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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, July 06, 1920, Home Edition, Image 4

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Jntora Slimes
INDIANAPOLIS, IND.
Dally Except Sunday, 25-29 South Meridian Street
Telephones—Main 3600, New 28-361.
MEMBER OF AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS.
(Chicago, Detroit St. Louis, G. Logan Payne & Cos.
Advertising Offices (New York, Boston. Payne, Borns A Smith, Inc.
THIS IS THE YEAR”—
“SHERIFF MILLER Is left in a rather unenviable position,” says the
News. Rather.
INVESTIGATION will now be made to find out “what is wrong with
the Marion county Jail” —or, more correctly, what is not wrong with it.
SENATOR HARDING once played a horn in the village band and he
hasn’t been out of the band wagon since.
man ttrf[,s are killing off the race, according to a medical scientist.
Didn’t you notice how the race had been killed off since the last census in
1910?
Everlasting Boost
No citizens of Indiana can tour the western cities as did the members
of the party that went to San Francisco for the democratic national con
vention without being thoroughly impressed:
1. That the measure of the success of the western country is its abil
ity to boost, uniformly, consistently and everlastingly.
2. That the most enthusiastic efforts to boost Indianapolis that have
so far been conceived fall short of the normal efforts of the western
citizens.
The explanation of the tremenduously impressive boosting power of the
westerners lies in its general prevalence. From the moment a guest awakes
in a hotel until he retires for the night there is always something before
him that typifies the advantages of the particular localities in which he
is stopping.
Even the little group of paper and stick shacks of the desert cluster
about a sign that tells the traveller the altitude at which the town is
located.
The elevator boys of the progressive western city hotel casually re
mark on the beauty of the weather. The hotel clerk hastens to suggest
some particular point of interest. The breakfast table is either decorated
with home-grown flowers or the menu proudly calls attention to some
choice delicacy that is grown “right here.”
Never for an instant during the whole of a busy day is the stranger
allowed to rest his mind from consideration of some of the advantages,
natural or artificial, of the city in which he is a guest.
The boosting is continuous, it is unanimous, and it is always sincere.
The native believes It himself, and believing it, he is proud to boast, able
to boost and to convince.
Western cities have much to exploit. But there is nothing exclusively
exploitable among them. One city may be proud of its climate, its water
supply, its products or its size.
Whatever there is about it that makes a good “talking point” is known
to everybody, talked by everybody and in clever ways presented to every
body.
The greatest asset of all the west, however, is not natural but artificial,
not normal but stimulated.
It Is the universal ability and desire to "put forth the best front pos
sible.”
It is a "get together and boost” spirit that is patent to no one and miss
ing from none.
If only the half of it existed in Indianapolis there would be no greater
city in America.
Bones
Hunting for bones is not, as far as the average hunter is concerned,
quite In the 6ame class as gunning for bears, moose, mountain goats and
similar animated bits of nature that have been pursued by man since the
race of man was in a most primitive state.
Os course there are some men who have taken keen delight in ex
huming the remains of those who have long gone before them, and ex
hibiting the spoils of their chase in various museums throughout the
world.
It must be alb in the state of mind, so to speak, for according to in
formation from Edmonton, Alberta, another expedition to look for the bones
of great prehistoric reptiles in the Red river valley of Alberta is on its way,
and it is announced that it is the hope of Prof. Parks of the Royal Ontario
museum to collect ultimately, for the museum, one of the finest exhibits of
dinosaurs in existence.
But even that sport would be much more desirable and accompanied
by less mental anguish than hunting for the collar button that rolled and
rolled and rolled.
An Ideal Husband
Some way there seems to attach to the feminine personality ability
as a cook.
At least theoretically, the husband is looked upon as the bread winner,
and the wife as the bread maker, but there is a case at Ashbnrnham, Mass.,
where this theory did not work out into actuality, for a 14-year-old boy was
announced as the winner of the Worcester county farm bureau bread con
test, in which scores of girls competed from efery city and town in the
county.
It might be added that he made fifty-eight loaves of bread In nineteen
bakings, performed seventy-eix hours of housework and used forty-eight
hours in doing errands for his mother during a three months’ period.
When he reaches his majority, he surely will make an ideal husband
for some woman; but it might be a better course for him to pursue to move
to some distant point, where his early exploits are unknown, that he may
be a happy husband.
Mexican Politeness
From the flock of stories that are emanating from Mexico, it might
be thought by the man about town that a number of publicity agents are
busy in that abode of tranquility and industry.
One of the latest and most pleasing of the stories is that in which the
courtesy of the Mexicans is “played up,’’ and which explains that these
marks of courtesy are a valuable aid to a stranger who wishes to establish
profitable commercial or pleasant social relations in Mexico.
On the theory that kindness is true politeness, it might seem, how
ever, that some visitors to Mexico have met natives who were not quite
normal.
Poor Rooster
The rooster has for a long, -long time rather looked upon himself as
by far the superior in the field of poultry; but it is a sad commentary that
before long the egg from which he ought to emerge will be sold at a much
lower price than the eggs from which will come the females of the species,
as an instrument has been invented to determine the sex of the egg, with
intent to sell to a large extent the rooster eggs, at a lower price, for con
sumption, while the eggs that bear, in incipient state, the future hens will
be saved for hatching.
How Many?
There is a vital question involved in a recent legal'proceeding isl
Maine that has not yet been cleared up as far as is known here.
The question is, how many flies are required to justify, legally, a
guest in quitting a hotel, even if he has rented a room for a definite stay;
for a justice of Bangor has held that a guest was justified in such action
if there were too many flies on the table.
But, as far as is known the decision did not go into such details as
to how many flies constituted too many—as to whether one skinny little
fly would be suffcient; whether it should be accompanied by its ma and pa
before sufficient grounds for such a decision were had, or whether it would
needs be accompanied by the entire immediate family—and an immediate
fly family is no inconsiderable thing.
And there is another matter to be taken into consideration. There is no
available information as to whether a fly that returned to the table, time
after time, after being driven away, was* merely one, was a repeater, or
, was in truth an individual guest for each visit
M'KAY MORRIS GOES A WOOING ON A BICYCLE
And Wins Fair Christabel Fro m the Motoring Tom Kelly
Here are three of the trailers In “The
Gypsy Trail,” a romantic comedy, which
Is being presented at the Murat this
week.
The good, old-fashioned two-wheeled
bicycle wins over the high-powered mo
tor In a love game.
It's funny how much speed McKay
Morris can get out of his bicycle In the
romantic comedy, “The Gypsy Trail.”
McKay Morris and Thomas Kelly run
a merry race for the hand of Frances
Raymond, played by Christabel Hunter.
Morris peddles a bicycle and Tom
guides a six-cylinder motor, but the
darned old bicycle picks up more speed
than the several hundred horsepower ma
chine.
When the curtain goes down McKay
and Christabel are sitting very close to
gether dreaming the grand old love song
In the moonlight.
Poor Kelly la not around, bnt guess
he Is trying to put that motor of his
in bgh speed.
We are rather sympathetic for Kelly
because he can’t throw the sympathetic
gush as Morris does—he tried so hard
to learn the love game, but the bicycle
rider put It all over him when he came
to throwing the grand English in the
moonlight.
This little love conflict Is charmingly
told In two Zlmmerer settings In this
week’s production of “The Gypsy Trail,
at the Murat, by the Stuart Walker
players.
Kelly Is entirely satisfactory as the
lover, who never could get Into high
speed.
M. Kay Morris makes a regular whirl
wind out of his newspaper reporter ana
excels In the love game.
I never realised before that a news
paper reporter could be such a mngnift
cant lover but when I check over my
newspaper acquaintances most of 'em are
married. I am going to ask ’em if they
used a bicycle to do their courting, but
somehow or other I can’t see how they
conld afford to even buy a bicycle.
But the play is delicious fooling and a
thrill of expectation runs through the
entire conflict.
Christabel Hunter Is one of those sweet
little bundles of femininity which thrives
in the moonUght and love scenes, a ca
pable player.
Aldrich Bowker, as the father of Chris
tabel In this play, again gives a sterling,
unaffected performance.
But there Is one player generally In a
Stuart Walker production who '‘walks
sway” with the performance and In The
Gypsy Trail” It Is none other than KHz
abeth Fatterson as the grandmother of
Tom Kelly of the play.
Miss Fatterson In her matronly cap.
shawl and glasses gives oqe of those
rare, unaffected characterizations which
are so seldom seen but so sadly neeiled
on the stage.
In her every scene Miss Patterson dom
inates the stage and If the writer bad
flowers to hand over the footlights they
would go to Miss Fatterson.
Opinion: Don’t miss seeing the bicycle
outdistance the auto In the modern game
of love.
On view at the Murat all week.
—w. i). n.
-I- -I- -I-
I)OG ACT WINS
APPROVAL AT KEITH’S.
'Tls seldom. Indeed, a dog act la good
enough to be starred, but Watson's dogs
this week at Keith's prove the deception
to the rule.
As vaudeville performers Watson's dogs
are almost human—that Is, to the ex
tent of their own act.
Walking pegs and balancing on tight
ropes are only a few of the difficult
stunts they do and they do them in a
manner that shows long and difficult
training.
The Cortes sistera, international enter- i
talners, furnlah fifteen minutes of real
entertainment with their Imitations of
vaudeville acta of different parts of the
world.
A little Chinese song proved the best,
Judging from the audience’s response.
McGreevy and Doyle, In an up-to-date
comedy offering, preaent an amusing lit
tle sketch in which a motorcycle plays ;
a prominent part. McGreevy & Doyle
have a good line of chatter and deserved
more appreciation than they received.
Morrison, Nash and Williams (though
there were only two of ’em) kept the
audience In a continual uproar.
Eccentric dancing they have down to
a fine art and an audience Is always
quick to respond to anything new.
Both are light on their feet and know
how to handle them.
Comedy songs and dances are the
specialty of Lorenz and Wood. One song
In particular registered a distinct hit.
"Step Lively,” star act of the hill, fea
turing Mildred Rodgers, is the kind of
act the average theater-goer likes to see j
and keenly enjoys.
"Step Lively” Is a miniature dance j
revue and has everything from the minuet j
of long ago to the “shimmy” of modern
days.
-I- -I- -1-
MVING ACT IS
BIG SPLASH.
Splash.
And there was anothar spectacular dive.
Conroy and sister \v*re cavorting in the
big tank at the Lyric to their heart's
content. * j
For there is a diving and swimming
act at the head of this week's bill at
the Lyric.
BRINGING UP FATHER.
OH'THE INMATE HERE ARE IT'S ALL RICHT ITS ALL VRON<V STRADER • *’ M VERNr telume-hAVE 1 >• '
HARMLESS-WHT-TOO WOULD THEN IF I I'M AS SANE AS YOU ARE - COON-TOUR ‘ TOUAVVIFfi? /
HARDLT KNOW THAT THIS IS AN WALK ABOUT* i SHOULDN'T BE IN HERE °° T * L, , „ U '* *
* © 1920 av Inn. Kkatusi Slavic*. Inc. ' 'j,( 0
' - rr '■ ■ . ...... 1 . ui—ll ■ L_ , -- „ 1,, , M Tin , im . i,i, i, —n —m
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, TUESDAY, JULY 6, 1920.
M’KAY MORRIS, CHRISTABEL HUNTER AND THOMAS KELLY
Poor Tom Kelly drives a high-pow
ered motor, but McKay Morris on a bi
cycle wins In. a race for the hand of
Christabel Hunter.
Handsprings, backward dives and other
breath-takers are performed by these two
veteran performers.
In addition to their water aets, these
players do some singing and dancing.
Miss Conroy does not depend on her
aquatic ability entirely, as she has quite
a few song numbers and dances.
In addition to this act, the Kuhn sis
ters add some songs and dances that are
well received.
Operatic selections rival popular tunes
and Jazz In their act.
One of is at the piano, and
the other tens Jokes when not accom
panying her sibter with some selection.
Ollbert and Saul are performers on the
violin and accordion, who have some har
mony numbers -end up-to-date Jazz.
Cy and Cy are humorists with songs
and dance.
Their eccentric dances and peculiar
brand of humor help their act gain the
favor with which they were received.
And Hart and Helene supply much hu
mor to the bill with a series of takeoffs
on matrimonial troubles.
Dancing, singing and bnmor are part
of their offering, but they have, in addi
tion to this, a series of selections on mu
sical instruments.
The three Ambler brothers appear in
their Individual act.
The films that are shown are a Fox
comedy. “Jazz Beauties,” and a news reel.
-I- -i- -;-
BROCK WELL IHB HONOR
FLACK AT THE KIALTO
Gladys Brock well is the start of “A
Stater to Salome,” which Is the feature
of this week’s bill at the Rialto.
This Is a serious picture that shows
Miss Hrookwel! at her best
The feature of the vaudeville per
formance Is the act which Is listed first
on the bIH.
That Is Kiefer and his two (lancing
Kewples.
Is It true that canned food may bo
spoiled and yet not show It Is spoiled
when the can Is opened? This depart
ment'of The Time* tells you. If you
b4vo a question to ask, send It with a
2-ccnt Mump to The Indiana Dally Times
Information Bureau, FreJeric J. Haskin,
Director, Washington. D. and the an
swer will be mailed direct to you.
BRANDING LIVE STOCK.
Q Would It be poison to horses and
cattle to brand them with a copper or
brass branding iron? W. E. R.
A. The bureau of animal Industry says
that using a copper or brass branding
Iron will not poison cattle and horses.
CANNED FOODS.
Q. Is it true that canned foods may be
spoiled when It Is Impossible to de'ect
this condition? L. L. J.
A. In poisoning cases Investigated by
the bureau of chemistry it has been re
peatedly shown that the food consumed
was spoiled, and that someone who
handled It recognized its condition.
The Young Lady
Across the Way
■ ■ "■
The young lady across the way says
no nice girl will allow a young man to
kiss her until they are engaged and
nothing so cheapens a girl in a young
man’s eyes as indiscriminate oscillation.
—Copyright, 1920.
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
McKay and Miss Hunter have the
gypsy look about ’em in this picture,
while Tom has that I don’t-care look
about him.
These three performers have a variety
of dances that are the bright spots on
the bill.
Almost all kinds of dances are repre
sented in their offering, from toe dances
to Jigs.
Kiefer is assisted by two girls who do
the toe dancing while the man of the
troupe does the jigging.
The two Earleys are singer* who have
In addition to a line of Jokes, a violtn
number by the woman member .of the
pair.
Vance and Alleen present a number of
Jokes with their songs, Ia Follette and
Leonard are singers and comedians, and
Kenny, Mason and School are skaters.
At the Rialto all week.
-i- -i-
AT THE BROADWAY.
Holding out as the feature act at the
Broadway this week Is an act called
“The Five Merry Men,” a spectacular of
fering A little chap Is the featured
member of the Bandy Fields Trio, an
ether headliner on the new bill.
The bill Includes Jack Oik In “Just
Polking Along”. Merlgan and Howard,
singers and comedians; Charles Ledegar
the roller skating rube; Charles and Ella
Polly, singers and dancers, and Mutt
and Jeff in “On Strike.”
-I- -I- -1*
THE MOVIES.
The movies on view today are as fol
lows: “Huckleberry Finn,” at English’s;
Norma Tatmadge In “Yes or No,” at the
Circle; Eugene O'Brien In “The Figure
head." ta the Colonial; “The Best of
Luck," at the Ohio; Warwick in “The
City of Masks,” at the Isis; Franklyr
Farnum In “Vengeance and the Girl,’
at the Regent; Dorothy Gish in “Re
modeling a Husband,” at the Alhambra,
and Madge Kennedy In “Dollars and
Sense,” at Mr. Smith’s.
Canned food, free from gas or swell, ‘
from disintegration and from bad odors, j
has proved safe In all of their experl- j
ruents. The responsibility for deter
mining Its fitness for consumption rests
with the person who opens the can.
1 Never serve contents that are In any
way doubtful.
SIZE Or PLANETS.
Q, Can you give us a plan for Illus
trating the comparative sizes of the
I planets? I<- P
j A. Rib John Herschel’s illustration pf
I the relative size of the planets follows:
Taking a globe two feet In diameter to
represent the sun, a grain of mustard !
j will represent the relative size of Mercury j
j to the sun, a pea will represent Venus
■ and a pea will alse represent the earth, j
while Mars l* designated by a rather
; large pin’s he„ad; Jupiter, a modern-sized
orange; Saturn, a small orange; Uranus,
, a full-sized cherry, and Neptune, a good,
sized plum.
POISON IVY.
Q. After being exposed to poison Ivy;
Is there any satisfactory prevention? 1
F. F. B.
A. A thorough washing with soap and
water ns soon after touching poison Ivy
as possible may prevent the usual In
flammation. Use a heavy lather of soap
and let some of It dry oa the skin.
BKTLL IN PORKER.
Q. What Is meant by a “skillful” pok
er player? A. M.
A. According to Hoyle, skill consists
entirely of good Judgment In betting.
This Is based on three things: A mathe
matical knowledge of the probable value
of one'B own hand as against all the
other hands In play; the odds to be ob
tained in the hefting when the player
outs chips In the pot; the Indications
given by other players.
COI.rMBPS AND THE EOO.
Q. What Is the story of Columbus and
the egg? * J. M. T
A. This story rests on the authority
of Benzonl, an Italian historian. He
relates that while Oolunfbus was at a
banquet In Barcelona, just before Ills sec
ond voyage, a jealous courtier asked If
Columbus thought anyone else could have I
discovered the Indies. Columbus made
no reply, but Invited each of the guests j
to see if he could make an egg stand j
on one end. All tried In vain. Columbus
took the egg, struck It gently on the
table to break the shell, leaving It stand- ;
lng on the broken part. In this way he j
Illustrated the fact that It would be j
very simple for others to follow the path
to the new world now that he had point
ed the way.
Speed Up!
SKA ISLAND COTTON.
Q. Is sea Island cotton still produced
In the south? G. M. N.
A. This famous variety of cotton has
32 Years In This Same Location.
Three Blocks West—Easy to Find and Worth Finding
Wednesday
BARGAIN
SQUARES
Pointing to bargains of unusual interest for our great midweek bargain day. Snappy
and right to the point! No phone, 0. 0. D. or mail orders on the following.
Dresses, $2.39
Children's voile and or
gandy dresses. In laven
der, blue, pink, yellow and
blue and white, pink and
white checks; trimmed in
dainty ruffles and tie
sash; sizes 2 to A.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$2.39
Second Floor
Union Suits
Meq/f athletic union suits,
fine crepes and checked
nainsooks, sleeveless, knee
length, large flap seat,
closed crotch; sizes 34 to
46; regularly up to $1.50
values,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Suit, $1.19
(* Suits, 53.35)
Main Floor
Kayser Vests
Kayseris vests for women,
sizes 40, 43 and 44; Swiss
ribbed. sleeveless, hand
top; also pretty lace yoke
styles; splendid quality;
good 75c value,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Each, 55£
Main Floor
Voile Dresses
Women’s figured voile
dresses, In tunic, drapes
and ruffles; some with
white collar and cuffs;
regular sizes,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$4.89
Second Floor
Curtain Net
Curtain net. 36 Inches wide,
in white and ecru; filet
weave, new fall patterns;
worth 49c; special.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Yard, 43£
Third Floor
Hosiery, 39c
Women’s hose. Durable
Durham, nationally ad
vertised, and other brands,
fine gauge lisle finish,
gat le weight, seamless
and seamed leg: satisfac
tory wear guaranteed;
black, white and cordo
van; our regular 60c lines
(2 pairs, 75c), /
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Pair, 39 1
Main Floor
Men’s Suits
Men’s cool summer suits,
of crash cloth, dark or
medium colors; also plain
blue, green, tan and gray
Faint Beach; all sizes;
$17.50 and $10.75 values—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Suit, $14.65
Main Floor
Socks, 15c
Men’s Durable Durham
lightweight lisle finish
socks; colors, gray and
black; first quality; made
with spliced heel and toe;
nationally known 25c
value (limit 6 pairs),
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Pair, 15^
Main Floor
Voiles, 25c
36-inch printed voiles, col
ored, striped and ring pat
terns on white grounds;
also 27-lnch assorted bat
istes; 49c quality— 2
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Yard, 25^
Main Floor
practically passed out of existence in
the south owing to the advent of the bill
weevtL The department of agriculture
Introduced anew kind, Meade cotton, to
take Its place. This new staple, named
Women’s Hose
Women's fiber silk hose,
fine gauge, mercerized
lisle top and double sole,
with high spliced heel and
toe; colors black, white,
cordovan and gray; extra
good $1 value,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Pair, 85£
Main Floor.
Union Suits
Women's union suits;
gilt-edge mercerized lisle,
loose knee union suits;
bodice and band top; also
Futurist athletic union
suits, of fine sheer nain
sook; white or pink; reg
ular prices up to $2,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Suit, 89^
Main Floor.
White Waists
One lot of women’s white
wsists. in dimities, voiles
ond organdy; some cross
bars; trimmed In lace and
embroidery; round or
square neck; all sizes,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
89<*
Second floor,
Cut Glass
Cut glass fruit bowls.
8-lnch size; beautiful
cuttings; would make
pretty wedding gift;
$1.98 to $3.00 value*—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Each, $1.29
Main Floor.
Shapes, 98c
Untrimmed hat shapes
for women; all black, ex
cellent braids; special—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Each, 98C
Second Floor
Wash Goods
Lot consists of printed
40-lnoh voiles, mercerized
madras, Swiss dot and
striped voiles, 36-inch col
ored middy suJtlug; 88e
to 98c qualities—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Yard, 59<^
Main Floor
Hair Goods
Hair switches, 26-inch
size; made of fine lustrous
hair, and very pretty and
wavy; 8-stem style; all
shades except gray; $8.98
quality—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Each, $2.75
Main Floor
Cream Freezers
Two-quart Hummer ice
cream freezers; freeze*
cream in 10 minutes; very
substantial; $1.29 value —
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Each, 95^
Basement
9-4 Sheeting
9-4 unbleached sheeting,
heavy round thread qual
ity; an extra 85c value
(limit 20 yard?)—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Yard, 65^
Basement
Girls’ Pumps
Mary Jane pumps for
girls: patents or vici kid;
low heels; native shape
toes; sizes up to 2
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Pair, $2.59
Main Floor
JIGGS MAKES CARELESS REMARK..
tor the man who produced the variety, J*
certainly aa good aa and many are in
clined to believe, better than sea Island
waa.
We Close at S o’Clock
During July and August
Saturdays at 6 P. M.
Boys’ U. Suits
Boys’ union suits; pure
bleached and ecru cotton;
elastic ribbed and fiat
weave; quarter sleeves,
kuee length; agea 6 to 14;
worth up to sl,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Suit, 69<^
(3 for $1.35)
Main Floor.
Work Shirts
Stlfel Indigo blue shirts
for men. Cones’ Boss,
best make, all double
stitched, yoke hack, made
with poexet; cut very
large and roomy; sizes
to 17. Regular $1 75
grads,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Each, $1.45
Main Floor.
Nightgowns
Women's gowns, slipover
style, good quality mus
lin; some trimmed In col
ored French knots and
embroidery trimmed; reg
ular sizes,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$1.19
Second Floor.
Child’s Dress
White dresses for chil
dren, of organdy; lace
trimmed; sizes 8 to 14.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$3.39
Second Floor
Silks, $1.49
36 and 40- Inch plain
colored Georgettes, 23
shades; black ans col
ored taffetas; plain and
printed crepe de cblnes;
worth $2.98 —
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Yard, $1.49
Main Floor
Boys’ Suits
Boys’ gaits, made of
fancy eas si meres and
plain blue, green and
brown flannels and all
wool blue serges; size* 7
to 17 years—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$10.89
Main Floor
Bedspreads
Honeycomb bedspreads,
large double bed size;
beautiful designs; an ac
aetual $2.95 value—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
' Each, $2.35
Basement
Men’s Pants
Mens pants, made of
dark fancy cotton mixed
worsteds and eassimere;
also blue serges; sizes 29
to 42
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Pair, $4.65
Main Floor
Toweling
Stevens’ linen toweling,
pure linen; heavy quality;
36 Inches - wide; un
bleached for toweling use.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Yard, 25^
Main Floor
Rug Border
Rug border, imitation of
hardwood, golden oak fin
ish; makes beautiful bon
der around rugs; looks
like real hardwood floors;
24 Inches wide, sells for
69c.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Yard, 48£
Third floor.
Aprons, $1.19
Coverall aprons for worn,
en, made of pretty striped
and checked percale; also
plain colors; several
styles to select from;
some are slightly Imper
fect,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Each, $1.19
Main Floor.
Hand Bags
Hand bags and purses
for women; top strap and
back strap handles; small
and large sizes; black and
colors; Inside Strings*
$2.50 to $3.00 value—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Choice, $1.75
Main Floor.
9x12 Rugs
Matting rugs, size 9x12,
cotton warp, reversible;
can be used either side;
Japanese patterns; regu
larly $6.50,
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$5.69
Third Floor
- - " - 'i: "
Hats, $2.98
A clean up on children**
hats, in very nobby and
smart styles; values up to
$7.50; go for—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Choice, $2.98
Second Floor
Suitings
38-inch medium blue,
rose, pink and white linen
finish suitings; fast col
ors; extra quality: for
suits or dresses; up to 65c
value —
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Yard, 29^
Basement
Boys’ Hats
Boys’ summer hats, black
straws and fancy mix
tures: 14 dozes In lot; for
boys 2 to 14 years; 79cand
SI.OO values—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
43<*
Main Floor
Dresses, $3.65
Misses’ gingham dresses,
4 styles; neatly made ana
latest modes; ages 14 to
20 years; a bargain at $6;
while 75 last—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
$3.65
Basement
White Pumps
Women's white canvas
pumps and lace boots;
regular $3.00 kinds; while
200 pairs last—
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Pair, SI.OO
Main Floor
Oxfords, $3.95
Women's oxfords, of
black and brown kid, with!
high or low heels; evejfl
size; a better $6.00 gradM
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Pair, $3.95
Main Floor

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