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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, October 23, 1920, Last Home Edition, Image 9

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STOCK MARKET
PRICES STRONG
„ Mout Changes Were to Higher
Figures—Rails Gain.
v k 1 " ■
NEW YORK, Oct. 23.—Initial prices
on the stock exchai.ge today generally
showed fractional improvement.
Dealings were very light, however.
In some cases small fractional de
clines were changed to net gains before
the end of the first fifteen minutes.
Steel common was % higher at 88%.
Baldwin Locomotive rose % to 114%.
Atlantic Gulf & West Indies was
another active issue, advancing 1 point
to 145%.
The gas stocks were in favor. Con
solidated Gas rising % to 89, while
People’s Gas sold up to 42%. .
The market closed higher.
Public utility stocks were the most
active group in the last few minutes of
trading and moved into higher ground.
Closing price* included: United States
Steel, 88*s, up %; Mexican Petroleum,
192, up %; Pan-American, 99%, up %;
Gas, 89%, up 1%; Reading,
96%, ofT %: St. Louis Southwestern, 38%,
up %; Baldwin, 114%, up %; Southern
Pacific, 99%, up %.
TWENTY STOCKS AVERAGE.
NEW YORK. Oct. 23.—Twenty indus
trial stocks averaged 85.06, an increase
of .41 per cent. Twenty active rails av
eraged 83.43, an increase of .16 per cent.
NEW YORK STOCK SALES.
NEW YORK Oct. 23.—Total sales on
the stock exchange today were 187.000
shares, and 86,667,000 in bonds.
’ For the week the total was 2,365.000
•hares and 851,117,000 in bonds.
CLEARING HOUSE STATEMENT.
NEW YORK, Oct. 23.—Subtreasury
debits, $146,273; exchanges, $800,477,633;
balances $68,084,624.
Money and Exchange
Indianapolis bank clearings Saturday
were $2,866,000, agaiust $3,088,000 Satur
day of last week.
For the week they
against $18,496,000 the week before^
NEW YORK, Oct. 23.—Prices were
steady at the opening of foreign ex
change. Sterling demand opened at.
$3.44%; francs, .0646; lire, .0375; marks,
.0142; Canadian dollars, .9038.
Demand aterling closed at $3.45%, up
%c Other quotations were: Francs,
.0646; lire. .0375; marks, .0142; Canadian
dollars, .9040.
NEW YORK, Oct. 23.—Commercial bar
■liver was today quoted: Domestic, un
changed at 99%c; foreign, %c lover at
80c.
LONDON, Oct. 23. —Bar silver was %and
lower today at 52%d.
MOTOR SECURITIES.
(By Thomson & McKinnon.)
—Oct. 23
/ —Opening—
Bid. Ask.
Briscoe 14 16
Chalmers com - 1% 2%
Packard com ....A. 12 15
Packard pfd * 79 81
Chevrolet 250 500
Peerless 31 32
Cont. Motors com 7% 7%
Coot. Motors pf and 93 93
Hupp com 13% 14
Hupp pfd 90 JOl
Reo Motor Car 23 23%
Elgin Mqtors 7% 8%
'Grant Motors 3% 4%
Ford of Canada 310 320
United Motors 30 40
National Motors 7 10
Federal Truck 20 24
Paige Motors 18 20
Republic Truck 32 35
ACTIVE OIL STOCKS.
(By Thomson & McKinnon)
—Oct 23-
Bid. Ask.
Anglo-American Oil 20% 21%
(Atlantic Refining 1053 1125
Borne-Scrymaer 410 423
Buckeye Pipe Line 88 90
Chesebrough Mfg. Cons 210 225
Cbesrtrough Mfg. Cons., pfd. 100 105
Continental Oil. Colo 107 113
Cosden Oil %nd Gas 7% 7%
Crescrfnt
Cumberland Pipe Line 140 150
Elk Basin Pete 9% 9%
Eureka* Pipe Line 114 119
Galena-Signal Oil. pfd.. new 90 97
Galena-Signal Oil, com 43 43
• Illinois Pipe Line 162 166
Indiana Pipe Line 90 32
Merritt Oil 14% 14&
Midwest Oil 1 1%
Midwest Rfg. 159 lfin
National Transit 29% 30%
New York Transit 170 lo
Northern Pipe Line 99 102 _
Ohio *)il 3<Vi 308
Penn.-Mex 17 50
Prairie Oil and Gas 530 560
Prairie P’pe Line 2 -> l ‘ v >4
Sapulpa Refg a '.5% "&%
holar Refining a* 390 410
Southern Pipe Line 119 123
South Penn OH 267 272
Southwest Penn. Pipe Lines. 63 67
Standard /Oil Cos. of Cal 320 323
Standard OH Cos. of Ind 758 7>
Standard OH Cos. of Kan. ... 525 540
Standard Oil Cos. of Ky. ... 440 470
Standard Oil Cos. of Neb. ... 430 4iO
Standard Oil Cos. of N. Y 314 377
Standard OH Cos. of Ohio ... 410 425
Swan & Finch 60 70
Union Tank Line 114 115
Vacuum Oil 347 -*-
Washington Oil 33
SEW YORK CURB.
(By Thomson & McKinnon)
—Oct. 23
—Closing—
Bid. Ask.
' nrtls Aero, com 4 g
Curtis Aero, pfd 20 40
Texas Chief ..., 10 Vi
Sub Boat 13 1314
First National Copper lVi
Goldfield Con S 10
Havana Tobacco J in
Havana Tobacco pfd 4 gf 4 * -
Cent. Tere*a 4*4 5%
Jumbo Extension 5 6
International Petroleum ... 15% 16
Mpissing 814 B^4
Indian Pkg 4 41K
Royal Baking Potvde/ 114 118
Royal Baking Powdef pfd... 81 84
Standard Motors 7 8
Salt Creek 28 20
Tonopeh Extension 1% 1%
Tonopah Mining 1% 1%
United P 8 new 2% 2%
U S Light and Heat 1% 2
U S Light and Heat pfd 1 2
Wright Aero 4 6
World Film Hi Hi
Jerome % 14
New Cornelia 17 13
United Verde n 28 30
Sequoyah Vi %
Omar Oil v 2% 3
Rep. Tire 1% 2
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Stocfc Market Review
NEW YORK, Oct. 23.—The Evening
Sun’s financial review today said:
"Today’s stock market was a specialty
affair In which the public utility issues
were prominent, but the general run of
stocks did little mope than mark time
pending the outcome of the British min
ers’ strike.
“Stocks were less sensitive than yes
terday and vigorous buying of a number
of properties imparted a firm tone to the
whole list.
"The rise in United Ffuit which com
menced several days ago, continued this
morning, the stock going up to 225 for
a gain of more than 7 points and anew
level for the year.
“American International and Atlantic
Gulf were sympathetically higher.
’ "The whole public utility group moved
forward 1 to 3 points on comparatively
light -buying and was the most buoyant. 4
“RaUs were dull and steady,
“The foreign exchange market was
generally firm with sterling % of a cent
higher at $3.45.
“Price uncertainty and the lateness of
the season have been militating against
any important revival in business activ
ity, according to the weekly trade re
views.”
N. T. Stock Prices
■ 'C
—Oct. 23 — Prev.
High. Low. Close, close.
Ad.-Rumely pfd 58% 58% 58%
Allis Chalmers. 35 . 34% 35 34%
Am. Agricul.... 81 * 81 81 80%
Anu-B. Mag.-Co. 74 74 74 72%
Am. Car & Fdy.l3s 134% 135 135
Am. H& L pfd. 58% 58% 58% 57%
Am. Drug 0% 9% 9% 9%
Am. Inter 74% 72% 73% 72%
Am. LoCo 96% 9044 96% 96
Am. Sm. & Ref. 58% 58% 58% 08%
Am. Sugar Ref.lo6 . 106 106 104
Am. S. Tob. Cos. 88 57% 88 BS%
Am. Steel Fdy. 37% 37% 37%
Am. Tel. & Te 1.100%.100% 100 100% 99%
Am. W001en.... 71% 71% 71% 71
Ana. Min. C 0... 50% 50% 50% 50
Atchison 88% 88% 88% 88
At. Gulf & W. 1.146 145% 145% 144%
Baldwin L0c0..114% 114% 114% 114
B. & 0 47% 46% , 47% 47%
Beth. Steel IB). 71% 71 71 70%
Bk. Rap. Trans. 14% 13% 13% 14%-
Can. Pac.* Ry.. .125% 125% 125% 125%
Cent. Leather... 41) 40% 40% 41
Chandler Mot... 89% 88% 89% 84%
C. & 0 67 67 67 67
C., M. &St P.. 41% 41% 41% 42%
C. M. & St:P.pfd. 03 62 % 63 62%
Chi. &N. W ... 81% <Bl% 81% 82
C, R. I. & P... 37% 37% 37% 57%
C. P.7Crpfd 81% 81% 81% 82%
Cnili Copper... 14 14 14 , 13%
Chino Copper... 25% 25% 25% * 25%
Coca Cola 31% 31% 31% 31%
Columbia Gas.. 60% 59% 60% 60
Columbia Grap. 20% 20 20 20%
Consol. Gas .... 59% 88% 89% 88%
Corn Produce.. 82% 81% 82% 82%
Crucible Steel.. 129 128% 129 128%
Cuban Am. Sug. 40% 40% 40%
D. & Rio G 2% 2% 2% 2%
D. & R. G. pfd.. 3% 3% 3% 3%
Erie 18% 18% 18% 18%
Erie Ist pfd.... 28 28% 28 28
Famous Players 68% 67% 68% 0.8
Fisk Rub. C 0... 20% 20% 20% 20%
Gen. Electric... 139 138% 138% 139
Gen’l Motors ... 17% 17% 17% 17%
Goodrich 50 49 50 40
Gt. North, pfd. 87% 87% 87% 87%
Houston Oil 109 105 107% 103%
Inspiration Cop. 43% 43% 43% 43%
Interboro Corp. 5% 5 5% 5%
lnt'l Nickel 17% 17% 17% 17%
Inter.. Paper... 71 70% 71 69%
Invincible Oil.. 34 33% 33%, 33%
Kan. City 50... 25% 24% 25% 24%
Kenecott Cop... 22% 22% 22% 22%
Lehigh Valley.. 55 54% 55 54
Leows, Inc 20% 30% 20% 20%
Marine com 10 18% 19 18%
Marine pfd 71% 70% 71% 70%
Max. Mot. com.. 3% 3% 3% 3%
Mexican Petr 01.192% 191% 192 191%
Miami Copper... 19 1.8% 19 18%
Mid. States Oil. 14% 14 14% 14
Midvale Steel... 38% 38 38% 38
K„ K. A T 5 5 5 5
Mo. Pacific Ry.. 27% 27% 27% 27%
Nat. En. & Stp. 81% 81% 81%
Nev. Con. Cop.. 11 1 11 10%
X. T. Central... 82% 81% 81% 82%
New Haven...-. 33% 32% 32% 32%
Nor. &. West— 99% 09% 99% 99
Mkt. Pro. A Ref. 4 4 4, 4
Owen Bot. com. 58% 57% 58% 51
Pan-Am. Petrol. 90 Ki% 89%' 89%
Penca. Ry 43% % 43% 43%
People’s Qaa 44% 41% 44% 41%
Pierce-Arrow .. 36 36 36 36
Pierce OH 14% 14% 14% 14%
Pittsburgh Coal. 67% 07% (77% 68%
Pressed Stl. Car 97% 96% 97%
Pullm. Pal. Car. 112% 112% 112% 112%
Ray Copper 14 13% 13% 13%
Reading 97% 96% 90% 96%
Rep. Irn. A Stl. 77% 77 77% 77
Replogie Steel.. Sl% 80% 81 79%'
Djl Dch. N. Y. 78% 77% 71% 78
8.1 Won Motors... 5% 5% 5% 5
Sears-Roebuck .111 111 in' 111%
Sinclair 31% 31% 31% 31%
Sou Pacific 99% 98% 90% 98%
Sou Ry 31% 31% 31% 31%
Stan OH. X J. 641 639 039 644
St L& 8 F com 31% 31% 31% 31%
Studebaker 50% 57% 58% 58%
Tenii Copper .. 9% 9% 9% 9%
Texas Cos 51% 51 51% 51
Tex A Pac.... 21% 21% 21% 21%
Tob Prod 66% 66% 66% 66
Trans Oil 12 11% 12 11%
Union Oil 27% 27% 27% 27%
Union Pacific ..127 120% 127 126%
Un Ret Stores.. 73% 73% 73% 73%
Un Fruit C0...224% 219% 224% 217%
U K Ind Also.. 83% 83% 83% 84
V S Rubber.... 77% 76% 77% 70%
U S Steel 88% 87% 88% 88
U S Steel pfd.. 108% 168 168 108%
Utah Copper .. 58 58 58 57%
Vanad Steel ... 04% 63'% 63% 64
Wabash 12 11% 11% 11%
Wab Ist pfd.. 32% 31% 32% 31%
W. Maryland.. 14% 14% 14% 14%
West Union ... 92% 90 92% 89%
West F.lec .... 47% 47% 47% 47%
White Motors .. 45% 45% 45% 45%
Willys-Overland 11 10% 11 10%
Wilson & C 0... 51 51 31 .10%
NEW YORK LIBERTY BONDS.
Prev,
High. Low. Close, close
L. B. 3%s 92.90 92.80 92.80 92 90
L. B. Ist 4s ’ 90.10
L. B. 2d 4s 89.00 89.00 89.00 89.26
L. B. Ist 4%5... 90.20 90.08 90.12 90.24
L. B. 2d 4%5... 89.20 88.80 88.80 89.20
L. B. 3d 4%5.... 90 84 90.70 90.82 90.95
L. B. 4th 4%5... 89.20 88.90 89,00 89.20
Victory 3%s 96.42 96.36 96.36 96.36
Victory 4% s 96.4| 96.36 06.38 96.40
NEW YORK BANK STATEMENT.
NEW YORK Oct. 23.—Average:
decreased $40,275,000; demand deposits,
decreased $14.421.000; time deposits, in
creased $6,463,000; reserve, decreased
$5,731,000.
Actual: Loans, decreased $90,843,000;
demand deposits, decreased $12,935,000:
time deposits, Increased $290,000: reserve,
decreased $50,233,200.
In the Cotton Markets
NEW YORK, Oct. 23.—The cotton mar
ket opened firm today at an advance of
17@50 points on further active buying
from Liverpool accounts.
Houses with Japanese connections also
were liberal purchasers at the start
while New Orleans was the principal
seller.
Local and Wall street firms traded in
a comparative small way.
Prices after the start were a shade
easier but the advance was fairly well
maintained.
New York cotton opening:
20c: January, 20e; March, 20.10 c: May,
19.95 c; July. 19.55 c; September, 19.35 c.
Favorable advices from London on the
British coal strike led to good buying
in the second hour, prices moving up to
net gains of 100@107 points.
The cltise was irergular at a net rise
of 40@70 points. i
New York cotton range—
December ... 20.00 21.00 19.86 20.75
January 20.00 20.75 19.75 20.50
March 20.10 20.85 19.8 p 20.58
May 19.95 20 60 J 9.50 20.25
July 19.55 20.4$ 19.35 20.00
NEW ORLEANS, Oct. 23. 1 —Cotton fu
tures were Irregular at today’s opening.
3 polntssxhlgher to 15 lower and on some
realizing sales declined 10 to 18 points.
On better spot demand and favorable
advices from tbe Industrial situation
abroad quotations advanced to levels 60
to 100 points abve the openßig anjj
closed firm net 0 Oto 78 polntii higher
than Friday s final figures.
New Orleans cotton range—
Open. High. Low. Close.
October 19.20 10.80 19.20 19.78
December f ... 19.35 20.35 19.25 20.32
January / .... 19-30 20,20 19.13 20.10
March 19.23 20.12 19.06 20.12
May lOjOO 19.84 18.98 19.75
.Iniv 1LJ.... 18.75 10.67 18.75 19.48
HOG PRICES
STILL LOWER
General Decline 25 to 50 Cents
Lower—Cattle Steady.
RANGE OF HOG PRICES.
Good Good Good
Oct. Mixed. Heavy. L’fht.
16. *15.70 @ 16.85 *15.75 @ 16.00 *[email protected]
18. 15.50 @ 15.60 15.75015.86 [email protected]
19. 14.75 14.75® 14.95 [email protected]
20. 14.25® 14.40 [email protected] [email protected]
21. 13.25® 13.35 [email protected] [email protected]
22. 13.25®13.35 [email protected] [email protected]
23. 13.00 @ 13.10 13.00 @ 13.25 [email protected]
There was a farther decline of 25c to
50c in prices of hogs on the local Stock
market today at the opening, and the
decline held throughout the early trad-
The market had a very poor sentiment
and there were indications that there
would probably be a further drop be
fore the end of trading.^
Local packers were about the only ac
tive buyers, the eastern shippers appar
ently acting under small orders.
Indications pointed out that there
would probably be a large number of
the 5,500 fresh hogs and the 550 stale
hogs on sale left over for rhe Monday
market unless better buying movement
set in after jthe early trading.
Most at the buyers were inclined to not
want even sl3 hogs, which leaves an im
pression that there mr.y be a still fur
ther decline in prices.
There were but few good heavy hogs
on the market, most of the hogs being
of the medium and light grades.
However, there was one load of good
heavy hogs weighing around 280 pounds
that brought the extreme top of the mar
ket. $13.50. j .
The bulk of the good heavy hogs *old
around $13.25, with some as low as
$13.15 and a few at sl3 35.
-Good medium hogs brought [email protected];
with a few at $3.25.
Light hogs generally brought sl3, with
a few going as low as $12.90.
The bulk of sales for the early trad
ing was close to sl3.
Trading on the cattle market was quiet,
with onlv 150 fresh cattle on the mar
ket for sale. The yards are fairly well
cleared of stale cattle.
l*Ttces were generally steady, with
the few good cattle on the market proba
bly a little atronger.
Calves were about steady with the
close of the Friday market.
However, there was a sls top, which
wag 50c higher than the Friday top, but
generally prices were steady.
Receipt* for the day approximated 200.
With light receipts at 200. sheep were
steady at [email protected], and lambs were
higher with aa sll top.
HOGS-
Best light bogs, 160 to 200 ii>*
r-erage *[email protected]
200 t 0.300 lbs average 13.00013.2.5
Over 300 lbs [email protected]
Sows 11.30® 12.00
Best pigs, under 140 lbs...i. 13.50® 13.75
Bula of sales 1300
CATTLE.
Prime cornfed steers, 1,300 lbs
and up [email protected]
Good to choice steers, 1,200 to
1,300 lbs [email protected]
Good to choice steers, 1,100 to
1.200 lbs 10.75@ 13.75
Good to choice steers. 1,000 to
1.100 11 [email protected]
Common td medium steers.
900 to 1,000 lbs [email protected]
Heifers and Cows—
Good to choice heifers 1©[email protected]
Medium heifers 8.50® 9.00
Comon to medium heifers..., 6.0@ 7.50
Choice cow* .... [email protected]
Good to choice cows 7.oy@ ”-50
Fair to tnedlum cows *8.50@ 6.50
Canners 3.50® 4.25
Cutters ' 4.50@ 7.23
—Bail*—
Good to choice butcher bulls.. 7.5C® 9.00
Bologna bulls 0.06® 7.50
Light common bulls 4.50@ 6.00
—Calves—
Choice veals [email protected]
Good veals 12.00#13.0(1
Medium veals [email protected]
Light weight veals 7.<10@ 8.00
Heavy weight calves 4.50& 7.5 u
—Stockers and Feeders—
Good to choice steers. 800 lbs
and up [email protected]
Good to choice steers, under -
800 lbs 7.30® 8.00
Medium to good cows 5.00@ 5.50
Good cows 5.50 t 6.00
Good heifers 0.50® 7.50
Medium to good heifers 6.73® 7.00
Good milkers 50 00® 12500
Medium milkers * 60.00@100 00
Stock calves, 250 to 450 lbs... 7.00® 9.00
SHEEP AND LAMBS.
Good to choice sheep ........ 4.00@ 4.50
Fair to common 3 00@ 4.00
Bucks 3.00® 4.00
Lambs—
Common to choice yearlings.. 4.90@ 4.50
bpring lambs [email protected]
Other Live Stock
CHICAGO, Oct. 23.—Hogs-- Receipts,
4/A)0; market steady to strong; bulk,
[email protected]; bluchers, [email protected]>.
packers. [email protected]; lights. [email protected];
pigs, $12@18; roughs, $12.90<g|13.46. Cat
tle—Reclpts, 2.300; market steady; beeves.
[email protected]; butchers. $5,25@13; choice can
rers and cutters, [email protected]: stackers ano
feeders. [email protected]; cows, s.>@ll; calves,
[email protected]. Sheep—Receipts, 2,000; mar
ket Steady; laml>s, [email protected]; ewes,
|2.25@f1. f
CINCINNATI. Oct. 23.—Hogs—Receipts,
2.600; market steady to 50c lower; heavy,
mixed and medium. sl3; lights, $12.50:
pigs. $11.25; stags, $8.50. Cattle—Re
ceipts. 200; market steady; bulls, steady;
calves, sl6. Sheep and lambk—Receipts,
200; market steady; sheep, $1.00@5;
lambs, s6<ft 11.50.
CLEVELAND, Oct. 23.- Hogs Receipts,
1,500; market steady; Yorkers, $13.50;
mixed, >13.50; medium, $13.60; pigs,
$13.50; roughs. $12.50; stags. $8.50. Cat
tle—Receipts. 300; market slow. Sheep
and lambs—Receipts, 200; market steady;
top, sl2. Calves—Receipts, 250; market
slow; top, sl7. 1
EAST BUFFALO, N. Y., Oct. 23.—Cat
tle—Receipts, 675; market dull to steady;
shipping steers, $14.504416.50; butchers
fradcs, ffjCal-l; cows, $2.50@9. Calvfls—
leceipts, 300; market slow to 50c lower;
culls to choice, ss@l6. Sheep and lambs
—Receipts, 800: market active, lambs 25c
up, yearlings $1 up; choice lambs, Sl3@
13.23; culls to fair, [email protected]; yearlings,
[email protected]; sheep. s4@t. Hogs—Receipts.
2,8 W); market slow to steady and lower;
yorkers. $13.75(214; pigs. $13(5:13.26;
mixed, sl4; heavies, sl4; roughs, $ 114112;
stags, sß@lo.
EAST ST. LOUIS, Oct. 23.-Cattle-
Receipts, 0,000: market steady; native
beef steers. [email protected]: yarllng beef
steers and heifers, [email protected]; cows, s9ftt
9.50: Stockers and feeders. s‘J(gß; calves,
$14@15; canners and cutters, $3<54. 25.
Hogs—Receipts, 5,000;' market 10c lower;
mixed and butchers. $12.75(513.25; good
heavies, $13.15(513.25; rough heavies
$10.50(511.75; lights, $13<&13.25; ptgs, sl2
@13.20; bulk of sales. [email protected].
Sheep—Receipts, L 000; market nominal;
ewes, [email protected]; lambs, $11.25(511.75; can
ners and cutters, [email protected].
PITTSBURGH, Oct. 23.—Cattle— Re
veipts; light; market, steady; choice, sl4
@14.50; good, sl3@ 13.50; fair, $11@12;
veal calves, $16.50@17. Kheep and lambs
—Receipts, light; market, steady; prime
wethers, $6 [email protected]; good, [email protected]; mixed,
fair, [email protected]; spring lambs, $11.50@12.
Hogs—Receipts, 22 doubles; market, low
er; prime heavies, $13.50(0)14; mediums.
$13.50; heavy Y’orkers, [email protected]; light.
Yorkers, 512.50@13; pigs. $12.50@13;
roughs, s9@l2; stags, s7@B.
CHICAGO STOCKS.
(By Thomson & McKinnon)
Oct. 23-5-
Open. High. Low. Close.
Carbide & Car.. 59% 58% 58% 58%
Libby 12 12 11% 12
Mont.-Ward ... 25
Nat. Leather... 9% 9% 9% 9%
Sears Robk pfd.lll 112 111 112
Stewart-Warner 32 32 31% 31%
Swift & Cos 106%
Swift Inter 29 Vi
Arxh Lea "... 15%
Reo 23
CHICAGO PRODUCE.
CHICAGO, Oct. 23.- Butter—Creamery
extras. 56c; creamery firsts, 46%e; firstc,
41@540; seconds, 37@39c.
naries, 49@55c; firsts, 57%@58%c. Chccui
—Twins, 22%c; Young Americas, 23c.
Live poultry—Fowls, 22@23%c; ducks,
27c; geese, 26c; spring chickens, 27c; tur
keys. 86c; roosters, 20c, Potatoes— Re
ceipt!, 77 cars; Wisconsin and Minnesota,
$1.5001.75. i
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23,1920.
[ Local Stock Exchange
—Oct. 23
STOCKS.
Ind. Ry. & Light, com 55
Ind. Ry. A Light, pfd 80
Indpls. A-Northwest, p1d...y... 75
Indpls. & Southeast,, pfd 75
Indpls. St. Ry 60 70
T. H., T. & L. , Cl
T. H., I. A E.. c0m.... 1% 0
T. H„ 1. & E., pfd 9% 16
U. T. of Ind., com 1
U. T. of Ind., Ist pfd..... 10
U. T. of Ind., 2d pfd 2
Miscellaneous— -
Advance-Ruraely, com 28
Advance-Rumely, pfa
American Central Life 235
American Creosotlng, com 93
Belt Railroad, com 65 75
Belt Railroad, pfd 47%
Century Building, pfd 95
Cities Service, com
Cities Service, pfd
Citizens Gas 32% 35%
Dodge Mfg., pfd 91% ...
Home Brewing 55
Indiana Hotel, com 64
Indiana Hotel, pfd 91
Indiana National Life 4% ...
Indiana Title Guaranty 59
Indiana Pipe Line 90 93
Indpls. Abattoir, pfd 46 51
Indpls. pas 45% 50
Indpls. Tel., com. 9
Indpls. Tel., pf-1 88
Mer. Pub. Util., pfd 53
National Motor .... r; 8 11
Public Savings 2% ...
Rauh Fertilizer. Dfd 43
Standard OH of Indiana 740
Sterling Fire Insurance 8 ...
Van Camp Hdw., pfd ... 65
Van Camp Pack., Ist pfd 95,
Van Camp Prod., Ist pfd ... 95
Van Camp Prod., 2d pfd .... -95
Vandhlia Coal, com 5
Vandalia Coal, pfd 19
Wabash Ry., com 11 ...
Wabash Ry. pfd 31
Banks and Trust Companies—
Aetna Trust 100
Bankers Trust 118
City Trust 82
Commercial National 65 ...
Continental Nat. Bank 112
Farmers Trust 200
Fidelity Trust* 120
Fletcher Amor. National 256
Fletcher Sav. & Trust 163
Indiana National 283 290
Indiana Trust 194
Live Stock Exchange 450
Merchants National 279
National City 111% 112%
People'a Slate 176
Security Trust 120
State Savings and Trust.... 89 91
Union Trust S4O
Wash. Bank and Trust 150
BONDB. '
"Broad Ripple 3a 54 ...
Citizens r>t. Ry. 3s 74
Ind. Coke A Gas Cos. r,s 87
Indian Creek Coal A Min.... 08
Indpls. A Coluuj. South. 55.. 88
Indpls. & Greenfield 5s - 91% ...
Indpls. A Martinsville 55.... 55 ■..
Indpls. A North. 5s 42 48%
indpls. A Northwest. 5s 32 61
Indpls. A Southeastern 45
Indpls., Shelby A S. E. 55... 80
Indpls. St. Ry. 41 00 70
Indpls. True A* Term. ss. .p.. 71
KokomO, Marlon A Western. 80 86
Union l’rac. of Ind. 6s 31% 59
Citizens Gas Cos 78% SI
Ind. Hotel 2nd 0s 96% 100%
Indpls. Gas 5s 73 76
Indpls. Light and Heat 76 80
Indpls. Water 4%s 71 80
Indpls Water 5s 87% i
Vi H. and-L. Ref. 5s 87% 90
New Tel. Ist 6s 91
New Tel. Long Dlst. 5s 93% ...
South. Ind. Power €s 88
LIBERTY BONDS.
Liberty first 3%s 92~0 92.94
Liberty first 4 j
Liberty second 4a 88 90 80 24
Liberty first 4%s 89 88 1)2.12
Liberty second 4%5......... 88 80 89.04
Liberty third 4%# 90.8.’ 9106
Liberty fourth 4%a 89.00 89.24
Victory 3% 96.36 90 60
Victory 4%s 90.38 96.62
On Commission Rote
Trading on the wholesale produce
market opened with a brisk tone today
and the early hours held that tone.
With the week-end buying It is prob
able that trade would hold good
throughout the entire day.
There were no matertnl changes In the
price schedule, the principal changes In
the prices for the coming week to be
released at noon.
TODAY’S PRICES.
Sweet Apple Cider—Per gal., $1; half
gal.. 60c.
, Apples—Barrel, s6@B.
Beans—Michigan navy in bags, per lb,
California large white, in sacks,
sc; JPolorado nlntos, in bags, per pound,
7Hs&e; red kidneys, In bags, per lb,
17%(fjl8o; red kidneys, in bags, per lb,
17%Ol8>e: California pink chill. In bags,
| per lb. BV((j%e; lintels, per lb, 13c;
I California red chill. In bags, per lb, B%®
B%c; California limns. In bag, ll@l2c.
Beets —Fancy Dome grown, per bu,
11.5 C
Cabbage— Home-grown, per lb, 2c.
Cantaloupes—Honey Dews, per crate, S3.
Carrots—Fancy, home grown, per bu.
$1.50.
Celery—Fancy High Ball, per crate,
$175412.
Cucumbers Fancy home-grown, per
doz, s2@2 25.
Cranberries—Per bbl, $10; per half bbl
boxea> ss.so; per bu, $3.50.
I (Jrape<t--California Malagas and To
; ksys. per 25-Ib crate, $2.75@: California
Aniperors, per 25-lb. crate, s3@3 25.
Egg Plant—Fancy home-grown, per
doz. $1 .25® 1 40.
1 . Grapefruit—Fancy Isle of Pine, per
■ box, sßbo@7; extra fancy Florida, per
j box, [email protected].
i Lemons —Extra fancy California Suu
klst, per box, $5.75@6; extra fancy Cali
fornia choice, per box, $5.50@6.
Lettuce —Fancy home-grown leaf, per
bu basket. $1; fancy home-grown endive,
per doz, 40c; fancy home-grown head
lettuce, per bu. $1.65; fancy Washington
Iceberg, per crate, $7.50; fanpy hot house,
per lb. 10c.
Onions Fancy home-grown, yellow,
per 100-lb bag, [email protected]; fancy Indiana
whites, per 100-lb bag. $2.85; extra fancy
Indiana, white, per 100-lb bag, $2.75@5;
fancy Spanish, per crate, $2.50; fancy
pickling, per 30-lb box, $1.50.
Oranges—Extra fancy California Valen
clts, per csdte, [email protected].
Parsley—Fancy home-grown, per dez,
25c
Prune*—Fancy Idaho Italian, 18-lb box,
$175.
Pears —All kinds. $1.15(03 per bu.
Radishes— Button home-grown, per do*,
25c; fancy tong, per do 2,25 c; fancy
Michigan, round whites, per 150-lb bag.
$3.75(03.30
Sweet Potatoes—Fancy Virginia Red
Stars, bbl, $5; per hamper, [email protected].
Spinach—Fancy home-grown, per bu,
$1.25.
Squash—Summer, per bu, $1.75.
Tomatoes— Fancy home-grown, per bu,
$1.50 @2.
Turnips—Fancy home-grown, new, per
bu, $1.50@1 75. •
WHOLESALE FEED PRICES.
Top Sacks. Cwt.
Acme brand $42.00 $2.15
Acme feed 42.00 2.15
Acme middlings 48.00 2.45
Acme dairy feed \ 60.00 3.05
E-Z dairy feed 49.25 2.50
Aonie H. & M 48.75 2.50
Acme stock feed 42.00 2.15
Cracked corn 48.75 2.50
Acme chicken feed 58.00 2.95
Acme scratch 55.00 2.80
E-Z scratch 52.00 2.65
Acme dry mash 58.50 2.95
Acme hog feed 56.00 2.85
Homlik yellow 48.75 2.50
Rolled barley ' 56.75 2.90
Alfalfa mol 55.00 2.80
Cotton seed meal 63.25 3.20
Linseed oil'meal... 69.00 3.50
GRAINS.
Shelled corn, small lots $ 1.12
Shelled corn, large lots 1.1 l
Shelled corn. 2-bu sacks 1.18
Oats, bulk, large 63
Oats, less than 100 Ru 68
Chicken wheat, cwt. sacked 4.00
CORN MEAL AND FLOUR.
Cdrn meal, Nwt, net $ 3.80
E-Z-Bake bakers* flour. DS-lh sacks. 12.70
_ -
CLEVELAND PRODUCE.
CLEVELAND, Oct. 23. —Butter—Extra
tub lots, 01@61%c; prints, 62@62%c; ex
tra firsts, 59%@80c ; firsts, 58%@5Jc; sec
onds, 55@56c. Eggs—Ohio firsts, new
cases, 62c; old, 61c; fresh gathered
Northern extras, 66c; extra firsts, 62c;
Western cases, firsts, 60c (a case, con
tains 80 dozen). Poultry—Good heavy
fowls, 25{J30c; light stock, 25(3300;
broilers, 25@30c; old roosters, 21@23e;
spring ducks, 35@37e.
GRAIN PRICES
SAG AT CLOSE
British Labor Situation Princi
pal Factor.
CHICAGO, Oct. 23.—After opening
strong quotations on grain on the fhl
cago Board of Trane sagged today and
cld&ed lower than yesterday.
The British labor situation was the
main factor in the drop.
Provisions were irregular.
December wheat was up 2%r at the
opening, $2.04%, and closed off 4%e.
March wheat opened at $1.90, off %c, and
closed Apwn 2%c.
December corn was up %c at the open
ing, 81 %c, and was off le at the close.
May corn opened unchanged at 87%c, and
closed off %c.
December oats was unchanged at the
opening, 53%c, and closed at that figure.
May oats opened unchanged at 58%c, and
lost .%c in later trading.
(By Thomson A McKinnon.)
* —Oct. 28-
Wheat—The only evidence of any ex
port business was reported buying of the
December delivery in the Southwest.
This could quite possibly have been
against sales consummated yesterday
which by the way was made possible be
cause of plentiful offerings from south
western. shippers. On* the question of
foreigu demand, It is to be noted that
vessels have been sailing from Montreal
without any grain lu holds. There was
some business reported In rye la the way
of export, but at a reduction in premium
of 3c. This lowering of bids and the
fuct that ths export demand appears
only on good depressions in price, sugy
gests that forreign demand is of a leis
urely sort, therefore is not likely to ap
pear when markets are advancing. There
are mauy Items drifting in from the com
mercial world, all showing a considera
ble destruction of demand. This attitude
on purt of buyers will In all probability
appear in everything, even foods.
Corn—An item in the corn situation
is reduction of premiums for current ar
rivals, No. 2 mixed selling today at 3%c
over December, yellow* *md white at 3%c
to c. This Is of importance for the rea
son that it is a reflection of the poor
demand. Still nnother Item is the fact
that receipt* from the country are con
tinuing longer and of greater size than
any one expected. Distributing and In
dustrial demand for corn are both dis
tinctly slow, probably another illustra
tion of the waiting uttitude of all con
sumers.
tilts—There have been hedging sales
coming from Northwest. Demand has
been < outined to previous sellers. Mar
ket will be governed by <-'>ra.
Provisions—Foreign demand decreased
greatly and the southern trade is not
brisk.
(.'HICAOO GRAIN.
—Oct. 23-
WHEAT— Open. High. Low. Close.
Dec .' 2.04% 2.04% 1.09 2.09
March... 1.98 1.96% 1.92% 1.95%
CORN— 7
Dec 81% 81% 80% 80%
May 87% 87% 86% 86%
OATS—
Dec 53% 53% 53% 53%
.... 58% 58% 58% 58%
•Oct :... .22 75
•Nov 22.75
LAUD—
Oct 20.05 20 25 20.00 20 25
Nov 19.70 19 80 19.62 19.02 .
RIBS- '
•Oct 16 75
Jan 14.30 14.30 14.05 14.05
•Opened nominal.
CHICAGO CASH GRAIN.
CHICAGO, Oct. 23.—Wheat- No. 2 red.
V’[email protected]; No. 3 red, 52.05; No. 1 hard
winter, $2 [email protected]%; No. 2 hard winter,
*2.07%. Corn No. 2 white 88%@s7e;
No. 1 yellow, 84%@55%c; No 3 white.
83c; No. 2 yellow, 84%@85%e. fiats No.
2 white. 53%@.*4e; No. 3 white. 52@52%c;
No. 4 white, 61%c.
TOLEDO CASII GKAIX.
TOLEDO, Oct. 23.~>tb8e: Wheat-
Caah. $2220; December, $1.77. Corn—No.
2 yellow-, 9.1 c. Oata—No. 2 yellow, 56%
@.m %c. It ye—No. 2, $1.70. Barley—No.
2, soc. ( loverseed Cash i1919i. 112.35;
<1920), $12.93; October, *l2 95; December,
sl3 06; February. sl3 10; March. $13.07%;
January, $13.06. Timothy -Cash (1918
and 1919), $3.22; Octocx-r, $3.45; Decern*
tier, *3.30; March, $3.40. Alftke—Caab.
$17.50; October, sl6; December and
March, sl7.
96.30 90 60
90.38 96.62
PRIMARY MARKETS.
(By Thomson Jk McKinnon.)
—Oct. 23
Wheat. t’orn. Oats.
Chicago 23.000 319,000 218,000
Minneapolis... 524,000 It,ooo 138.000
Duluth 257.000 40.000
-St. Louis 73,000 II'.OOO 42,000
Toledo 141.000 3,000 13,000
Detroit.. 14.000 5,000 6,000
Kansas City.. 196.000 13.000 14,000
Omaha 176,000 7AOOO 86.000
Indianapolis.. 7.000 84,000 78.000
Totals 1.411,000 533,000 555,006
Year ago.. 1.718.000 467.000 631,000
Shipments—
Wheat. Corn. Oats.
Chicago 20.000 391.000 235,000
Minneapolis... 173,000 11.000 56.000
Duluth 137.000
St. I.nuts 75.000 24.000 36,000
Toledo 2.000 24 000
Kansas City.. 262,000 6.000 7,000
Omaha 118.000 11.000 .30.000
Indianapolis 22,000 20,000
Totals 785.000 467.000 .390.000
Year ago... 688,000 397,000 776,000
—Clearances—
Domestic W. Corn. Oats.
Boston 82,000 •
Totals 82.000
Year ago... ii*,ooo
INDIANAPOLIS CASH GRAIN.
—Oct. 23
Bids for car lot* of grain and hay at
the call of the Indianapolis Board of
Trade were:
Corn —Steady: No. 2 white, 86@87%c:
No. 2 yellow, 85@57c; No. 2 mixed, 84@
85 %c.
Oata—Steady: No 2 white, 960530;
No. 3 white, 51 %@52%e; No. 2 mixed,
Xp2e.
Hay—Steady; No. 1 timothy, $27.50@
28: No. 2 timothy, $26.50®27; No. 1 light
clover mixed, $264/26.50; No. 1 clover bay.
$24.50625.50.
Inspections—
Wheat—No. 5 red, 1 car; No. 2 mixed,
1 car; sample. 3 cars; total, 6 cars.
Corn—No. 2 white, 17 ears; No. 2 yel
low, 10-cars; No. 2 mixed, 2 cars; total,
29 ears.
Oats—No. 2 white. ]g cars; No. 3 white,
3 cars; total, 21 cars.
BOARD OF TRADE STATEMENT.
The weekly statement of the Indian
apolis bciard of trade, showing the output
of flour by local mills, inspections for
the week aud stock in store, follows:
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT.
Output of Flour— Barrels.
Oet. 23, 1920 - 8 591
Oct. 16, 1920 8.667
Oct. 25, 1919 14,232
Oct. 26. 1918 7,733
Inspections for Week— —Bushels—
In. Out.
Wheat 39,000 5.000
Corn 391.000 162,000
Oats 312,000 164,000
Rye 6,000
—Stock In Store —
Wheat. Corn. Oats. Rve.
Oct .23, 1920 . 282,730 412,790 505,830 1.000
Oct. 25, 1919. 340,810 113,880 299,570 45,770
Oct. 26. 191S. 238,320 573,800 199,980 5,350
HAY MARKET.
The following are the Indianapolis
prices for hay by the wagon load.
Ilay—Loose timothy, new, $26@28;
mixed hay, new, $22@25; baled, $26(328.
Corn—Bushel, [email protected]. ,
Oats—Bushel, new, 55@57e.
XVAGON WHEAT.
Indianapolis flour mills today are pav
ing $2 for No. 1 red wheat, $1.97 for No.
2 red wheat, and $1.94 for No. 3 red.
Other grades according to their quality.
Oats—Per bu, 43c.
WHOLESALE BEEF TRICES.
The following are today’s wholesale
market prices for beef cuts sold by the
Indianapolis markets:
Ribs -**No. 2,39 c; No. 3.24 c. Lions—
No. 2,26 c: No 3,22 c. Rounds—No. 2,
25c; No. 8,22 c. Chucks—No. 2,16 c;
No. 3,13 c. Plates—No. 2,12 c; No. 3,11 c.
LOCAL HIDE MARKET.
Green Hides—No. 1,9 c; No. 2, Bc.
Green calves—No. 1,11 c; No. 2, 9%c.
Horsebldes—No. 1, $5; No. 2, $4. Cured
hides—No. 1,19 c; No. 2. 9c.
\ >
Weather
' The following table shows the state of
the weather at 7 a. m., Oct. 23, as ob
served by United States weather bureaus:
Bar. Temp. Weath.
Indianapolis, Ind... 30.13 02 Cloudy
Atlanta, Ga.‘ 30.10 63 Clear
Amarillo, Tex 29.00 42 PtCldy
Bismarck, N. D.... 20.88 40 Cloudy
Boston, Mass 30.20 48 Clear
Chicago, 111 30.10 64 FtCldy
Cincinnati, Ohio 30.14 50 Clear
Cleveland, Ohio 30.18 58 Cloudy
Denver, Colo 30.28 30 Know
Dodge City, Kas... 30.00 44 Clear
Helena, Mont 30.34 23 Clear
Jacksonville, Fla... 30.04 63 Clear
Kansas City M 0... 30.04 56 Clear
Louisville. Ky. 30.1.2 58 Clear
Little Rock, Ark... 20.96 63 Cloudy
Los Angeles, Cal... 30.00 53 Clear
Mobile, Ala 30.00 70 Cloudy
New Orleans, La... 20.94 72 Cloudy
New York, X. Y.... 30.20 54 Clear
Norfolk, Va 30.12 06 Clear
Oklahoma City 20.94 62 Rain
Omaha, Neb 30 10 46 Clear
Philadelphia, Pn... 30.22 54 Clear
Pittsburgh, Pa 30.20 56 Clear
Portland. Ore 30.38 50 Cloudy
Rapid City, 5...D... 30.24 32 Clear
Iloseburg, Ore 30.38 48 Cloudy
San Antonio, Tex... 29.88 70 Cloudy
San Francisco, Cal. 80.08 54 Clear
St. Louis, M 0....... 30.10 04 Rain
St. Paul, Minn 30.00 43 PtCldy
Tampa, Fla 80.00 70 Clear
Washington, D. C.. 30.20 62 Cloudy
WEATHER CONDITIONS.
Since Friday morning showers have
continued from the western gulf to the
western lakes, und upper Mississippi
Valley, and rains or snows have failsn
from the middle Rockies northward. Tem
peratures are lower over most of the Mis
souri and upper .Mississippi Valleys and
northern Rocky Mountains region, and
in the northeaet; but tbe readings are
not much. If any, below the seasonal
average In any of these districts, except
in Yellowstone Park, where a tempera
ture of 12 degrees was reuorted.
J. H. ARMINGTON,
Meteorologist, Weather Bureau.
Railroad Men Will
AttendJMnner Party
Lemuel Bolles, national adjutant of
the Amerlcau Legion, will address the
Indianapolis Transportation Club next
Wednesday night at p Halloween dinner
to be served in the Rdinbow room of the
Hotel Stverin.
Another talk will be given by W. E.
Pittsford, who will discuss "Business Or
ganization.”
E. P. Humston will be toastmaster at
the dinner. *
B. W. Fredenbtirg, commercial agent
of the Illinois Central Railroad Company,
Is chairman of the banquet committee.
Louisville, Cincinnati and Chicago rail
road men will attend the dinner.
Grand Jury Indicts
in Spiceland Robbery
Special to The Timse.
NEWCASTLE, lud., Oct. 23.—The
Henry County grand Jury returned an
Indictment Friday In connection with the
robbery of the Spiceland Bank Feb. 20,
1920. - |
It Is understood the Indictment names
at least three men. Including Halford
Johnson of Losantvllto, Randolph County,
now under sentence to the state reforma
tory for robbery, and who confessed to
assisting In robbing the Spiceland bank
and a number of other banks In this
section of the State.
Marriage Licenses
Stanley gooezah. 1914 Ittrer ave 30
Laura Underwood. 10*4 River sve 36
Hyman Newman. 817 S. Meridla.i 5t.... 26
Lillian Greenburg. 33 N. Noble st 23
John Clark, 1227 Wright at 23
Anna Butler, 538 Buchanan at 21
Verla Keller. Midland 28
Hattie Heneley, Vicksburg 24
Cornelius J. WalkWr. 112 W. North st.. 22
Jessie K. Lawson, 112 W. North st... 24
Clarence A. Henry. 247 N. Bevllle ave. 26
Lueila Stanley, 1532 E. Market at 22
Melon Fisher, Vincennes 31
Evelyn Keesllng, 911 E. Twenty-First. 19
Frederick Kapp, Ft. Harrison ........ 20
Berdie Venter, Lawrence 20
Arthur Stuart, 044 Marion are 24
Helen Gentry, 644 Marlon ave 26
William Nugent, Chicago, 111 31
Della Eckler, 2444 N, Meridian st 29
Kenneth Wiseman. 619 Congress ave... 23
Adella Quinlan, College and Illinois st. 33
Houston Shoppaob, Ft. Harrison 22
Laura Wilson, 332 Douglass st 22
James Manllef, 314 E. Morris 5t.f.... 47
Katherine Snhyers, 314 E. Morris st... 40
John Byrd, Connersville 32
Jessie Twaddell, Los Anglese, Cal 27
It. H. Mitchell. 1118 Woodlawn ave 22
Alma Uukriele, 1335 S. State st 19
Births
Benjamin and Maude Johnson, 1519 W.
Morris, boy.
s WUHam and Dorothy Clifford, Deacon
ess Hospital, girl.
Joseph and Thoraion, Deaconess
Hospital, boy.
l>atonla and Clara Collier, 1003 Elm.
boy.
John and Hazel Balay, 2143 Bellefon
lalne, girl.
David and Helen White, 2447 N. Gale,
boy.
Shirley and -Olive Kerrlck, 2750 Chester,
Klrl.
Uannady and Mary Jackson, City Hos
pital. boy.
William and Ruth Walters, 810 Dor
man, girl.
Robert and Alberta Scott, 519 W. Thir
teenth, boy.' *
Samuel and Hazel Welch, 1162 W. Thir
ty Fonrth, boy.
I.ulher and Hattie Kurtz, 2311 North
western. boy.
Deunis and Louise Dunlap, 915 Colton,
boy.
Claude and Grace McDougall. 964 W.
Pearl, boy.
Irvin and Agnea Hart, 3006 Graceland,
boy.
Anton and Emma SmardeU, 737 Ketch
am, boy.
James and Amanda Kelly, 930 W. Shef
field, boy.
Walter and Ella Slmmerman, 67 S.
Dearborn, boy,
Lucius and Harriett Hamilton, St. Vin
cent’s Hqspltal, boy.
August and Katherine St. Vin
cent’s Hospital, boy.
Thomas and Mary Dever, St. Vincent’s
Hospital, girl.
Samuel and Eva Webbhoft, 301 S. Ar
lington, girl.
Samuel and Ethel Keller, 1220 Nordyke,
girl.
Patrick and Mary Corcoran, 1205 Pleas
ant. girl.
Charles and Richey Fraejie. 663 Blake,
girl-
Deaths
Ruth Carmine Fagan, 1, 1161 Belt,
Ileocolitis.
Wallace Molder, 2 months, 517 South
Alabama, entero colitis.
Frank William Rusko, 67, 621 North
Rural, chronic nephritis.
Infant Shaw. 6 hours, City Hospital,
premature birth.
Llddta Clark, 48, 40S Muskingum, gas
tro enteritis.
Infant Hlghleyman, 2 days, Methodist
Hospital, spina bifida.
Charles Sullivan, 35, City Hospital,
abscess of brain.
Emma Wagner, 70. 1610 Pleasant,
chronic myocarditis.
Jordon Leroy Dawning, 3 months,
Fairview Settlement House, gastro en
teritis^
Infant Jackson, 12 hours, City Hos
pital, congenital atelectasis.
W HOLES ALK PRODUCE.
Eggs—Fresh, loss off, 57c.
Poultry—Fowls, 17@22c; broilers, 1%
to 2 lbs, 30c; broilers, Leghorn, 22c;
cocks, 16c; ola tom turkeys, 35c; young
tom turkeys, 12 lbs and up, 40e; young
hen turkeys, 8 Ijs and up 40c; cull thin
turkeys not v anted; ducks, 4 lbs and
up, 25c; ducks, under
10 lbs and up, 20c; yothig geese, 22c;
/■quabs, 11 lbs to dozeu, $6; guineas, 3
lbs per do*. #9.
Better—Buyers are payiug 564157 c for
creamery butter delivered at Indianapo
lis.
Butterfat—Buyers are paying 52@53c
for cream delivered r.t Indianapolis.
Cheese (Jobber*’ selling prices)—Brick,
30@31c: New York cream 32c; Wlfcou
sln full cream, 31®33c; /onghorus, 31 @
38c; llmburger, domestic,
60ci imported,
‘TAKES A PASTOR
TO GET FOOLISH’
Remark of Slain Preacher
After ‘Rent Hog 5 Charge.
CHICAGO. Oct. 23.—"1t taken a
preacher to get foolish when he tries
Ms hand at business.”
Tills was the comment made by the
Rev. Frederick O. Ruff, who was
killed here today by Frederick Se-x
---tro, a tenant, when he was brought
up several months ago as a “rent
hog" before* the committee of aider
men investigating the housing situa
tion.
The pastor felt the sting of the
charge, which he bitterly resented,
and declared the accusations were
made by a “cheap-skate tenant with
a champagne appetite and a beer in
come.” ,
The apartment in which the Rev.
Mr. Raff lived was luxurious even for
the North Shore neighborhood.
The .building the edge of
Lake Michigan and was modern in all
details.
Rents in one of his buildings had
been increased by the Rev. Mr. Ruff
from $65 to SIOO and from SIOO to
$l5O a month, to informa
tion given the aldermen.
TO OPEN SCHOOL
FOR INSTRUCTORS
Playground Teachers Will
Start Course Nov. 4.
The recreation department school foi
playground instructors will be opened at
Lauter Slemorial Hall, Market and Greer
street, on Thursday evening, Nov. 4.
Young women who are seniors of lo
cal high schools, students at Butler Col
lege or the Teachers’ College of Indian
apolis, or who are of proper age and are
interested in the work, are eligible to at
tend the classes, which will be held from
6:30 to 9 o'clock each Thursday evening
during the winter.
Many of the playground instructors for
summer wilr he chosen from tbe students.
R. Walter Jarvis, director of recreation,
and his assistant, Miss Alice Mescali,
will supervise the school.
Instructors are Miss Clara Ledlg, Miss
Ethel Hughes and Miss Gertrude Hacker,
dancing and gymnasium; Miss Rose
Lynn, art and industrial work, and Mrs.
Murrle Carr, musical appreciation.
Prospective students may register at
the recreation department offices In the
city hall any time from Monday until the
day of the school opening.
Classes in gymnasium, art and indus
trial work and musicar appreciation will
be conducted for both bpyg and girls at
the Brightwood and Greef* street commu
nity centers and at the Indianapolis Or
phans' Home, the Indiana State School
for the Deaf and possibly at the Indiana
State School for the Blind, i
Girls at the two community centers
will receive advanced Instruction In aes-'
thetic and Interpretative dancing.
COURT SUSTAINS
ORAL DEMURRER
Socialist Labor Ticket May
Not Appear on Ballot.
In sustaining an oral demurrer of the
State election commissioners to the com
plaint of Alexander Burkhardt asking
that the State election board be man
dated to place the names of the caudi-,
dates of the Socialist Labor party oh
the State ballots. Circuit Judge Harry
Chamberlin today practically prevented
the petition being granted.
The plaintiffs were given sixty days
within which to file an appeal.
Counsel for the State board held that
the Socialist Labor party In Its complaint
for a mandate did not follow the pro
visions as stated by law under which
such actions shall be filed.
The Socialist Labor party sought to
compel the State election commissioners
to place the names of their candidates
on th official ballots.
In Superior Court, room 5. Judge T.
J. Moll heard three hours arguments on
a petition of the Independent Republican
Tarty asking that Its ticket with a list
of county candidates be placed on the
official ballots.
The action Is directed against the mem
bers of the Marion County Election
Board.
Woodbnrn Masson, Democratic mem
ber of the board, offered to file an answer
sustaining the petition of the plaintiffs,
but the court overruled It. .
Judge Moll took the petition of the
Independent Republican party, asking
for a mandate, under advisement.
Believe Gems, Worn by
Woman, Part of Loot
CLEVELAND. Ohio, Oct„2£~Tb $25.-
000 worth of gems found on a woman as
sociate of reputed bank robbers arrested
here was believed part of $200,000 worth
of jewelry stolen from a diamond sales
man recently In Buffalo.
The woman gave her name as Mrs. Mil
dred Johnson and said she was the
mother of Harry Johnson, alias Joyce,
who was slain after he and his com
panions had robbed the Bedford bank of
$53,000.
Statehouse Grounds
Will Be Rearranged
Plans have been prepared by the de
partment of parks and adopted by the
building and grounds committee of the
State government for the beautification
of the StatehoUße lawn. Park Superint.u
dent James H. Lowry announced today.
The plan contemplates the rearrange
ment of walks and flower and shrub
bery beds suitable to properly display
the architecture of the building, Mr.
Lowry said.
Similar beautification will be made In
the plazas surrounding the Federal build
ing before winter, Mr. Lowry said.
Farm Fire Aid Plait
Afoot at South Bend
Special to The Times-
SOUTH BEND, Jnd.. Oct. 23.—Protec
tion from fire for New Carlisle, near
here, and for farmers within four miles
of the town, Is provided for by the pur
chase of anew chemical fire tru-;k.
An afrangement Is being considered
wfifereby the farmers will be asked to
contribute for the privilege of summon
ing the truck.
TWO ENTER PLEAS OF GUILTY,
HARTFORD CITY, Ind., Oct. 23.
Upon entering pleas of guilty In
Juvenile Court to charges of contrib
uting to delinquency of young girls,
Mrs. Eva Walker of this city received a
suspended sentence of sixty days to tbq
woman’s prison and a fine of S2O, and
William Keeley, also of Hartford City,
waa-flned sls.
TEVER PATIENT ASKS DAMAGES.
KGKOMO, Ind., Oct. 23.—Dorothy Fay
Relgle fias sued Joseph D. Studebakerl
and Fannie B. Studebaker for $5,000 dam
ages, alleging that her sickness was
caused by typhoid fever contracted be
cause she drank of water from a weh
condemned by the State Board of Health
on the defendants’ property. Goldie
Relgje, a sister, recently recovered S6OO
on the same grounds. .
KILLS PREACHER
PROWLER IN HALL
Tennant Says He Mistook
Landlord for Burglar.
CHICAGA, Oct. 23.—Frederick Sextro.
wealthy manager of a coal company here,
admitted today, police say, he shot and
killed the Rev. Frederick Raff, pastor of
the Memorial Methodist Chuffch in the
exclusive North Shore district and own
er of several apartment buildings.
Sextro, when taken to the Rogers Park
police station, declared he mistook the
pastor for a burglar when he met him
In the hallway.
Sextro occupied an apartment above
the one In which the pastor and his fam
ily lived.
According to Information given po
lice, Sextro was among the many tenants
of buildings owned by the pastor who
had quarreled with Ruff recently be
cause of large Increases in rent.
■s. The pastor, his wife and three chil
dren were preparing to go to Melvin, Ill
early today, where they planned to vielt
John Ehl, a brother of Mrs. Ruff.
Mrs. Rutt and the children went out
to the automobile In front of the apart
ment house, where they adjusted the bag
gage and made other arrangements far
the trip, while Rev. Mr. Buff was sup
posed to be shutting the windows, lock
ing the doors and getting tbe apartment
In shape to leave.
Mrs. Ruff was overcome and could not
talk.
She was the first one to reach her hus
band’s side after the shooting.
The pastor was taken to St. Vincent’*
Hospital In Evanston, but was dead when
the ambulance reached the Institution.
During tbe investigation a few month*
ago by a committee of aldermen into the
high rent conditions in Chicago the Rev.
Mr. Ruff was among the landlords calls!
to give an explanation of why bis rents
were increased by iarge amounts.
Police were unable to find a logical ex
planation of why the Rev. Mr. Ruff had
gone to the second floor Instead 'ot
stopping at his own apartment.
The theory was advanced he might
have absent-mindedly walked past his
own door. _..
Sextro denied he had quarreled with
the pastor over rents.
Following his preliminary examination
police held Sextro tor further questloa
iug.
SOLDIER FOUND
DEAD AT CAPITAL
WASHINGTON, Oct. 23.—A new mur
der mystery today baffled police of
Washington and Alexandria, Va., as a re
sult of the finding of the body of an
overseas veteran believed to have been
’ murdered three days ago.
Cards in clothing on the body bore the
name MaJ. Frank M. Scanlon. Louisville,
Ky.
The body was found In a field a mile
north of Alexandria.
Police believed the man was beaftn to
death.
SEEK RELATIVES
OF MURDERED MAN
WASHINGTON, Oct. 23.—Police today
were trying to get in touch with rela
tives of a man believed to be Frank
Scanland. found murdered in a field in
Alexandria, Va,
They have no clew as to the identity
of the assailant.
According to Information obtained from
a local hotel and war risk insurance
bureau, Scanland's home was in Youngs
town, N. Y. He had a wife and children
j there, according to police. \ ,
BOY, 12, FACES
MURDER CHARGE
Grand Jury, in Partial Report,
Returns 13 Bills.
Walter Good, 12, colored, 419 West Six
teenth street, today was indicted for the
murder of his playmate, Joseph Ed
wards. colored, Aug. 3, laet. by the Marl
on County grand jury, when that body
made Its sixteenth partial report by re
turning a total of thirteen indictments.
Good Is said to be the youngest person
to be indicted on the serious charge of
murder in this county.
The boy has been confined at tbe Juve
nile Detention Home since the fatal
shooting of young Edwards.
According to the attaches of the Juve
nile Court who investigated the case.
Good and his victim were playing "Wild
West," and Good, by holding t revolver,
prevented Edwards from going heme.
It is said by the court officials that
when Edwards finally started home Good
pdlled the trigger of the revolver and
the tragedy resulted.
Uuder Indiana Jaw, the judge of the
Criminal Court has the right to transfer
the case to the juvenile court because
of the tender age of the boy.
Judge James A. Collins permitted th*
following additional indictments to be
made public: Alonzo
Muskingum street, vehicle taking; Lahe
Alexander, 1312 Nofith Senate avenue, re
ceiving stolen goods; Joe Shea, 508 North
Illinois street, and Robert Forestal, 1051
West North street, Tepreseating them
selves to be an officer and threatening
to arrest Martha Ryan, 1336 West Wftb.
tngton street; Rodney Biggs, 825 West
Torbitt street, burglary and grand lar
ceny; Clifford Allen, alias Earl C. Allen,
vehicle taking, and Carl Stafford, Issu
ing fraudulent checks.
Reputed Dog Thieves
T a ke n at Noblesville
Special to The Times.
NOBLESVILLE, Ind., Oct. 23.—With
tbe arrest at Frankfort of Arthur
Plunkett and Elmer Keck, local authori
ties believe they have apprehended two
members of a gang which has been steal
ing fine dogs in this section of the State.
It is charged they stole three hounds
valued at SIOO each /rom Howard Flekal
and Richard Beaver Saturday night.
The dogs are said to have been found
in possession of Plunkett and Keck.
Flurries
of the Market
do not worry the investor
who buys high grade listed
stocks and bonds outright
and holds them for perma
nent profit.
The Kriebel Plan of outright bar
ing on convenient payments will
make of you a food investor. It
enables you to control fire times aa
large a block of securities aa toss
could control on a cash basis. You
get all dividends while paying.
Our magas/ne, "Investment,’* ssflt
keep you posted on the vital news
about the better class of listed seenri
ties. Ask ut to •end it id you Btt
for fix month*. Dept* 1.
KBIEBEL & CO.'
- INVESTMENT HANKERS
So. LaSalle St. Chicaqo.
DON’T THROW A
BRICK
There’s a Reason
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