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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, October 30, 1920, Last Home Edition, Image 11

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STOCK MARKET
TONE VIGOROUS
Steel Industrials Neglected—
Southern Pacific Leads.
NEW TORE. Oct. 30.—The stock mar
ket opened with Tlgorous buying in many
Issues today, but for a time the steel
Industrials were comparatively neglected,
interest being centered in various other
groups.
Southern Pacific continued to bold the
market leadership, being traded in on a
large scale and opening with a gain of
one point at 102. After reacting to 101%,
the stock later moved up to above 102.
United Fruit was also prominent, ad
vancing 3% to 223. and Atlantic Gulf and
West Indies rose one point to 113.
Marine common rose % to 19%. Asso
ciated Oil advanced 2% points to 107%,
the buying being based on remarks that
the company'will be usM as a holder and
operator of Southern Pacific Oil lands.
Mexicau Petroleum made a gain of %
to 192% and then reacted to 191%.
Pan-American Petroleum rose % to
SB%.
Royal Dutch continued under pressure,
slllng*down 1% to 71%. 1
United' States Rubber was also under
pressure because of the trade conditions
reflected In the prices announced yester
day, and dropped 3 points to 72%; Steel
common shaded off % to 87% and then
moved back to 88.
Baldwin Locomotive advanced % to
113 Vi.
The market closed irregular.
Closing prices included: United States
Steel, 88%, up Vi; Baldwin Locomotive,
112%, unchanged; Pan-American, 86%.
off %; Southern Pacific, 102%, up Vi I
Ptndebaker, 57V*. off % : American Smelt
ing. 60%. up 1: Texas Company, 51%,
off %; Mexican Petroleum, off IV4; Read
ing, 05%, off %; Crucible Steel, 124,
off %.
(By Thomson A McKinnon.)
—Oct. 30-
There was every reason why we should
have had a fairly active market today.
The confirmation at Washington that
the Mexican recognition was a settled
fact, October financing completed and tn
election next Tuesday that is counted
upon confidently to put new life into
business.
The short session, however, passed
with nothing unusual In the trading, only
a moderate volume of business, strength
Jn a few issues and weakness in a few
with only minor price changes through
the list.
The weakness In the rubber shares is
of greater significance than the fluctua
tions In other stocks because here the
market responded to the announcement
of cut prices.
This is the all important element in
industry at this time and up to the pres
ent only a few lines hare adopted drastic
enough measures to place them in a po
sition to do business on a deflated basis.
All industries must of necessity do
likewise and until so we can hardly be
Justified in expecting anything more than
temporary advance.
NEW TOR.K BTOCK SALES.
NEW YORK, Oct. 30.—Sales on the
stock exchange today totaled 199,400
shares aud $6,401,000 in bonds.
For the week the sale of share? totaled
2.739 000. while $70,904.00 in bonds were
•oid.
TWENTY STOCKS AVERAGE.
NEW YORK, Oct. 30—Twenty indus
trial stocks averaged SS.OS, an Increase
of .47 per cent. Twenty active rails av
eraged 82.57, an increase of .47 per cent.
CLEARING HOUSE STATEMENT.
NEW YORK, Oct. 30. V—Clearing house
statement: Subtreasury debit, $2,036,713;
exchange, $530,299,425, and balances, $71,-
927,788.
Money and Exchange
Indianapolis bank clearings Saturday
were $2,599,000, against $2,865,000 a week
ago.
For the week they were $15,562,000,
against $27,637,000 for the week before.
NEW YORK, Oct. 30—Foreign ex
change opened steady. Sterling $3.43%,
unchanged; francs .0038, up .0002; lire
.0374, unchanged; marks, .130, unchanged;
Canadian dollars .9044, unchanged.
The market closed lower. Sterling,
$3.43%, off I*4; francs, .0630, off .0008:
lire, .0270, off .0004; marks, .0128, off
.0003; lire cables, .0371; Canadian dollars.
.9044. *
NEW YORK. Oct. 30.—Commercial bai
silver: Domestic unchanged at 99%c;l
foreign, %c lower at 99c.
LONDON, Oet. 30. Bar silver waa %and
higher today, at 52%d.
MOTOS SECIRITIEg.
(By Thomson k McKinnon
—Oct. ao—
—Opening—
Bid. Ask.
Briscoe 14 lfi
Chalmers com 134 2%
Packard com 13 13%
Packard pfd 78 * 8t
Chevrolet 250 500
Peerless 31 S3
Contlnenial Motors com 7% '*4
Continental Motors pfd 93 95
Hupp com 1334 ]4
Hupp pfl 90 101
Eeo Motor Car 23(4 23%
Elgin Motors 7% 8(4
Grant Motors .... 2% 3%
Ford of Canada..,. 300 315
United Motors 30 50
National -Motors 7 10
Federal Truck 2o 24
Palse Motors 18 20
Republic Truck 30 34
7 7 FINANCIAL-
TJU CAN
BORROW MONEY
isO CHEAP
and on such easy terms or repayment
from the Fidelity Loan Com aany. a li
censed and bonded firm, for use in paying
overdue bills or to buy the things you
seed for CASH at BARGAIN PRICES
that every one should taka advantage of
our service.
LOANS ON FURNITURE
$20.00 to $300.00
•t legal rates, on short notice and without
publicity. We give you all the time you
went to repay a loan and only charge for
the actual time you have the money. Fair
Isn't it?
You Can Afford to Borrow
On $ 40 pay $2 a month and interest
On $ 60 pay $3 a month and interest
On SIOO pay $5 a month and interest
PAY MORE ANY TIME AND REDUCE
THE COST.
IN YOUR BEHALF
We are on the Job eight hours a day, and
through personal contact and personal
service, plus a deep personal Interest, we
. can serve you and your friends as you
I Wish to be served. In these unusual times
business friendships, close relations, mu
tual understandings and co-operation are
real assets to all it us. We are ready to
go three-fourths of the way. Now It is
up to you.
FIDELITY LOAN CO.
Use Our Serviee
OPEN AN ACCOUNT
WITH US
$lO0 —$200 —$300
investigate our easy-to-pay
Twenty-Payment Plan Loans.
Get ISO, pay back 12.50 a month.
Get 1100, " " 15.00 •’ ••
With interest at 3% per cent a
month. Pay faster if you like
less cost. T'or example:
Pay a ISO loan In full
In One Month.
TOTAL COST $1.76.
On Furniture. Pianos. Vlctrolaa,
etc., without removal.
ALSO ON DIAMONDS ETC.
Call, phone or write.
, Endlana Collateral
Loan Cos.
(Bonded Lenders.)
ESTABLISHED IIS7.
201 LOMBARD BUILDING,
1 24 h cast Washington st
I Main *SS. Auto. 26-711.
■NBURANCE in all branches. AUBREY
9 D PORTER 111 Peoples Bank Bldg
UKsin 70te.
■LOANS Oh diamonds; 3W77 per month
KBTIRTO** JEWELRY CO.. S3 Monu
j Stock Market Review
NEW YORK, Oct. 80.—Tbo Evening
Sun’s financial review today said:
“Although price movements in today’s
quiet short session of the stock market
were not uniform, there was a strong
under tone from the beginning, which
brought numerous strong spots compris
ing such issues as Southern Pacific, most
of the oils. National Aniline, United Fruit,
American Can, and so on.
“The leader in the trading was against
Southern Pacific, which was pushed for
ward in good buying volume on the
strength of news from Washington re
specting recognition of Mexico.
“United State Rubber was an out
standing weak feature, dropping several
points on the trade situation reflected in
the cutting of prices for rubber and tire 6.
“For the same reason, of course, Good
rich suffered substantial losses also.
“There was little change in the steei
industrials or In railroad descriptions as
a whole. Further railroad returns for
< September were not very good, with the
exception of Great Northern.
“The foreign exchanges were under
[ considerable pressure.
“Price reductions continue unabated,
according to the Federal Reserve Bank
review of conditions as well as the Dun
cud Bradstreet agencies.’’
N. Y. Stock Prices
—Oct. 30— Prev.
High. Low. Close, close.
Ajax Rubber... 39% 39% 39% ... .
Alaska G01d.... 1% 1% 1% 1%
Allis-Chalmurs. 32% 32% 32%
Am.B. Mag. Cos. 74 74 74 ” 72%
Am. Car Fdy...134% 134% 134% 134%
Ain. Cotton Oil. 27% 20% 25% 25%
Am.H. & L.pfd. 58% 58% 58% 58%
Am. Drug 9% 9% 9% 9%
Am.lnter.Corp.. 72% 72% 72V4 72%
Am. Linseed.... 67% 67% 67% 60%
Am. Locomotive 95 95 95 96
Am.Bmelt.& Ref. 60% 59% *50% 59%
Am.-S.Tobae.Co.. 86 86 86 86
Am.S. Fdry 37 37 37 37%
Am. Tel. & Tel. ltK) 99% joo 99%
Am. Tobacco ..126% 126% *126% 125%
Am. Woolen 70% 70% 70% 70%
Am. Zinc & Lead. 10 10 10 10
An .con. Min. Cos 60% 50 50% 50%
Atchison 87% 86% 86% 87
At. G. & W. 1.143 142 J 42 142
Baldwin Loco .113% 112% 112% 112%
g- £ 0 44% 44% 44% 44%
Beth. Steel 8... 70% 69% 69% 70
Brook R. T.... 13% 13% 13% 13%
Can. Pac. Ry... 125% 124% 124% 125%
Cent. Leather.. 40% 40V* 40% 41%
Chandler Motors 84 83 % 83% K3%
C. & 0 66% 60% 60% 66%
C.,M. A St. P... 41% 41% 41% 41%
C..M. & St.P.pfd 62 61% 61% 61%
‘ _ w N. U ... 81 8i 80%
C.,R. I. & Pac.. 37Vi 36% 37 36%
Chill Copper ... 13% 13% 13% 13%
Chino Copper .. 26 26 26 25%
Colombia Gas .. 59 58% 5!) 58%
Colum Graph .. 19% la 19 19%
Consol Gas .... 87% 87% 87% 80
Con Candy Cos.. 9% 9% 9% ..
Corn Prods .... 82% 82% 82% 83
Crucible Steel ..121 123% 124 124%
Ou Cane 8u .. 34% 34% 341% 2(9%
DA R P pfd.. 3% 3% 3% f 3%
Erie 17% 17% 17% 17%
Erie Ist pfd 26% 26% 26% 26'*
Fa Players 67 66% 66% 67%
Fisk Rub Cos.. 20% 19% 20% 20%
G, W & Wig... 5 4% 4% 4%
Gen Electric ...139% 138% 138% 138%
Gen Motors 17% 16% 17 17
Goodrich 50% 48% 49% 50%
G Nor pfd 80% 86 86% 86%
Gulf States Stl. 46 46 46 , 45
Houston 011 ..106 106 103 106
Illinois Cen ... 93% 93% 93% ...
Inspir Cop 42% 42% 42% . 42%
Inter Corp 5 4% 5 4%
Inter Ilarv ....105% 103% 104 106
Inter Nickel ... 17% 171* 17% 17%
Inter Paper ... 65% 64% 65% 65%
Invin Oil 33% 33% 33% 33%
K C South 24% 24% 2% 24%
Kelly-Sprg Tire 50% 60 ' 50 50%
Kenne Copper . 22% 22% 22% 22%
Lehigh Valley.. 53 52% 53 53
Loews. Inc 19% 19% 19% 19%
L. A N 105% 105% 105% .....
Marine C0m.... 19% 19 19' 19
Marine pfd 70% 70 70 69%
Max. Mot. Com. 33 fi
Mex. Petrol 192% 190 190% 19*2
Miami Copper.. 19 19 19
Middle St. Oil.. 14% 14% 14% 14
Midvale Steel... 37% 37% 37% 1!8
M . K. & T 4% 4% 4% 4%
Miss. Pac. By.. 27% 26% 26% 27%
Nat. En. & Stm. 57% 57% 57% 58
Nev. Con. Cop.. 11% 11% 11% 11
N. Y. Central... 80% 80 80% 80%
New Haven 32 Vi 32% 32% 33%
Nor. & Western 99 99 99 98%
Northern Pac.. .83% 8712 87% SH
Ok. P. & Rf. Cos 4 4 - 4 .3%
Owen Bot. Com. 54% 54% 54% 54%
Pan. Am. Petrol. 89% 8.8% 88% 89
Penna. Ry 43 s * 43% 43% 43%
Pierce-Arrow ..34% 34% 34% 34%
Pierce Oil Cos.. 14% 14% 14”-* 14%
Pull. Pal. C0r..110% 109% 109% 109%
Ray Copper 14% 14% 14% 14%
Reading $"!% 95% 95% 96
Rep. Iron A St. 76% 76% 76% 76%
Iteploge Steel.. 79 79 79 78
Ry. D. of N. Y. 72% 71 Vi 71% 73%
Sears Roeburk.inp 107% 107% 1 (*%
Sinclair 32% 31% 32% 31%
Sou. Pacific 108% 101% 102% 101
Southern Ry... 89% 30% 30% 30%
Stand. 011N.J...688 688 68-8 SB7
St-L.&S.F.com. . 30% 39% 30% 29%
Strcmberg Garb. GB% 08 68%
Studebafeer 57% 56% 57 57%
Texas Cos 51% 51% 51% 51%
Texas & Pacific. 26% 25% 25% 26%
Tob. Products.. 65% 65% 65% 65%
Trans. Oil 12 11% 11% 12
Union Oil 25%- 28 28% 28%
Union Pacific...l2s% 124% 125 125%
Unit. Ret. Stores 72% 72% 72% 72%
Unit. Fruit C0..223 219% 220% 219%
U.S.lndusAlcohl 83% 82% 82% 82%
U. S. Rubber... 75% 71% 71%. 75%
T t . S. Steel...*.. SB% 87% *B% S8
V. S. Steel pfd. .108% 108% 108% 107%
Utah Copper 58% 58% 58% 57%
Vanadium Btvel 03% t>! 63% 63%
Vir. Car. Chem. 55 54 54 % 55%
Wabash 11% 11 11% 10%
Wabash Ist pfd. 31 31 31 30%
\V. Maryland... 13% 13% 13% 13%
West. Union 9o 88% 9> 88%
West’houee Elec. 46% 46-% 46% 46%
White Motors.. 44% 44% 44% 45
NEW YORK LIBERTY BONDS.
—Oct. 30—
I’rev.
High, Low. Close. Close.
L. B. B%s ... 93.38 03.10 93.38 93.12
L. B. 2d 45.. 88.60 88.56 88.60 88.22
L. B. Ist 414s 89.80 89.60 89.88 89.80
L. B. 2d 4V*s. 88.54 88.32 88.56 88.40
L. B. 3d 4%5. 90.48 90 32 90.42 90.22
L. B. 4th 4Vis. 88.62 88.44 88.54 88.50
Victory 3%a . 96.20 „ 96.14 96.14 96.04
Victory 4%5.. 96.22 96.08 96.16 96.68
ACTIVE OIL STOCKS.
(By Thomson & McKinnon.)
--Oct. 20—
Anglo-Amer. Oil 21% 22%
Atlantic Refining 1080 1120
Borne-Scrymser 410 425
Buckeye Pipe Line 88 90
Chesehrough Mfg. Cons 210 225
ChcsebrouKh Mfg. Cons. pfd. 100 105
Continental Oil. Colorado 108 113
Cosden Oil and Gas 7% 7%
Crescent Pipe Line 81 83
Cumberland Pipe Line 150 155
Elk Basin Pete 9% 9%
Eureka Pipe Line 113 117
Gaiena-Signal Oil, pref. new. 88 92
Galena-Signal OH, com 45 47
Illinois Pipe Liqt 163 167
Indiana Pipe Lltlsy 90 92
Merritt Oil 13*i 14%
Midwest Oil 1 3%
Midwest lifer > 158 160
National Transit 29% 30%
New York Transit 170 18t<
Northern Pipe Line 09. ini
Ohio Oil 310 325
Penn.-Mex. ‘ 40 50
Prairie Oil and Gas 570 580
Prairie Pipe Line 230 253
Sapulpa Uefg 5Vi 5%
Bolar Refining 400 420
Southern Pipe Line lit 121
South Penr, Oil 273 278
Southwest Penn Pipe Lines.. 62 66
Standard Oi! Cos. of Cal 342 345
Standard Oil Cos. of Ind 780 790
Standard Oil Cos. of Kan 575 600
Standard Oil Cos. Ky 440 460
Standard Oil Cos. Neb 440 455
Standard Oil Cos. of N. Y.... 385 3.59
Standard OH Cos. of 0hi0... 425 445
Swan & Finch 80 to
Union Tank Line 114 Its
Vacuum Oil 547 333
Washington Oil 30 35
_____
CHICAGO STOCKS.
(By Thomson & McKinnon.)
—Oct. 30—
Open High. Low. Close.
Carbide A- Carbon. 58% 58% 58% 58%
Libby lk% 12 11 Vi 12
Montgomcry-Wa^^^^
N ill - 9% 9% 9%
Beu fri** ■ 10s 109
MEDIUM, LIGHT
HOGS UP 25 CENTS
Trading m Cattle Mart Good—
Sheep, Lambs and Calves Up.
RANGE OF HOG PRICES.
Good Good Good
Oct. Mixed. Heavv Light.
22 .$1 3.25 @ 13.35 *13.35013 40 $13.25 0 13.35
23. 13.00® 13.10 13.00® 13.25 12.90013.00
25. 13.00 ® 13.25 13.00013.25 13.00013.25
26. 12.35 012.50 12.50012.75 [email protected]
27. 12.75012.85 12.85013.00 12.75012.80
28. 13.26013.50 13.50013.65 13.00013.25
29. 13.38*13.35 13.50013.75 [email protected]
30. 13.50 @ 13.75 [email protected] 13.50013.60
Hog prices were steady to 25c higher
on the local live stock exchange today
at the opening and continued in that
trend during the short market.
Trading was active and all, or prin
cipally all of the 6,000 hogs ou the mar
ket were sold at an early hour in the
forenoon market.
Both local packers and eastern shippers
were active. Klngan & Cos., usually the
principal buyer in the hog market, had.
bought 2,000 hogs at an early hour In
the trading.
Good heavy hogs were steady with the
Friday market, while good mediums aud
lights' were fully 25c higher.
Houghs and pigs were about steady.
Trading on the cattle market was fair,
but the receipts were light at 200 aud
prices were steady. There was the usual
Saturday market.
There was a strong and active market
in calves, with prices fully 50c higher, in
some cases. There was an extreme top
of sl7. but few calves brought the top.
With a fairly good run of sheep and
lambs for the Saturday market and a
strong and active market, sheep and
lambs were 50c higher, with sheep at
$5.50tg6, and lambs, s7<g>l3.
Receipts approximated 400 to 500.
HOGS.
U bo . B> *. 18 °. 10 iU 13.iyvai3.fl0
200 to 300 lbs average 13.50(^13.75
Over 300 lbs 12.7,><0)13 0 >
Sows 12.01 -'ft 1—.•►()
Best pigs, under 140 1b5.... 13.0(>ai3.50
Bulk of sales [email protected]
CATTLE. ,
Prime cornfed steer*, 1,300 lbs
and up 18.5001 i.20
Good to choice steers, 1,200 to
1,300 lbs 14 [email protected]
Good to choice steers, 1,100 to
1,200 lbs [email protected]
Good to choice steers. 1,000 to
1.100 lbs 9 [email protected]
Common to medium steers,
900 to 1.000 lbs 8.00(210.30
Heifers and Cows—
Gpod to choice heifers...., 10.00@, 13.23
Medium heifers .... 8.50@ 900
Coiuon to medium heifers.... <J.oo@6 7.50
Choice cow* B..’o^jpio.eo
Good to choice cows 7.00® 7.50
Fair to medium cows VMif 6.00
Fanners 8.5048 4.25
Cutters / Lso@ 7.23
—Bulls —
Good to choice butcher bulls.. 7.50® 9.00
Bolognr bulls 6 oo@ 7.50
Light common bulls 4.50® 6.00
—Calves —
Choice veals 35.00f5!6.60
Good veals 13.00® 11.00
Medium veals 9(K)@l2.(h)
Light weight veals B.oo® 9.00
Heavy weight calves 5.50% 8.00
Stockers and Feeders—
Good to choice steers, 800 ibj
and up - [email protected]
Good to choice steers, under
800 lbs 7.50® 8.00
Medium to good cows 3.00® 6.30
Good cows # 6.50® 6.00
Good heifers 6.50® 7.50
Medium to good heifers 6.73® 7.00
Good milkers 50 004J125 00
Medium milkers 60.00® 100.00
Stock calves. 250 to 430 lbs... 7.00® 9.00
SHEEP AND LAMBS.
Good, to choice sheep 5.50@ 6.00
Fair to common 3 50% 4.50
Bucks 2.31'® 4.50
—Lambs—•
Common to choice yearlings.. 6.00® 600
Spring lambs [email protected]
Other Live Stock
CHICAGO, Oct. 30.—Hogs—Receipts.
3,000; market, steady; bulk, $12@13:
butchers. $12.23® 13.15; packers, $11.75®
12.85; lights, sl2 33% 13; i.lgs, $12.25®
13.40. Cattle—Receipts, 2.000; market,
steady; beeves, s9@lS; butchers. ss.7;Vr|.(
13; canners and cutters. $3.60@t!.23j
stockers and feeders. $4,500,112; cows, $5
Q. 10.75 $12(0:14. Sheep—Receipts,
4,000; inHrkit, steady; lambs, $9.50®
13.75; ewes, * $3®7.25.
CINCINNATI. Oct. 30.—Hogs—Re
ceipts, 2,500; market, steady to 23c
higher; heavy and mediums. $13.50;
lights. sl3; pigs. sl2; roughs. $11.50;
stag(, $9. Cattle —Reeeipts.X 300; good
grades firm, others slow Sheep and
lambs- Receipts, 200; market strong;
sheep, [email protected]; iambs, $13.50.
CLEVELAND, Oct. 30.—Hogs -Re
ceipts, i,500; market higher; Yorkers,
$13.25: mixed, $13.25: medium, 5’3,40;
pigs. *13.25; roughs, sl2; stags, SS. ('at
tic -Receipts. 250; market strong. Sheep
and lambs—Receipts. 500; market act've;
top, SKOSO. Calves—Receipts, 300; mar
ket steady; fop, $lB.
EAST ST. LOUIS, Oct. 30—Cattle—Re
ceipts, 350; market steady; native be<*f
steers, $14.50® 15; yearling beef steers
and heifers, $11 ( @11.23; cows, $7.25'q8;
stockers and feeders, ss<fi.o 25; calves,
$lB 50@14: i-anners and cutters, ss@s 23.
Hogs—Receipts, 2,200; market 15@25c
higher; mixed and butchers. $13.10®
13 50; good heavies, [email protected]; rough
heavies. $11.25® 12 25; lights, sl3 15®
13 40; pigs. $12.50®, 13.25; bulk of sales.
$13.15® 13.40
PITTSBURGH, Oet. 30.—Cattle - Re
ceipts, light: market, steady; choice, 314
@11.50; good. sL>.so@l3; fair, $ 10,50®U;
veal calves. Sl7@lS. Sheep and lambs—
Receipts, light: market, steady; prime
weathers, s7iii7.so; good, [email protected]: mixed
fair. $5(i4t).50; spring lambs, [email protected].
Hogs—Receipts. 15 doubles: market,
lower; prime heavies, $14.10®.4.15; me
dium*. $14.10® 14.15; lieavr yorkers,
[email protected]; lighf yorkers, [email protected];
pi * M.{.50it13.75; roughs, $11@12; stags,
[email protected].
SEW YORK CURB.
(By Thomson & McKinnon.)
Oct. 30—
Closing
Bid. Asked.
Curtis Aero, com 3 5
Curtis Aero, pfd 20 30
First National Copper. % l'.i
Goldfield Con 8 10
Havana Tobacco 1 1
Jumbo Extension 5 0
Internationr 1 l'etroleum 17% 18
Nipissing 0
Indian Pkg 3Va 4
Royal Baking Powder. 11l 113
Kyi. Bak. Powder pfd SO 80
Standard Motors 7 S
Salt Creek 32 34
Tonopah Extension.... 1% 1 11-1 C
Tpnopah Mining I s ** 1%
t'nitod P. S., new it, 2
C. 8. Eight and Heat. 1% 2
V. S. Eight and Ht. of 1 2
Wright-Martln 4 6
World Flint % %
Yukon Gold Mine Cos.. 1 lbj
.Terome t/i %
New Cornelia 17 19
United Verde 23 31
Sequoyah V* ?s
Omar Oil 2% 3
Ilep Tire.... ... 1% 2
NEW YORK BANK STATEMENT.
NEW YORK, Oct. 30.—Average—Loans
decreased $74,282,000, demand deposits
decreased $03,574,000, time deposlls de
creased $932,000, reserves decreased
$1,359,930. Actual —Loans decreased $61,-
719,000, demand deposits decreased $3,889,-
000, time deposits decreased $17,418,000.
Reserves increased $37,972,270.
CHICAGO PRODUCE.
CHICAGO. Oct. SO.Butter—Cream
ery extras. 60c; creamery firsts, 52%c;
firsts, 46@58e; seconds. 40@42e. Eggs
Or linarics. 49@53c; firsts, 58(g39e. Cheese
—Twins, 21<&58c; Young Americas, 23c.
Live pou\try—Fowls, 22Qi27c; ducks, 28c;
geese, 25c; spring Chickens, 26c; tur
keys, 33e; 22c. Potatoes—Re
eelpts, 101 cars; Wisconsin and Minue
sola, $1.90(^2.15.
''vvhoeesajue uekt prices.
The following are today's wholesale
beef prices for cuts as sold on the In
diaiUtpolis markets:
’ Rlfck.—No. 2,39 c; No. 3.24 c. Loins—
to. 2,26 c; No. 3,22 c. Rounds—No. 2,
*c; No. -3, 22c. Chuck*.—No. 2. 16c;
A>. 8,13 c. Plate*—No. V 12c; No. 3j
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1920.
| Local Stock Exchange
—Oct. 30—
- STOCKS.
Ind. Ry & Light, c0m..r.... 00
Ind. Ry. & Light, pfd 8%
Indpls. & Northwest, pfd ; 75
ludpls. St Southeast, pfd 75
ludpls. St. Ry 60 65
T. H., T. & 1 6i
T. 11., I. & E. ( com 1% 6
T. 11., I. kE„ pfd 9% 16
L. T. of lud., com 1
U. T. of Ind.. Ist pfd 10
U. T. of Ind., 2d pfd 2
Miscellaneous—
Advance-Kumply, com ...
Advanee-Rumely, pfd
American Central Life *245
American Creosotlng, com... 93 ...
Belt Railroad, com 65 75
Belt Railroad, pfd 47% ...
Century Building, pfd 95
Cities Service com 330 315
Cities Service pfd 05 65%
Citizens Gas 32% 35%
Dodge Mfg., pfd 91% ...
Horne Brewing 55
Indiana Hotel, com 64
Indiana Hotel, pfd 91
Indiana National Life 4% ...
Indiana Title Guaranty 59 69
Indiana Pipe Line 89 93
ludpls. Abattoir, pfd 40 61
Indpls. Gas 45 50
Indpls. Tel., com 9
Indpls. Tei., pfd 88
Mer Pub. Util., pfd % 55
National Motor 8 11
Public Savings 4
Kaub Fertilizer, pfd 43
Standard OR of Indiuna 778
Sterling Fire Insurance 8
Van Camp Hdvv., pfd 95
Van Camp Prod., Ist pfd 95
Van Camp Prod,, 2d pfd 95
Vandalia Coal, com 5
Vandalln Coal pfd *0
Wabash R illy way com 9% ...
Wabash Railway pfd 29% ...
Banks and Trust Companies—
Aetna Trust 100
Bankers Trust 118
City Trust 80
Commercial National ... . 00
Continental Natl. 8ank....’.. 112
Farmers Trust 200
Fidelity Trust 120 '...
Fletcher Am. Natl 256
Fletcher Sav. A- Trust 163
Indiana National 280 290
Indiana Trust 194 294
Live Stock Exchange 450
Merchants National 279
National City 112 120
People's State 176
Security Trust 12")
State Sav. k Trust $9 I*4
Union Trust 310
Wash. Bank & Trust 150
BONDS.
Broad Ripple 5s 58 ...
Citizens St. Ry. St 74
Ind. Coke A Gas Cos. 6s <* 87
Indian Creek Coal A Min us
ludpls & Col. South 5s Rs ... (
ludpls Sc Greenfield 5k 00
ludpls. A Martinsville 55... 58 08
ludpls A North 5s 42% 60
ludpls St North 5s G 8
iudpls A South 45 ...
Indpls, Shelby & E E 55.... 80
Indpls St Ry 4s 60 70
ludpls True k Ter 5s 71
Kokomo, Marion A Western. 81 86
Union True of Ind tis 62% 61
Citizens Gas Cos 76 81
Ind Hotel 2d 6s 96% 100%
Indpls Gaa 5s 74 SO
Indpls Light A Heat 70 82
Indpls Water 4%s 70 80
Indpls Water 5s SR 02
H. H. A L. Itcf. 5s 88 91
New Tel Ist 6s 94
New Tel Long DU 5s 93% ...
South Ind Power 6s 86
LIBERTY BONDS.
Liberty first 3%s 93 28
Liberty first 4s
Liberty second 4s. 88 60
Liberty first 4%s 89 HR
Liberty Second 4%s 88 56 89.00
Liberty thlr<U4%s 90.42
Liberty fourth 4%s 88 56 80.00
Victory 3%s 90.0-1
Victory 4%s 96.16
On Commission Row
With the grocers, or st least iho most
of theta, buviug in large quantities for
the week-end supply, sr.il the nJtli><l de
mand for the more staple line of pro
duce, trading on the wholesale produce
market today opened with a very brisk
tone, and that tendency nas continued
during the morning hours of the market.
Prices were about steady with those of
the Friday market. In fact, there have
been no material changes in UlO price
schedule during tbs past wedk. v
TODAY'S PRICES.
Apples—Barrel, $6(08.
Bear.s Michigan navy, in bags, per lb,
s*ecc; California large white. In sacks,
sc; Colorado plntos, iu bags, per lb, 7(4
<tlSe; red kidneys, In bass, per lb. 17%fi/
1.8; California pink chill, In bags, per
ib, B%<?iß%c: lintels, per rb. 12%c; Cali
fornia red chill, In bags, per lb, B%'iJi
Stic; California Ulna*, in bags. 11^0612''.
Beets —Fancy home-grown, per uu,
$1.50.
Bananas—Extra fancy high grade fruit,
OOfijjdOc per hunch; per lb., 10c.
Cabbage—Home grown, per lb, lA'2
Cantaloupes—Per crate, $2.75414.
Carrots - Fancy, home grown, per bu,
$1 25.
Celery—Fancy lligb Ball, per crate,
$1.85*82.
Cocoanutc —Fancy, per do*., SI2OO
1.50.
Cucumbers —Fancy hothouse, per dos,
$2(42.25.
Cranberries—Per bbl. $10; per half bb’.
boxes, $5.00; per bu., $3 50.
Grapes—Fancy Michigan Concords,
5-lb. basket, 53c.
Egg Plant Fancy home-grown, per
dot, sl.
Grapefruit—Extra fancy Florida, per
box, $5.50(£)6.
Lemons- l 'xtrn fancy California B>in
kist. per ..ox, $5.75429; extra fancy Cali
fornia choice, per box, ss.so((ju.
Lettuce Fancy hothouse, per bu basket,
,1 ; fancy home-grown endive, per dox,
4<ic; fancy home-grown betid lettuce, per
bu. $1.5051.H5; fancy Whittington Ice
berg. per cratelg, .
Onions- Fanrywiaaie-grown, yellow, per
ino-lb bag, [email protected]; fancy Indiana
whites, per 100-lb bag, $2.50; fancy Span
ish, per crate, $2.50; !#!• .v pickling, per
20-lb box, $1.50.
Oranges—Extra fancy California Volea
cins, per crate, $7.5008.75.
Parsley—Fancy home-grown, per dor,
25c.
Peaches—Good New York and Mlchl
gnn Albertan, per bu., $303.50.
Potatoes— Fancy Michigan and Wiscon
sin round whites, per 150-lb. bag, $3.50;
in 5 or 10-bag lots, per 150-lb. bug,
$3.25.
Prunes —Fancy Idaho Italian, 10-lb box,
$1.75.
Fears —All kinds, $1.1503 per bu.
Qu nces Fancy New York, per bu.,
$3.2503,50.
Radishes —Button home-grown, per dox,
250; fancy long, per dor, 25c.-
Sweet Potatoes —FSney Virginia Red
Stars, bbl, $4.50; per hamper, $1.5001.85,
Spinach— Fancy home-grown, per bu,
$1.50.
Squash--Summer, per bu, $1.75.
Tomatoes —Fancy home-grown, per bu
$101.60.
Turaips- Fancy home-grown, new, per
bu, $1.2501.50.
Quinces— Fancy New York, per bu,
$3 SO.
WHOLESALE FEED I’UICES.
Top Sacks. Cwt.
Acme brand $42.00 $2.15
Acme feed 42.00 2.15
At me middlings 45.00 2.45
Acme dairy feed 00.00 3.05
15-2. dairy feed 40.25 2.50
Acme 11. & M... 48.75 2.50
Acme stock teed 42.00 2.15
Cracked corn 48.75 2.50
Acme chicken feed.. 58.00 2.95
Acme scratch 55.00 2.80
E-z scratch 52.00 2.05
Acme dry mash 68.50 2.95
Acme hog feed 60.00 2.85
Homllk yellow 48.75 2.50
Rolled barley 50.75 2.90
Alfalfa mol . 55.00 2.80
Cotton seed meal 63.25 3.20
Linseed oil meal 69.00 3.50
GRAINS.
Shelled corn, small lots $ 1.12
Shelled corn, large lots l.n
Shelled corn, 2-bu sacks 1.18
Oats, bulk, large 63
Oats, less than 100 bu (ig
Chicken wheat, ewt. sacked 400
CORN MEAL AND FLOUR.
Corn meal, cwt, net $ 3.50
E-Z-Bake bakers' f our. 9S-lb sacks. 12.70
CLEVELAND PRODUCE.
CLEVELAND, Oct. 30.—Butter—Extra
tub lots, 63%064c; prints, 04V5)65e;
extra firsts, 00% ©01c; tirsts, 57%0
58c; seconds, 54055 c. Eggs— Ohio
tirsts, new cases, 62c I old cases, 61c;
fresh gathered northern extras, 60c; ex
tra firsts, 62c; western cases. flrstß, Ctkfl
Poultry—Good heavy '’--to
GRAIN MARKET
CHANGES SLIGHT
Grain Receipts for Week Show
Decrease.
CHICAGO, Oct. SO.—Fractional changes
in grain quotations on a small volume of
trading marte-d the short se‘s on ou the
Chicago Hoard of Trade today.
Receipts for the week showed a slight
falling off, although few traders agreed
that it was the result of the farmers’
organized effort to withhold grain from
the markets for higher prices.
Provisions were lower.
December wheat opened off 1 point at
$2.08% and closed unchanged. March
wheat lost % at the opening at $2.03 and
closed down another 1 point.
Un-ember corn lost %c at the opening,
83%c, and closed up %c. May corn was
unchanged at 89%e at the opening, but
showed a gain of %c at the close.
December oats, up %e at the opening,
55c, gained auother %c in later trading.
May oats opened at 6OV4C, up %e, and
advanced an additional }*c.
(By Thomson A McKinnon)
—Oct. SO
Wheat—Export business in wheat has
been conspicuous by its absence, nor has
Here been nny) buying of wheat in this
market such as has been seen the last
three This oond.tlon has bee;, on
set for today by the strength in corn.
Private cables intimate the British have
impertant stocks of wheat on hand and
there will be further delay in buying for
future needs. Southwestern markets are
showing relative firmness, presumably
because of the refusal of Oklahoma and
Kansas farmers to accept the prevailing
price. There is a growing feeling that
ihe holding attitude of the* farmer may
bring about congestion in the December
delivery, but there is no buying based
on this theory. Imports of Canadian
wheat and flour liav ■ more offer; j., the
minds of the trade than the attitude of
the Western farmer.
Corn—A further falling off in receipts
of corn liaa prompted consiflftable buy-
Ing by former sellers. It has also %n
---cournged a demand from some loesl
traders who are friendly. It Is not pos
sible to say there is any broad demand
from the outside, either for the deferred
deliveries or the cash article. The ad
vance in price has checked such little
export business as was doing. Further
than this Argentine corn Is under-selling
us in England at least. If not elsewhere.
In the absence of any strong reason for
an advance in prices the market Is like
ly to encounter selling on any further
advance.
Oats—Smaller shorts have been cover
ing oats because of the strength in corn.
The market continues dull and uninter
esting. The important thing in the sit
uation Is the lack of dcrnnnd from either
domestic or’foreign sources.
Provisions—Liquidation of nearby de
liveries is to tie - en in the provision
market. Outlook for new foreign busi
ness' Is not encouraging. There are re
pot ts from the country ea rr yi n({ tjj„ tj el
of lower prices in hogs.
CHICAGO GRAIN.
WHEAT— Open High, Low. Close.
Dec 2." % 2 10% 2.08 V* 2.06%
March ... 2.03 2.04% 2.U2 202
COHN—
Dec 84 .85% .83% .64%
May 80% .90% .89% ,90 V*
Dec „V. .55% .54% .55%
Msy ..... .00% .00-1* .59% .60%
POHk—
Oct 23 20 23 25 22 90 23.00
Nor 22 90 23.00 22.40 22 30
Jan 24 55 24.60 24.50 24.50
LAUD—
Oct 19.05 19.03 19.05 10.05
*Nov 18 70
Jan 16.40 16.40 16.50 16.30
RIBS—
•Oct 14.00
•Jan 13.60
•Nominal.
CHICAGO CASH GRAIN.
CHICAGO. Oct. 30—Wheat—No. 1
hard winter, $2.17%; No 3 hard winter,
$2 14 Corn- No. 2 mixed, 89%'090c; No.
2 White. 89%-,90%c; No 1 v-11-ivv, 90%(
l%<*'. No 2 yellow, tei%,9l V. Oats
No. 1 white, 56%c; No. white, 56%®
56%e; No. 3 white, 54'V'(5SV*c.
TOLEDO CASH GRAIN.
TOLEDO, Oct. 30. Wheat -Cash. $2 30;
December, $2.28. Corn- No. 2 yellow,
96c Oats—No. 2 white, 55%v69%< Rye
-No. 2. $1.75. Barb-v No. 2,92 c. Clover
seed—Cash 11919, $12.80; (1920), October
anil December. sl4; February, $14.60;
March, $14.40; January, sl4 30. Timothy
Cash <l9lßi. $3; (1019), $3.25; October.
$3.35; December, $.'145; March. $3.65.
Aielke—Cash, sl6 5; October, $17.50; De
cember and March, sl7 25.
PRIMARY MARKETS.
(By Thomson & McKinnon.)
-Oct. 30—
Wli-at Corn Oats
Chicago 44.'r,0 257 000 277.000
Milwaukee ... 7.00 u 51,000 53,000
Minneapolis . 402.000 if 000 97.000
Duluth 543,000 15.000
St. Louis .... 142.00)) 36.000 60,000
Toledo 4,000 1.000
Detroit 6,000 4.000 2 000
Kansas City.. 326,000 6,000 37,0’M)
Peoria 14,000 5,000
Omaha 109.000 18 000 36.0(H)
Indianapolis.. 4,000 18,000 34,000
Totals 1.486. 418,000 616,000
Y ear ago.. .1.287.000 253.000 627.000
—Shipments—
IVh fit Corn Oats
Chicago 28000 102,000 145.000
Milwaukee .. 10 *MH) 42,00(1 95,000
Minneapolis . 194.000 32,000 52,000
Duluth 218.000
St. Louis 43.000 13.000 45.000
Toledo 7,000 2,000 1 000
Kansas City. 126.000 8 000 10,000
Peoria 1.000 8,000 13,000
Omaha , 133 000 26.000 8.000
Indianapolis.. 1.000 34 000 26.000
Totals 761,000 267,000 SO6OOO
Year ago... 719.090 262,000 603,000
—Clearances
bom. W. Corn Oats
New York ... 158,000
Totals 158,000 ....
Year ago... 60,000 35,000 64,000
INDIANAPOLIS CASH GRAIN.
—Oct. 30-
Bids for ear lots of grain and hay at
(he call of the Indianapolis Board of
Trade were;
Wheat—Steady.
Corn -Finn: No. 2 white, 94095 c; No.
2 yellow 93094'Ac.
Data—Firm; No. 2 white, 57058 c.
Hay—Steady; No. 1 tliuotbv, $27.50(0)
28; No. 2 timothy, $26.50027; No. 1 light
i lover lulxf<V, $26026.50; No. 1 clover
hay, $24.50025.50.
—1 nspeetlons—
Wheat—No. 2 rod, 1 car; No. 3 ro<l,
1 car; sample, ,1 ear; total, 3 cars.
Corn—No. 1 white, 4 ears; No. 2 white,
8 ears; No. 1 yellow, ] car; No. 2 yel
low, 2 cars; No. 3 yellow, 2 cars; sample
mixed, i ear; total, 18 cars.
Oats—No. 2 white, is cars.
Bye—No. 2, 1 ear; No. 4, 1 car; total,
2 cars.
Ilay—No. 1 timothy, 1 car.
BOARD OF TRADE STATEMENT.
The weekly statement of the Indian
apolis Board of Trade, showing the (Hit
put of Hour by local mills, inspections
lor -the-v.eek and stock In store, follows;
Output of Flour—
Oct. 0, 1920 6,453
Oct. 23, 1920..: 8,591
Nov. 1, 1919 9,809
Nov. 2, 1018 7,21.3
inspections for Week— Bu.
Wheat * 30,000 7,0: ti
Corn 300,000 179.0(H)
“als 232,000 162,000
liyo 4,000 None
—Stock In Store— i
Wheat. Corn. Oats. Rve
Det. 30, 19:%.. 279,160 420,500 542,500 1,000
Nov. 1, 1919...582,530 156,930 375.060 59 100
NOV. 2, 1918...219,1.-70 440 030 192,200 31,900
HAY .MARKET.
The following are the Indianapolis
prices for hay by the wagon load.
Hay—Loose, timothy, new, $26@28-
mixed liny, new, $22025; baled, $26028.
Corn —Bushel, 9Ocosi.io.
Oats —Bushel, new, 55057 c.
WAGON tvnEAT.
Indianapolis Hour mills today are pay
ing $2 for No. 1 ’-ed wliea . $1.97 for No.
2 red wheat, and $1.94 for No. 3 red.
Other grades according <o their quality!
Oats —Per tru, 43e.
LO^jyUUUIARUT.
<*
In the Cotton Market 9
NEW YORK, Oct. 30.—The cotton mar
ket opened weak today at a decline of
40 to 64 points under general atlling due
to bad reports from manufacturing cen
ters and an absence of killing frosts In
the South.
Trading was active with increased
offerings on rallies and with the prices
after the start ruled barely steady.
Private predictions were for frosts to
night for the Central and Eastern belts.
New York cotton opening: December,
20.90 c; January, 20.05 c; March, 19.80 c;
May, 19.50 c; July, 19.15 c; August, 18.95 c,
bid.
Late in the morning local and foreign
selling supplied the demand from New
Orleans and some of the spot houses.
The close wag firm, 25 points lower tv
2 points higher
he# York cotton range—
Open. High. Low. Close.
December 20.90 21.10 20.65 20.97
January 20.03 20.45 20.05 20.31
March 19.80 20.12 19.60 20.12
Mr t 19.50 19.98 19.&0 IU.WO
July 19.15 19.55 19.15 19.48
N EW OP,LEANS! Oct. 30.—Bearish ca
ble! and selling caused declines in cot
ton futures arouind the opening today,
first quotations being 15 to 25 points
lon ei - , and prices sagged off 10 to 29
points further, v
Covering orders then appeared, bring;
lng a better tone, advancing prices 26
to 45 points above the opening level.
'lhe close was steady 11 to 24 points
net higher.
New York cotton range—
Open. High. Low. Clos n .
December .... 20.20 20.46 19.91 20.42
Januuary ... 19.30 19.85 19.36 19.78
March 19.35, 19,69 19.25 19 58
May 19.00 19.45 19.00 MM3
July 18.88 19.20 18.88 19.20
FARMERS PICKET
KANSAS ROADS
To Keep Wheat From Market
Until Price is $3.
WICHITA. Ku.. Oct. 30—Picketing
has made its appearance In farmers’ ef
forts to keep wheat from the market un
til it reaches $3, according to word
reaching the national headquarters of the
Wheat Growers’ Association here today.
At Harper, when farmers drive toward
the mill with wagons loaded with grain
they were met by picketing neighbors,
who attempted to dissuade them, by ar
guments, from marketing their wheat at
this time.
They were usually successful, the re
port stated.
The Wheat Growers' Association is
planning to finance those farmers who
must sell some of their grain to meet
debts, v ,
Weather
The following table shows the state of
the weather at 7 a. m., Oct. 30. as ob
served by U. 8. weather bureaus:
Sr.at!o’i. Bar. Temp. Weather.
Indianapolis, Ind... 90.14 31 Clear
Atlanta, Gi 30.44 42 Clear
Amarillo, Tex 80.00 50 cloudy
Bismarck, N. D. .. 30.22 40 Cloudy
Boston, .Mess 30 06 40 Cloudy
Chicago. 11l 80.06 36 Clear
Cincinnati. 0 30,48 32 Clear
Cleveland. 0 80.34 38 I’tCldy
Denver. Colo 30 16 86 Cloudy
I lodge City, Kan. i 30.00 48 Clear
Helena. Mont 30.40 90 Snow
Jncksonvll’*. Fla. . 30 34 50 Clear
Kanscs City, M 0... 80 24 46 FtCldy
loulsvillß, Ky. ...30.48 $4 Cloudy
Little Hock, Ark.. 30.36 41 Clondy
Lo Angeles, Cal.. 29.62 54 PtCldy
Mobile. Ala 30 38 50 PtCldy
New Orleans. La.. 3036 56 PtCldy
New York, N. Y..’. 30.20 40 Cloudy
Norfolk. Va. 30.36 44 Clear
Oklahoma City ... 30.20. 4s Clear
Omaha. Neb 30 12 46 PtCldy
Philadelphia, Pa, . 3024 44 Cloudy
Pittaburgh, Pa. ... 30 36 36 Clondy
Portland. Ore 303 Q 42 Clear
Kp:d City. S. D... 30.26 38 Cloudy
ltoseburg. Ore. ... 30 20 38 Cloudy
San Francisco, Cal. 29.74 .58 Clear
st. Louis. Mo 50.38 40 Clear
St Paul, Minn. ... 30 14 34 l’tt’ldy
Tampa, Fla 30.50 56 Clear
Washington, D. C. 30.34 40 Cloudy
WEATHER CONDITIONS.
The Eastern field of high pressnr* la
continuing Its movement southeastward,
nnil mused last n ght killing fronts Irom
Michigan southward through the Ohio
Valley to I>nne*-M?e, blit the temperature
has risen considerably to the westward,
and the readings are again near or above
the seasonal normal over the .Plains
region and upter Mississippi Valtey. Tl>e
Pacific field of high pressure is now push
ing In across the northern Rockies ac
companied by much colder weather, but
Ihere Is a mnrketl drpresslon renter in
the Southwestern Plateau.
WHOLESALE produce.
Eggs—Fresh. loss off. 59e.
, Poultry— Fowl*. 20024 c; broilers. 1%
to 2 ib*., 30e; bro.lers, Leghorn, 22c;
cocks, I6e; old tom turkeys, 35c; young
tom turkeys, 12 lbs. and up. 40c; young
hen turkeys, S lbs. and up. 40c; cull thin
turkeys not wanted; ducks, 4 lbs. and up
25c; ducks, under 4 lbs., 20c; geese, 10
lbs. and up, SOe: young geese. 22c;
jsquabs, 11 lbs. to dozen, $6; guineas 2
lbs. per dozen, $9.
Butter—Buyers are paying 53054 c for
creamery butter delivered at Indlauapo-
Its.
Butterfat—Buyers are paving 49050 c
for cream delivered at Indianapolis.
Marriage Licenses
LerOy Stein, Carmi, 111 27
Clara YVnlton, Carmi, 111 27
Frank Klnimel, La Salle Hotel 27
Mabel Williams, 2332 E. Sixteenth st. 21
Thomas Wright, 2343 Sheldon 5t.... 40
Mayy Hill, 2343 Arsenal ave 32
Carl Smith, Knighfsiown. Ind 41
Gla McDaniel, Knightstown, Ind 37
Paul Vogt. ’2608 Boulevard place 21
Margaret Belnberg, 2582 Boulevard pi. 19
Herbert Jordan, 2810 Clifton st 22
Flora BaYlnger, 735 Weghorst 5t.... 21
)} Hllam McGill, 24.91) Brightwood ave. 63
Stella Heck, Brightwood ave 53
Charles Taylor, 209 8. Leota sL 20
Johanna Manor, 205 S. Leota st 16
Robert Edwards, Indianapolis 44
Buia Cantrell, 3137 N. Senate ave 24
Births
George and -Irene Phillips, 327 N. La ;
bn Up, boy.
Erwin and Laura Newhart, Deaconess
Hospital, boy.
Harry and Ruth Estle, 1239 Leonard.
boy.
Everett and Mary Tucker, 124 N. New
Jersey, boy.
Edward and Emma Armour, 1247 Mas-
Kn- * ► itp, b<v\
Henry and Julia Lock, 151 S. Suapmitt,
boy.
h tlliam and Geneva James, 1042 S.
Harding, girl.
Ralph and Lena Eacret, 514 W. Court,
boy.
Elmer and Clara I’rltehßrd, 545 Bell,
girl.
Frank and Edith Putsch, Deaconess
hospital, girl.
William and Helen Bultner, 311 E.
Twenty-Fourth, 2'irl.
Clarence and Margaret Thompson, 520
IV. Morris, 2irl.
John and Maud Welsh, 1076 Oliver,
boy. -
James and Lora Butler, 1322 Deloas,
boy.
Henry nnd Ceelle Pendygraft, Long
Hospital, boy.
John and LIII Hofman, Long Hospital,
girl.
i
Deaths
William C. Washington, 11 mo., 812 W.
Pratt, broncho pneumonia.
Anna C. Laker, t mo., 1501 Talbott,
cerobro spinal meningitis.
Walter W. Davy, 76, 3356 Kenwood,
acute lobar pneumonia.
CnnrajJ Solder. 79, 1126 N. Keystone,
diabetes inellitus. .
Thomas Kephnrt, 70, City Hospital, In
testinal obstruction.
Ransom Ismloro' Stalnaker, 59, 2324 N.
Alahnfna, hemiplegia.
Madge Pnvtln, 3'., 1928 W. St. Clair,
pulmonary tuberculosis.
Alice M. Hendrickson, 04, 120 E. Ver
mont, carcinoma.
Emma
acute nephi'itL^
BOSTON HOLDS
MOST NOTABLE
PERSONS’ BONES
Heroes of Past ‘Lie’ in Twenty
Burying Grounds of
Hub City.
MOTHER GOOSE THERE
By FREDERIC J. ITASKIN.
BOSTON, Mass., Oct. 30. —Boston and
its cluster of surrounding towns surely
possess more famous dead than any other
locality in the country.
It is Impossible to say how many no
table characters lie buried around here
because the question would have to be
settled, “What is a famous character?”
Otis and Hancock, for instance, two of
the greatest orators of the Revolution,
are passed over hurriedly by many vis
itors to the Old Granary ground, but
nearly all linger in pleased surprise near
the simple stone of Mary Goose, who, ac
cording to the little wooden placard, la
believed to be the Mother Goose of the
nursery rhymes.
So many of the great lie in and around
Boston and they represent so many lines
of achievement that few strangers leave
here without paying tribute to at least
one favorite character.
The graves of Revolutionary heroes are
numerous.
The tomb of Mary Chilton, the first
woman to lenp from the Mayflower to
Plymouth Rock, is in the heart of Boston,
Inf its oldest cemetery.
Elisabeth Pain, believed to be the orig
inal of Hawthorne’s Hester Prynne of
"The Scarlet Letter,” lies in this same
ground, and as nawthorne says in his
novel, her stone may be seen to this day.
FAMOUS PERSONS
IN CAMBRIDGE.
Over In Cambridge there Is a more
modern ground, one of the most beauti
ful iii the country, and here may be seen
stones nnd monuments to such famous
folk ns Edwin Booth, the actor; Agassi*
and Gray, the great naturalists: Phillips
Brooks. Lowell, Holmes and Longfellow,
Rufus Choate nd Julia Ward Howe.
One of the most beautiful monuments
to be found anywhere is here erected to
a still different type of famous person.
This is the memorial to Mrsl Eddy, the
founder of Christian Science.
The memorial is composed of eight
white columns in a circle, with begonias
and geraniums planted inside.
It stand* by one of the lakes in the
cemetery, and as you look across this
lake the effect Js that of a graceful
Greek temple In a grove of trees, the
whole mirrored in the blue water be
fore it.
Boston has twenty cemeteries,-all but
three of which might be called "■old.”
The four oldest —Kings Chapel. the
Granary, Copp’s Hill, and the Common
Burying Ground—are the most interest
ingly populated.
Os these four, afl|bnt Copp’s Hill 'are
in the very center of Boston, where shop
pers and office workers throng steadily
past the Eates.
There are nearly always a few
strangers inside, poring over the faint
inscriptions ar.d smiling at the ferocious
skull and crossbones and the hourglass
to be seen on most of the flint slabs.
But Boston folk In general hurry by
without a thought or a glance Inside.
These graveyards were old before their
great-grandfathers were born.
They are an accepted part of the land
scape and neither repel nor attract.
Even for the stranger these very old
burying grounds do cot Inspire gloom
as modern cemeteries often do.
The inhabitants have been dust for
over two hundred years, and it is an
unusually emotional temperament that
can be moved to tears over the rows of
gray stone* all ctit after the same pat
tern. but now .varied by different stages
of dilapidation.
THIN4.S NJ4T ALWAYS
AS THEY SEEM.
But even were you Inclined to grow a
bit sentimental over an ancestor or a
favorite hero, you would remember in
time that he might not, after all, lie
below- that, particular stone, and put
away your handkerchief with a single
sir-li.
For It Is a sad fact that the stones do
not always stand where they were orig
inally planted.
After the oldest burying grounds were
forsaken for newer ouea, they were al
lowed to go tmeared for, and In these
'•ears of neglect stones were stolen,
moved about, broken and lost.
In Copp's Hill burying ground, up the
street from the Old North Church, stones
were filched to fill holes In chimneys
and prop up doorsteps around the neigh
borhood.
One boy amused himself by changing
the date on one stone from 1695 to 1625.
and on another from 3690 to 1820. In
order to perplex the antiquarians who
would wonder how persons were buried
there several years before Boston war
settled.
When the city began to care for the
old grounds systematically, many of the
stolen stones were recovered und those
found lying about were set up iu con
venient places In the same cemetery.
City officials and the cemetery watch
men know in almost every case which
stones are not In their own places,
though they may not always know, ex
cept In a general way, where the lost
graves lie.
It was this lack of accuracy In the
tombstone markers that led Oliver Wen
dell Holmes to remark that the stones
really tell the truth when they say
“here lies.’’
One of the most famous lost graves is
that of Gilbert Stuart, who painted pic
tures of so nuny of the revolutionary
statesmen.
His best known work is the portrait
of Washington which is familiar to most
people.
It Is a fact that Washington presents
a different appearance In almost every
portrait.
A bust in Old North Church shows
him with cheeks slightly sunken from
age and lips tight set.
Few people would recognize this eld
erly gentleman as the sturdy, pink
cheeked Father of his Country presented
by Stuart.
Yet Lafayette Is said to have looked
at this bust and exclaimed, “It is my
old friend Washington, indeed’” \
Confidentially, the sexton of Old North
Church whispers that Stuart stuffed the
checks) of his most famous sitter with
cotton In order to obtain the well-round
ed contour of the face.
Whatever the beauty secrets between
Stuart and Washington, the painter was
a master nnd his Washington portrait
a “masterpiece.
It seems a pity that his bone* should
have been so carelessly mislaid, so that
is known only that he was bufled in
the Common burying ground.
UNUSUAL STONE
IN BOSTON COMMON.
This burying ground on the Boston
Common has what Is.probably the most
unusual stone in the city.
It was set up “In memory of Mrs.
Bally Morse (wife of Mr. Samuel Morse),
who dies July 28, 1 f99, of the cramp In
her stomach after about one hour’s Ill
ness. aged 26 years nnd 2 months.”
This stone, dug up by chance not so
long ago, attracted a good deal of at
tention. and curiosity was aroused as to
whether the unfortunate’ young women
American Town Lot Company, Indianapolis, Indiana
jUpiVIDEND NO. 27
The twenty-seVen Ui regular quarterly dirt
dead of her 1, 1920, upon its oiitatandllng pre.
- A a.l r- j'-es >■ ’ stockholders cs recorde-J
witt be closed from October
had eaten a green apple, or perhaps un
wittingly swallowed a peach pit, or evfp
a dose of poison.
—The mystery was still new and'pop
ular when one day the door of the ceme
tery office In the city hall was flung
open, and a pompous matron entered and
requested that the stone on the Common
be destroyed, because of the indelicate
nnd unladylike inscription. .
The v.sitor waxed more Insistent as
the secretary pleaded a Jack of authority
to destroy anything. -
Finally, the caller took a dramatic
stand and demanded that some
be taken while she waited.
The secretary happened to be a great
admirer of George Washington, but he
bad work to do and he saw one way.
out.
“Madam,” he whispered impressively,
“that atone Is of great value.
“Harvard University has Just been
making an investigation and has pro
nounced that stone Important evidence
of the first authentic case of appendicitis.
“Madam,” he concluded, “that stone
cannot be destroj-ed.”
At the magic came of Harvard th
visitor retreated, vanquished, and went
forth to tell her friends of the appen
dicitis stone as it came to be called.
Missouri Co-eds
Define Term ‘Date*
COLUMBIA, Mo., Oct. 30.—1 fa girl
meets a young man and has a soda
a chat, it Isn’t a “date," but if she spends
more than half an hour In bis companj
after 7 p. m. that is a “date.”
This is the edict laid down by girl
students of the University of Missouri,
in mass meeting assembled, to establish
rules for the social conduct durlDg the
present year.
Unanimously agreed that “mere mat£
couldn't interfere with their search for r .
knowledge, the fair co-eds also resolved
to confine their “dates” to four a week
and to insist on their male callers leav
ing before 10:30 p. m., except on Friday
and Saturday evenings, or the evenings
preceding a school holiday. *
They also agreed to attend dances only
on Friday and Saturday evenings or
holiday eves. -
Wesleyan ‘Freshies’
Made to Toe Line
MACON, Gar, Oct. 39.—Consternation
reigned among the 165 freshmen at Wes
leyan College when the rules for sopho
more week were announced.
Here are some of the #ules Imposed on
the new students:
Middy suits only are permitted, no
tics, no pins and no rolls; each new girl
will appear wearing either" a baby cap
or a baby bib; hair must be parted in
the middle, left side plaited, green bow
at end of plait, right aide puffed.
This applies to bob hair particularly.
Absolutely no paint nor powder, nor
Jewelry permitted; must salute all
upperclassmen; all food and drink at
meals must be taken with spoon only;
ill new girls will line up on back poach
cutside of dining rbom for all meals
t pd. sucking their thumbs, will march
' a backward until further notice.
Weigh School Kids
in Cincinnati, 0,
CINCINNATI, Ohio, Oct. 30.—Weigh
ing and measuring of every school child
In Cincinnati has started.
The work is being done by the teach
ers.
Charts detailing the results of this
work will be turned over to the city
health department. District health offi
cials will then make a thorough physical
examination of those children who, ac
cording to the charts, are under weight.
This is the most thorough and sys
tematic Inspection ever attempted of
Cincinnati's school children.
Parents are being invited to witness
the examination of their children.
Eskimos Don’t Have
to Go to the Dentist
BOSTON. Oct. 30.—Eskimos don’t need
dentistsT Eskimos’ teeth are free from
decay so long as are outside the
pale of civilization.
These facts were made knowri to
American dentists in national session
here, by Dr. Perc)- Howe of this city,
who obtained the Interesting Infor a-
Uon only a few days ago in a letter
from Stefaneson, the famous Arctic ex
plorer.
English Maids Plan
■American Invasion
LONDON, Oct. 30—Because they hear
that they will be treated In America r.i
governesses are treated In England—al
most as members of the family—many
girl clerks are migrating westward.
They scorn domestic serviee here, but
go to America prepared to become nurses
or housemaids or cooks at wages rang
ing from S4O to SIOO a month.
Farm Life Liked Best
by Army Police Dog
SWEETWATER, Neb., Oct. 30.—An
army police dog in the United States
service Jumped from a Burlington bag
gage car and took up residence on she
farm of A. W. Zlnnel.
The* collar and tag Identified the dog
and army officials were notified.
He will be sent to Omaha to the fort,
although the dog has indicated by every
ineaas in his power he prefers firm
to army life.
10,000 MILES TO SCHOOL.
CAMBRIDGE, Mass, Oet. 30.—Travel
ing 10,000 miles to be among the first
women to enter Harvard. Miss Lorna
Hodklnson of Sydney, Australia, has ar
rived and enrolled in the Harvard Gikd
uate School of Education. She has been
sent by the- government of New South
Wales to study the American system of
education here.
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One investor, after comparing
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11

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