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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, July 07, 1920, Home Edition, Image 8

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TAILENDERS GROW CONFIDENT AND PROMISE TO GIVE HOOSIERS PLENTY OF OPPOSITION
BLUES TRYING
TO PUT SKIDS
UNDER INDIANS
Tribe Sees Big Task on Hands
as Kansas City Series
Opens.
KANSAS CITY, July 7—. Tack Hen
dricks' Indians are not expecting an
easy series with the Blues, even though
the local team Is occupying the cellar
position, and the opener today promise!
to bring out plenty of baseball.
The Blues, under new management,
have been bolstering to some extent, and
they are hopeful of winning this series.
In an effort to convince home fans that
they are not definitely booked for last
place.
Owner Muehlbach and Manager Knabe
have been working on deals and plans
with a determination in view of getting
out of the cellar, and they hove indi
cated that the team is about ready to
break loose In ? comeback effort.
The Blues succeeded In trimming the
Brewers twice Monday, and the double
victory has resulted in a spark of the
old enthusiasm showing among the K.
C. fans.
However, the Hoosiers are desperate
at the present time, because this seems
to be tne opportune series for them to
use in climbing into the first division,
and for that reason they mean to bat
tle their best for the chance to get up
among the contenders.
Charlie Whitehouse was slated to per
form on the mound for Hendricks today,
and the young southpaw was expected
to deliver if his control was good.
Around the A. A.
WITH nDDIE ASH-
The day of rest in the A. A. yesterday
permitted the managers of Indians,
Colonels and Senators, the teams In a
triple tie for fifth place, to scheme for
some means to break the deadlock.
It's an open season for deadlocks and
Managers Hendricks, McCarthy and Cly
mer are entitled to show their political
ability.
All Hendricks wants now is a little
aid from the Kansas City delegation.
There's one A. A. team that Is not in
a deadlock, however. It is the Saints,
who have a hammerlock on first place,
Included among the good points of
Presidential Nominee Cox is the fact
that he Is a baseball fan and frequently
attends games in Co'.umbns.
Duke Rellley hasn't been interviewed
regarding his opinion on the outcome of
the democratic convention, but it can be
stated authoritatively that Duke will
support Cox.
Evidently holidays are made for Jack
Hendricks’ Indians. They won both
games Decoration day and then grabbed
two Independence day.
Perhaps some think it unusual that
Babe Ruth didn't’ get in on the demo
cratic race, but the Babe doesn't neeu
the presidency to get himself prestige.
He is too valuable with the bat to oc
cupy the whitehouse chair.
One good point about Louie Wolf,
Tribe utility infielder, is that he is al
ways in shape for any emergency. He
doesa"t get hurt easily. Louie formerly
played footbal! and Is a past master In
shaking off Injuries.
Covington's slowness In recovering
from a sprain is a handicap to the
Tribe at Kansas City, because the K. C.
right field fence is short, and Tex usu
ally hits in that direction.
Indianapolis fans would like to see
Kansas City pull up In the race, but
desire that the club postpone any drives
until the Indians leave those parts.
Jack Hendricks will have some good
trading material when his cripples re
cover, and there is a possibility of one
of the extra lnflelders being used in a
deal for a pitcher.
GREATEST HE EVER SAW.
New York. July 7.
Nate Lewis, who has been with and
around fighters since the day that the
Smith brothers first had their whiskers
trimmed, pickers Terry McGovern as the
greatest fighter he ever saw
“I knew a lot of great fighters." said
Nate, "but there's that old McGovern
looming up before me all the time. I
try to think of tough guys, vicious guys,
aggressive guys, hard guys and suc
cessful guys, and there's always McGov
ern before me. He was without doubt
the greatest crowd pleaser the ring ever
knew He had everything a fight crowd
den uds.
"People love fighters in the ring the
same as they love hitters on the dia
mond. They want to see results. They
want knockouts and home rune.
"McGovern gave them the knockouts.
Whenever he was tumbled tii4y knew
he'd be up again. Yes, I must say that
he was a marvel. A wonderful record
he bad. A record that's hard to beat.
“Who were my ‘great fighters?’
“Oh, I should say that Joe Gans and
Abe Attell were about the next best.
They were real artists In their line. Not
so aggressive as McGovern, of course,
but wonderful rlngmen."
TIA JUANA TO OPEN AGAIN.
Although the opening date for the next
Tia Juana meeting has not been settled
on, the tentative day will probably be
Thanksgiving. The success that Coffroth
has enjoyed this season, which was won
derful considering the short prepara
tion, has spurred him on to make Tia
Janan next winter the largest winter
racing game in the United States.
He intends giving a fortune away in
purse money, with the Business Men's
Handicap, having a valuation of SIO,OOO
attached to it, his “main event." The
Monte Carlo will be worth $5,000, while
the Frank B. Beyer Handicap will be
raised to $2,500. In addition to these
stakes, the usual fixtures, such as the
Openiug Handicap, Dupee Plate, Coron
ado Selling Stakes, Spreckles Handicap
and others will be run, while $1,500
overnight handicaps will be plentiful.
CANADA CAL’S CHIRPS.
"Pop" Korn, who owns a cotton plan
tation, wants to know how he should
treat the boll weevil, which is destroying
his cotton. We don't see why he should
treat it at all, since it’s an enemy. But,
if he must treat it we would recommend
giving it a drink of near beer. The boll
weevil will leave and never return.
Oleander says he is going to take a
Regarding Tilden and
Victory Over Patterson
Some dispatches from England con
cerning the tennis tournament at Wim
bledon, which was won recently by Wil
liam T. Tilden 11, referred merely to
the “British championship," omitting
mention of the fact that Gerald Patter
son’s victory in this same event last sea
son carried with it the title of “world's
champion.”
It may be that the refusal of the
United States thus far to Join the inter
national federation abroad prevents the
award of this honor to an American, for
it is one of the constitutional articles of
the European organization that Wimble
don shall stage the annual competition
for the world's title.
But whatever the technicalities of the
esse may be, the fact rema ns that Til
den has now twice defeated Patterson,
once in America and again in the chal
lenge ronnd at Wimbledon.
Whatever real or theoretical title be
longed last year to the Australian U
now Tilden's by every law of the game,
and be mast, therefore, be recognized,
for 1920 at leant, as the world's tennis
champion.
Cubans Coming for
Second 1920 Clash
With Taylor’s Team
The Cuban Stars will make their sec
ond visit of the season here Sunday
when they come to Washington park to
meet Taylor’s A. B. C.'s in a double
header.
The Cubans have bolstered their
lineup since their previous visit here
and are sure to give the A. B. C.'a
plenty of opposition.
Manager Taylor will keep hla men
working the remainder of the week in
order to be prepared for the Cubans.
The rain yesterday afternoon robbed
the A. B. C.'a of a chance to even up
the series with the Detroit Stars, and
thev are anxious to get busy and win
the* majority of games from the Cubans.
The first game Sunday will be called
at 2 o'clock.
WHITE DESERVES
ANOTHER CHANCE
BENTON HARBOR, Mich., July 7.
Charlie White, conquered in the ninth
round Monday by Benny Leonard via the
knockout route, has more admirers of his
dghtlng ability today than wnen he
climbed through the ropes to face a
champion with the calm assurance of a
challenger who had great confidence in
ais prowess and condition.
Charlie did well, indeed, much better
than most fans expected, and lost when
caught napping with a punch that would
have had the same effect on most any
fighter, including welters and middle
weights.
White won many friends with his
dazzling performance for eight rounds,
and he will be a better attraction around
Chicago now than ever.
The knowledge that he had Leonard
on the run In three rounds and had him
weak and stalling while taking a thres
count sitting outside the ropes in the
fifth round, will make another meeting al
most a sure thing, either here or in the
east.
Charlie wants a return whirl and
Benny probably will not object when
the promoters start offering them fancy
sums to try it again.
Criticism of White’s seconds for not
claiming the scrap on a foul In the fifth
round because Charlie Leonard left
Benny’s corner to lift him hack Into the
ring is wasted. Referee Ed Smith says
he would not have disqualified the cham
pion for such a technical and trivial vio
lation of the rules. That settles it.
Still, White could have caused a lovely
mixup by quitting evea If disqualified
himself for so doing when the arbiter or
dered him to go on fighting. Another
meeting then would be Inevitable, and
Charlie would be able to ask for better
terms than a title holder usually con
cedes to a rival.
Some of the White adherents are re
gretting now that such a move was not
made. The knockout Is the chief reason
for such a line <■! talk, however. The
referee did not disqualify Leonard aud
Charlie wpnt on fighting gamely to the
last, just as he should have done. Per
haps he thought he could win by a
knockout himself. Many of the fans felt
the same way about it for several rounds
Then Charlie may have though fast
enough In the crisis to realize that
to quit the ring claiming a foul
which would not be allowed would
not get him the championship any
way. Johnny Ertle tried to become
champion that way when fouled by
Johnnv Williams, but could not get away
with It.
Leonard was not himself and prob
ably never will be caught that way
again. He was worried and along in
the fourth and fifth rounds was so
winded he gasped for breatn.
When he was taking the three count he
kept saying to Referee Smith: “I'm all
right and can get up." But he was fouled
In the ropes and might not have ex
tricated himself without the aid of
his brother.
It's too bad that Charlie Leonard butted
into the parade in this situation, but bis
Interference did not warrant tbs switch
ing of the world’s championship to Chi
cago. Leonard, while stung with the left
hook that knocked him into the ropes,
was not in serious distress, as later events
indicated.
Promoter Flojd Fitzsimmons is going
TAD’S TIDBITS
trip around the Horn and wants to
know if It is true that the voyage is
usually a tormy one. We believe the
report Is correct. It Is called “the
Horn” and it is usually stormy there
because it blows so much.
Might you call a morgue a stiff Joint?
You tell ’em, butcher, you have the
tongue.
Dry volumes are dry because they are
seldom pored over.
Uncle Ez was tellin' me he knew a
little Greek, and I was glvin' him credit
for bein' quite a linguist till I found he
meant the little Greek that runs a shoe
shine parlor down at the corner.
You tell ’em, Grover Alexander, you
can get it over.
A Chicago man named Booze has be
come a lawyer. Booze is allowed to ap
pear in cases and practice at the bar.
You tell ’em, Texas, you can give ’em a
steer, r
Another way tbey have of importing
the stuff is to sboot it across from Wind
sor, Ontario to Detroit in torpedo tubes.
You tell’ cm, Tris, you’re some Speaker.
THOSE ENGLISH HEAVIES.
Wilton Lackaye, the anti-English can
didate for president of the Actors’- Equity
association, is Just as big a fight bug as
he is a ball fan. The other night he was
talking about England and her great
heavyweights and pulled the following
yarn told him by an old-timer concerning
the great John L. Sullivan.
“Sullivan, the idol of the American
public, visited England while he was
champion of the world and made quite n
good impression. He was wined and
dined and introduced to the ’4OO. every
where. John, very proud of his title and
his prowess, figured that it was a treat
for these people to meet him, and felt
the same way when he was introduced to
the Prince of Wales.
"He despised the English heavies, and
looked upon them as pugilistic ninepins.
"One day he was shown an article in a
New York paper which slipped over quite
a roast about him. John L. was very
sore. He paced the floor, thinking of
America. He bit bis lips and kept on
walking. Sullivan was a very pcoud man,
you know.
“Finally he turned around to the friend
who showed him the clipping, his face
jicarlet with rage. Shaking his big fist,
he growled: ‘Say, you know what I
ought to do? I ought to let one of these
English dubs knork me out and see how
America would feel about it then.’ "
ONE BAD APPLE SPOILS A BOX.
There’s an old saying which runs: “One
bad apple will spoil a box.” The bird
that wrote that said a cartful. Look at
our Yanks. They were nice, home-loving
boys before tha" Ruth hoodlum got Into
the layout. He's the bad apple In the
Yankee box.
Home runs were as scarce as Scotch
highballs until Ruth Joined the gang.
Look at ’em now, sergeant! Look at
’em now!
Up to date they’ve made forty home
runs, and it’s early in July.
Within the last week or so the follow
ing birds have pickled the old apple for
homers: Quinn, Ueekiripaugh, Rues. Han
nah. Pratt, Bodie and Meusel. No use
mentioning Babe.
Ain’t it awful. Mabel?
Circuit Card Delayed
CLEVELAND, July 7. —Grand circuit
racing at North Randall track was called
off Tuesday because of rain and a muddy
track.
GIANTS LOSE EXHIBITION.
TORONTO. Ontario. July 7 —The New
York Nationals lost an exhibition game
to the Toronto club here Tuesday, 4 to 3.
Winters and Benton did the hurling for
the Giants, while Peterson worked for
the International leaguers.
FIFTY WITHOUT SUSS.
Brendell and Ford turned in a perfect
score in (be shoot at the Crooked Creek
Gun club Monday. They each broke fifty
targets out of the fifty shot at.
BOXING
AIDING CARDINALS IN RACE
Harold Janvrln, Upper Left; Ferdle Schupp, at Bight; Jack Fournier, Below.
The Cardinals are staying in the Na
tional league race. It’s the first time in
about thirty-two years that the St. Louis
faas have had a rip-snorting team and
LEAGUE STANDINGS AND CALENDAR
HOW THEY STAND.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
W. L. Pet. W\ L Pet.
St. Paul.. 53 23 .697 Indpl* 34 39 ,48fi
Mlnneap. 43 34 .558 Loui.svlle. 84 8!* -4G45
Toledo... 41 34 .547 Columbus 34 89 .460
Milwau.. 37 38 .403! Kan.Clty. 22 52 .297
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W. L. Pot. W. L. P< t.
NewYork 49 26 .653 Boston... 34 38 .507
Cleveland 46 24 .648 St. Louis. 31 38 .472
Chicago.. 44 28 .611 Detroit .. 22 47 .319
Washgtn 36 30 .543 Philadel.. 18 56 .248
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
W. L. Pet. W. L. Pet.
Cincin... 39 29 574 Chicago.. 36 3fl .s*o
Brooklyn 39 32 .549 Boston... 30 32 ,4>G
St. Louis. 38 34 .528 New-York 33 38 .405
Pittsbrg. 38 38 .500 Philadel.. 27 41 .397
THREE I-LEAGUE.
W. L. Pet. W. L. Pet.
8100 m... 43 28 Cofl|R Island 29 38 .433
Evansvlle 37 28 569 Cedar Rp. 32 36 .427
Peoria... 40 31 .563 Terre Hut 28 38 .424
Rockford. 34 35 493 Moline.... 30 41 423
right ahead preparing for other matches.
He has Jack Dempsey about cinched for
Labor day. and would like to have White
and Leonard again before the weather
gets too cold.
NEW YORK TO
SAFEGUARD GAME
NEW YORK. July 7.—To keep boxing
• lean In New York and make a record
that will induce other states to give the
rport a chance, the international Sport
ing club has announced a move to check
the parasites and the evil lnflueu>’ea of
the old days.
Vigilance committees will be appointed
in every city in the state to 4n an
rye on boxing ss it will ne conducfed
under the new Walker bill and report
uny lnfracton of the new rules.
The chairman of the New York com
mittee announced by the club Is Charles
Whitman, former governor, who killed
boxing during I.ls regime because it was
"crooked."
Serving with Whitman will be WUliat*
Travers Jerome, former district attor
ney; Theodore Roosevelt and Col. Wil
liam Donovan, formerly of the 165th
infantry.
BURKE TRIMS MEEHAN.
NEW’ ORLEANS, July 7. Marty
Burke of New Orleans defeated Willie
Meehan. San Francisco, in fifteen rounds
here. Burke won the fighting by Jab
bing Meehan almost at will with a left
to the face, crossing repeatedly with a
left hook to the Jaw and a right to the
body.
Yachts ‘Weigh in’ for
Cup Race This Month
SANDY HOOK, N. ,T„ July 7—Sir
Thomas Lipton's fleet, comprised of the
Shamrock IV, the twenty-three-meter
Shamrock and the houseboat KUlarney,
left Sandy Hook Tuesday for a dry dock
in Brooklyn, where the challenger and
the Resolute. Americas cup defender,
will be measured officially, to determine
the handicap to be given the Resolute
in the races off here this month.
Both Shamrocks were in tow of Sir
Thomas’ steam yacht Victoria.
While the Shamrock IV had not
many trial races as was expected, Sir
Thomas said he was pleased with her
itehavior and felt confident that he has
n good chance of lifting the cup this
time.
Southern League Clubs
Seek Daamages in Suits
MEMPHIS, Tenn., July 7.—The South
ern Baseball association is preparing
wholesale damage suits against inde
pendent clubs which have induced play
ers to Jump.
One suit of $50,000 already is filed and
another of $25,000 is to be filed at once.
The clubs are acting on the ndvlce of
John D. Martin, president of the league,
and a prominent attorney. 1
—-
OAKLAND
lIMHU .•
) 7,000 to 10,000 miles on j
the original set of tires j
means two years’ average |
driving. This is a factor
now in selecting your car.
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, WEDNESDAY, JULY 7, 1920.
they’re Just about In the booby-hatch.
Ferdy Schupp’s hurling, Jack Fournier’s
game at first and the batting and util
ity work of Harold Janvrln are contrib
uting factors in the club's climb.
GAMES TODAY.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
Indianapolis at Kansas City,
Louisville at Milwaukee.
Toledo at St. Paul.
Columbus at Minneapolis.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Boston at Philadelphia (two games).
No others scheduled.
NATIONAL LBAOUK.
Chicago at St. Louis
Philadelphia at Pittaburg.
Only two games scheduled.
YESTERDAY’S RESULTS.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
No games scheduled.
AMERICAN LEAOUE
New York... 0 0 1 1 14 0 1 0 0-17 16 1
Washington. 0000 0000 0— 0 3 6
Batteries—Mays and Ituel, Hoffman ;
Erickson, Snyder, Courtney and Gbar
rity, Plclnicb.
—First Game—
Boston 0 2 2 1 6 0 0 0 o—ll 18 0
Philadelphia.. 000000000—0 5 1
Batteries-Jones and Walters, Smith;
Moore. Harris, Rommell and Myatt,
Perkins.
—Second Game—
Philadelphia.. 10 0 1 000 2 •—5 12 0
Boston 00001000 o—l 9 2
Bateries—Naylor and Perkina; Har
per and Walters.
(Eleven innings.)
Chicago 0102000001 I—s 14 0
Cleveland.. 01 10100001 o—4 9 0
Batteries Faber, Wilkinson and
Schalk; Bagby and O’Neill.
Rt. Louis at Detroit: rain.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Cincinnati 00112210 O—T 14 2
Pittsburg 00010000 I—2 8 0
Batteries—Ring and Wtngo; Meador.
Wiener. Watson and Schmidt.
Brooklyn 01200001 o—4 7 2
Boston 00000010 I—2 9 2
Batteries—Mitchell, Smith and Krue
ger; FlUtnglm, McQuillan and Gowdy.
Chicago 10 002 33 0 3—12 23 4
St. Louts 1 0 0 2 0 3 0 2 0— 8 15 2
Batteries—Carter, Martin and O'Far
roll; North. Jacobs, Goodwin, Sherdel
and Dilhoefer.
fOnly three games scheduled.)
;vrolet /A
j |
Chevrolets win
3 firsts and 1
second out of 4
starts, includ
ing the 5-mile
free-for-all,
running this,
the fastest race
of the after
noon, on Parker
cord Tires.
Jones-Whitaker Sales Cos.
Distributors for Chevrolet Cars
345-55 N. Capitol Ave.
Main 5646 Main 5647
NET GAMES IN
THREE MEETS
Plenty of Tennis for Local
Court Fans.
Net Card Here Today
BOYS.
2 P. M. (Finals)—Guy Dixon vs. Chick
Davidson.
JUNIOR.
3:30 P. M. (Semi-Finals) —Hence Orme
Jr. vs. Milton Pctrovltsky.
WOMEN.
3 P. M.—Elizabeth Hill vs. Mrs. 11.
R. Adams, Harriet Klspner vs. Edith
Esch, Lucille Bailey vs. Margaret Noon.
4 P. M.—Margaret Koob vs. Mrs.
Mount, Josephine O’Donnell vs. <atb
erlne Phillips, Anna Ruth Hayworth vs.
Alice Crosier.
6:30 P. M.—Eloise Ludlow vs. Vir
ginia Llndstrom, Hannah Noon vs. Mrs.
I. W. Pugh, Carolyn Ilerdrlck vs. Surah
Sagalowsky, Helen Seward vs. winner
of Hill-Adams.
CITY.
3 P. M Gavin vs. Kackley, Gilbert
vs. Robison, Orme Sr. vs. Robtsoq, Gar
ver vs. Starbuck, Rabb vs. Harbottle,
Sagalowsky vs. Neal.
4 P. M.—Jacobs vs. Gloin, Davidson
▼s. H. Cox, Ankenbrock vs. UiugLiner,
Markey vs. McKay, Ray vs. Overstreet,
Appel vs. I. Kohn, Carey vs. Borran.
Mills vs. Vlelt.
5 P. M.—Mayer vs. Lance, Mitchell vs.
Hill, Tlio-uton vs. Ellis, Stuart vs. Orme
Jr., Richards vs. Zerkle, winner of Star
buck-Garver vs. winner of Gloln-Ja
cobs, M. Kohn vs. winner of Rabb-Har
bottle.
0 P. M.—Sturm vs. R. (’ox. Pugh vs.
Bailey. Watson vs. Purker. Dixon vs.
Cash, Harris vs. Keppler. Pratt v&
Duncan, Shackelford vs. WellmrJn, Mel
lett vs. Ludlow.
Men, women and boys were scheduled
to scrap for state and city tennis laurels
on Indianapolis courts today.
The men’s contingent Is formed of
those racqnet swingers who, halted by
rain yesterday afternoon, were to re
sume play In the annual city champion
ships on the Hawthorn courts.
The schedule mapped out for yester
day was to hold good today and thla aft
ernoon's matches were expected to mark
the opening of a number of Important
contests despite the fact that the tourney
Is still In Its Infancy.
RECORD LIST OF
WOMEN PLAYERS,
Speaking of women, nlcteen of ’em
were to swing Into action in the annual
city women’s tournament on the Haw
thorn courts this afternoon, the first
matches being carded at 3 o'clock.
Asa proof that tennis is booming
among Indianapolis women as well as
among the men, the registration com
mittee offer* an entry list almost double
the size of last year’s as convincing evi
dence.
in former years s list of ten women
was considered good enough, but this
year there are nineteen In Une for battle,
and probably would have been more If
last week s weather conditions were any
thing like they should be to arouse ten
nis pep.
As In the boys’ and junior tourney,
most of the entrant* In the women's
tourney are newcomers and the pros
pects of some snappy tennis are good.
DIXON AND
DAVIDSON MATCH.
The boys referred to are those ftvu
youngsters left lu the fight for Indians
boys' and Junior championships In the
bora' division Guy Dixon and Chick Da
vidson were the sole survivors of the con
flict and they were scheduled to meet on
the Haw-thorn courts this afternoon at 2
o'clock to decide which of them shall be
crowned king of Huuslerdom s boy ten
ds army.
The oue being so crowned will also b
slated for a trip to Forest Mills, N. Y..
next month for competition In the na-
MEN!
All-Wool Summer
SUITS
Why swelter In a "heavy” suit all
summer?
A custom-tailored, two-piece suit,
selected from a wcinderful variety of
■umtner woolena, with plenty of
style and comfort, so
*3O
LEON
TAILORING COMPANT
131 East New York Street
Upstairs
Three-quarters of a Block East of
Pennsylvania Street.
Mil
aa/M-PKOS * tel? 3
The Indianapolis Tartars will meet at
355 East Morris street tonight, and all
players arc requested to attend. The
club dropped a loose game to the Dixie
A. C. Monday, but the manager prom
ises to have a strong nine ready for
Battle with the Itupp Juniors at River
side diamond No. 1 next Sunday.
Tigers and Trojans will clash at Gat
field No. 1 Sunday at 3:30. These clubs
hare been going good and should offer
a hot scrap when they get together.
Fast state clubs with dates open dur
ing August should get in touch with the
manager of the Rector A. C. at 1397
Bridge street as soon as possible. .Sun
day the Rectors will cross bats with
Baskervllle.
The Indianapolis Specials had a bit
of tough luck at Morgantown Monday,
tional boys’ tournament. This trip means
a whole lot to the youngsters and they
were expected to stage a mighty Interest
ing scrap today.
Either of them was considered having
a chance to win the match. They have
both been playing a clever game during
the tourney, winning their elimination
round matches, without a lot of trouble.
In their ’'friendly" matches their stand
ing Is, just about even.
Dixon went into the finals yesterday
when he surprised the crowd and defeat
ed Julius Sagalowsky, favorite to win
the boys' laurels, 7-6, 6-3, 9-7. Their
match was easily the best that has been
played In the tourney and both boys were
.applauded for their clever work on sev
eral different occasions.
Little “Sag" plays good tennis for his
size and age and he kept Guy humping
for a while yesterday afternoon, but the
latter was out to win and his speed and
hard driving finally wore down his op
ponent.
Davidson defeated Huesslng, 6-4, 0-4,
6-2, to open the door for his entry Into
the finals The winner had the ad
vantage all through the match.
ANKENBROCK BINS
EXPERTS’ PRAISE.
Henry Ankenbrock did Just whst
everybody thought he would do yester
day, when he defeated Paul Horan. 6-3,
3-6. 6-3, 6-1, to enter the finals of the
Junior tourney. "Ankle” Is playing In
hi* first Junior tourney this year, but the
minute he stepped on the I. T. A. courts
for his first round match, Hence Orme,
Sr., and the other old-timers around the
courts saw class sticking out all over
him und they made a few predictions,
which were fulfilled yesterday when he
won hi* semi-final round match.
Ankenbrock was to take things easy to
day while Hence Orme, Jr., and Milton
Pctrovltsky fought their semi-final
round battle at Hawthorn. This match,
by the way, was expected to be a corker.
Orme, 1019 boys’ champ, and Petrovltsky,
1919 Junior champ. Rre recognized as two
of the leading Juniors of the state and
the dope output today was almost evenly
divided with Petrovltsky being a slight
favorite.
Ankenbrock meet* the winner of this
match on the Hawthorn courts tomorrow
afternoon.
ISIS
OHPfi The House of Thriu.. Th urs . Smashing Pic
iftaggWf & tUrW ptetoe. Wai
The Daredevil Queen of the West
TEXAS GUINAN “THE WILDCAT”
The Screen’s Baby Vamp
OLIVE THOMAS Subdeb Play “THE FLAPPER”
Circle]
Mack Sennett
Comedy
"BY GOLLY”
The C-irclette of News
Circle Orchestra
ENGLISH’S
CONTINUOUS 1 UNTIL 11 P. M.
THE WORLD’S GREATEST ROMANCE OF YOUTH
“HUCKLEBERRY FINN”
A NEW MARK TWAIN-PARAMOUNT ARTCRAFT
PRODUCTION.
BURTON HOLMES TRAVELOGUE, OTHER
DIVERTISEMENTS.
ÜBbMTY QUiiNTETTE
g MUSIC THAT CWA!JB\y
) AMERICAN HARMONISTS
wmlwmmmsmf
denial
mm
dropping both ends of a hard fought
double bill by close scores.
The Marlon Ramblers still have July
11 and 18 open on the Marlon Rambler
schedule. Address Charles M. Clark, 207
West Twenty-ninth street.
One of the fastest clubs that has ever
represented Marion, Ind., in the inde
pendent field, la now ready to book games
with strong Indianapolis clubs. Address
Moses Davis, Citizens Trust & Savings
Company, Marion, Ind.
Greensburg will be the stamping ground
of the Indianapolis Cardinals next Sun
day. Games are wanted with the best
clubs in Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky.
Address L. McCurdy, 269 Parkview, or
call Circle 4052.
Fast teams desiring to meet the Morris
town Dauntless are requested to com
municate with A. E. Haubb, Morristown,
Ind.
The Morgantown Red Sox will have
plenty of work on their hands Sunday
when the Merchants’ Heat and Light nine
Invades their fair city. For games with
the local club address Paul Felix. M. H.
& L. Company, 133 South West street.
Maywood and the Van Camp Reserves
went sixteen innings Monday before the
Maywood nine could cop a 4 to 3 win.
Noble went all the way on the mound
for the Grays, while McMurtry and Levi
divided the work for the iron men.
Fast Indianapolis clubs are requested
to address Ed Rosenbaum, New Palestine,
Ind., for games with the independent club
of that place.
For games with the Hoosler Giants call
Irvington 2661 and ask for Jamei.
NOBLESVILLE, Ind.. July 7.—The
Nobtesvllle club defeated the Westfield
team bv the score of 7 to 4. Champ did
the twirling for Noblesvllle, while Bar
ker was In the box for Westfield. Frank
Hare, a former football and baseball
star of Indiana university, who lives In
this city, played an Infield position on
the Noblesvllle team.
The manager of the Indiana Daily
Times club calls attention to a note
printed In this column yesterday to the
effect thts the American Railway Ex
press clnb had won all Its games. The
Times team defeated the Americans, 8
to 6, at Falrview park, June 6, accord
ing to the Times team manager.
Hagen in French Tourney
PARIS, July 7.—Walter Hagen, the
American golfer, who Is playing In the
tournament for the French open golf
championship, is tied for second place,
his medal score being 150 for the first
dav's play at Laßoulle.
Hagen made the first round in 73 and
the second In 77. Lafltte of Biarritz Is
leading with a score of 147.
MOTION PICTURES.
Thursday,
Friday,
Saturday
DOROTHY
GISH
—IN—
“REMODELING
HER HUSBAND”
An Uproarious Comedy
of Matrimonial Errors.
MILBURN MORANTI in
“THE KICK”
—TODAY—
ROBERT WARWICK
in “The City of Masks”
NORMA TALMADGE
—In—
“YES OR NO”
A play of married life with Miss
Talmadge in a remarkable dual role
as the “Yes" girl and the "No" girl.
ALL WEEK
EUGENE O'BRIEN
-IN-
The Figurehead
ALL WEEK
THE BEST OF LUCK
With an All-Star Cast
Moakley Is Named
Head Coach of the l
U. S. Olympic SquaM
Cornell Athletic Tutor /J
Named Head of Team *
of 350.
NEW YORK. July 7. —Jack Moaklfi?.
track tutor of Cornell and the dean or
American coaches, will have charge of
the team Uncle Sam will send to the
Olympic games.
His appointment and a board to serve
with him. along with other routine busi
ness was announced after a meeting of
the American committee.
Serving with Moakley will be Lawson
Robertson of the University of Pennsyl
vania; Martin Delaney, Chicago Athletic
association; Mike Ryan, Colby college,
and either J. W. Maloney of Leland Stan
ford or Coach Cromwell of the University
of Southern California.
Spike Webb and J. W. Bateman of the
naval academy will coach the boxers; S.
M. Plnneo will have charge of the wres
tling team and the fencers will be in
charge of Paul Gelas and George Sterntz
of Annapolis.
The team will number at least 350 and
In addition to the track and field stars
will consist of fourteen cyclists, sixteen
boxers, ten fencers, twenty-one male
swimmers and ten girl swimmers, four
water polo and gymnastic teams, two,
weight lifters, fifteen rowers, ten wres
tlers and ten in calisthenics.
Big League Stuff ||
Hap Felsch's homer In the eleventh In
ning gave the White Sox a victory over
Cleveland yesterday.
The Y'anks made fourteen runs in
one inning Hgainst Washington, four
runs below the major league record.
Homers by Walker, Dykes and Welsh
gave the Athletics an even break with
the Red Sox, who won the first game
easily.
Clarence Mitchell was in form against
the Braves and the Dodgers wound up
their Boston sojourn with a victory.
A homer by Neale and heavy hitting by
other members of the team. Including
Jimmy Ring, featured Cincinnati's wlu
over the Pirates.
Turner Barber made five hits ont
of six trips to the platter a* a part
of the day's work in helping the
Cabs defeat the Cardinals.
Speed Up!
AMUSEMENTS.
RCKEITHS
MJ.+X - •lt^m\au<tevilic
STEP LIVELY
With Mildred Rogers In a
Dance Cycle
LOREN 2. & WOOD
Tulip and Pansy—Comedy Song. Talk,
Dance and Plano
-WATSON'S DOGS
The Act Different
MORRISON, NASH &
WILLIAMS
A Comedy Variety Offering
CORTEZ SISTERS i
International Entertainers
McGREEVEY &
DOYLE
Up-to-date Comedy Cycle
KINOGRAMS
Foto-Fllm News
DIGEST TOPICS
Pithy Paragraphs
Keep Cool at Keith’*. |
Matinee at 2:SO. j
Evenings at 7:30 and 9:00. t
POPULAR PRICES. 1
Are you a Walrus
or a Carpenter?
MURAT Matinee Tota?
IVIUI*I Evenings 8:30
Mats.Wed.Jhurs.,Sat. 2:30
If THE STUART WALKER GO.
—The—
I Gypsy Trail
A Romantic Comedy by
If Robert Housum
PBIPP<S- Eve*-. 50c. *I.OO, $1.50
| rnlbLd. Mats., 25c, 50c, 75c.
• —next WEEK
TEMPERAMENTAL HENRY
CONTINUOUS
8 Big Features
INCLUDING
FIVE MERRY MEN
BANDY FI? LIS~TMO
AND OTHERS |
Ladl ft' Bargain Matinee Every B|
Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
RIALTO
Let’s Go—lt's Pontlnuona
A Downtown Beach
THE COOL JOY SPOT
Feature Vaudeville
Keifer’s Dancing Kewpies
Gladys Brockwell
and others
Ladies get coupons at this theater
good at the Broadway matinees
Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
CONTINUOUS VAUDEVILLE
LYRIC
Going on All the Time.
1 Until 11 P. M.
John F. Kuhn Sisters /
Conrov Gilbert and Sanl
. 7 Hart and Helene
ana - Cy and Cy
Sister Three Ambler
World's Brothers
Greatest Francis
Water Experts Dougherty .
FOX COMEDY ‘JAZZ BEAUTIES’ {
Dancing in the Lyric Ballroom
Afternoon and Evening

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