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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, July 17, 1920, Home Edition, Image 9

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CRUCIBLE LEADS
IN STOCK MARKET
Extra Dividend Causes Shorts
to Rush to Cover.
NEW YORK, July 17.—The stock mar
ket closed steady today. Covering by
shorts caused a steady tone in the late
dealings, nearly all the leading issues
moving up about a point to new high
levels for the day.
Crucible Steel featured the dull and
listless opening of the market. A rush
of shorts to cover forced the issue up
"Va points to 155%, from which it re
acted to 150, and tnen rallied to 152%.
The activity was due to an extra divi
dend declared at a special meeting of
the directors Friday.
Trading became dull at the end of the
first hour. There was some evening up
of committments, but it had little effect
on prices. Invincible Oil at its best price
was up 2 points from Friday’s low.
Government bonds were unchanged,
and railway and other bonds steady.
Sales today were 1.H.000 shares: bonds,
$5,066,000. Total sales for the week were
3,106,700 shares; bonds, $59,007,000.
(By Thomson ’& McKinnon.)
—July 17—
Today’s session was a typical holiday
affair. Attendance was light, the vol
ume of business was moderate and fluc
tuations recorded were without special
significance.
Traders were not concerned about
money today and probably unwilling to
press the selling side of the market, in
view of the sharp decline that was ex
r perienoed the past week. This created
an appearance of stability.
The two chief news items were the
stock dividend by Crucible and anew
financing plan by the United States Rub
ber Company.
There was a fair degree of activity
in a t,-w ot the raiis. particularly South
ern railway.
The action of the general market will,
of course, oe governed tuis coming vv-ces
by the same factors that have been of
influence during the recent pi*r, but in
view of the known policy of the banks,
funds can hardly be anticipated,
except now and then for short periods,
and without this it will be difficult to
establish a permanently higher level for
stocks.
MOTOR SECURITIES.
(By Thomson & McKinnon.)
—July 17-
Bid. Ask.
Briscoe 4, .si
Chalmers com 2 5
Packard com 17% 18%
Packard pfd 8a 88
Chevrolet 300 500
Peerless .. 1 35 37
Continental Motors com .... 9% 10
Continental Motors pfd 1*6% 98%
Hupp com 16 13%
Hupp pfd !-
lteo Motor Car 22 22%
Ford of Canada 35. 3*
National Motors 16 19
Federal Truck 32 54
Paige Motors
Republic Truck 47 49
ACTIVE OIL STOCKS.
(By Thomson & McKinnon.)
—July 17.
• —Opening—
. Bid. Ask.
’ Angle American Oil 21 23
Atlantic Refining 1150 1200
Borne-Scrymser 425 #75
Buckeye Pipe Line 85 87
Cbesebrough Mfg. Cons 220 230
Chesehrough Mfg. Cons pfd. 103 10*
Cont. Oil, Col i 120 130
Cosden Oil and Gas 7% 7%
Crescent Pipe Line 27 29
Cumberland Pipe Line 152 165
Elk Basin Pete 7% 7%
Eureka Pipe Line 100 103
Gal -Sig. OH, pref 90 93
Gal-Sig. Oil. com 42 45
Indiana Pipe Line 85 87
Indiana Pipe Line 35 87
Merritt Oil 15 16
Midwest Oil 1 2
Midwest Rfg 146 149
National Transit 26 27
New York Transit 160 170
Northern Pipe Line 92 97
Ohio OH 280 285
Oklahoma P. & R 7 7%
Penn.-Mex 42 4o
Prairie Oil and Ga 5....... 565 375
Prairie Pipe Line 195 200
Sapulpa Refg. 5*4 6
Solar Refining 330 371*
Southern Pipe Line 123 135
South Penn Oil , 270 275
S. W. Penn Pipe Lines.... 65 68
Standard Oil Cos. of Cal... 310 317
Standard Oil Cos. of lnd... 650 600
Standard OU Cos. of Kan... 520 540
Standard Oil Cos. of Ky 370 380
Standard Oil Cos. of Neb... 420 430
Standard Oil Cos. of N. Y.... 370 375
Standard Oil Cos. of Ohio.. 435 450
Swan & Finch 63 69
Union Tank Line 110 114
Vacuum Oil 875 380
Washington Oil 27 33
NEW YORK CURB.
(By Thomson A McKinnon.)
—July 17-
Bid. Ask.
Curtis Aero 4 6
Curtis Aero pfd 4*> 50
Sub. Boat 12 13
First National Copper % 1%
Goldfield Con 9 11
Havana Tobacco 1 1%
Havana Tobacco pfd 5 10
Jumbo Extension 4 C
International Petroleum ... 34 35
Niplsslng 8% 9
Indian Packing S S%
Royal Baking Powder 129 I.l*
Royal Baking Powder pfd. 80 50
Standard Motors s 9
Salt Creek 36% 37%
Tonopah Extension 1% 1%
Tonopah Mining 1% 1%
United P. S.. new i% 1%
U. S. Light and Heat 2% 2%
U. S. Light and Heat pfd... 2
Wrlght-Matin 2 6
World Film % •?
Y'ukon Gold Mine % 1%
Jerome % •,
New Cornelia 16 17%
United Verde 30 32
Sequoyah % %
Omar ........ 3% 3%
Republic Tire 1%
MACHINERY AND TOOLS.
WONDER MIXERS
Hoists and pumps for building
and bridge construction. All
sizes carried in stock. Burl
Finch. Dist, 312-20 W. Mary
land St.
LEGAL NOTICE. _
UNITED STATES MARSHAL’S NOTICE
United States of America. District of In
diana, sg. .
Whereas, a libel of Information was
filed in the district court of the United
States for the district of Indiana on the
14th day of July. 1920. by Frederick
VanNuys, esq.. United States attorney on
behalf of the United States, against 332
dozen packages, more or Ims. 20-cent size,
and 36 dozen packages, more or less. 50-
cent size, of a drug labeled In part Dr.
Burkhart's Vegetable Compound, seized
at said district in violation of the Inter
state commerce law and claiming dam
ages in the sum of $ . and praying
process against said property and that the
tame may be condemned and sold
therefor.
Now. therefore, in pursuance of the
monition under the sea! of said court to
me directed and delivered, I do hereby
give public notice to all persons claiming
said goods or any part thereof, or In any
manner interested therein, that they be
and appear before the district court of
the United States, to be held at the city
of Indianapolis, In and for the district of
Indiana, on the first Monday of August
next, at 10 o’clock of the forenoon of that
day, then and there to interpose their
claims and make their allegations In that
behalf. MARK STOREN,
Marshal United States.
Attest: —NOBLE C. BUTLER. Clerk.
NOTICE TO HEIRS, CREDITORS, ETC.
55—16911.
In the Probate Court of Marion County,
vacation. 1920.
In the matter of the estate of Marietta
Huckstep. deceased.
Notice ts hereby given that Andrew B.
Huckstep. as administrator of the above
named estate has presented and filed bis
account and vouchers in final settlement
of said estate, and that the same will
come up for the examination and action
of said probate court on the 18th day of
# September. 1920. at which time all heirs,
or legatees of said estate are
y* red to appear in said court and
Bow cause, if any there be. why said ac-
Bun: and vouchers should not be ap-
And the heirs of said estate are
required to appear and make proof
their heirship.
RICHARD V. SIPE. Clerk.
W. MARKS, Attorney.
Ladoga, lnd.
Stock Market Review
NEW YORK, July 17.—The Evening
Sun stock market review this afternoon
said:
“Trading fell to small volume, while
price movements were uncertain and nar
row.
“The selling movement of yesterday
appeared to have pretty well run its
course, yet there was no disposition to
turn to the buying side and mark up
prices, although such little news as there
was overnight was constructive.
“Railroad stocks were very irregular,
with price changes for the most part
inconsequential and representative of
little more than professional operations.
“The steels, equipments and oils rose
fractionally.
“Crucible Steel responded to the an
nouncement of another stock dividend
declaration by advancing 8% points to
1555% in the early trading, followed by
a partial reaction.”
N. Y. Stock Prices
—July 17 —
Prev.
Sales. High. Low. Close. Close.
Allis-Chalmers.. 35% 35% 35%
Alaska Gold ... 1% 1% 1%
Am. Agricul. ... 55% 85% 85% 84%
Am. Beet Sug.. 89 89 89 89
Atner. Bosch Cos. 87% 87% 87% 56%
Am. Can 39% 39V* 30% 39%
Advance-Rum. p. 64 64 64
! Am. Car A Fdy.l3s 134% 134% 134%
' Am. Cottcn Oil. 42% 42 42 42%
Amer. H. & L.. 16 15% 16
Am. H. & L. pf. S8 88 88 87
Am. Internat’l.. 83% 83% $3% 83%
Am. Locomotive 97% 97 97% 97
Am. Smelt 58% 58% 58% 59%
Am. Sumatra .. 90 89% 90 85%
Am. Steel Fdy.. 38 37% 38 37%
I Am. Tel. & Tel. 93% 93% 93% 93%
Am. Woolen ... 88 86 87% 85%
Anaconda 55% 55% 55% 65
Atchison 79% 79% 79% 80%
Baldwin L0c0..117% 117 117% 117%
Bethlehem (8*..88% 88% 88% BS%
Brook. Rap. Tr. 12 11% 11% 10%
Butte & Sup.... 23 23 23 22%
Canadian Pac..121 119 121 119%
Cent. Leather... 63 62% 63 62%
C„ R. I. A P... 37 36% 37 36%
Chino 29% 29% 29% 30%
Chill Copper.... 14% 14% 14% 14%
! C.. M. A St. P... :* 34 34 33%
C..M.A St.P. pfd 51% 50% 50% 50%
Chi. A- Xorw.. 70% 70% 70% 70
•’handler .Motor. 97 96% 97 96
Coca-Cola 37 37 37 36%
Colo. Fuel 32 32 32
Con. Gas ...... 78% 78% 78% *B%
Corn Prod 92 91% 92 92
Crucitde 155% 150 151% 147
Cuba Cane Sug. 51% 51 51 51%
Colurn. Graph... 28% 28% 28%
Den. A R.Grand 5% 5 5%
r>. A R. G. pfd. 11 11 11 11%
Erie 12% 12% 12% 12%
Famous Play... 78% 78% 78%
Fisk Rubber... 32% 31% 32% 32
Gen. Electric ...141% 141% 141% 142
Gen Mb tors (etfst 25 24 % 25 24%
Goodrich 60% 60% 60% 00
Gt. Nor. pfd... 70% 69% 69% 70%
Houston Oil. •.. 95V* 95% 95% 97
Inspiration 49% 49% 49% 49%
lut. Harvester..l2B 128 128 127
Inter. Nickel... 17% 17% 17% 17
Int. Paper 84% 83% 84% 84
Invincible Oil.. 44% 43% 44% 42%
Kelly.Spgfleld.. 98 96 96 96%
Kennecott 25% 25% 25% 25
Lackwana Steel. 73% 73 73 7254
Missouri Pac 25% 25% 25% 25U.
M. K. A T 7 7 7 6%
Midvale .4 40% 40% 40% 41%
Marine 30 30 30 30
Mariue, pfd. ... 81V* 81 81% 81%
Mex. I'etroleum.l92 190% 192 191
New Haven 30% 29% 30% 29
N. Y. Central... 69% 60% 00% 08%
Northern Pac. . 71% 71 71% 71%
Okla. Pro A Ref 4% 4% 4% 4
Pan-American ..103% 102% 103% 102%
Pennsylvania .. 39% 39% 39% 39-*
Pierce Arrow ..51 5o 51 . 50%
Fierce Oil 15% 15% 15% 15
Pittsburg Coal.. 59% 59% 59% 59%
Pure Oil 40% 40% 40% 40%
Reading 89% 88% 89 88%
Rep. Steel 90% 89% 90% 89%
Replogle 84 84 84 83
Royal Dutch ..113% 113% 113% 113%
St L& S F com 25% 25% 25% 25%
Stromberg 83 81% 81% 81
Saxon Motor ... 9 9 9 8%
Sea A L pfd... 14 14 14
Sinclair Oil .... 31 30% 31 31
Slcss Sheffield . 70 70 70 69%
South. Pacific . 93% 92% 93% 92%
South. Railway. 19% 28% 29% 28%
Studehaker 70% 61*% 70% 70
Texas Cos 46 45% 46 45%
Tenn. Copper .. 9% 9% 9% ...
Tex. A Pac 4040 40 38%
Union OH 30% 80% 30% 30%
Tob. Products.. 66 60 66 o*s
U. Ret. Stores. 74% 74 74 73%
U. S. Food .... 64% 61% <14% 64%
U. S. Alcohol .. 88% SB% 88% 88k*
r. S. Rubber .. 93% 92% 92% 9.3%
U. K steel 91% 91V* 91% 91%
U. S. Steel pfd. 108 108 108 107%
Utah Copper ... 67 67 67 CC%
West Elcc. 48% 48% 48% 48%
Willys-Overl’d .19 18% 18% 18%
Wilson A Cos. .. 56 56 56 58
Worth. P *SB 68 68 67
Money and Exchange
Indianapolis bank clearings Saturday
were $3 250,000, as compared with $.3,276,-
000 a week ago. Total clearings for the
week amounted to $21,305,000, against
$17,202,000 for the previous week.
NEW YORK, July 17.—Demand sterling
closed nt $387%, off 1% cents. Franc
checks were 12.01 to the dollar, up 1 cen
time net; lire, demand, 16.99: cables.
16.97: Canadian dollars receded to 88
cents. Marks, demand, were 2.5S cents;
cables, 92.60.
NEW YORK, July 17—The weekly
statement of condition of the New Y'ork
Clearing house banks is as follows:
—Actual-
Loans, increased $42,328,000
Demand deposits, increased .. 21,346,000
Time deposits, decreased 443.000
Reserve, increased 19,218,330
—Average -
Loans, decreased $ 7,024.000
Demand deposits, decreased.... IO.TBS.fM)
Time deposits, decreased 981,00!)
Reserve#, decreased 1,763,0:10
Terse Market Notes
—July 17-
STOCKS—Twenty representative Indus
trial stocks at the close of business Fn*
day r showed an average of 89.95, a decllun
of .31. Twenty active rails averaged
72.65, off .55. -
Crucible Steel directors declared a stock
dividend Friday afternoon of 7 per cent
on the common shares in addition to tin,
16 2-3 Tier cent declared June IC.
The United States Rubber Company
has sold $20,000,000 ten-year 7% per cent
gold notes to Kuhn A Cos. A syndicate is
to be formed to sell the notes', and it Is
expected the offering will be rnado
around par.
R. G. Dun A Cos. report 160 commercial
failures in the United States during tho
last week, which compares with 106 for
the previous week and 88 for the corre
sponding week of last year.
CHICAGO STOCKS.
(By Thomson A McKinnon.)
—July 17-
Open. High. Low. Close.
Armour pfd 92% 92% 92% #92 Vi
Carbide A Carb. 65% 65% 05% 65%
Libby 12% 12% 12% 12%
Natl. Leather... 11% 11% 11% U%
Sears-Roebuck. .142 142 142 142
Stewart-Warner. 40% 40% 40% 40%
Swift A Cos 108% 10.8% 108% 108%
Swift Inti 36 36 35 % 35%
WHOLESALE MEATS.
Wholesale nmat prices are quoted by
Indianapolis packers as follows:
Hams—Regular, 14 to 16 lbs, 42%c;
skinned, 8 to 10 lbs, 43c; fancy boiled,
10 to 13 lbs. 63c.
Bacon—Fancy breakfast, 5 to 7 lbs,
48c; fancy sliced, 1-lb carton. 57c; sugar
cured. 4 to 6 lbs average, 47c.
Salt Meat—Dry salf Indiana butts,
16c. 31
Lard—Refined, tierces basis 20%c;
open kettle, tierces basis. 21®21%c.
Fresh Pork—Spare ribs, 18%e; shoul
der bones, 7%c; tenderlins, 58® 6: 3tJ,
dressed hogs, 24%c.
Beef—Steers, medium, 400 to 500 lbs,
21%c; No. 2 heifers, 20c; native cows.
186®19e; medium cows, 14@15c; loins,
No. 2,29 c; No. 3,26 c: ribs. No. 2,39 c;
No. 8. 25c; rounds, No. 2,29 c; No. 3,
27c; chucks, No. 2,. 15c; No. 3,14 c;
plates, cow. No. 2,12 c; No. 3,10 c.
FURTHER UPTURN
IN HOG VALUES
Steadiness Prevails in Cattle,
Calves and! Sheep.
RANGE OF HOG PRICES.
Good Good Good.
July Mixed. Heavy. Light.
12. $16.25016.50 $16.00 @16.35 $16.35 ® 16.60
13. 16.00 16.25 15.75 © 16.26 [email protected]
14. 16.00 @16.05 [email protected] [email protected]
15. 15.25 @ 15.40 [email protected] 15.25 <@ 15.50
16. 15.50©16.00 15.50 @ 15.75 15.76 @ 16.00
17. 16.00 @ 16.40 [email protected] 16.25 <® 16.60
A further upturn was effected in hog
prices today, the brisk inquiry from
shippers being a big factor in the
strength of the market.
Prices were unevenly higher, and the
bulk of good hogs sold at [email protected],
with a top of $16.50. This was 50 cents
above the general level of Friday.
Trading was of the usual week-end
character, and all orders were filled
early. Five thousand hogs were on hand
with 1,600 left over from the previous
session.
Receipts were light and dealings quiet
in the cattle division. Only 300 cattle
were available, but the demand was
light and as a result prices were steady.
Steadiness also prevailed in calves.
Trading was narrow, with the best veal
calves selling at $15.50(g16. Receipts
totaled 450 calves.
Sheep and lambs were unchanged, the
best sheep bringing $5.50 and the best
lambs selling at sl4.
HOGS.
Best light hogs, 100 to 250 lbs
average $16.25®16.50
250 to 300 lbs average 16.00w16.25
Over 300 lbs average. 15.00(^16.00
Best pigs, under 140 lbs 13.00®14..*0
Sows 12100® 13.00
Bulk of sales [email protected]
CATTLE.
Prime eornfed steers. 1.300 lbs
and up [email protected]
Good to choice steers, 1,300
lbs and up [email protected]
Good to choice steers. 1,100 to
1.300 lbs [email protected]
Good to choice steers, 1,000
to 1,100 lbs 10.00® 12.50
Common to medium steers,
900 to 1,000 lbs [email protected]
—Bulls and Calves—
Good to choice butcher bulls. o.oo® 9.00
Bologna bulls S.!XiW 6 “0
Light common buds 4 50® 000
Choice veals 15.00ffi16.30
Good veals 14.00® 15.00
Medium veals 12.00®.14.M
Lightweight veals B.oo® 12.00
—Stockers and Feeding Cattle —
Good to choice steers. SSO lbs.
and up 9.00®1G.00
Good to choice steers, under
800 lbs B.oo® 9.00
Medium to good cows 5.50® 6.00
Good cows 6.00® 7.00
Good heifers 7.00® 8.00
Medium to good heifers 7.73® 8 25
Good milkers 50.00Q123.00
Medium milkers 60.00®100.00
Stock calves 250 to 450 lbs 7.00®10.00
—Heifers and Cows—
Good to choice heifers 11150® 13.00
Medium heifers lO.OOffill 50
Common to light heifers ".OOffilO.OO
Choice cows 10.00®12.00
Good to choice cow s B.oo® 9.00
Fair to medium cows 7.00® 8.<)0
Canners 6.00® 7.00
Cutters 4 (H)® 6.00
—Sheep and Lambs —
Good to choice sheep 5.00® 5.50
Fair to good sheep 3.50® 5.00
Common to medium sheep.... 2.50®. 3.50
Bucks g.so® 4.00
Common to choice yearlings.. “.00® ,8.00
Good to cbolcq clipped 3.00® 7.00
Spring lambs [email protected]
Other Live Stock
CHICAGO, July 17.—Hogs—Receipts.
5 000; market lo®2oc higher; bulk. $13.85
@l6; butchers. sls® 16.10: packers, $13.75
® 14.40; lights. sl4® 15.75; pigs, $12.75®
14 50; roughs, sl3® 13.75. Cattle—Re
ceipts. 2.0O0: market steady; beeves.
[email protected]; butchers. S6 [email protected]; can
ners nr.d cutlers. $4.25® 8.50; Stockers
and feeders. $3.25® 10.25: cows. $6.50®
14.75: calves. $12.50 :14'•0. Sheep—Re
eelpts, 700; market steady; lambs. sl3®
16.50; ewes. $6.25® 9.73.
CINCINNATI. July 17.—Hogs—Re
ceipts, 3.300; market 25c higher; heavy,
mixed and medium, $16.25; light, $15.75;
pigs, $12.75: roughs. $12.75; stags, $9.25.
Cattle—Receipts. 2<io; market steady;
bulls, steady: calv-s. sl6. Sheep and
lauib# —Receipts, 1,500: market steady;
sheep, $8.50 down ; lambs. sl7 down.
CLEVELAND, July 17.—Hogs—Re
ceipts, 1,500: market 25c higher; york
ers, $16.75; mixed, $16.75; meolum. $16.75;
pigs. sls; roughs, $12.50; stags. $8 Cat
tle-Receipts, 500; market steady. Sheep
and lambs -Receipts, 300; market steady;
top, sl7. Caives- Receipts, 300; market
strong; top, 818.50.
EAST ST. LOUIS, 111., July 17.—Cattle
—Receipts, 1.000; market steady; native
beef steers, sls; yearling beef steers and
heifers. sl2® 14 75; cows, $7(311; Miockers
and feeders, $8?5®9.75; calves, sl2® 13;
canners and cutters, $5.25®8.25 Hogs
Receipts. 2,500; market steady; mixed
ami butchers, $15.75® 16.20: good heavies,
$154115.75; rough heavies, sl2® 13; lights,
$15.75®. 10.15’ pigs, $12.50® 15.00 ; bulk of
sales, $15.85® 1p. 15. Sheep -Receipts, 250;
market steady; ewes, sß®9; lambs, sl4®
15 25; canners and cutters, s2®4.
EAST BUFFALO, N. Y . July 17.—Cat
tle - Receipts, 450; market slow to steady;
shipping steers, $15.50® 1*5.50; butcher
grades, $10®15; cows, s4@lo. Calves—,
Receipts, 250; market active and $1 low
er; culls to choice, s7® 18 50. Sheep and
lambs- Receipts. 200; market slow; choice
lambs, $17.50®15; culls to fair. slo® 16.50;
yearlings, [email protected]; sheep, ss@lo. Hug#
Receipts. 3,200: market active and
steady to 10c higher • yorkers, sl7® 17.25;
pigs. sl6; mixed. sl7® 17 15; heavies slo®
16.75; roughs, sl2® 13; stags, sßffilo.
PITTSBURG, July 17.—Cattle -Re
oelpts light; market steady; choice. $15.23
@l6; good. $14.25® 15; fair, sls® 14; veal
calves, $10.50® 17.25. Sheep and lambs -
Receipts light; market steady: prime
wethers. >9.50® 10; good, sß®9; fair
mixed, s7® 8; spring lambs, [email protected].
Hogs Receipts, 20 double decks; mar
ket light; print* heavies, [email protected]; me
dlums, slo.Bo® 17; heavy yorkers, $16.80®
17; light yorkers, SIS7T.@JB; pigs, $14.75
@15.25; roughs, [email protected]; stags, sß(<j
8.50.
WHOLESALE PRODUCE.
Eggs- Fresh, loss off, 40c.
Poultry—Fowls, 26c; broilers, 1% to 2
lbs, 45c; cocks, 17c; old tom turkeys,
30’; young tom turkeys, 12 lbs and up,
35c; young hen turkeys, 8 lbs and up,
85c; thin turkeys not wanted; ducks,
4 lbs and up, 20c; ducks under 4 lbs,
17c; young ducks, 30c; geese, 10 lbs
and up, 10c; squabs, 11 lbs to dozen.
$6.50.
Rutter —Clean packing stock, 35c lb;
fresh creamery butter in prints is selling
at wholesale at s‘*@CK : In tubs. 58c.
Buterfat Buyers are paying 57 @ 60c
for cream delivered at Indianapolis.
Cheese (wholesale selling prices)
Brick, 30®35c lb; New York cream, 35c;
Wisconsin full cream, 32%@33%c; long
horns, 33%@45c; Mm burger, 34<@38c;
Swiss, domestic, 60@65c; Imported, sl.
CHICAGO PRODUCE.
CHICAGO, July li.—Butter—Receipts,
14.033 tubs; creamery extra, 55c; firsts,
49®.Me; packing stock, 34@40c. Eggs—
Receipts. 9,991 cases; miscelleanous re
ceipts, 3944420; ordinary firsts,* 38%@
39Vic; firsts, 31®>43c; extras. 50%@51%c;
checks, 33%@35c. Cheese —Twins (new)
24%@25c daises, 24%@25c; young Amer
icas. 26%@27e; Longhorns, 26@26%c;
brick. 26@26%0. Live poultry—Turkeys.
40c; chickens, 31c; springs, 32c; roosters,
23c; geese, 20c; ducks. 30\ Potatoes—Re
ceipts, 58 cars: Missouri. Kansas and
early Ohios, sacked. [email protected]. Kentucky
cobblers, [email protected].
CLEVELAND PRODUCE.
CLEVELAND. July 17. Butter—
Creamery, in tubs, extra. 61@01%c; ex
tra fancy, 60@60%e: firsts, 59@59%c;
seconds, 57®58c; packing, 35@40c. Eggs
—Fresh gathered, extra. 50c; fresh ex
tra, 49c; northern Ohio, fresh, new cases,
40c; old cases. 45c; western firsts. 44c;
extra, 47c. Poultry—Roosters, 20@210 ;
fowls. 55@3Gc; extra good, 40c; broilers,
50@60c.
BEEF UP AS CATTLE FALL.
WASHINGTON, July 17.—Prices of
dressed beef in New York went up while
the prices paid for live stock at Chi
cago were falling, according to a report
issued by the bureau of markets of the
department of agriculture today.
The report, which is contained in the
bureau’s weekly market report, covers
the six moths period beginning in Jan
uary and (ending with June.
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, SATURDAY, JULY 17, 1920.
Indianapolis Securities
STUCK#.
—July 17-
Bid. Ask.
Tractions—
lnd. Ry. & Light com 55
lnd. Ry. & Light pfd 95
Indpls. & Northwest pfd 75
Indpls. & Southeast pfd 75
Indpls. Street Railway 54 60
T. H., I. & E. com 1% 5
T. H., I. &E. pfd 9% 16
T. H„ T. A L. pfd 60
U. T. of lnd. com 1
U. T. of lnd. Ist pfd 10
U. T. of lnd. 2d pfu 2
Miscellaneous—
Advance-Rumely com 30 ...
Advance-Kumely pfil
Auer. Central Lift 235
Amer. Creosoting pfd 05 ...
Belt Railroad com 76 84
Belt Railroad pfd 47
Century Bulding pfd 98
Cities Service com 323 328
Cities Service pfd 66 66%
Citizens Gas 29 35
Dodge Mfg. pfd 99% ...
Home Brewing 55 ...
Indiana Hotel 60
Indiana Hotel pfd 92 ...
luu. National Life 4% ...
Ind. Title Guaranty 59 70
Indiana Pipe Line 83 01
Indianapolis Abattoir pfd... 48 52
Indianapolis Gas 48 3-1
Indpls. Tel. com 2 ...
Indols. Tel. pfd 75
Mer. Pub. Util, pfd 43
National Motor 15 20
Public Savings 2% ...
Rauh Fertilizer pfd 40
Standard Oil of Ind 650 680
Sterling Fire Insurance 8% 9%
Van Camp Hdw. pfd 95
Van Camp Tack, pfd 94
Van Camp Prod. Ist pfd. 95
Van Camp Prod. 2d pfd 93
Vaudalla Coal com 5
Vandalla Coal pfd 10
Wabash Railway com 7% ...
Wabash Railway pfd 23% ...
Banks and Trust Companies—
Aetna 7'rust 100
Bankers Trust 118
City Trust 82
Commercial National 65
Continental National 112 ...
Farmers Trust 200 ...
Fidelity Trust 120
Fletcher American National. 257
Fletcher sav. A Trust 163
Indiana National 284 294
Indiana Trust 195
Live Stock Exchange....... 425 500
Merchants National 275
National City 112 120
People's State 176
Security Trust 120
State Savings and Trust.... 85% ...
Union Trust 34u 370
Wash. Bank & Trust 142
BONDS.
Broad Ripple 5s 46
Citizens St. Ky. 55.......... 72 SO
Ind. Coke & Gas Cos. 6s 89
lnd. Creek Coal a Min. ttn.e.. 98 ...
lnd. Northern 5s
Ind. Untou Traction
Indpls. & Colurn. South. 55... 88 ...
Indpls. & Greeufleld DO ...
indpls. ix Martinsville 5s P 9
Indpls. A North 5s 35% 40
Indpls. A Northwest, 55.... 50
Indpls. & Southeast. 5s 44
Indpls., Shelby. A S. E. 5s 95
Indpls. St. Ry. 4s 52 60
Indpls. Trac. & Ter. 5s 64% ...
Kokomo, Marion & West..... 8u 8*
T. H.. 1. A- E. 5a
1 nion Trac. of Ind. 6s 50 V
Citizens Gas 5s 73 83
Ind. Hotel 2d 6s 9*) 100
Ind. Gas 3s 72 80
Indpls. L. A H. 5s 75 82
Indpls. Water 5s 87% 91
Indpls. Water 4%s 70 80
M. 11 & 1., ref. 5s 89% 94
New Tel Ist 6s 94
New Tel. Long Diet. 55.... 93% ...
South, lnd. Power tie 87
LIBERTY' BONDS.
Liberty 3%s 90 96 91.20
Liberty first 4s 85.90
Liberty second 4# 84 ni Vi (>*
Liberty first 4%s 85.72 85.96
Liberty second 4%# 83 02 85 26
Liberty third 4%# 88.5s $8.7?
Ltberlv fourth 4%s 85.24 83.48
Victory 3%s 95.84 96.08
Victory 4%s 95.80 96.04
In the Cotton Markets
NEW YORK, July 17—The cotton mar
ket opened steady at an advance of 3
to 5 points, Influenced by reports of
showers over much of the belt and on
improved advices from Manchester Much
of the business early was local and after
the start there wav a disposition to take
profits. Trading in July was light with
prices showing a loss of 25 points. The
market was 1* ss active in the last hour,
but held steady, with July closing 40
points lower and the other positions 17
to 23 points net higher.
Open. High. Low. Close.
July 41.50 41.50 41.10 41.10
October 34.55 34.77 34.45 34.73
December ... 32.90 33.10 32.80 33 06
January 32.05 32.33 32 (*0 32.33
March 3L28 31.62 31.28 81.62
May 30.45 30.75 30.45 30.75
NEW ORLEANS, July 17.—Cotton fu
tures opened unchanged to 20 polm*
higher. On some profit taking profits
declined 4 to 8 points but the matket
soon stiffened on covering orders, quota
tions advancing 28 to 33 points above the
opening levels. The close was steady, 20
to 45 points net blgber.
Open. High, Low, Close.
Oct 33.90 34.23 33.86 34.20
Dec 32.55 32.85 32.40 32.88
Jan 81.91 32 19 31.86 82 15
March 31.15 31.93 31.08 31.40
May 30.80 30.02 30.30 3057
On Commission Row
TODAY'S PRICES.
Apples Barrels. $8@11; boxes, s4®
4.50; baskets, $2.50@4.
Asparagus Fancy home-grown, dozen,
35@40e.
Bananas—Pound, B@loe.
Blackberries Crate, s3@ 6 50.
Oabb-ge—Fancy Texas, barrels, 2%@
3%c; Mississippi, [email protected]; home
grown, bbl, $5.
Beana—Michigan navy, in bastj, per lb,
B%<g9c; California plmas, in sucks, 13®
14c; marrowfats, per lb, 14%@15e; green,
fa no*-, home-grown, hamper, $3.64.
Beets—Fancy Kentucky, per hamper,
$1.25; home-grown, doz. 45c.
Blackberries -Crate, $2.75@6.
Cantaloupe—Crate, standard, s4®s;
flat. $2.
Carrots-Forty-Ib. basket, $2.50; home
grown. 30c per doz bunches.
Cauliflower—Crate, s3®4.
Celery—Florida, per crate, $7; fancy
trimmed, per doz, [email protected].
Cherries—l6-qt ease, $4; New Albany,
crate, $6; home-grown, basket, $2.50®4.
Cucumbers—Fancy hothouse, per doz,
S2; fancy Florida, 5-doz crate, $5.25;
home-grown, doz, st.so®2.
Grapefruit—Extra fancy Florldas, $4.50
@6.60.
Ooosjberrips—l6-qt case, $4.
Kale—Fancy home grown, per üb, sl.
Lemons Extra fancy, California $4.50
@O.
Le.ttuec —Home-grown, leaf, per lb, !r
@7o; Iceberg head lettuce, per crate, $5
@7; hrae-grown. lo@l2e per lb.
Mangoes—Fancy basket, $1(0.1.00.
Oranges —Extra fancy Oaliiornlas, na
vels, $.50@7; Valencias, $4.75@6; extra
fancy mediterranean sweets, $5.50@8.
Onions—Fancy new Texas white, 50-
lb crate, $2; same yellow, $1.75; home
grown, green doz, 10@25c.
Parsnips—Fancy, 65-lb hamper, $1.65.
Parsley—Fancy home-grown, 35c doz;
southern, $1 doz.
Peaches—Home grown, bu, [email protected];
Georgia, crate, [email protected].
Peas—Fancy Mississippi, per hamper,
$3®3.60; fancy telephones, bu, $4.
Pieplant—Fancy home-grown, 25@40e
doz.
Pineapples—Ripe Havanas, [email protected].
Potatoes —Northern whites, $8 per 100
lbs; bags, sl2; new Texas $9 per ICO
lbs; fancy new Florida Rose, per bbl,
$14.50@13; per 58-Ib basket, $5.25; Vir
ginia and Kentucky cobblers, bbl, $13.50.
Radishes —Home-grown, button, doz
bunches, 25<g30c; southern, long, 15@20c.
Raspberries—Case, $2.70@6.
Seed Potatoes—msh Cobblers, Maine,
per 100 lbs SB.
Sw’cet Potatoes —Fancy Jerseys, s3®
3.25 per hamper.
Seed Sweet Potatoes —Indiana grown
yellow Jerseys, per bul SL2S.
Spinach—Fancy, per bu, •<l@2.
Tomatoes —Basket, $1.75® 3.25.
Watermelons—Fancy Florida, 75e@$l.
HAY MARKET.
The following are the Indianapolis
prices of hay py the wagen load:
Hay—Loose timothy, $31@38 a ton;
mixed, $26@31; baled. $32@37.
Corn—sl.7s® 1.85 bu.
Oats—sl.lo<@l.ls a bushel.
Straw—Wheat, $S@9 a ton.
WHEAT FUTURES
RECEDE SHARPLY
Fractional in Corn and Oats—
Provisions Higher.
CHICAGO, July 17. —Favorable crop
reports from responsible observers bore
down on future prices on the Board of
Trade. The effect of the reports was no
ticeable, especially in wheat, which fell
as far as 15c on some exchanges, 9c being
the biggest drop here.
Reports of large yields where the crop
has been harvested also had an effect.
Corn and oafs were somewhat lower
In sympathy with wheat.
Provisions worked lower, but rose with
better hog prices here.
(By Thomson & McKinnon.)
—July 17—
Belated short covering and rather
light receipts started corn higher, but
the market encountered selling by east
ern houses and responded readily, as
new demand was of distinctly small pro
portions.
Despite the decrease in receipts, the
cash market shows no strength. De
liveries on July contracts have totaled
about 1,250,000 bushels and there Is prob
ability of further deliveries before the
month is completed.
Thorough liquidation of unnecessary
holdings will make it possible to rally
prices without much opposition, but, at
the same time, there is nothing in the
crop news or the cash demand to war
rant any protracted advance.
The market gives indications of await
ing developments before taking any de
cided trend. Crop conditions probably
will be of more influence than recently.
Rather high temperatures in the ex- ;
treme northwest together with buying :
of December oats by cereal interests, :
have given the market a degree of firm- i
ness.
Beyond the buying by industries there
is no important demand.
Unfavorable weather mny rally prices
to some extent, but the action of the
market is to be found in the trend of
corn prices.
Offerings o? cash wheat from the coun
try were on a fairly general scale and
at lower prices.
The British commission is reported to
have re-entered the market. Neverthe- j
less, the buying power in the futures
was negligible.
There Is a possibility of higher tem
peratures in the northwest which may
rally the market.
CHICAGO GRAIN.
—July 17-
Open. High. Low. Close. Loss.
WHEAT—
Dec. 2.39 2.53% 2.51 253 7
Mar. 2.00 2.03 % 2.55 2.57 7
CORN—
July 1.49% 1.50 1.48% 1.49% %
Sept 1.50 1.51 147 149 %
Dec. 1.38% 138% 1.35 1.36% 1%
OATS—
July 89 89% 88% .89% %
Sept 76% 77 76 76% %
Dec. 75% 70 74% 75% %
PORK—
July +26.60 • .10
Sept 25.20 28.35 28.10 28.85 * .38
LARD—
July 15.40 18.77 1835 18 77 .15
Sept 19.05 19 37 19.00 19.37 * .45
RIBS—
July tIOOO • .18
Sept 16.85 16.92 16.85 10.90 .10
•Gain. tNomlnal.
CHICAGO CASH GRAIN.
CHICAGO. July 17.—Wheat—No. 2
hard, [email protected]. Corn—No. 2 mixed.;
$152%; No. 2 white, $1.58%® 1.59; No. 2;
yellow, $1.53® 1.54; No. 3 mixed, $1.52.;
bats—No. 2 white 96%@97c : No. 3 white, j
94®95c; No, 4 white, 93@93%e.
TOLEDO CASH GRAIN.
TOLF.DO, July 17.—Wheat-December,
$2.39. Corn—No. 2 yellow. SIOO. Oat*—
No. 2, $1.02. Rye—No. 2, $.17. Barley
—No. 2, $1.35. Cloverzeed—Cash. $24;
October, $24.20; December, $23.10, Tim
othy—l9l7 and 1918. $5.40; 1919. cash,
$5.50; September, $3.75; October und De
cember, $5.60; March, $5.80. Alstke—|
Cjss, $23; October, $23.35; December,
$23.30.
PRIMARY .MARKETS.
(By Thomson & McKinnon)
(July 17)
- Receipts—
Wheat. Corn. Oats.
Chicago 89,000 373.001) 300.000 j
Minneapolis . KM.oOo 13,000 17.-ni
Duluth 174.000 7,000 ;
St. Louis ... 153.0(10 60.0* Z) 30.00 U
Toledo lo.ouo o,<joo 4,0u0
Detroit 2,000 3,000 7.000
Kansas City. 294,000 28,000 k 15,(00
Peoria 4,000 1.000 31,000
Utnaha 78,000 45,000 30,00*1
Indianapolis... 16,000 30.000 14.000
Totals 9.84.U00 637,000 475,000
Year ago. .2,111,000 639,000 721AJ00
• Shipments
Wheat. Corn. Oat*.
Chicago 64.000 127,0*0 18,000
Minneapolis . 136,000 9,000 07,000
Duluth 80,000 1,000
St. liouls 53,000 54,009 33,000
Toledo 7.000 I.o*o ,
Detroit 2,009 2.00t> |
Kansas City 157,(810 11.(881 ,
Pe<>rla 1,(00 23.000 7x8.000
Omaha 84.000 7(i'J‘* 52,000
Indianapolis 27,000 1t1.900
Total# 548,0 0 330,000 4fti.ooo
Yea r ago.. 314,000 303,000 69*5,000
—* lea runoee—
bum. W. Corn. Oats. ]
New Y’ork... 75,000 ...J.. :
New Orleans 740,000 ) ;
Totals 815,000
Year ago.. 267,000 j
INDIANAPOLIS (ASH GRAIN.
July 17—
Bids for car lots of grain and hay at
the Indianapolis Board of Trade were: j
Corn Steady; No. 4 yellow. sl4l.
Iln.v Strong: No. 1 timothy, s34® ;
34.50; No. 2 timothy, $33®.'13.50; No. 1
light clover mixed, $3.'[email protected]; N*>. 1 clo
ver mixed, $32.5(1® 33.50.
—lnspeectiona
Wheat—No. [ red, 1 car: No. 2 red,
1<) cars; No. 3 red, 2 curs; total, 13 cars.
Corn —No. 1 white. 3 cars; No. 2 white,
15 can; No. 3 white. 5 cars; sample
white, 1 ear: No. yellow, 5 cars; No. 2
yellow, 18 cars; No 4 yellow. 1 ear; No,
5 yellow, 1 car; No. 2 mixed, 2 cars;
sample mixed, 2 cars; total, 53 cars.
Oats—No. 1 white, 2 cars; No. 2 white,
17 cars; No. 3 white, 2 cars; No. 4 white,
1 car; No, 1 mixed, 2 cars; total, 24 cars.
Hay—No. l .-lover mix*®, 1 car.
BOARD OF TRADE STATEMENT.
The weekly statement of tho Indian
apolis board of trade, showing the out
put of Hour by local mills, grain inspec
tions for the week, and grain in store,
with comparison, follows:
Output of Flour— Barrels
July 17. 1920 4,(\30
July 10. 1920 2,601
Jnlv 19. 1919 4,654
July 20. 1918 2.850
-Bushels—
Inspections for Week— 1919 1920
Wheat 55.000 5,000
Corn 4.87,000 154,000
Oats 314.000 68,000 I
Rye 7.000 1,400
—Stock In Store—
Wheat. Corn. Oats. Rvo. ;
July 17, 1920 . 52,320 5.83,030 8,3.490 .... 1
July 19, 1919.130,210 560,000 102.000 3.900
July 20 1918 . 49,820 902,170 91,300 520
WAGON WHEAT.
Indianapolis flour mills and elevators
are paying $2 50 for No. 1 red wheat,
$2.50 for No. 2 red and $2.45 for No. 3
red. Other grades op their merits.
CORN- AND WHEAT BULLETIN.
For the 24 hours ending at 7 a. m.,
90th meridian time, Saturday, July 17:
Temper- 1 .
ature.
Stations of m
Indianapolis to
District. % •!•£•§ %-Z
w 5 )£ s ua
s 9 *-,S a so
South Bend I 72 I 52 j 0 I Good
Ft. Wayne 76 54 | 0
Wheat field |7Bj 51 | 0 | Good
Royal Center ...I 72 152 | 0 j Good
Marion ! 81 j 52 I 0 Good
Lafayette JB2| 59 i 0 j Good
Farmland |Blj 52 | 0 j Good
Indianapolis |Bo| 52 | 0 ) Good
Cambridge City..l 83 |52 I 0 I Good
Terte Haute ....I 84 i6O | 0 1 Good
Bloomington ]BS) Cl I 0 j Fair
Columbus |Bs| 59 | 0 j Rough
Vincennes [ 90 | 60 | 0 | Good
Evansville |9OI 70 ( 0 i .J
J.
Meteorologist wlather Bureai^H
Housewives ’ Market
LATEST PRICKS.
The following prices are the general
prices charged at the city market, ob
tained by striking an average of the
prices charged at various stands:
Apples, choice, per Id $ .10® 15
Asparagus, home-grown, ac
cording to size of bunches.. .03@10
Bananas, doz 20®40
Beans, string, lb 10®20
Carrots, bunch 03®05
Cabbage, lb 04®04
Celery, bunch ,05@15
Cherries, qt box .85
Cucumbers, hothouse, each 10®20
Cucumbers, southern .05®10
Grapefruit, each 10®20
Kale, home-grown, lb 15®20
Lemons, per doz 20®30
Lettuce, leaf, per lb .15®20
Lettuce, head, each 05® 13
Onions, lb 05®07%
Onions, Texas Berumda, 1b.... .15
Onions, green, bunch 05@07
Oranges, doz 30®75
Parsley, 2 bunches .05
Peppers, green, Florida, bunch. ,05®47%
Pineapples 15®30
Potatoes, peck [email protected]
Potatoes, lb .10
Potatoes, new, lb .12
Potatoes, sweet, 3 lbs .25
Radishes, 3 to 5 bunches .10
Rhubarb, 2 to 3 bunches .05
Spinach, lb 10®15
Strawberries, qt box 25®35
Tomatoes, 'lb * •.. .60®65
Green peas, lb .25
Scotch peas -12%
Split peas, yellow -12%
Split peas, green .18
Beans, navy, lb .11
Beans, lima, lb .17
Sugar, soft A _26
Sugar, granulated 36®34
Beans, Colorado pintas, lb .10
Beans, kidney.. -IB
Weather
The following table shows the state of
the weather at 7 a. m., as observed by
U. S. weather bureaus:
ladhtnapolis, Ind.. 30.11 66 Clear
Atlanta, Ga 30.12 72 Cloudy
Amarillo, Tex 30.00 70 PtCldy
Bifctnarck. N. D.... 29 96 . 70 Clear
Boston, Mass 30.06 68 Clear
Chicago, 111 30.10 66 Clear
Cincinnati, 0. .... 30.10 68 Clear
Cleveland, 0 30.12 (V) Cloudy
Denver, Colo 30.l 1 * 58 Clear
Dodge City, Kas... 30.02 68 Rain
Helena, Mont 30.12 56 Clear
Jacksonville, Fla... 30.14 70 Cloudy
Kansas City. M 0... 30.02 72 Cloudy
Louisville, Ky. ... 30.10 74 Clear
Little Rock, Ark... 30 02 74 Cloudy
I,os Angeles, Cal... 29.96 68 Clear
Mobile, Ala 30.12 78 Cloudy
New Orleans, La... 30.10 78 PtCldy
New York. N. \'... 30.10 64 Clear
Norfolk, Va 30.06 74 Clear
Oklahoma City ... 29 96 72 Cloudy
Omaha, Neb. 29.9S 74 PtCldy
Philadelphia, Pa. . 30.12 68 Clear
Pittsburg, Pa 30 14 66 Clear
Portland, Ore 30.08 60 Cloudy
Rapid City. S. D.. 30.06 70 Cloudy
Roseburg, Ore. ... 30.12 50 Cloudy
San Antonio, Tex. . 30.(>4 76 Clear
San Francisco, Cal. 30.10 54 Cloudy
St. Louis. Mo 30.02 74 PtCldy
St. pAul, Minn. ... 30 04 62 Clear
Tampa, Fia 30 12 78 Clear
Washington, D. C.. 30.12 68 Cloudy
WEATHER CONDITIONS.
An extensive but moderate depression
covers most of the country between the
Rockies and the Mississippi river, while
high barometric pressure prevails in the
eastern sections, (fine* Friday morning
showers and thunderstorms have occurred
In many localities of the southern states,
and at some widely scattered points to the
northward. It I# warmer In the north
ern Red River valley and western Cana
dian provinces, while elsewhere tempera
ture changes have not been decided over
any large areas.
J. H. ARMING TON,
Meteorologist.
WHOLESALE FEED PRICES.
Ton Sack*. Cwt.
Acme bruad $50225 $3.00
Acme feed 62.25 g. 13
Acme middlings 66.25 3.35
Actae dairy feed 78.25 3.96
E Z dairy feed 69 25 8.50
Acme H * M 84 25 4.25
C. O. & B. chop 70.25 8.56
Acme stock feed........... 70.00 8.55
Acme farm teed 72.25 365
Cracked corn 83.75 4.25
Acme chick feed 83 25 4.20
A* me scratch 80.25 4 05
E Z scratch 69.25 8.50
Acme dry masb 80.23 4.05
Acme hog feed 80.00 4.03
Acme barleycorn 88 25 4.20
Ground barley 84.75 4JO
Ground oats 85.75 4.35
Hnmlik white 80 75 4.10
Rolled barley 84.75 4.30
Alfalfa mol 73.00 8.70
Cotton seed meal 80 00 4.05
Kafir corn meal * .... 68.25 8.45
Gral.N'E
Shelled corn, small lots $ 2.05
Shelied corn, large lot# 2.04
Shelled corn, bu sacks 2.14
Oats, 3 bu sack ’ 1.34
Oats, bulk, large 1218
Oats, less than 100 bu 1.29
Chicken wheat, cwt. sacked 4.60
CORN MEAL AND FLOUR.
Corn meal, cwt, net $ 4.90
E-Z bake bakers’ flour. 98-lb sacks. 14.70
LOCAL HIDE MARKET.
Green hides —No. 1,15 c; No. 2,14 c;
Green calves—No 1,15 c; No. 2, 20%-.
ITorsehldes —No. 1, $7; No. 2, $6 Cured
bides—No. 1. 17c; No. 2. 16c.
Marriage Licenses
Ira Hamilton, Norwalk, 0 21
Rosa Drake, 725 Pennsylvania st 22
John Bailey, Hendricks county, lnd.— 45
Hattie Stewart, 1201 Ronderon st 42
Romanzo Powell, 718 W. Tenth st... 34
Fannie Smith, 143*) W. Walnut 22
Madison Glore, 510 E. Walnut 39
June Blufflugton. 59 N. Hawthorne.. 23
William Armand 2945 Massachusetts.. 28
Mamie McNeely, 429 N. Liberty 20
Hugh Hubbard, 639 W. North 26
Susie Page, 510 Blake st 25
Grover Klße, 25 S. War-man ave 21
Irene Lowe, 24 McLean place 21
Kenneth Tampiln. 1222 Congress ave.. ;i
Goldla Carr, 1222 Congress ave 19
Clarence Robinson. 418 N. West at... 19
Revine Helm, 418 N. West st 18
Pierre Lepere, 1106 Capitol ave 30
Pauline llodeuberger, Bridgeport, lnd. 23
Russell Stephenson, Kanakee, 111 21
May S -orenant, Kanakee, 111 22
Benjamin Mowbray, Jefferson, 0k1n.... 62
Hettie Swayne, 147 W. Pratt 43
Donald Ca.vton, 708 Fletcher ave 22
Kathleen Woods, 902 Elm st 19
Harry Beasley. Terre Haute, Ind 2\
Hazel Cline, 1513 Orange st 19
William Flint, 1534 Senate ave 20
Myrl Hykendall, 1534 Senate ave 24
’lhomas Mosley. Washington, D. C.... 47
Susie Harris, 633 YV. Thirteenth st... 43
Martin Schaffer, 1415 LaSalle 22
Daisy Farnsworth, 1415 LaSalle 19
Harry Brock, Baltimore .-... S3
Alice Grlner, 421 W. Thirtieth st 27
Births
Joseph and Leonard Ramsey, 525 West
Seventeenth, girl.
Ernest and Mabel Asher, Long hos
pital, girl.
Anthony and Violet Donadio, 302 West
New Y’orK, boy.
James and Sarah Hawkins, 1628 Beile
fontaine, girl.
Frederick and Edna Smith, 414 South
Warman, girl.
Carl and Katherine Bailey, St. Vin
cent’s hospital, boy.
Deaths
George Birely, 27, Long hospital, acute
myocarditis.
Patrick Farrell, 35, Flower mission,
pulmonary tuberculosis.
John .T, Lyons, 51, 100 South Traub,
carcinoma.
George A. Lane, 1, 2817 East Twenty
flfth, gastro enterocolitis.
James Paine, 75, 2846 Northwestern,
intestinal obstruction.
Henry C. Albrecht Kipp, 71, St. Vin
cent’s carcinoma.
Lon Cornforth, 48, 331 North Delaware,
strangulated hernia.
Senelln Irene Pruitt, 3, 1518 Miller,
acute colitis.
Thomas Hampton, 48, 710 Douglass, tu
bercular enteritis.
FIRE.
iff
GOODRICH COAL
BOARD MEASURE
PASSES HOUSE
(Continued From Page One.)
and individuals engaged in the sale and
distribution of such food products, and
to make recommendations to the governor
for preparation of a bill to be presented
to the next general assembly recommend
ing such laws as will prevent profiteer
ing, hoarding and destroying of such
food products by wholesalers, retailers or
individuals engaged in handling them.
The Phelps amendment was adopted by
an overwhelming vote.
ONLY TWO OF
SAME** PARTY.
The. Goodrich coal commission bill pro
vides that the governor, the lieutenant
governor and the speaker of the house
each shall appoint a member of the In
diana state coal commission, but only
two shall be of any one political party.
The bill gives the governor the entire
power to remove any member of the
commission when the chief executive
feels that It Is in interest of the pub
lic welfare, and the governor has the
right to appoint the successor of the
member who is removed.
Members of the house contended that
the person who appointed the removed
member should have the power to ap
point the successor to the member re
moved by the governof.
The‘chair Indicated that a correction
would be made to provide for that.
The commission Is given the power to
appoint as many clerks and deputies as
necessary to carry on the work of the
commission and to make all the rules
pertaining to hearings and the fixing of
rates.
The commission Is given complete au
thority to order any coal company to pro
duce all books, reports of. production,
costs of mining and transportation, and
fixes a heavy penalty including a year’s
sentence at the Indiana state farm for
any persons refusing to comply wicii
the orders of the commission.
The bill provides hat each company
mining coal In Indiana shall register
with the commission and pay a yearly
license fee of $25.
The bill fixes the wholesale dealers li
sense fee at $lO and the retailer's fee
at $5.
FEES TO BE USED
TO FAY’ EXPENSES.
All fees so paid are to be used to pay
the salaries and the expenses of the com
mission.
In discussing the power of the com
mission to regulate and fix the price af
all coal mined in Indiana, the bill pro
vides that the commission shall hold a
public hearing preparatory to the fixing
of the prices of coal at the mines and
the wholesale and retail prices of the
coal.
The prices so fixed shall not be less
than the actual cost of production plus
transportation price and a fair return
of profit.
The commission also has the power to
fix maximum and minimum coal prices,
and to require all coal mining companies
In the state to list with the commission
the number of tons mined.
It is specifically stated that any prices
or regulations fixed by the state coal
commission shall in no way affect coal
in interstate shipments or to apply to
any mine or mines under any federal
control or Jurisdiction.
The bill provides that suits to test the
validity of the orders fixing prices of
coal shall be filed in the Marion coun
ty circuit court, and the court in de
termining prices shall consider the cost
of production plus transportation, to
which is to be added a fair margin of
profit.
HOW THEY’ LINED
UP ON MEASURE.
Following is the vote on the Goodrich
measure for the creation of a coal com
mission :
AYES.
Republicans—Abraham. Abrams, Ander
son, Bakr, Barker of Boone, Barnard,
Behraer, Benedict. Buller, Butler, Byers,
Covalt, Davis, Day, Pelaplane, Dunn, Fi
fleld, Gaesser, Gibbens, Given, Gordon,
Grayson, Green, Hamsell. Harris, Hoff
man, Johnson. Kessler, Kimmel, Kings
bury, Knapp, Lafuze, Laughlin. I.eer,
Lowe. McKinley, McMaster, Malott. Men
denhall, Miltenberger, Morgan, Newby,
Newman, Noll, Overmeyer, Phelps. Fhil
llps. Shilling. Smith. Southard, Swain,
Symons. Traub, Vesey, Williamson, YVim
mer, YVlnesburg, Wood, Y'oder, Youse.
Democrats—Axby, Craig, Curry, Lee,
O’Kiel. YValker.
NOES.
Republicans—Cann, Jlnnett. Miller of
Marlon, Sambor.
Democrats —Barker of Posey, Bidaman,
Griffiths, Scott.
COMMISSION CAN
CONDEMN ANY MINE.
- One of the most objectionable features
of the bill, as favored by Gov. Good
rich, Is that it gives the commission the
right "to condemn any mine,” accord
ing to Representative Miller of Ma
rlon.
This section, which is No. 19, is looked
upon as "a Joker.”
This “joker” provides that if the state
should take any coal mine all funds de
rived from the sale of coal in the state
owned mine should be placed in a spe
cial fund to be used in operating such a
mine or paying compensation to the own
ers of the mine.
Representatives claim that this "joker"
virtually gives the coal commission the
power to condemn any mine for the pur
pose of obtalniug coal for state Insti
tutions.
It is pointed out that Section 19 would
give the governor a state-owned mine for
a limited period.
It is evident, according to some mem
bers, that the governor seeks to obtain
a state-owned mine tot a limited period,
at least, by means of this “Joker,” when
he realizes that the house would never
pass a state-owned coal mine bilL
ASSESSORS’ISALARIES
TO COME UP MONDAY
The house today decided to take up
ns special order of business at 2 o'clock
Monday afternoon the consideration of
an amendment made by Representative
Charles Bidaman of Terre Haute to house
bill No. 571, a bill fixing the powers and
salaries of the township assessors and
their deputies.
The original bill of Representative Co
valt fixes the salary of township asses
sors at $4 a day and their deputies at $3
a day, but in townships having a cities
of the first and second-class located
Established 1912.
©Lowell Live Stock
Shares in this established con
cern can now be purchased at
par. We recommend this issue,
president. as this stock is preferred, non
assessable and nontaxable. Cer
tificates carry dividends of seven per cent and
participate in additional profits.
Indianapolis Securities Company
Please send me without obligation on my part detailed infor
mation regarding Lowell Live Stock 1% participating shares.
Name
Address .A.
therein the deputies shall receive $4 a
day for each day actually employed.
In townships having a population of
5,000 or more the salary of the assessor
shall be S3OO a year, with S3O additional
for each 1,000 or fraction thereof of pop
ulation above 5,000, and not more than
20,000, the bill provides.
20,009 TOWN PAYS
SALARY OF SI,OOO.
it is also provided that in townships
having a population of over 20,000 and
not more than 75,000, the assessor shall
receive not less than SI,OOO nor more than
$1,700 a year, which amount is to be de
termined by the county comissloners.
In townships containing a population
of over 75,000 and not more than 100,000,
each assessor shall receive $2,000 a year
as full pay for services.
In townships containing a popnlation
of over 100,000 and not over 200,000 or in
any township where the asssessed valua
tion as shown by the last preceding as
sessment amounts to $1,000,000 of tax
ables or more, the assessor shall re
ceive an annual salary of $3,000 a year.
The Bidaman amendment would change
the word one hundred thousand in the
above paragraph to $90,000,000 of tax
ables or more.
The Bldaman amendment also pro
vides that the township assessors in any
township having an assessed valuation
of $90,000,000 or more, has the power to
engage deputy assessors and accountants
at not to exceed $6 a day for as long a
time as the assessor directs.
That part of the amendment is ob
jected to by some members on the
grounds that it gives the township as
sessor power to engage as many deputies
as he wants.
A vigorous debate is expected on the
Bldaman amendment Monday afternoon
in the house as some members think
the amendment is ‘vicious” and too in
definite.
SHE’S IN DOUBT
ABOUT HER NAME
Kokomo Woman in Quandary
After Marriage.
Special to The Times.
KOKOMO, Ind., July 17.—Did Jean
McLaughlin, 24. who thought 6he mar
ried Irving Ausman, late of Milwaukee,
YVis., became the bride of one Mulcher,
who assumed Ausman’s name?
That Is the query police investigations
are seeking to answer.
Meantime the woman, who believes
herself Mrs. Ausman, is in a quandary,
but has a firm belief that the mystery
will be cleared and the continued ab
sence of her husband will be explained.
Early in January, a man came to the
borne of Mr. and Mrs. Robert McLaugh
lin to board, giving the name of Irving
Ausman.
Aft.r a short stay at the McLaughlin
home, he fell in love with the daughter.
Miss Jean McLaughlin, 23, and they
were married at Peru, Rev. Carpenter
officiating.
Relinquishing an important position
Mr. Ausman held here, the couple moved
to Frankfort, where, July 1, the husband
left for Eau Claire, YVis., to dispose of
reme property he held there.
Mrs. Ausman came to Kokomo.
Letters received at Milwaukee, signed
“your loving wife. Mrs. Irving Ausman/
Kokomo, Ind.,” when read by Irving
Ausman were turned over to the po
lice with a request that they locate a
man named Mulcher, a former room
mate of Ausman, who left suddenly
taking away clothing, valuable papers
and a bnnk book.
When the wife formed the acquaintance
of the reputed Ausman, he had various
data and memorandum indicating his
Identity.
Think Auto Thieves
I Are Members of Gang
LAFAYETTE. Ind., July 17.—Lester
Mannis, 17, and William Kaster, 22, both
of Knox county, who were arrested In
an abandoned farmhouse In the woods of
Starke county on a charge of automobile
stealing, are believed by the authorities
to be members of a gang that has stolen
many cars In northern Indiana in the
last two months.
The police found several old auto
mobiles in the vtcinity of the house
where the men were arrested.
Mannis and Kaster are charged spe
cifically with the theft of an auto belong
ing to Arthur Cooper of Brook, Ind., on
July 5.
Chance Talks Before
Logansport Ad Club
Special to The Times.
LOGANSPORT, Ind., July 17.—At a
dinner given by the Advertising club
last evening Frank Chance of Indian
apolis spoke on advertising, club organi
zation and Better Business Bureau meth
ods.
At its next meeting the club will vote
on the question of establishing a Better
Business Bureau on a plan similar to
that followed by the Indianapolis club.
Mr. Chance stated that, largely through
the efforts of the Indianapolis club the
city has achieved the reputation of be
ing commercially clean, a good host, and
aggressively alert in matters pertaining
to civic betterment.
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INVESTMENT BANKERS
137 So. LaSalle St.“ Ch.ica.do
9

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