women who traco their ancestry
to Indian chieftains.
They are Mr*. Richard L. Fite, wife of
a physician formerly of Georgia and
grand niece of Seaquoyah, inventor of
the Cherokee alphabet, and Mrs. Eugene
B. Lawson, wife of an attorney and oil
man and daughter of the Rev. Charles
Johnnycake, last chief of the Delawares.
Mrs. Fite was first chairman of the
Women’s Democratic Club of Oklahoma,
and Mr*. Lawson was formerly president
of the Oklahoma Federation of Women'*
Clubs.
KENTUCKY WOMAN
PRACTICAL FARMER.
Miss Laura Clay, delegate at large
from Kentucky, was one of the orga
nizers of the Kentucky Equal Right* as
sociation In 1888 and ia reputed to boa
“practical farmer.”
Mrs. Elizabeth Mar bury, delegate-at
large from New York, who was decorated
by tbe United States, France, Belgium
and Italy for war work, is first vice
president of the League of Catholic
Women.
She came to the convention with Mrs.
John Sherwin Crosby, "mother of New
York women democrats.” In a special
train from New York that carried fifty
four women delegates and alternates.
Texas sent a nationally known figure
in Mrs. Percy Pennybaker, club leader.
One of the best known of California’s
eight delegates is Miss Mary E. Foy,
who has been Identified with many phases
of civic betterment work. Mrs. John W.
Troy of Alaska was the first woman
delegate to arrive here.
17 WOMEN NAMED
FOR COMMITTEE .WORK. f
Seventeen women, headed by Mrs. Jo
sephus Daniels, wife of the secretary of
the navy, have been appointed by Horner
S. Cummings, chairman of the dem
ocratic national committee, as members
of the executive committee of thirty-four.
Mrs. George Bass, chalnfian ot the
woman’s bureau ot the democratic na
tional committee, and Mrs. Mry Holland
Klnkaid, asistant director of publicity
in charge of women's activity, are among
the leaders here.
Mrs. Bass is a Chicago civic worker
and had charge of the 1918 democratic
presidential campaign in twelve west
ern equal suffrage states, ten of which
cast their electoral vote for Wilson.
jTuesday
Bargains
$1.50 Kayser’s lisle union suits,
white or flesh; all QQ*
sizes j. .yuv
SI.OO Dressing sacques,
kimono sleeves (limit 2).dsrC/
Sanitary napkins, ftft _
dozen
Pure linen wash skirts, broken
sizes, up 0A AO
to $5
$2 Gowns and envelopes,
white or 6”8 QQ
flesh viivv
$1 Brassieres, pink,
front or back
$1 Pure silk gloves,
double tips f dt
$2 Lingerie waists, d-f
all sizes, special
$1 Silk fiber stripe hose,
all sizes dvv
$3.00 Kimonos, plain and !
fancy pat- gft
terns
House dresses, broken sizes;
t?.o“ $1.98
Three net dresses, QQ
sold at sls
11 Short coats, good patterns
and styles; up M ac
to sls 94.90
One rack gingham street
dresses, up ft©
to $8 94*90
.HARGROVE’S
|MBssac!iusettß Ave. and Delaware St >
Grandmothers Hold
Prominent Place
in Big Convention
Silver Hair end Sweet Man
ners of Motherhood to
Touch Future Democracy.
By EDNA HUBER CHURCH.
SAN FRANCISCO, June 28.—Grand
mother is certainly gettiug into politics.
That was the impression which I re
ceived as I looked ovr nearly 500 demo
cratic women gathered hero for the na
tion convention.
One hundred and four of these women,
many of whom are grandmothers and
most of whom are mothers, will have
seats as delegates in the convention,
while 2,404 will be seated as alternates.
The women of this convention are a
most impressive example of the dignified
beauty of modern women.
The most beautiful silver hair, soft
toned voices and sweep manners of
motherhood which are combined in these
women belie the most aggressive work
which they have done and are doing to
win victory for the democrats in 1920.
MORE ACTIVE THAN
MANY OF YOUNGER.
Mrs. John B. Castleman of Kentucky,
80 years old, the oldest woman In the
convection, leads many a tight for pro
gressiveness and liberality and is more
active than many of the younger girls
who have come to San Francisco to act
as convention ushers.
Mrs. Mary Holland Klnkald, who is
proud she is a grandmother, is grind
ing out printable publicity in a manner
that would put to shame most of the
bob-haired young females who claim
themselves “publicity experts’’ nlong
Broadway.
Mrs. Betty White, a delegate at large
from Arizona, admits that while she has
not lost her youthfnl fervor for Jeffer
sonian democracy she is not too old to
lead a fight on the floor of the convention
if some of the male democrat* attempt
an onslaught on the Jeffersonian pol
icies.
NEW YORKER
ANOTHER GRANDMOTHER.
Mrs. M. G. Church of New York is an
other grandmother who declares “we
women must put the idea of progressive
ness firmly in the minds of men.”
Vleing with that beauty which comes
only with gray-haired dignity, there
stands out In sharp contrast the fresh,
young beauty of Mrs. Neil! Wright of
Huntington. Tenn., the youngest |ouian
delegate in the convention.
Mrs. Wright Is a sister of May Allison,
a movie star, and one wonders how she
herself escaped the screen.
✓Of course there are some young wom
en all concerned in the democratic con
vention, as. Miss Chari Williams of Mem
phis. Tenn., and Mrs. Peter Olesen of
Cloquet, Minn., but the fact still remains
that grandmother is most prominent in
politics.
Denver Hospitals
Crowded to Limit
DENVER. Colo., June 28.—Becaime
Denver mothers frown upon receiving vis
it* from the stork in their own homes
there 1* a lying-in shortage In the city.
The hospitals are inadequate to care
for expectant mothers who apply for ac
commodations.
Local ph>sic!ans declare that Die ’'fail”
prevalent in the east for some time has
reached Denver nnd Is responsible for
Denver mothers eschewing the home a* a
place for bringing children into the
world.
That the “fad" has come to stay is
the opinion f.f many physicians, who de
clare that the need for an Institution to
be used exclusively for lying in purposes
Is growing daily.
With women about to become mothers
■swamping the hospitals there is uot suf
ficient accommodation for other patients,
it Is said.
Jlearn the
V-Ak
Make your breakfast one of real en
joyment. The distinctive corn fla
®vor of JERSEY Corn
Flakes adds zest to the
first meal of the day.
Ask your grocer
The Jersey Cereal Foo<? Company, Cereal, Pa.
Also makers of Jersey Whole-Wheat Pancake Flour
JIRSEY&S
Qhe Original Qhick Com Flakes
2006-A
fflmn OU S , Fairbanks
All This Week THE
booth task,notch, n MOLLYCODDLE
Edgar S JOliab i/ay He was a monacled lady-bug with—
six-shooter ancestors, but blood will
The Circeltte of News tell. “Doug's” greatest! Ask any-
Circle Orchestra body!
£Nl2l§ GU S Q I CONTINUOUS
El II 139 LIO 81 O I IUNTILIIP. M.
FAMOUS PLAYERS—PARAMOUNT PRODUCTIONS.
Maurice Tourneur’s
“TREASURE ISLAND”
Robert Louis Stevenson’s tale that has thrilled the world.
EXTRA—Arthur Kauk’s “SUNSHINE REVUE”
20 People, Including the Sunshine Beauty Chorus.
The Invisible Divorce §|
B CHRISTY COMEDY FOX NEWS WEEKLY |S|
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, MONDAY, ~J UNE 2b, 1920.
The Right Thing
at the Right Time
By MARY MARSHALL 8. DCFPRE
CHILD REN’S PARTIES.
Children like parties. And as a sum
mer party is not very difficult to plan
and carry out, this Is tho time of year
to make them happy.
A fairy party Is sure to meet with fa
vor. It should be given out of dooro.
Here Is a suggestive wording for the in
vitation :
"The faries invite you to come to a
party they are giving on Wednesday,
July 14, from four to six, Jn Mary Den
nis’ apple orchard. Please come dressed
as fain*.”
Ur the fairy party could be given in
the woods or In a garden—but It must
be out of doors.
The small host or hostess should dress
like a fairy with wings of crinoline and
a spangled frock and should lead the
guests from th.y house to the faries’
playground. Lanterns glowing under
shrubbery, nig butterflies and bats of
crepe paper hanging from branches of
trees and perx-lied on bushes, add to the
fulryllke look of the garden.
The little fairies can dance around
a fairy pole, trimmed with rib
bons ; somebody can read or tell them
a faimly story—there almost always
some clever young girl who will do this
in costume for you—and to each may
be given a small fairy tale book —the
book can be given as a favor or one can
given as a prize for winning some game.
The fairy refreshments cau l>c spread
on the grass.
If the children are told to hunt for
them, where the fairies have hidden them,
and find them banging to bushes, t: ri
der flowers and all about the garden, the
fun will be Increased.
Tiny sandwiches and cukes, wrapped
in waxed paper, might be hidden In this
way. Call the lemonade or cold choco
late milk shake fairy dew, and If desir
able have the Ice cream In flower molds.
A summer party can take the form of
a hay ride through the country, with
supper at the end. Or a ride with a pic
nic lunch ns a surprise In the middle ot
It is delightful.
An Indian party can be given, at
which the children play outdoor games
for amusement.
For a prize a string of beads and an
Indian arrow may be given.
Refreshment* may be served at a ta-
SAY “DIAMOND DYES”
Don't utreak or ruin your material In
a poor dye. Insist on “Diamond Dyes”
Easy directions in every package.
| GIRLS! MAKE A
| LEMON BLEACH
| Lemons Whiten and Double
j* Beauty of the Skin
Squeeze the juice of two lemons Into a
bottle containing three ounces of Orchard
White which cau be had at any drug
store, shake well and you have n quarter
pint of harmless and delightful lemon
breach for few tent*.
Massage this sweetly fragrant lotion
Into the face, neck, irmi and hands each
day, then shortly note the beauty of your
skin.
Famous stage beantle* uae lemon juice
to bleach and bring that soft, clear, roy
white complexion Lemona bare always
been used a* a freckle, sunburn and tan
remover. Make thiz up and try IL—>
Advertisement.
ble with an Indian centerpiece—green
paper spread for grass.
A big Indian teepee may be made of
Irown paper, a llttje canoe fashioned out
of bark embarking on a mirror for n
lake, and some little Indian dolls
grouped about.
At each plate a bit of bark might serve
for place cards.
The Ice cream Is served In glasses,
with a paper Indian teepee or tent placed
over each—Copyright, 1920.
College Folk to Be
Country Club Guests
Ladies of the Country club will en
tertain Wednesday night in honor of the
young folk who have returned fr /m col
lege, with a dinner dance at the club.
The hostesses wlli Include Mrs. Otto
F. Hauelsen, Mrs. John S.
Jacqnelih 8. Holliday end Mrs. Carl Ver
non Griffith.
On Thursday the first -round for the
ladles’ golf championship will be played.
Tennis, bridge and tea will also be in
order for those who do not golf.
Mrs. K. IV. Hughes, Mrs. W. It, Gates,
nnd Mrs. Thomas D. Bheerin will be in
.Charge of the Thursday arrangements.
' The regular dinner dance fill be given
on Saturday ntgbt.
AMUSEMENTS.
I CONTINUOUS
fTlilTilw Is I
O FEATURES 0 I
TOPAYI
SPECIAL
ATTRACTION
BENNY HARRISON \
& CG. |
Daily Delivery
BEATIE & BLOKE I
Dance Delineators i
BENNY BARTON
Versatile Funster
AIH T DONE RIGHT
BY OUR Mall
OLIVE & MACK I
Oh Cierhy
Extra Special
COMEDY 1
MURRY & LANE !
Hubby's Holiday
James A Jessie Burns |
Something Ntw on the
Wire
JOHNNY MULDOON &
PEARL FRANKLYN
Hlth
LEW ROSE
by
CRESCENT CITY JAZZ BAND
A Revelry us Son*. Dane* and Music.
BARRY McCOHMACK
Ireland'. Represent stive Entertainer.
TOMMY HAYDEN *
CARMEN ERCKI.LE
English Character entedlan and
Print* Donna Violinist.
I’M*. I A GREEN
Eccentric Silent f unstsrj*.
BEATRIX DOANK
The Cosmopolitan I‘rlmo Donna in a
Variety of Up-to-Date Operatic and
Popular Songs.
“ NESTOR 4 tIM ENT
A Unique Novelty.
‘ HI NOG KA M 8
V<Ho-Film News.
DIGEST TOPIC.
Pithy Paragraph*.
Keep Fool at Keith’s.
Matinee at *:.!.
Evenings at 7:90 and 9:00.
POPULAR PRICES.
| 1
I CONTINUOUS VAUDEVILLE |
SLYRIC,
1 Until U P. M.
?! i* ■ 1 Elia LaVail
i Meryl Ellsworth & W
1 Prince s p '“* R ' a * l
| S'" | Packer Trio B
9 biriS Robb & Hollis t|
§ HARRY COLLIER TROUPE
FUm Farce. ‘ Bringing Up Fa- ■
H tber,” with Johnny Ray as "Jiggs.”
1 Dancing In the Lyric Ballroom I
Afternoon nnd Evening.
I MURAT "ES&VZ 1
8 slats. Wed., Thurs. and Sat.—2:Bo.
THE STUART WILKES SO.
THE MOW
®HOP
A Comedy of Theatrical Life
By James Forbes
nninrc Evenings, 50c, sl. 81.50
riiHfCw Matinees, 25e, 50c, 75c
NEXT WEEK
THE GYPSY TRAIL j
ja*MgcaAMßwtßnß9rv;i.
1 RIALTO I
Let's On—lt's Continuous ||
A Downtown Beach
THE COOL JOY SPOT
Feature Vaudeville
Camille of the Yukon
£|g| Ladle* get coupons at tl.is theater H
Mg fD>od at the Broadway matinees jf
Monday, Wednesday and Friday. ■
\ " X ' . ' . - : .
Vacation •V* fY** A Vacation
-r&J-vtojAaßgs o’ C o'-Amt
A Dtp- in the Deep Necessitates
■ Correct, Fetching
Bathing Attire
ik To start off on a vacation trip with
/ out a bathing suit would be like start
\ ing off on a fishing trip without bait.
A, fIIPP Wcty* I* can he done, of course, but the pros
jSnHßlr poets of* vacation of jolly fun are la
. Ew WsHHal I T nderstood, of course, that everybody takes
a bathing suit, have you chosen, yours? And
tlijlpi you’re going away in July? Tempus is on
tMfjnK iia know, and choosing will be so
!|iS' [P much more pleasant when you are not rushed
jwJBP /\ V o‘ In addition to the luring little bathing frocks
Mam . • / | \ of satin, taffeta and crepe meteor, trimmed
me . J^/ 1 \/„ o 0 with bright' bits of color, and fashioned in
A 7 i'dry* 'b?}Sl£ 8 * ° many chic effects, there are wool knitted swim
saits in every- manner of striking shade
~ Mb. — 1 And there are fetching bathing capes— yon
J* can not imagine their swank pieturesqueness
6ee them yourself!
Finger Tipped
Grooming
All aboard for Vacation
Land, and milady not gloved
to a charming finesse, or out
for a brisk gallop, across
country, and not gauntleted
as befits a riding habit and
a mount that’s slicked to per
fection ?
No, not when a call upon
our glove section will con
vince you of the excellent
quality, and the outstanding
smartness of our—
Ayres Gloves for
Every Occasion.
—Ayres—Street floor.
Water Togs for
Kiddies
Even If one can’t swim, one
paddles around and gets awfully
wet and splashed, so mother al
ways gets jolly-colored suits,
warm and woolly, that dry
quickly—and so I won t catch
cold, she says. And she gets the
same kind for sister.
Rubber wading pants, in red,
blue and green, to be slipped on
over the frock, are sized for the
tots of 2 to 6 years. And so are
canvas shoes.
—Ayres —Fifth floor.
Canoeing Time
Is Pillow Time
At least half the pleasure is taken out of your days on the
river when your craft lacks its full complement of soft, luscious
pillows, among which you caa loaf to your heart’s content or
relax, the while you send forth summer serenades.
If you don't have enough pillows you are losing half the fun
of canoeing. Why suffer? Coine in and get two, four, a dozen
of our jolly round cretonne covered pillows at 95d.
—Ayres—Fourth floor.
Motor With Accessories
A motor car without the needful accessories is as iuad
visable to use as roller skates in the Alps. For the vacation
ist who expects to pack pleasure into a week, see the coun
try and enjoy even the unavoidable blowout, we would sug
gest that you consider the following accessories and their
pricings. *
Running board luggage carrier,
95.00.
A reliable, sure stroke pump,
92.50.
An inexpensive, but good jack,
92.35.
Two or three spark plugs, 35£
to 91.50 each.
A good tire, with tube, is nec
essary. At various prices.
A gallon of Havollne (medi
um) oil, 96<b
If you own a safety Auto Signal you may rest at'ease —your car
will be where you left it- 97.00 to 912.00.
Any other articles of which you are In need before starting, pro
cure in our Accessory department. —Ayres—Basement.
Hard-a-Lee!
No Leather Soles on Deck
That ? s one vital reason why no one should plan a vacation
outfit without including sports shoes; the sloop’s captain will
object if you are without them—and while you’re there you’ll
want to enter into every phase of outing activity.
A finely built white kid oxford, with white sole and white Cuban
heel, is smartly fitted for a turn on the links. Then for an active
game of tennis we have a shoe in either brown or white, priced from
91.50 to 93.50. For your every go away need we can supply you
with shoes satisfactorily priced. —Ayres—Second floor.
Mine Won’t Blow Off—
IBs a Sports Hat
And who wants to worry about -one’s _
hat flying with the sea gulls when the wind
is blowing strong, the breakers racing
and the World’s too wonderful a place to
give a hat a thought—almost. For there nj? jsr
is always the assurance when one wears a /\v
sports hat that one is costumed most de- Ujr >
lightfully. ) j r
Trim, trig, tempting—-Ve can not think / U
of all the adjectives that would be entirely J
descriptive of the smart hats for sport
wear. One of them should be yours—and we have the one
for you. —Ayres—Second floor.
Tube patching material,
to 75^.
A "Break Not” hydrometer is
essential, 95^.
Schrader air gauge should be
in your car, 91>25.
Boyce motometer is a real help
to your motor, 92.25 to 98.75.
A spotlight is an aid to nigh*
driving, 92.98 to 6.50.
Provide for a windshield
cleaner before it rains, 40£.
You’re Off!
But see that you keep your
traveling bag with you, remem
bering the first of your summer
reading is just on top, and
there’s that box of chocolates,
too.
Our luggage section can read
ily supply you with handsome,
good quality—
Traveling Bags
—Ayres—Street floor.
Picnic Provisions
What a joy to fill—and empty
—the picnic basket! The bacon
frying over an open fire, the eoi
fee boiling, and sandwiches and
cakes spread on the picnic cloth
—m-m-m. aren't you hungry?
A good place to stock up for
such a junket is Ayres' grocery
—good quality and reasonable
prices always prevail.
Arnold’s Breakfast Bacon,
sliced, pound, 46^.
Root Beer, 16-ounce bottle,
20tf; dozen, 92.30.
Batavia Orange Pekoe Tea,
14 pound, SOd.
Fresh Nut Meats, pecan and
walnut halves, *4 pound, 25^.
Anona Cheese, Pimento, plain
and chile, package, 15^.
Chase & Sanborn’s Seal Brand
Coffee, 5 pounds 92.80.
Jell-O, in all flavors, the box,
14 <*.
Sunshine Cakes and Crackers,
15<?, 19? the box.
Salt, for table use, 10-pound
bag. 25?.
Prunes, Santa Clara fruit, nice
size, pound 20?.
—Ayres— Basement.
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