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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, November 03, 1920, Last Home Edition, Image 1

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THE WEATHER
Fair and wanner tonight and Thursday,
increasing cloudiness.
vol. xxxni.
SCOPE OF REPUBLICAN VICTORY GROWS
LATE RETURNS
CUT DOWN G. 0. P.
INDIANA LEAD
Whole State Ticket Swept to
Victory With National
Leaders.
EWING’S RACE CLOSE
Republican State headquarters this
afternoon announced that the G- O. P
lead In Indiana had been cut from their
original estimate of 223,000 to 160.000 by
returns from counties coming In late.
Returns from Marlon County, v. here
the result was comparatively close, had
an appreciable Influence In reducing the
original estimate.
Estimates at Republican headquarters
place the possible plurality at 223,000.
Latest available returns Indicated that
the Democrats' last hope, the hope that
they would elect John W. Ewing as
Congressman from the Third dlstrlc*.
was shattered when virtually complete
returns showed that his opponent, James
W. Dunbar, had carried the district by
about 700.
The Republicans claim seventy-six out
of the ninety-two counties In the State,
concede eleven -to the Democrats and
place five in the doubtful column.
The great surprise to the Democrats
was the fact the voters did not scratch.
Watson, who Democrats predicted
would run far behind his ticket and who
many Republicans admitted was not a
strong candidate, ran about one vote to
the precinct behind Harding and about
two votes to the precinct behind McCray,
who apparently led the ticket.
VOTERS EVIDENTLY
APPROVE TAX LAW.
That the voters of Indiana are not
objecting to the Goodrich tax law, which
has added millions to the burden of
taxation in the Btate, was indicated by
the fact that many scratched their tick
ets In favor of McCray as a successor
to Governor Goodrich.
The Democrats had counted on the so
called labor rote.
But, as 1n 1918. the labor rate, if there
is such a thing as a unit, failed to ma
terialize.
Democrats began to lose confidence
early on election day when report after
report indicated that voters were casting
tbeir ballots straight.
There never was a great deal of confi
dence among the Democrats that the
national or State ticket would be able to
carry the State, although they Insisted
there was a strong possibility.
On the other haDd, they were confident
that Mr. Taggart would be elected and
his failure even to make a good showing
was the greatest surprise.
NO MYSTERY ABOUT
THE WOMEN.
i The woman vote Is no longer mys
jtery—lt was strongly Republican.
I it was the woman vote, undoubtedly,
"that broneht about the enormous Repub
lican victory.
Politicians are trying to explain this
and their theory is that the women “fell
for” the statement of many Republican
campaign speakers that the League of
Nations would mean armed participation
by the United States In European affairs.
Returns were rather fast In coming in,
despite the enormous vote, and It was
early apparent that the Democrats had
ro ehenre to carry the State.
They lost Vanderburgh County, the
home of Benjamin Bosse, their State
chairman.
ALL IMPORTANT
COUNTIES GO G. O. P.
They lost Allen County, the home of
Edward G. Hoffman, secretary of the
national committee.
They lost Marion County, where they
bad lnslste.l Taggart would receive a
Urge plurality.
They lost everything they had hoped
to gain In the general landslide which
enveloped the nation.
Democratic headquarters closed early,
there was nobody there this morning:
the party had suffered perhaps the most
overwhelming defeat In its history in a
year when It thought it had a chance..
VIGO.
TERRE HAUTE. Ino., Nov. 3.—Sixty
■even out of eighty-four precincts in Vigo
L uaty gave Harding 14,110, Cox 12.305
Watson 13.842, Taggart 12,224, McCray
13.446. McCulloch 12213.
Everett Sanders, Republican candidate
(Continued on Page Two.)
WEATHER
Forecast for Indianapolis and vicinity
for the twenty-four hours ending 7 p. m..
Nov. 4, 1020: Fair and somewhat warm
er tonight: Thursday, Increasing cloudi
ness and warmer.
HOURLY TEMPERATURE.
<1 a. m 37
I 7 a. m 37
8 a. m 39
9 a. m 41
42 a. m 42
11 a.
12 (noon) 40
1 p. m 48
What About League
of Nations Now?
Now that the new President Is chosen,
read again that vital document upon
which the people have issued their man
date.
Go over the League of Nations cove
nant in the light of the vote yesterday.
It Is still the document that occupies
the spotlight of the world.
Peopie will be talking about It through
all the remaining years of your life.
Get the text of it from our Washing
ton Information Bureau, study It, stick
It back of tile clock and refer to it from
time to time. IT IS FREE to all who
send 2 cents In stamps for return post
age.
(In filling out the coupon print name
and addTSs or be sure to write plainly)
/
■ Frederic J. Haskln. Director,
J The Indtarui Hally Times
B Information Bureau,
Washington, D. C.
Hut enclose herewith 2 cents in stamps
return po-tage on a free copy 0 f
League of Nations covenant.
Hltate ■
Published at Indianapolis Entered ae .Second Class Matter. July 25. 1114. at
Ir.d. Dally Except Sunday. Postoffice Indlanapoli.i. Ind. under act March S. I*7l.
PLURALITIES IN
MARION COUNTY
ARECUTDOWN
Early Republican Claims Met
by Figures Showing Loss
in Party Vote.
SLUMP IS NOTICEABLE
Unofficial tabulation of the official re
turns In Marion County indicated thi*
aftfernoon that the Republicans had not
obtained anywhere near the pluralities
they claimed nor those indicated by the
geueral landslide in the State.
One hundred of the 177 precincts give
Harding a plurality of 8,418 and Watson
a plurality of 5,790.
The difference between the earlier tabu
lation of sixty-one precincts and the
tabulation of ninety-two prednetts in
dicated that the Republican plurality
would be nearer 10.000 than 20.000, by
which the Republicans claimed the
county.
In view of the fact that the Repub
licans carried Marion County In 1918 by
approximately 10,000 votes without the
assistance of the women voters, the plur
alities obtained in this election Indicate
practically a slump In the Republican
vote In the county.
REPUBLICANS POLL
CLAIM GIVEN SHOCK.
Contrasted with the'extraordlnary suc
cess of the Republican ticket In all the
other congressional districts, this slump
is more noticeable.
The Republicans claimed their poll of
the county showed a plurality of 26,444
votes.
Apparently about 8,000 of theae vote*
went to the Democratic party In this
county.
Tue controlled negro vote made pos
sib,e the sweeping victory of the entire
Republican Marlon County ticket. In
complete official returns Indicated early
today.
Republican lenders relied safely on the
negro vote of Indianapolis to establish
a lead which the Democrats could not
overcome In their heaviest products.
The Indiana avenue districts gave gi
gantic returns to Ralph Lemeke, tho
present county treasurer, and William
Evans, wh ohas been a deputy under
Claris Adams, the present prosecutor.
The returns clearly indicate that ths
colored women voted the straight Ro
publicau ticket and In this way swelled
the totals.
TAGGART RAN AnEAD
IN SOME PRECINCTS
In many of the heavy white voting
precincts of the city Thomas Taggart.
Democratic nominee for United States
Senator, received B heavier vote than the
highest presidential elector.
The returns also show that la some of
the German prerirets of the city where
the Democrats received a heavy vote four
years ago, the vote was materially de
creased and in some cases nearly cut In
half.
An examination of the returns shows
that while the Democrats Increased their
minority standing In the county by addi
tional woman's vote, the woman’s vote,
(Continued on sage Eleven.)
Marion County Figures
Official returns from ICO precincts of
the 177 precincts In Marlon County, un
officially tabulated, show the following
pluralities:
PRESIDENT.
Hardin* (Rep.) 42.3*1
Cox (Dera.) 83,963
SENATOR.
Watson (Rep.) 40.889
Taggart (Dem.) 33.019
GOVERNOR.
McCray (Rep.) 41,830
McCulloch (Dem 31,625
LIE C TEN ANT GOVERNOR.
Branch (Rep.) 42,211
Foster (Dem.) 34,090
SECRETARY OF STATE.
Jackson (Rep.) 42,506
Wagner (Dem.) 33,961
AUDITOR OF STATE.
Oliver (Rp.) 12.296
Hughes (Dem.) 31,160
TREASURER OF STATE.
Davies (Rep.) 41087
Be Horlty (Dem.) *33,116
ATTORNEY GENERAL.
Lesli (Rep 42,217
Sunkel (Dem.) 31,080
FOR STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF
PUBLIC INSTRUCTION.
Hines (Rep.) 42,310
Mclntosh (Dem.) 33,999
FOR JUDGE OF SUPREME COURT,
THIRD DISTRICT.
Ewbank (Rep.) 42,317
Felt (Dem.) '..... 34,047
lOR JUDGE OF SUPREME COURT,
FIFTH DISTRICT.
Travis (Rep.) 42,209
Bowser (Dem.) 34,065
FOR JUDGE APPELLATE COURT,
FIRST DIVISION.
Batman (Rep.) 42.304
Swan (Dem.) 34.043
FOR JUDGE APPELLATE COURT,
SECOND DIVISION.
Dauseman (Rep.) 42,231
Reidclbach (Dem.) 33.945
FOR REPORTER OF SUPREME
COURT.
Adams (Rep.) 42,272
Unger (Dem 34,072
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS,
Seventh Congressional District.
Moores (Rep.) 42,117
Spaan (Dem.) 81,172
FOR JUDGE CIRCUIT COURT,
Nineteenth Judicial Circuit.
Chamberlin (Rep.) 42,908
Sciilosser (Dem.) 33,119
FOR PROSECUTING ATTORNEY,
Nineteenth Judicial Circuity
Evans (Rep.) 41.660
Davis (Dem.) 34,367
FOR SENATOR.
Baxter (Rep.) 42.339
Hack (Dem.) 81,171
FOR SENATOR.
Buchanan (Rep.) 48,267
; lloltzman (Dem.) 33,861
FOR SENATOR.
{ Miller (Rep.) 42,342
j Little (Dem.) 34,003
FOB SENATOR.
Moorehead (Rep.) 42,345
Rauh (Dem.) 34,117
3htiitotia flatly
New Leaders of Nation Chosen by People
PRESIDENT-ELECT HARDING.
Alien Land Measure
• Wins in California
SAN FRANCISCO. Nov. 8,-CslirornU
voter* emphatically regUturM tlwtr tp
; rural of legislation against ills* lan :
ownership In the State.
The amendment, aimed at the Japanese,
which will prohibit them from owning or
holding land In the State, carried by at
least three to one.
The Harris prohibition net, modeled
after the Volstead enforcement measure,
which would have given State officials
power to enforce prohibition, was de
feat®-!.
FOR JOINT SENATOR, HAMILTON,
HENDRICKS AND MARION
COUNTIES.
English (Rep.) 42J93
Dugan (Dem.) 31,085
FOR REPRESENTATIVE.
Abrams (Rep.) 42,360
Benedict (Rep.) 42,112
Cox (Rep.) 12,113
Glvan (Rep.) 12,402
Haworth (Rep.) 12,415
Haworth (Rep.) 42,913
Jameson (Rep.) 42,45,
Kingsbury (Rep.) 42,413
Newman (Rep.) 12,319
Noll (Rep.) 42.405
Cox (Dem.) 34,169
Lalaney (Dem.) 53.993
Uonlan (Dem.) 33,691
Gibson (Dem.) 31,076
Henry (Dem.) 31 ’•!
Herr (Dem.) 38,070
McNamara (Dem.) 88.835
Kochford (Dem.) 81,013
Wood (Dem.) 81,00)
Ryan (Dem.) 33,829
FOR COUNTY TREASURER.
Lemcke (Rep.) 12.191
Woollln* (Dem.) 33,660
FOR COUNTY SHERIFF.
Snider (Rep.) 42,228
Slndllnger (Dem.) 31,072
FOR COUNTY CORONER.
Robinson (Kep.l .< 12.479
Buchanan (Dem.) 33,909
FOR COUNTY SURVEYOR.
Griffith (Rep.) 42,335
Julian (Dm.) e 81.017
For County Commissioner —2d District.
TutewUer (Rep.) 42.310
lvervan (Dem.) 34,097
For County Commissioner—3d District.
Hoffman (Rep.) 42,286
Hardin (Dem.) 84,166
Burleson A taro in
WASHINGTON, Nov. 3.—The biggest
cause for the Democratic defeat was the
failure of the Democrats to foresee and
predict In advance the slump In tue
price of farm products, and place the
responsibility therefor on the Republican
Congress, according to Albert Sidney
Burleson, postmaster general and polit
ical war horse of the Wilson cabinet.
N
‘Congratulations’
Cox and Roosevelt
DAYTON, Ohio, Nov. 3.—Governor
James M. Cox today sent his con
gratulations to Senator Warren G.
Harding.
His message follows:
"In the spirit of America, I accept
the decision of the majority, tender,
as the defeated candidate, my con
gratulations and pledge, as a citizen,
my support to the executive author
ity In whatever emergency might
arise.
(Signed) "JAMES M. COX.”
NEW YORK, Nov, 3.—Franklin D.
Roosevelt, Democratic candidate for
Vice President, today Bent the follow
ing message of congratulation to Gov
ernor Coolldge, Vice President-elect:
"My sincere congratulations to you.
"I trust that under the administra
tion of Mr. Harding and yourself the
nation will grow in prosperity and
in the unselfish Ideals of Americanism
whch unprejudiced citizens of all
parties d4slre,^___..
INDIANAPOLIS, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1920.
CABINET POSTS
GET ATTENTION
Will Hays Mentioned an
Likely Postmaster
Getieral.
MARION, Ohio. Nov. 3. Special Inter
est regerdlng the next cabinet started
here today before telegraph Instruments
la the Ua-’ding headquarters had ceased
clicking off election returns.
No one presumes at this stage of the
game to Siy who will be picked.
The following list of names, however,
has figured in talk around headquarters
here since It became apparent Harding
ould be elected :
Secretary of State- Senator Henry ( *-
bot Lodge, Herbert Hoover, Ellhu Root
Secretary of the Tre sury—Governor
Frank O. Lowden, Fred IV. I pbarn, Illi
nois.
Secretary of War—MaJ Gen. Leonard
Wood, Gen. John J. Pershing.
Attorney General —George W. Suther
land, l tali.
Postmaster General—Walter F. Brown,
Ohio; Will H. Hays, Indiana; Harry M.
Daugherty, Ohio.
Secretary of the Navy—John W. Weeks,
Massachusetts.
Secretary of the Interior—Senator Fall,
New Mexico.
Secretary of Agriculture—Henry Wal
lace, lowa.
Secretary of Commerce—J. J. I'sch,
Wiacoualu.
Secretary of Labor—Congressman John
I. Nolan, Raymond Robins, Chicago.
Probable Standing
of Electoral Vote
The electOr.ll Tote probably will be
grouped bjr States ns follow*.
FOR HARDING.
California IS
Colorado ' A
Connecticut 7
Delaware 8
Idaho 4
Indiana 15
oa 18
Illinois iv
Kansas 10
Minnesota IS
Michigan • 15
Maine A
Ma ts' hniMrtts 1*
Maryland . A
Missouri 18
Montana 4
New York 43
New Hampshire 4
New Jersey 11
Nebraska 8
Nnrih Dakota 5
Keiarts 8
Oregon 5
Ohio 24
Pennsylvania 88
Rhode Island ■ 5
South Dakota 6
l - tah 4
Y r eimont ■ 4
Wisconsin • 12
Wyoming , 3
Wnshl ngt on 7
West Virginia 8
Totals 370
FOR COX.
Alabama 12
Arkansas 0
Florida 0
Georgia 14
Kentucky 13
Louisiana 10
Mississippi 10
North Carolina 12
Oklahoma 10
South Carolina 0
Texas ■ 20
Tennessee 12
Virginia . ..• 12
Totals 140
YET IN POI'BT.
Arizona • 3
New Mexico 3
Totals <S
Total number of electors, 531; ma
jority, 206.
SIIELBY COINTY WOMAN DIES.
GREENSBLRG, lud.. Mrs.
Sarah E. Neibert, 70, at
the home of her aflMj^M^BJgjjaNellie
ill Shell.j I.ounuMßuanwwWnw# and
was taken three
uc- ghte.n s■: ■
VICE PRESIDENT-ELECT COOLIDGE.
Statements From Leaders
on Result of the Election
PRESIDENT-ELECT
MARION, o. Nov, 8. —"I am happy to
utter lay gratitude, but I am not exul
tant, ’’ President elect Warren G. Hard
| in* raid In big flr#t vrritteu statement
Issued since his election was conceded
"It Is not a personal victory. It is a
renewed ex press ton of confident Ameri-
J canl .m and a national call to the Re
publican potty.
j “It Is aiso serious. The obligations
j are so solemn, that Instead of exulting
I am more given to prayer to God to
make me capable of playing my part,
i aud that all those called to responsibility
may meet tbe aspirations and expecta
tions of America and the world,
j “I am sure the people w.io have voted
tho Republican ticket will understand
i my feeling mat t should make no un
i studied statement of policies at tilts
time be) oud the expressions made
; throughout the campaign."
The statement which the President
) elect, wrote with a pencil In his Library
j began:
“Assuming that the early returns are
; wholly deptndable, I do not hesitate to
say that I am pleased, of course."
•j President-elect Hnrding tent the fol
lowing message* of congratulations:
| To Will lLoys: “My gratitude along
1 with congratulations ou your cupable
and successful management of a great
campaign "
To Governor Calvin Coolldge: “My
b- artiest congratulations over the great
Republican victory to which your
strength added so materially.
“You are expected to play a full part
In the coming Republican administration.
Good wishes."
CHAIRMAN WHITE
NEW Y'OKK, Nov. 3.—George White,
chairman of tbe Democratic nat onai
committee, after conceding Harding's
election, made the following stst.-incut:
“The abandonment by some of the most
prominent Republican ’enders of the
League of Nations which they helped to
construct has been successful.
“The people have succumbed to the
confusion wrought by these distinguished
men nnd to tho misrepresentation of
those who would not and did not under
stand the League of Nations. I hope It
may yet be rescued from the political
morass and be saved to mankind.
“No one has any occasion for bltter
i-eas or recrimination. What the whole
people decide the whole people must ac
cept. The Democratic national committee
abides by the result cheerfully, If with
foreboding. Senator Harding will be the
people's President.
“In this election Republican propa
ganda has been shrewdly directed to In
duce tho descendants of six European
nations to vote as six European nations,
instead of ns one American nation.
“Our common task must be to coalesce
those groups again.
IRISH PROBLEM IS
RETURNED TO BRITISH.
“The fate of Irish freedom has been
settled adversely. Men nnd women of
Irish blood bnve voted for the Candidate
who has declared the Irish question to
he tho domestic problem of Grent Britain
i In which we cun have no official concern.
With their support the American people
; have returned the Irish problem to
Downing street. They have Indorsed, I
am sod to say, a separate peace with
Germany'.
Indiana to Have
Assemblywoman
Special to The Times.
MTJNCIE, Ind., Nov. 3.—A woman
has been elected to a sent In the Indi
ana General Assembly for the first
time In the State’s history.
Mrs. Julia Nelson, Mtincie. nomi
nated to ‘mceeed Clark D. McKinley,
State representative from Delaware
County, who died last Saturday, is
the successful woman.
Her name was pasted on the bal
lots over that of Mr. McKinley, who
was a candidate for re-election.
IBy Currier, W*ek, Indianapolis, 10c; IClucwbere. lie*
Subscription Rate* J By MftU so c Pe r Mor.tb 15.00 Per Year.
’Tor the first time L< Mght years the
Republican party is face to face with the
task of constructive legislation and more
than that the measures of reconstruc
tion for which the country has been ask
ing a Itepubl.cun Congress for two years
In vain.
"They must change a negative reco r( j
into a positive, and In this task they
have the best w.shes of all who love their
country.
“Aa the national chairman of a party
which Is, has always been and always
is for America first, I have sent mvsa-tges
f congratulation to Senator Harding,
overnor Coolldge and Sir. llaya.
"1 w sb them aurccss.”
SENDS BEST WISHES TO
PRESIDENT-ELECT.
Uhtnnuun White sent the following
congratulatory telegram to Senator
Herding at Marlon:
"The American people have overwheim
ngly Uoseu you. My heartiest congrat
ulations and best *\ shes for successful
Vudcrshtp of this great nation in Its
'•rttlcal hour."
White telegraphed Governor Coolldge
at Northampton as follows:
"You are the overwhelming choice of
the people for Vice President. Please
(Continued on Page Two.)
'"
Complexion of
Congress
(lUvxl on Incomplete Returns)
V , I. 1.1
STATES Senators
Rep. Dem. Rep. Deni.
Alabama 10 .. 2
Arizona 1 .. 2
Arkansas 7 .. 2
California (c) .... 9 2 2..
Colorado 3 1 2
Connecticut 5 .. 2
Delaware 1 .. 1 1
Florida 4 .. 2
Georgia 12 .. 2
Idaho 2 .. 2
Illinois 24 3 2 ..
Indiana 13 .. 2
lowa 11 .. 2
Kansas , 7 1 2
Kentucky 4 7 .. 2
Louisiana 8 .. 2
Maine 4 2
Maryland ........ 4 2 2
Massachusetts ... 14 2 2
Michigan 13 .. 2
Minnesota (a) ... 10 .. 2
Mississippi 8 .. 2
Missouri 5 11 .. 2
Montana 2 .. .. 2
Nebraska 6 .. 1 1
Nevada 1 .. *2
New Hampshire... 2 .. 2
New Jersey 12 .. 1 t
New Mexico 1 .. 2
New York 31 12 2 ..
North Carolina .... 10 .. 2
N. Dakota (b) ... 3 .. 2 ..
Ohio 17 6 2 ..
Oklahoma 2 6 .. 2
Oregon 3 .. 1 *1
Pennsylvania .... 34 2 2
Rhode Island .... 3 .. 1 1
South Carolina 7 .. 2
South Dakota . 3 .. 2
Tennessee 2 8 .. 2
Texas .. 18 .. 2
Utah 2 ... 1 1
Vermont 2 .. 2
Virginia 1 • .. 2
Washington 5 2
West Virginia ... 8 2
Wisconsin (c) ... 10 .. 2
Wyoming 1 1 1
Totals 271 /157 55 41
House of Representatives:
(a) One Independent.
(b) One Independent.
(c) One Prohtfctfionlst. A
(•) In doubt f A
LAST HOME EDITION
TWO CENTS PER COPT
CONGRESS NOW
IN CONTROL OF
REPUBLICANS
Senate Majority of Twelve
Sure With Forty Demo
cratic Seats.
GAIN OF 33 IN HOUSE
NEW YORK, Nov. 3—The Republican
majority In the next Senate will be at
least twelve as a result of the unpre
cedented majorities given President-elect
Warren G. Harding and other Republican
candidates at Tuesday's election.
With s.nntffrial races In Oregon, Ne
vada und Arizona still In doubt. Re
publican successes In twenty contest* In
creased their scats to Etty-four, while
eleven Democratic victories gave them a
total of thirty-nine seats.
The margin by which Republican
leaders will control the Senate will be
sufficiently wide to Insure that Mr. Hard
ing will receive adequate support for
whatever domestic policies are laid down
by him, it was declared at Republican
national headquarters here
Even If certain Republican Senators
of pronounced Independence of action
and Tiews should offer opposition to
the HardlDg Administration on domes
tic questions, Mr. Harding will still have
the support of a comfortable working
majority In the upper chamber of the
new Sixty-Seventh Cor-gress.
It Is expected, owing to pressing leg
lslatlve requirements of the country, that
President-Elect Harding will call the
new Congress In special or extra session
In March or April next or soon after
his inauguration on March 4.
The new Senate will convene automa
tically, in accordance with recognized cus
tom, immediately after Mr. Harding takes
office, to give consideration to whatever
cabinet and other appointments to office
he may make.
Mr. Harding will dominate the new
Senate sufficiently. It was :&id, to insure
(Continued on Page Five.)
ASSEMBLY TO
BE REPUBLICAN
Proponents of Goodrichism
Will Return to Next
Session.
The Republican majority In the next
Indiana Legis’ature will be as over
whelm!: g as the Republican vote in the
State, returns Indicated today.
Avallab’e returns indicate that ei-'bty
alx of tbe 100 members of the House
will be Republicans six will be Demo
crats and the contests In other districts
are still In doubt. ,
Indications are that twenty of the
twenty-five Kepablb-an candidates for
the Senate bare been elected and that
the Republicans will have thirty-eight or
forty members of the upper house.
Most cf the men who voted for the
Goodrich tax law and for the Tuthlll-
Klper tax law, and for all the other
notorious Goodrich legislation olil return
when the General Assembly convenes In
January.
In the last Legislature the Republican
majority was so g:eat It made the Dem
ocratic minority utterly Ineffective.
Indications are tbe Democratic minor
ity In the next Legislature will be so
small a to be Insignificant.
Inasmuch as returns on legislative can
didates are the last to come la, no poil
tive statements can be made; but If the
voters voted for legislators the way thiy
voted for the State and National tickets,
a cumber of counties and districts which
usually send Democrats to the Assembly
will be represented by Republicans.
The entire Marlon County delegation
will be Republican.
The Marion Connty Senators will be
Winfield Miller, Charles J. Bnchnnan,
Arthur R. Baxter, Robert L. Moorehead
and William E. English.
The representatives will be Paul L.
IlawortU, Clinton U. Glvan, James L.
Kingsbury, Frank J. Noll, Henry
Abrams. John L. Benedict, Thomas
Harvey Cox, John T. Jameson, Russell
H. Harrison and Omtr U. Newman.
SLEUTH SHOT AT POLLS.
CHICAGO. Nor. 3.—Detective Sergeant
John J. Walsh of the South Clark Street
station,, assigned to election duty at
the Fiftieth Street station, was shot
! twice by a negro near a polling place.
Republicans Elected
in Marion County
The following, all Republican, were
elected on the State and Marlon County
tickets:
Senator, James E. Watson.
Governor, Warren T. McCray.
Judge of Supreme Court, Third dis
trict, Louis B. Ewbank.
Judge Supreme Court, Fifth district,
Julius C. Travis.
Judge Appellate Court. First district,
Ira C. Batman.
judge Appellate Court Second district,
F.tbau A. Dauamau.
Treasurer of State. Ora J. Daviea.
Lieutenant Governor, Emmett F.
Branch.^.
Secretary of State, Ed Jackson.
Auditor of State, William G. Oliver.
Attorney General. U. S. Lesh.
Superintendent of Public Instruction,
Linneus N. Hints.
Reporter of Supreme Court, Will H.
Adams.
Prosecuting attorney, William P.
Evans.
Judge of Circuit Court, Harry O.
Chamborlln.
County treasurer. Ralph A. I^emcke.
Sheriff, George Snider.
Coroner, Paul F. Robinson.
Surveyor, John J. Griffith.
Commissioner, Second district, Harry
D. Tutewiler.
Commissioner. Third district, Albert
Hoffman.
Following is a list of congressional
candidates, all Republicans, whom early
returns indicate are elected:
First district. Oscar R. Lubring.
Second district, Oscar E. Bland.
Third district. James W. Dunbar
(doubtful.)
Fourth district. John 8. Denham.
Fifth district. Everett Sanders.
Sixth district, Richard N. Elliott.
Seventh district. Morrill Moores.
Eighth district. Albert H. Vestal.
Ninth district. Fred 8. Purnell.
Tenth district. Will Wood.
Eleventh district. Milton Kraca.
Twelfth district, Louis W. FairflaSd.
Thirteenth district, Andrew J, Hickey,
NO. 151.
POPULAR VOTE
GREATEST EVER
POLLED IN U. S.
President-Elect Assured of
Comfortable Majority in
Both Houses.
MAY EXCEED 6 MILLION
NEW YORK, Not. 3. —The scope of
the Republican victory that swept the
nation yesterday continues to grow as
the return* were complied today.
These returns showed that:
Harding has been elected President by
tbe greatest popular vote ever amassed
In the history of American politics and
the largest electoral vote ever rolled up
by a Republican , candidate.
Republicans have strengthened their
grip on the Senate and will have a work
ing majority of from twelve to sixteen
seats.
They will have a top heavy majority
of approximately 100 votes In the House.
Republican Governors were elected Ja
every State except those of the solid
South.
Harding's electoral vote had reached
37, with Indications that doubtful
States might carry the figure to the 400
mark.
His popular plurality seemed certain
to exceed six million.
The electoral rotes of only two States
appeared to be In doubt L-.lay—those of
Arizona and New Mexico, each with
three. The returns from there two were
slow and the vote so close that It may
take several days to determine the re
sults.
The Cox-Roosevelt ticket carried the
solid South, comprising eleven States,
and nothing else, barring possible vic
tories In Arizona and New Mexico.
The Hardlng-Coolldge ticket carried
I every State north of the Mason-Dixon
j line and every State west of the Missis
sippi river with exception of Arkansas,
Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas and
possibly tbe two doubtful States of the
j Mexican border,
t a. O. P. PLURALITY
FROM 4.00* 000 to 7 000 000.
j On the face of available returns. Hard
i tag's popular plnrallty Is estimated any
where from 4,000.000 to 7,000,000 votes,
j possibly more, and the Ohio Senator
seemed assured of having around 389
votes In the electoral college. It Is the
greatest victory ever scored by a Re
publican candidate-'for the presidency,
far exceeding that of Theodore Roose
velt in UKH. “T. R.” had a popular
, plurality of 2.541.291 and had 336 votes
! la the electoral college.
Staggering pluralities were run np la
many States, due to the addition of mil-
I lions of woman votes. The Republican
i national ti< ket appears to have esp
tured must of tho new votes.
, New York gave Harding a plurality
estimated roundly at 1.000,000; Pennsyl
vania. a Republican stronghold, 750.010:
j Illinois, 800 0U0; Michigan, 400.000; Cali
; fornia. 500.000; Massachusetts, 300,000,
aud Ohio tbe home State of both candl
i dates, gave Hnrding a victory roundly
, estimated at 330.000.
BROUGHT BAC K ALL
THE ERRANT STATES.
The Republicans succeeded in turning
back Into the Republican column every
northern and western State which Wood
(Continued on Tage Five.)
FORMER POLICE
OFFICER FINED
Found Guilty of Operating
‘Blind Tiger.’
John H. Hack, 601 West Thirtieth
street, former police officer, was found
guilty of operating a blind tiger and
fined $l5O aud sentenced to thirty days
on the penal farm by Judge Robbins in
City Court today.
The penal farm sentence was suspend
ed, and narry Schofield, 81914 Indiana
avenue, signed a “s-ay" in the elt7
clerk's office for the fine.
Charges against Walter Zoeler, 1454
Lanrel street, at whose house Huck’*
automobile was found, were dismissed.
There was no evidence that Zoeler had
knowledge of the whisky.
The police testified they found Hnck*
automobile in Zoeler’a garage, and in tb*
automobile were twelve eusea of whlaky,
each case containing thirty-eight half
pint bottles.
The police said Huck admitted the
ownership of the llqucr and that he had
purchased it from a man who had a
truck load on Shelby street.
Panic Seizes Tenants
When Bomb Explodes
CHICAGO, Nov. B.—Twenty fa mills*
Bed to the street in near panic early to
day when a bomb exploded in tbe en
trance of a three-story apartment build
ing on tbe north side.
Charles L. Burgess, owner of the build
ing, told the police the explosion and
the reason for It was "a mystery.”
The explosion was the second on his
propijrtj in three month*.
George W, Stevens of
C. & G. Reported Dead
RICHMOND. Va., Nov. 3.—A telephone
message fro:n # White Sulphur Springs,
W. Ya., reports th:t George W. Stevens,
president of the Chesapeake A- Ohio Rail
road, died suddenly there th'-a morning.
Who Did It?
Vnder the caption, “Who IMd It,"
a contributor declares that the over
whelming deleat of Governor Cox was
brought about by:
Those who opposed the League of
Nations and those who approved the
League of Nations.
Those who understood the League
of Nations and those who did not
understand the League of Nations.
Those who believe in a separate
peace with Germany and those who
do not believe in a separate peace
with Germany.
Friends of Irish Freedom.
Opponents of Irish Freedom.
Those who opposed Wilson and
those who applauded Wilson.
Those who had voted for Wilson
and those who h ul not voted for Wil
son.
Those who faw Harding.
Those who fought him.
And Bfty-seven other varieties of
voters, none of whom appear to bars
been Democrats.

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