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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, November 23, 1920, Last Home Edition, Image 10

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EARLY ADVANCES
ONLY TEMPORARY
Leading Issues Decline After
Excited Trade of Opening.
NEW YORK. Nor. 23.—Trading on the
stock exchange at the opening today was
attended by a good deal of excitement,
the tone showing strength, with violent
advances in manv issues.
General Motors featured the trading,
opening with sales of 15,000 shares all
the wav from 16% to 176, a gain of 1%,
but later the stock reacted to 16%.
Crucible made a gain of 4% to 100 and
then reacted to 95%. e
Steel common rose % to 84%. from
which it reacted to 83%. Baldwin ad
vanced 1% to 9914.
Texas Company was strongest of the
oils, advancing 2% to 51. Similar move
ments were recorded in many other
stocks, reactions following openelng
gains.
Southern Pacific failed to make any
Improvement In Its market position,
yielding 14 to 114%, and after rallying
to 115, declined to 114*4.
Reading sold np to 90.
The buviag movement which caused
the sharp initial advances did not last
long, stocks being In supply during the
forenoog, and there was a general as
sumption that the early demand had
been In most cases covering of shorts
with some buying by room traders
which became over enthusiastic when
stocks were taken at the opening ad
vances.
Steel common yielded over 1 point to
82% and Baldwin, after selling at 99%,
dropped to 97*4. _
Bethlehem Steel ‘•B" and Republic
Steel reacted over 1 point.
General Motors reacted to 66% *nd
Crucible got down 4 points from the top
to 96.
Reading yielded nearly 2 points to
88% and Southern Pacific from 115,
dropped to 112%.
Mexican Petroleum reacted from 164*4
to 161%. /
CLEARING HOUSE STATEMENT.
NEW YORK, Nov. 23.—Subtreasury
debit, $1,060,145: exchanges, $933,207,419;
balances, $68,358776.
Money and Exchange
Indianapolis bank clearings today were
$2,759,000, against $3,100,000 a week ago.
NEW YORK. Nov. 23. —Foreign ex
change opened higher today. Sterling,
$3 52%, np 1; francs, .0624, np .0001; lire,
.0399, up .0002; marks, .0152; Canadian
dollars, .8950.
NEW YORK, Nov. 22.—Commercial bar
sliver: Domestic nnchanged at 99Vic:
foreign, lc lower at 74c.
LONDON, Nov. 22.—Bar sliver was l%d
lower today at 47%d.
NEW YORK CALL MONEY.
NEW .YORK. Nov. 22.—Money : Call
monev ruled 7 per cent; high, 7 per cent;
low, 5 per cent. Time rates, steady ; all
stocks, V 4 per cent. Tin3 mercantile
paper was steady. Sterling exchange
was steady with business in bankers'
bills at $3.49% for demand.
MOTOR SECURITIES.
(By Thomson & McKinnon)
—Nov. 23
—Opening—;
Bid. Ask.
Briscoe 13 15
Chalmers, com 1 I*4
Packard, com 12*4 13
Packard, pfd 79 81
Chevrolet 200 400
Peerless 25 26
Continental Motors, com. ... 0% 7
Continental Motors, pfd 93 95
Hupp, com 10 11
Hupp, pfd 97 101
Reo Motor Car 23*4 24
Elgin Motors 5*4 6*4
Grant Motors 2% 3 •
Ford of Canada .’. 275 280
United Motors 30 40
National Motors S 10
Federal Truck 21 22
Paige Motors 17V4 18*4
Republic Truck 27 30
ACTIVE OIL STOCKS.
(By Thomson & McKinnon.)
—Nov. 23
—Opening—
Bid. Ask.
Anglo-American Oil • 19*4 20%
Borne-Scrymser 400 420
Buckeye Pipe Line 86 88
Chesebrough Mfg. Con 390 210
Chesebrough Mfg. Con. pfd. 96 100
Cont. Oil. Colorado JOS 112
Cosden Oil and Gas 6% -7
•Crescent Pipe Line 27 3d
Cumberland Pipe Line 135 145
Elk Basin Pete 8 8%
Eureka Pipe Line 100 110
Galena-Signal Oil. pfd. new. 90 94
Galena-Slgna! Oil, com 50 53
Illinois Pipe Line 170 175
Indiana Pipe Line 87 90
Merritt Oil 12 12%
Midwest Oil 1 2
Midwest Refining 147 149
National Transit 25 27
N*>" York Transit 160 170
Northern Pipe Line 100 104
Ohio Oil 285 295
Penn.-Mex 40 43
Prairie Oil and Gas 510 525
Prairie Pipe Line 250 215
SapulpJ Refining 4% 5%
Solar Refining 400 430
Southern Pipe Line 110 115
South Penn Oil 245 250
Southwest Penn. Pipe Lines. 63 66
Standard Oil Cos. of Cal 327 330
s* -- -fl Oil Cos of tnd 710 720
Standard Oil Cos. of Kan.... 630 650
Sia. .. rd *lll Cos. of Kv 360 390
Standard Oil C0.,0f Neb.... 410 430
Standard o*l <’o. of N. Y—. 368 373
Standard Oil Cos. of 0hi0.... s
Swan & Finch 85 66
Union Tank Line 102 108
Y n <•> 306 315
Washington Oil 30 35
•Ex-Dividend.
KEH YORK CCKB.
(By Thomson & McKinnon)
—Closing—
Bid. Asked.
Curtis Aero, com 2 6
Oirtls Aero, pfd 15 25
First National Copper .... _% f%
Goldfield Con 7
Havana Tobacco 1 1%
Havana Tobacco, pfd 3
Cont. Teresa 3 4
Jumbo Extension 5 7
International Petroleum... 14% 5
Nipisslng 8% 9
Indian Pkg 2% 3
Royal Baking Powder 110 115
Royal Baking Powder pfd 78 83
Standard Motors 6 7
Tonopah Extension 15-16 17-16
Tonopah Mining 1% 1%
United P. S., new 1% 1%
U. S. Light and Heat 1 1%
I : . S. Ligbt and Heat, pfd. 1 2
Wright-Matln 4 6
World Film % %
Yukon Gold Mine Cos 1 1%
Jerome 18 IS%
New Cornelia '.. 10 16
United Verde 22 28
Eeuquoyah 3-16 7-16
Omar Oil 2% 2%
Kep. Tire 1% 1%
NEW YORK METAL MARKET.
NEW YORK, Nor. 22.—Copper—Dull;
spot, November, December, January, Feb
ruary and March offered 14%. L*ad—
Dull; spot, November, December and
January offered $0.20 Spelter—Weak ;
spot and November offered $6.20; Decem
ber, January, February and March of
fered $6.25.
CHICAGO STOCKS.
(Thomson & McKinnon.)
—Nov. 22-
Open. High. Low. Close.
Carb. and Carb. 50% 53% 56% 53
Libby 11 11 11 11%
Montgy.-Ward.. 19% 21 19% 20%
National Leather 8 8% 8 8%
Sears-Roebuck. 101% 104 101% 101
Stewart-Warner. 28% 23% 26% 25%
Swift & Cos 100% 102% 100 102%
Swift Intern a tl. 25 26% 23 26%
Armour Leather 15% ....,
Arm. Lea. pfd.. 15%
BOSTON FOOD PRICES DECLINE.
BOSTON, Nov. 23. —The price of food
in Massachusetts decreased 4 per cent In
October, compared with September, the
commission on the necessity of life an
nounced today.
In the same period, the cost of all
necessities decreased 2% per cent.
Nash Motors Plant
Down for Inventory
KENOSHA, Wla., Nov. 23—The plant
of the Nash Motors Company In this
city was practically closed today.
It was announced the shut down was
for two weeks while the annual in
ventory is being made.
It is not 1 expected all workers will
be re-employed.
I _
N. Y. Stock Prices
—Nov. 22. — Prev.
High. Low. Close. Close.
Ajax Rubber ... 31% 31% 31% 31%
Alaska Gold ... 1% 1% 1%
Allla-Chalmers.. 30% 29% 30% 28Lj
Am. Agri 70 69% 70 69%
Am. Beet Sugar. 52Vi 51% 52 49
Am. B. Mag. Cos. 68 67 % 68 65%
Am. Car & Fdy.124% 122 124% 121
Am. Can 26 24 25 % 23%
Am. H & L com. 7*4 7*4 7% 7%
Am. -HAL pfd. 47% 46% 47% 45
Am. Drug 8 7% 7% 7%
i Am. In. Corp... 46% 43% 45% 42%
i Am. Llnsedd. 54... 51 54 51
; Am. Locomotive. 85 81% 84% 81%
j Am. Smt. & Ref. 46% 44 45% 44%
| Am. Sugar Ref. 97% 93% 97% 94%
i Am. Su. Tob. Cos. 74% 70% 74% 71
Am. StL Fdry.. 30% 28% 30% 28
'Am. Tel &. Tel.. 99% 99 99% 99
! Am. Tobacco ..119% 114% 119% Hi
! Am. Woolen ... 66% 64 66% 64
:Am Zinc & Lead 8 7% 8 8
' Ana. Min. Cos. ...41% 38 41% 37%
Atchison 86% 84% 86% 84
i At. Gulf & W 1.111% 10S 111% 107
i Baldwin L0c0... 98% 94 98 93%
B. & 0 40 38 40 38
Beth. Stl. <8)... 57 53Vi 57 52%
Brk Rap Trans. 12% £% 12% 12%
Can. Pac. Ry... 115% 117 118% 116
Cen. Leather... 39% 38 39% 36%
Chan. Motors... 77 74 % 77 74%
C. & 0 65% 64% 64% 63%
ICM& St P 36 34% 36 33%
|C M&St P pfd. 54 52% 54 51
Chi & Northw.. 78% n 75% 77%
i C R I & P 31% 30% 31% 30
iCRIAP 6% pfd. 65% 65% 65% 64
! CRI&P 7<T O pfd. 79 77% 79 75%
! Chill Copper ... 13 12 12% 12%
! Chino Copper... 21 19% 21 20
: Coca Cola 24 23 24 22%
; Col Fuel & Iron 30*4 28% 28% 30
! Columbia Gas.. 55% 54 55% 03%
j Colum. Graph.. 14% 75% 14 l-%
Consol. Gas.... 81% 80 81% <9%
! Contin. Can.... 61% 59 61% • ••••
Con. Candy Cos. 6 5% _6 5%
Corn Products. 74 71 74 il%
Crucible Steel.. 96% 88 85 % 8*
Cuban Am. Sag 31% 31% 31% •••••
Del. & Hud 103% 103% 103% 101
D. & R. G 1 % N 7%
D. &R. G. pfd. 1 % % 7%
Erie 76% 16 16% 16
Erie Ist pfd.... 24% 22% 24% 21%
i Famous Players 54 60 53% 48%
! Fisk Rub. Cos.. 14% 14 14% 14%
Gas., W. A W.. 4 4 4 4%
Gen. Cigars 55% 54% 55% . 04%
Gen. Electric...
Gen. Motors.... 14% J 4% 15% 74
Goodrich 42% 41 42% ii_ ;
Gt. North, pfd. 81 78% 81 77%
Gt. North. Ore. 31% 29% 31% 29 ;
Gulf States St.. 37 34% 37 35
Houston 0H.... 85% 81% 85 * 80%
Illinois Central. 89 89 89 ..... ]
Insplr. Copper.. 35 3-*% 35 33 i
Inter. Corp 4% 4% 4% • •••• j
Inter. Harvester 96 93 90% V 2
Inter. Nickel... 15% 14% 15% 74%
Inter. Paper 50% 47 50% 46%
Invln. Oil 24% 23 .4% -3”*
Ivan. City 50... 21% 21% -1% 2*%
Kelly-Spfield T. 45 41% 45 41
Kennecott Cop.. 20% 19% 20% 19%
Lack Steel 53% 51 02% 46%
Lehigh Valley.. 50% 49 50% 48
Loess, Inc IS It Vi 18 IT
Marine c0m.... 15% 15% 15% 15
i Marine pfd.... 56 52 55% 52
Mexican Petr 01.163% 155% 163 , 154%
Miami Copper.. 17% 16% 17% 16%
Middle Stat. Oil 12% 12% 12% 12
Midvale Steel.. 34 31% 34 3**%
M, K. A T.... 3% 3% 3% 3%
iMo Pac. Ry... 23% 22% 23% 22
! Nat. En. A Stm. 47% 46% 47% 45 %
I Nat. Lead 72% 69% 71 6i%
Nevada Con Cp. 9% 8% 9% 8%
;N. Y. Air Brake 85% 84% 85% 83
;N. Y. Central.. 77% 75% 77% 75
New Haven ... 26 24% 26 24%
Nor. A West... 100 98 10>* 90%
Nor. Pacific 88% 85%' BS% 8,*%
, Ok. Pd AP.f.Co. 3% 3% 3% 3%
! Pan-Am. Petrol. 79Vi 74% 79 .3-%
Penn. Uy 41% 40% 41% 40%
j People's Gas... 36% 35 36% 33
| Pierce-Arrow.. 24 22 24 21
Pierce Oil Cos. 12% 11% 12% 11%
! Pittsburgh Coal 60% 57% 60% 56%
Pressed Stl. **gr 82 78 82 79
Pullman PI. Cr. 105 102 105 ftl
i Pure 0U....... 35 33 35 32%
! Ry. Stel. Sprgs. 85 83 85 82
Reading 89% 86% 89% % 86
' Rep. Iron A Stl. 69 66% 68%
1 Replogle Steel. 80 79 SO 79
Roy Dt. of NT. 9% 67 69% 67%
Sears-Roebuck 104% 10l 104 100%
Sinclair 27 25% 27 25%
S-3. S. A 1.... 55% 53% 55% 52
So. Pacific 114% 111 114% 110%
So. Railway.... 25% 24% 28% '24%
1 Stand. Oil N. J. 649 618 649 620
St.L. A S.F.com. 26 24% 26 23%
Strom. Carb.... 46% 52 46% 40%
Studebaker 47% 43% 47% 42%
' Tenn. Copper.. 7% 7% 7% 7%
Texas Cos 49% 46% 49% 46%
Texas A Pacific 23 21% 22% 21
Tobac. Prods... 54% 51 54% 49%
Transcon. OIL. 9% 8% 9 8%
| Union Oil 23% 22% 23% 21%
Union Pacific....l22% 120 122% 119%
U. Re. Stores... 60% 47% 60% 55%
U S.F.P.Corp.... 34 20% 33% 30
1 United F. C0...202 193 202 192
I U.S.lndus. Alco. 72 68 72 69
j U.S.Rubber .... 67 61% 66% 605^
;U S Steel 83% SI 83% SO *
! U.S.Steel pfd....106% 106% 106% 108%
I Utah Copper.... 53 52% 52% 51%
I Van Steel 49% 45% 49% 44%
i Vlr-Car. Chem. 41 40 41 38%
I Wabash 9% 8% 9% 9
Wab. Ist. pfd.. 25% 24% 25% 24
W. Maryland... 10% 10% 10% 10%
j Wert. Electric. 42% 41% 42% 41%
! White Motors... 40 38% 40 38
! Wlllys-Overld... 8 9% 7% 7%
Worth. Pnmp... 46% 43% 46% 43%
NEW YORK LIBERTY BONDS.
Prev.
High. Low. Close. Clcse.
L. B. 3%s 92.40 92.10 92.14 92.30
L. B. Ist 45.. 87.20 86.70 87.10
L. B. 2d 45... 86.00 85.00 86.10
L B. let 4%s 87.40 86 90 86 90 86.62
L. B. 2d 4%5. 86.32 85.80 86.14 85.70
L. B. 3d 4%5. 89.00 88.70 88 86 88 42
L. B. 4th 4%s 86.40 85.90 86.40 85.76
Victory 3%5. 96.04 95.96 96.02 95.91
Victory 4%5.. 96.06 95.90 96.00 95.96
TWENTY STOCKS AVERAGE.
NEW YORK, Nov. 23.—Twenty Indus
trial stocks averaged 77.15, an Increase
of 3.12 per cent. Twenty active rails av
eraged 79.73, an increase of 2.27 per cent.
Producers May Take
Over Packing House
\
CHICAGO, Nov. 23.—Stockyard and
terminal holdings of Morris & Cos., park
era in Chicago, Kansas City. St. Joseph,
St. Louis, Oklahoma City, El Paso, New
Orleans, Baltimore West Philadelphia
and New York would pass-into the hands
of live stock producers or the public if
a plan which Morris & Cos. has submitted
to the Supreme Court of the District of
Columbia is approved.
The plan, put forth by Edward Mor
ris, president of the company, propose*
that all of the capital stock holdings
of the company in these enterprises be
immediately surrendered to the court.
Live stock producers would then oe
given the first opportunity to acquire
these holdings.
Then the stock would be offered to peo
ple living near the various plants, then
to the common carriers and lastly to the
general public.
Morris A Cos. would be completely
divorced from ownership or control of
any of these properties, under the plan,
and a trust company designated to hold
and vote the stock as trustee until it Is
disposed of to people outside the pack
ing industry.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 23.—The Gov
ernment today decided to postpone for
one week action on the proposals of the
meat packers to divest themselves ol
their stockyard holdings under an agree
ment made with th< Department of Jus
tice.
The Government was expected to file
objections or acceptance of the dis
posal plan with the District of Columbia
Supreme Court today, but, after a con
ference between packers, representatives
and Government attorneys, Attorney
General l’aimer announced the postpone
ment.
WAGON WHEAT,
Indianapolis flour mills today are pay
ing $1.75 for No. 1 red wheat, $1.72 for
No. 2 red wheat and $1.69 for No. 3 red
Other grades according to their quality.
Oata# Per bn, 43c.
HOG PRICES
AT $lO MARK
Another Decline of $1 Brings
Hog Prices to New Low.
RANGE OF HOG PRICES.
Good Good Good
Nov. Mixed. Heavy. Light.
15. [email protected] $13.10013.25 $13.00
16. 12.85012.90 13.00 12.95012.85
17. 12.25012.35 [email protected] 12.25
18. 12.25012.35 12.40012.65 12.25
19. 11.75011.85 11.75012.00 11.65011.75
20. [email protected] 11.65011.85 11.40011.50
22. 10.75011.00 [email protected] 10.7t.011.00
23. 10.00 10.00 10.00
There was a continuation of the sharp
decline in hog prices on the local live
stock exchange today, when, losses rang
ing from 75 cents to $1 were generally
sustained on all grades of hogs.
Commission men again attributed tlie
decline to the large receipts and the re
flection of the other markets of the
country. . ,
Receipts for the day were again large
at between 15,000 and 16,000 at 10 o’clock,
and some commission men said that they
believed that the total receipts for the
dav would pass the 17,000 mark.
Trading was active from the very
start, with both the eastern shippers and
the local packers and other interests In
the marko*, and all indications pointed
out that the clearance for the day might
be good. .
Kingnn A Cos. had bought between
6.000 and 7,000 hogs at an early hour, but
representatives of the company did not
state whether or not they would pur
chase more hogs before the close of the
Armour A Cos., the Indianapolis Abat
toir Company and the other local con
cerns also bought large numbers of *<>gs.
The market wss practically a $lO mar
ket. with, however, one or lots or
good heavy hogs bringing Rlightly more
than that "early in the trading.
Good heavies, mixed, mediums, ngnts
and pigs brought SlO. Roughs, however,
were still lower than" the general mar
ket at $8 [email protected], with the bulk around $9.
The bulk of sales for the day, needless
to ear, was close to $lO.
Trading on the cattle market was again
draggy. with the local butchers and ship
pers none too active, and prices were
barely steady with yesterday's dose
Receipts f'-r the day approximated 7W
or 800 fresh cattle, and probably 500 stale
cattle left over from the Monday market.
There was a sharp drop in prices of
calves at the very opening of the market,
due, commission men stated, to no or
ders ironi the eastern markets, where
most of the calves bought on the local
market are shipped. , „
There was a general deo.lne of sl4*l.w
on good and choice veal*, where some of
the lower grades were practically steady,
with no demand.
Good to choice veals generally brought
sl2 50® 13 50. while there were a few
extra fancy calves that sold at sl4, which
was the top of the market.
Receipts for the day approximated 450.
With light receipts at between .00 and
300 sheep and lambs, the market was
barely steady with the bulk of the prime
sheep at $4. and lambs at $5.50(g10.
8008-
Best light hogs, 100 to 200 lb*
average *"- , ’V
200 to 3**o lbs average I 1 ;*'”
Over 300 lb*
Best pigs, under 140 lb* ® 10 '°°
Bulk of sales I" 00
IaTTLI.
Prime cornfcd steer*. 1.3U0 lb*
and up [email protected]
Good to choice steer*, 1.200 to
1 300 lb* 10.t.V)@ 13.00
Good to choice *teer*. 1.100 to
1,200 lbs 10 [email protected]
Medium steers, 1,000 to 1,100
Common to medium *teera.
800 to 1.000 lbs .k)@ 8.00
—Heifers and Cow* —
Good to choice heifer*
Medium heifers 8.70
Common to medium heifer*.. o.OOiJt 650
Good to choice cows
Fair to medium cows o.jn'tt Oftt
Canncr* ***
Cutters 4.25@
—Bulla-
Good to choice butcher bull* .. 7.25 Q 825
Bologna bu.la
Light common bull* 4,00@ 500
—Calves —
Choice veals 12.50'</ 14 00
Good veal* 9.00@12 00
Medium veals 9.00'rt11.80
Lightweight eals 6 00(g) 8.50
Heavyweight calve* 3.504S 8.00
—Stocker* and Feeder# —
Good to choice ateer*, 800 lb*
and up [email protected]
Good to choice #teer*. under
800 lb* 8 ( j0@ 8.50
Medium cows S.OOfJ 5.^40
Good cow* 5-50 7* COO
Good heifer* 6.eO@ 7.50
Medium to good heifer* 6.no@ 6.<5
Good milker. 50 00® 125.00
Medium milkers 00 0043100 00
Stock calves, 250 to 45 01b5... 7.00@ 900
SHEEP AND LAMBS.
Good to choice sheep 4 00
Fair to coinmou 2.00@ 2 50
Bucks 2.00 Q 3.50
—Lamb#—
Common to choice yearlings. 4.00@ 6.75
Spring lambs [email protected]
Other Live Stock
CHICAGO, Nov. 23.—Hog#—Receipts.
58,000; market 18<- lower; built, $9.75@
10.10; butchers, [email protected]; packers. S9..'SO
D0.65; light*. $9.60%10; pigs, $950@10.
Cattle R lpts. 16."*); market it rone;
beeves, $7.50% 17 ; butchers. sl.soit 12; ran.
nor* and cutters. [email protected]; Stockers and
feeders. $3.75% 15 50; cows, $4.50% 10.25;
calves, sll.3o<s 14.50. Sheep—Receipts, 18,-
ceipts, 18,000; market slow, steady; lambs,
$7.50<d9J0; ewes, [email protected].
I CINCINNATI. Nov. 23.—Hogs—Re
| ceipt*. 5.0C0; market 50 to 75 cents lower;
! heavies, mediums and lights. $lO 25; pig*.
$10; roughs, $9; stags, $7.50. Cattle —Ke-
i celpts, 500; market weak; bulls, steady;
calves, sls. Sheep and lambs- -Receipt*,
400; market slow; sheep, [email protected];
larnos, s6@lo.
CLEVELAND, Nov. 23. Hogs-Re
ceipts, 4.O00; market $1 lower; workers,
$10.00; mixed, $10.50; medium, $10.50;
, pigs. $10.30% 10.00; roughs, $9; stags, $7.
j Cattle—Receipts. 200; market slow. Sheep
land lambs—Receipts, 500; market
i steady; top. $lO. Calves-Receipts, 200;
! market steady, 50c off; top, sl6.
• PITTSBURGH, Nov. 23.—Cattle- Re
ceipts, fair; market, dull; choice, sl3@
13.50; good, $11.25@12; fair. s9@lo; vcnl
calves, $15.50@16. Sheep and lambs—Re
ceipts, fair; market, steady; prime
wethers, [email protected]; good, 55@'5.50; mixed,
fair, [email protected]; spring lambs, $10.50@11.
Hogs—Receipts, 70 doubles; market, low
er; prime heavies, $10,254)! 10.50; mediums,
[email protected]; heavy VBrkors, $10.75@
10.80; light Yorkers, [email protected]; pigs,
$ 10.754*; 10.80; roughs, s9@9; stngs, s7@
7.50.
EAST BUFFALO, Nov. 23.—Cattle—Re
ceipts, 1,100; market good, active, steady,
common slow; shipping steers, $12.50
@l3; butcher glades, $84): 12; cows,
[email protected]. Calves—Receipts, 300; market
good, active, steady, common slow; culls,
choice, $4.50@16. Sheep and lambs —Re
ceipts, 5,200; market good, active, 25c up,
others slow, steady; choice lambs, sll@
11.25; culls, fair, [email protected]; yearlings,
s7fq!S.so; sheep, $2(0)6.50. Hogs Receipts,
0,800; market slow, 25c@$l lower; York
ers, $10.50(0! 10.75; pigs. 8114/11.50; mixed,
$10.50(0)10.75; heavies, $10.50(0)10.75; roughs
$8(019.75; stags, $7(0)8.
EAST ST. LOUIS. Nov. 23. Cattle—Re
ceipts, 3.000; market higher; native beef
steers, [email protected]; yearling beef steers
and heifers, $114(14; cows, $7,25(08;
stoekers and feeders, $5.504)8; calves,
[email protected]; canners and cutters, $4.25@0.
Hogs—Receipts, 180,000; market 75c4/$l
lower; mixed and butchers, $9 75(0)10.35;
good heavies, $104)10 35; rough heavies,
$94/9.25; lights, $9 75(010.15; pigs, $1)4)10;
bulk of sales, $9.75(0 10.25. Sheep—Re
ceipts, 2.100; market steady; ewes, $5.50(0)
6.50; lambs, $11.50@12; canners and cut
ters, $1.50@5.
HOG PRICES FALL sl.
CLEVELAND. Nov. 23.—Hogs broke
to the lowest figure recorded since be
fore the war here today, when all grades
sold at $10.50, a drop of $1 in twenty
four hours. Cattle, calves and sheep and
lambs also sold off from previous figures.
PITTSBURGH, Nov. 283.—H0g prices
ft 11 75c here today, prime heavies selling
it? $10,254)10.50, with large receipts. Cat
tle were dull and sheep steady.
LOCAL HIDE MARKET.
Green Hides —No. 1,7 c; No. 2,6 c. Green
Calves—No. 1,10 c; No. 2, B%c. Horse
hides—No. 1, $4; No. 2, $3. Cured Hides
—No. 1,9 c; No. 2. Bc.
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1920.
Chicago Hog Market
Drops 75 Cents
CHICAGO, Nov. 23.—Prices of hogs on
the Chicago livestock market continued
to decline today, the market opening
75c lower than yesterday’s close.
There were few sales at $10.25, al
though the quality was reported good.
f t
Local Stock Exchange
—Nov. 23. —
STOCKS.
Bid. Ask
Ind. Ry. A Light, c0m...... 60 ...
Ind. Uy. A Light, pfd 8* • ”
Indpls. A Northwest, pfd
lndpU. A Southeast, pfd
Indpls. St. Ry 33 65
T. 11., T. A 1 60 ...
T. H., I. A E. com •
T. H., I. & E. pfd
TJ. T. of Ind., com *
U. T. of Ind., Ist pfd ■*■•
U. T. of Ind.. 2d pfd *
Miscellaneous—
Advanee-Rumely com 7® •••
Advance-Rumely pfd 49
American Central Life 235
American Creosoting com .... W *
Belt Railroad com 65 <5
Beit Railroad pfd
Century Building, pfd...... 95 ...
Cities Service com
Cities Service pfd , •••
Citizens Gas 1 32% 30%
Dodge Mfg. pfd 91% ...
Home Brewing 55 ...
•Indiana Hotel, com 65
Indiana Hotel, pfd 90 ... •
Indiana National Life 4% •••
Indiana Title Guaranty 69 69
Indiana Pipe Lluc 86
Indpls. Abattoir, pfd 46 OO
: Indpls. Gas 44 50
Judpis. Tel. corn 9 •••
Irdpls. Tel. pfd 90 ...
Mv-r. Pub. Util, pfd 49 9
National Motor t LI
Public Savings 2% ...
Rauh Fertilizer, pfd
Stand. OU of ludiana 710 •••
Sterling Fire insurance
Van Camp Hdws., pld 93 •••
Van Cutup I’acklug pfd 96
Vau Camp Prod., Ist pfd... 95 ...
\au Camp Prod., 2d pfd... .93 ...
Vaudalia Coal, com
Yandalla Coal pfd 29
Wabash By. com 9% ...
Wabash Ry. pfd 23% ...
Bunk# and Tru.it Companies—
Aetna Trust 102
Bankers Trust 118
City Trust 83
Commercial National 65 ...
Continental Nat. Uauk 112 ...
Farmer* Truat 200 ...
Fidelity Truat 120 ...
Fletcher Ain. Natl J... 250 ...
Fletcher Bav. A Trust 163 •••
ludiana Trust 196
Indiana National 280 290
Live Stock Exchange
Merchants National 27V
National City 112 120
I People's State 177 ...
Security Trust 120 ...
'State Savings and Truat... 91% 97
I Union Trust SM ...
| Wash. Bunk A Trust 150 ...
BO NOB.
Broad Ripple 5s 60
; Citizen* St. Ry. 5s 70
j InJ. Coke and Gas Cos. 6 ...
; Indian Creek Coal Min 96 ...
: lodpla. A Col. South. 5s 86 ...
Indpls. A Greenfield ■•# 90 ...
.Indiana A Martinsville 5a... DO
'lndpls. A Northern 5a.... .. 43 52
1 Indpls. A Northwestern 36 61
indpls. A Southeastern
indpls., Shelby A 8. E. 5a... 79
Indpls. St. Ry. 4s 60
Iridpis. True. A Ter. 5* 69
Kokomo, Marlon A Western. 80 84
T. I. A E. 5a 44 f.2
I Union Trac. of Indiana 6*.. 32 59%
I Citizen* Gas Cos 76 61
Ind. Hotel 2# 6a 93 100
Indpls. Üb* 5* 73 80
Indpls. Light and Heat 77 83
Indpls. Water 5* 88 92
Indpls. Water ss. 88 91
M. H. A L. Ref. 5* 88 91
i New Tel. lit 6 94 ...
! New Tel L. Dlst. 5#....>..... 93% ...
South. Ind. Power 6... S6 #
LIBERTY BONOS.
A Bid. Ask.
; Liberty first 3%s 7 92 26 92 60
| Liberty first 4s 87 40
'Liberty wcond 4s 86 10
Liberty first 4%s 87 '2o 87.60
Liberty second 4%......... 87.10 67J0
j Liberty third 4%* 89.00 89.50
j Liberty fourth 4%* 87.10 87.40
; Victory Loen 3%s 96 00 90.24
Victory Loan 4%s 96.00 96.24
On Commission Row
With the continued rainy nnd un
pleasant weather, trade on )b* local
wholesale produce market slowed up
toward the clone of the Monday mar
ket, but the tone was again satisfactory
to commission men at the opening to
day.
Price* were not materially changed.
Today and tomorrow will be the last
day In which to buy Thanksgiving pro
visions, h* the wholesale market will be
closed the entire day Thursday.
TODAY’S PRICES.
Apples—Barrel, $5.50@8,
Bean* Michigan navy, In bag*, per lb.,
5%@6c; Colorado pinto*, in bags, per lb.,
74)7%c ; red kidney*. In bag*, per lb.,
12%@13c; California pink chill, in bags,
tier 111., 8%4(8%c; lintel*, uer lb., 12%c;
marrow fats, per lb, ll@lsc.
Pess—Dried green, per lb., 10c; split
yellow, 100 lb. bag, per lb., 10c; marrow
fats, per lb., 10*-; marrowfats, In bag,
per lb., 10c.
Beets—Fancy home-grown per bu.,
$1 50.
Bananas—Extra fancy high grade fruit,
50@C0c per bunch, per lb., 10c.
Cabbage—Fancy Northern, per lb., l%c.
Carrots—Fancy, home-grown, per bu.,
$1.23.
Celery—Fancy New York (rough), 5 0
do*, crate, $5; trimmed, per bch,, $125;
fancy Michigan, square box. $1.75.
Cocoanuts — Fnncy, per do*., $1.25.
Cucumbers—Fancy hothouse, per do*.,
$2 7.V f )3.
Cranberries —Per bbl., sl4; per half
i bbl boxes, $7.50.
Egg Plant —Fancy, home-grown, per
doz., sl.
Grapefruit—Extra fancy California
choice, per box, $3.50@4.
Lettuce—Fancy hothouse, leaf, per lb.,
18c; barrel lots, pier lb., sl6; fnncy home
grown endive, per doz., 50c; fancy Wash
ington Iceberg, per crate, $6.00.
Onion* —Fnncy home grown, yellow or
red per 100-lh. bag, $1.35(01.90; fancy In
diana whites, per 100-lb bug, $2.50; per
bu., $1.40; fancy Spanish, per crate, $2.25.
Oranges Extra fancy California Valen
cias, per crate, [email protected].
Parsley—Fancy home-grown, per doz.,
254)30. ■
Potatoes —Fnncy Michigan and Wiscon
sin round whites, per 150-lb. bag, $3 75;
In 5 or 10-bag lots, per 150-lb bag, $3.65;
fancy Montana gems, per 100 lb. bug,
$2.75.
Pear*—All kinds, $1,504)2.50.
Quinces Fancy California D’Ango,
$0.50.
Radishes—Button home-grown, per
doz., 25c; fancy long, per dor,., 25c.
Sweet Potatoes —Fancy Virginia Red
Stars, bbl., $4.50; per hamper, $1.75; fancy
Eastern Jerseys, per bbl., $3.
Spinach—Fancy, per bu., $1.50.
Rice—Fancy head, per lb., 11c; Blue
Rose, per lb.. 10c.
Turnips—Fancy.home-grown, new, per
bu., $1.25(81.50.
Mustard —Fancy home-grown, per bbl.,
$1.75.
Kale—Fancy home-grown, per bbl.,
$1.75.
Cauliflower—Fancy New York, per
crate, $2 504)2.75.
Oyster Plant—Fancy hothouse, per doz.,
50c.
Leek —Fancy home-grown, per doz., 35c.
Sage—Fancy home grown, per doz., 45c.
Green Onions —Fancy hothouse, per.
doz., 17%c.
Mangoes Fancy home-grown, per
small basket, 75c.
Rutahagns—F’aney Canadian, per 50
lbs., $1; per 110 lbs., $1.75.
California Grapes—Fancy Tokays, per
crate, $3; fancy F.mperlors, per crate, $3;
fancy Emperors, In drums, 31 lbs., net, $7.
Cider —Pure apple, 6 1-gallon glass
jugs, per ease, $5.50; No. 10 tins, 0% lb.
nets, per case of 1, doz., $6.50.
CHICAGO PRODUCE.
CHICAGO, Nov. 23.—Butter—Creamery
extras, 50%c; creamery firsts, 33%c;
firsts, 43@.'V4c; seconds, 38(040c. Eggs—
Ordinaries, 58@02c; firsts, 09@70c.
Cheese—Twins, 24c; young Americas,
26%c. Live Poultry—Fowls, 17@23c;
ducks, 29c; geese, 25c; spring chickens,
23%c; turkeys, 40; roosters, 17c. Pota
toes —Receipts, 103 cars; Wisconsin and
Minnesota, [email protected].
GRAIN PRICES
MAKE ADVANCES
Increased Buying Principal
Cause of Gains.
CHICAGO, Nov. 23.—Increased buying
todn.v caused grain prices to advanefc in
trndlng on the Chicago Board of Trade.
The market was nervous at the open
ing with only scattered buying, but a*
the trading advanced the market grew
stronger and purchasing became more
general.
Commission houses bought heavily.
Provisions showed weakness due to
the continued drop In the hog market.
December wheat wa* up lc at the
oneiitng, $1.61% and later gained 2%c;
March wheat opened up 3c at $1.59 and
subsequently advanced l%c.
December corn, after opening up %c
at 65%, advanced another %c. May corn
ivas up %e at the opening. 71%e, and
gained an additional l%c later.
December oats opened up %c at 43%c
and In later trading showed a gain ol
%c. May oat* was up %c at the open
ing, 4S%c, and later was up %e.
CHICAGO GRAIN TABLE.
WHEAT— Open. High. Low. Close.
Dec 161% 1.69% 1.55% 168
March.. 1.59 1 64% 1.54% 1.63%
CORN—
Dec 65% 67% <U 67%
May.... 71% 74 71% 73%
OATS—
Dec 43% 45% 42% 45%
May.... 48% 49% 47% 49%
PORK—
Jan 22.00 22.70 21.50 22.50
LARD—
Nov 18.10 18.75 18.00 18.67
.Tan 14.25 14.60 14.15 14.60
RIBS—
Jan 1200 12.60 11.90 12.50
CHICAGO CASH GRAIN.
CHICAGO, Nov. 22.—Wheat—No. 1
hard winter, [email protected]%: No. 2 hard
winter. $1.68; No. 1 northern spring,
$1.71. Corn—No. 2 white, 70c; No. 3
white, 66%c; northern spring $1.71.
Corn—No. 2 white, 70c: No 3 white,
68%c; No. 5 white, 63%@4%c; No. 3
yellow, 67<880. Oats—No. 1 w hlte,
47%c; No. 2 white, 44%G47%c; No. 3
■white 44%@45c; No. 4 white, 43%@
44 %e.
TOLEDO CASH GRAIN.
TOLEDO Ohio, Nor. 22. Close:
Wheat—No. 1, SI.BB. Corn—No. 1,75 c;
old corn, 80c. Oats—No. 1 51@52c. Rye
—No. 1, SI.OO Barley—No. 1,60 c.
Clover seed Cash (19191, $11.15; (192*1),
■ November and December, $11.35; Jan
uary $1150; February, $1U8; March.
All 75. Timothy—Cash (1918), $3.28;
' (1919i, $3.26; November and December,
$3 30; March. $3.40; January. $3 37%.
PRIMARY MARKETS.
(By Thomaon A McKinnon)
—Nor. 22-
Wheat. Corn. Oat*.
Chicago 21,000 152.000 140 000
Milwaukee .... 12.000 101,000 111,000
MluneapoU* ... 738.000 136,000 147,000
Duluth 293,000 14.000
Kt, Louis 229 000 77,000 150,000
Toledo 7,000 10,000 21,000
Detroit 8.000 2,000 6,000
Kan*** City .. 513,000 100.000 17.000
Peoria 16 000 63.000 38.000
Omaha 83.000 67.000 45.000
ludlauapoll# .. 8,000 A3.000 24,900
Total# 1.928,000 771,X)0 726.000
Year ago ....3,118,000 977,000 830,000
—Shipment#—
Wheat Corn. Oat#.
Chicago 18000 419.0*)0 164.000
Milwaukee .... 3.0*81 13,000 14.000
Minneapolis . 2pT.ono 17,t0 61,000
Duluth . . 425.000
St Louis 62.0 th) 43.000 77,'X>
Toledo 38,000 4.000
Kansas City .. 168.000 13.000 22.000
Peoria 2,000 39,000 41,000
Omaha 94,000 29.000 10.000
Indianapolis 6,000 8,000
Total* 1,040.000 579.000 405.000
Year ago .1,070,000 354,000 002,000
—Clearance#
Dom. W. Corn. Oat*.
New York 849.000 ...
N#w Orleans .. 833,000
Newport New#. 54,000 ......
Total# 1.136,000
Year ago . 138,000
INDIANAPOLIS CASH GRAIN.
—Nor. 2SU-
Hld* for car lot# of grata and hay at
the call of the Indianapolis Board of
Trade were;
Wheat—No sale.
Com—Strong; No. 2 white, old 77@
7He: No. 3 white, new, 73@75e; No 4
white, new, 7<>@7lc: No. 2 yellow, old,
524t930; No. 3 yellow-, new, 74 , ft7.V; No.
4 yellow, new, 70'{j71c; No. 4 mixed, new,
67@8<\
Oats Strong; No 2 white, 49@50e: No'.
3 white, 48@49c; No. 2 mixed, 47@47%c.
Hay Steady; No. I timothy, s2.A**i
28; No. 2 timothy *26 50@27; No. 1 light
clover mixed, $25.50@26; No. 1 clover
hay. *25.50942*1.59
. —lnspection#
Wheat —No. 2 mixed, 1 car.
Corn—No. 1 white, 1 car; No. 2 white,
11 car*. No. 3 white, 6 ca.. v>. *
ft car#; No. 5 white, 6 car*; No. 6 white 1
car; No. 1 yellow, 4 cars; No. 2 yellow,
4 cars; No. 3 yellow, 4 Cara; No. 4 yel
low, 8 car*; No 5 yellow. 12 car*; No. 6
yellow, 2 cars; No. 2 mixed, 1 car; No. 5
mixed, 1 car; No. 6 mixed, 1 car; ear, 1
ear: total. 68 car*.
Oat* No. 2 white, 3 cnr; N’v. 3 while,
4 car*; No. 4 white, 1 car; total, 8 car*.
Rye—No. 2, 1 ear.
HAY MARKET.
Tb following ar the lndlannpoli#
price* for h*y by the wagon load
Hay—Loo** timothy, new. $21@29;
bixed hay. new, $26®28; baled. $26@2S.
Corn—Bushel, 90c@*l 10.
Oit* —Bushel, new, 55@5Sc
Cor* —New. 80@85e per bu.
WHOLESALE PRODUCE.
Egg#—Fre#h, loss off, 72c.
Poultry-Fowl#, 15@20c; #pringer#,
20c; cock*, 14c; old 'um turkey*, 28c;
young tom turkey*. 12 lbs. and up. 33c;
young hen turkeys, 8 lbs and up. 33c;
cull thin turkey* not wanted; ducks, 4
Iba and up, 28c; duck*, under 4 lb*.. 17c;
geese. 10 lb* and up. 22c; *qub, 11 lbs
to dozen, $0; guinesa, 2 lb*, per dozen,
$9. _
Butter —Buyer* are paying 58@r9e for
creamery butter delivered at Indianapolis.
Butterfst Buyer* are paying 57@5&
for cream delivered at Indianapolis.
Rabbits —Drawn, per dozen, $3.
CLEVELAND PRODUCE,
CLEVELAND, Nov. 23.—Produce mar
ket -Poultry—Live. heavy fowls. 29c;
light stock; 20@25c; springers, 20(S>27c;
old rooster*, 30c; spring ducks, 34@33c;
turkey#, 45c; geexe, 28@30c. Eggs Fresh
gathered Northern extras, 76@83c; extra
first*. 75c; Ohio firsts, new cane*, 74c;
firsts, olil, 73c; Western first*, new cases.
72c; refrigerator extras, 58c; refrigerator
firsts, 50c. A case contains 30 dozen.
Butter—Extra, In tub lots, 64%@65c;
prints, 62%@63c; extra fir*ts, 64%@6fic;
ilr*ts, 62%@H3c; seconds, 57@59c; pack
ing stock. 36c.
WHOLESALE FEED PKICKB.
Top Sack*. Cwt.
Acme brand $43.00 $2.20
Acme feed 43.00 2.20
Acme middling* 47.00 2.40
Acme dairy feed 53.25 2.70
E-Z dairy feed 43.50 2.29
Acme 11. A M 41.50 2.10
Acme stock feed 34.50 1.75
Cracked corn 40.75 2.10
Acme chicken feed 60.25 2.55
Acme scratch 47.25 2.40
E-Z scratch 44.50 2.25
Acme dry mash 61.00 2.75
Acme hog feed 50.00 2.55
Hontllk, yellow 40.75 2.10
..Rolled barley 53.00 2.70
Alfalfa mol ?- 4 9
Cotton seed meal 48.00 2.4,>
Linseed oil meal *... 69.00 8.50
GRAINS.
Shelled corn, small bits *.. 91
Shelled corn, large lots 91
Shelled corn, 2-uu. sacks 99
Oats, bulk, large 56
Oats, less t hnn 100 59
Chicken wheat, cwt., Hacked.., 4.00
UORfc MEAL AND FLOUR.
Corn meal, cwt., net $ 2..15
E-Z Bake bakers’ flour, 98-lb. sack* 10.30
WHOLESALE BEEF PRICKS.
The following are today's wholesale
market price# for beef cuts as sold by
the Indianapolis markets:
Ribs—No. 2,38 c; No. 3.24 c. Loins—
No. 2. 24c; No. 3,21 c. Rounds—No. 2,
24c; No. 3,20 c. Chucks—No. 2,15 c; No.
8,14 c. PUtes—No. 2. 14c; No. 3.13 c.
HOG MARKET
IS DEMORALIZED
Markets Flooded With Poor
Grades Chief Factor.
CHICAGO, Nov. 23. —The nog markets
of the country were practically demora
lized today by the continued sharp de
cline In quotations.
Heavy receipts caused by dumping of
poorer grades of hogs on the markets by
growers and lack of purchasing by pack
ers caused the continued decline.
The market In Chicago was ofT $1 and
similar drop* were recorded in other
leading centers.
Prices ranged around $lO.
At East St. Louis violent declines in
prices made It Impossible for traders to
determine the actual condition of the
market, with hogs off from $1 to $1.25.
Shippers Have Fear
of Bankruptcy
PITTSBURGH, Nov. 23.—Hog prices
were still on the toboggan today with a
75c break and shippers hurrying sup-
Elles here as fast as possible to get out
efore bankruptcy overtakes them.
Medium weights sold at $10.75@*0.80,
and heavier grades 25@50c lower vhan
that.
This Is a drop of $2.25 per 100 weight
in the last three market days.
In the Cotton Markets
NEW YORK, Nov. 23.—The.cotton mar
ket opened 5 points lower on December
and 1 to 5 points higher on other months.
Liverpool was a good seller at the start.
Spot houses and Wall street houses
took the offerings; also at ore time cables
from Liverpool were much better than
had been expected.
The English market lost nearly all the
Improvement under further liquidation,
and a* textile news here eontlnuued bear
ish, there was little to induce outside
support.
At the end of the first fifteen minutes
the local market was easier and 6 to 7
point* under last night * close.
New York cotton opening—December,
16.25 c; January, 16.15 c; March, 16.10 c;
May, 10.0OC; July, 15.70 c; October, 15.60 c.
NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 22.—With the
exception of the October option cotton
fututes were again under pressure today,
opening 4 to 20 points below.
Some strength was shown on weather
reports and some spot buying, prices ad
vancing 26 to 61 point*, but bearish
Government figures resulted in a drop to
the levels 29 to 41 points under the open
ing.
In the afternoon there were some re
coveries quotations being 29 to 40 points
net higher.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 22. Census
shows cotton ginned to November 14
from the crops of 1920 and 1919, respect
ively :
Totsl running bales (counting round as
half bales). 8,920,77# and 7,801.320
Round bales, Included, 177,212 and
84,211.
American-Egyptian, 31,495 and 19,009.
Sea Inland, 977 ana 4,231
Ginned prlod to November 14, 1920:
United States, 8,920,776; Alabama, 505,-
936; Arizona. 40.423; Arkansas. 675,192;
California, 25.096; Florida. 15,278; Georgia,
1.167.340: Louisiana. 300.119; Mississippi,
600.9*10; Missouri, 33,634; North Carolina,
501,159; Oklahoma, 614,025; Sonth Caro
lina, 1.070.797; Tennessee, 165.390; Texas,
3,156,773; Virginia, 6,439; all others. 3,766.
LIVERPOOL, Nov. 23.—Spot cotton
opened with limited Inquiry today. Prices
were easier. Sale* totaled 4,000 bale*.
American middling*, 17.18d; good mid
dlings. 14.43d; full middling*, 14 43d;
middling*. 11.93d; low middlings, 8.9-3il;
good ordinary, 5.93d; ordinary, 4.93d.
Future* opened quiet.
Weather

The following table show* the state
of the weather at 7 a. in., Nov 23. as
observed by United States weather bu
reau* :
Station. Bar. Temp. Weath.
Indianapolis. Ind. . 79.H1 S* Rain
Atlanta, Ga 29 98 42 Cloudy
Amarillo, Texas .. 29.94 4<) Clear
Hisroarck. X. D... 30.08 28 Cloudy
Boston, Ma* 29 58 46 Rain
Chicago, 111 29 92 40 Rntn
Cincinnati, Ohio .. 29 89 36 Rain
Cleveland. Ohio ... 29 90 39 Cloudy
Denver, Colo. 30.06 42 Clear
Dodge City, Kan.. 295*4 30 Cloudy
Helena, Mont. .... 30 14 40 Clear
Jacksonville, Fla. . 30.02 48 Clear
Kansas City, M 0... 30.06 .30 Clear
Louisville, Ky. ... 29 98 36 Cloudy
Uttle Rock. Ark.. 30.10 38 Clear
Los Angele*. Cal... 30.02 50 Clear
Mobile, Ala .1010 42 Clear
New Orleau*. La.. 30.12 49 Clear
New York. N. Y... 29 48 44 Rain
Norfolk, Vn 29.72 46 PtCldy
Oklahoma City .. 29 90 40 Clear
Omaha, Neb 30.08 2S PtCldy
Philadelphia. I*a. . 29 56 46 Rain
Pittsburgh. Pa. ... 29 80 56 Cloudy
Portland. Ore 30.30 44 Cloudy
Rapid City, 8. D.. 30.04 42 Clear
Roseburg. Ore. ... 30.32 42 Cloudy
San Antonio. Texn* 30.04 60 Clear
San Francisco, Cal. 3018 50 Clear
St Louis, Mo 30 02 34 PtCldy
St Paul, Minn 30 04 30 Cloudy
Tampa, Fla 30.02 56 Clear
Washington, D. C.. 29.66 44 Clear
WEATHER CONDITIONS.
The storm over the east oentrw! State*
Monday morning Is now passing Into
the Atlantic Ocean, having caused pre
cipitation from the middle Mississippi
\ iklley eastward. Colder weather now
prevails In the rear of the disturbance
over most of the area from the lakes
region to the middle Mississippi Valley
eouthesuittrard. J. 11. AKMINGTON.
Meteorologist. Weather Bureau.
RECALL FOREMAN
OF DERRICK GANG
(Continued From Fsjo One.)
operated on the south section of the
building.
The engineer Is snld to have told Car
roll that he would not hoist the parts of
the second derrick If they were too heavy.
Coroner Robinson, Walter B. Stern,
building inspector, and Jacob Hll
kene. of the city fire prevention depart
ment, and Fire Chief Loucks at noon
made a second careful Inspection of the
wreck of the Manual High School An
nex building. £
The Inspection, the Investigate™ ex
plained, was to make clearer to their
minds some of the locations of the der
ricks and Iron work described by wit
nesses who have testified at the coroner's
Investigation. They also visited the
scene of the accident yesterday.
After Carroll completed hla testimony
before the coroner, Ray Ayers was called
as the second witness. Ayers Is a rigger
who helped place the big derrick on the
top of the building, and Is employed by
the .Ittenbaeh Stone Company.
The coroner explained that the testi
mony of the men was of no unusual Im
portance except thut It differed from all
previous testimony In that they said
they believed the building started to col
lapse In the southeast part first, while
other witnesses had testified that the col
lapse started In the north section of the
building. >
Carl Ittenbaeh of the Ittenbaeh Stone
Company was scheduled to be the most
important witness at the afternoon ses
sion, which was resumed at 2 o'clock.
HOG MART DROPS
75 CENTS TO §1
(Continued From Fags o#s.)
because of the declines In by-product
prices.
Industry is engaged In a great
juggling act trying to prevent the bur
den of price declines and wage reduc
tions coming to a. standstill until all'in
• '>•' ■■■'l, Sarnnel S.
Marquis of Detroit testified.
Marquis, heau ot the euucatlobal da
partment of the Ford Motor Company,
Was a witness for the 2,000,000 employes
asking wage increases of $1 a day. The
hearing before Federal Judge Samuel
Alschuler was reopened on the claim of
the companies that the trend of wages
and prices is downward and additional
pay for workers is not compatible. An
endless chain of price and wage declines
is In motipn, Marqnls declared. “Some
one is going 4o feel the effects of it, but
I am not prepared to say who,” Mar
quis said.
He said the burden had been passed
by the automobile industry to the steel
business and unless steel companies force
they will suffer. Otherwise the burden
the ywill suffer. Otherwise the burden
will be handed down further, he said.
Workers already have felt the effect of
cTiftlnr prices, according to Marquis, by
the loss of shares in profits and similar
benefits not accruing with selling costs
below production expenses.
Marriage Licenses
Alonzo Cross, Edgewood, Ind f.4
Emma Pope. 909 E. Twenty-Ninth st. 55
Jerome Wolfe, 44 N. Walcott st 39
Mae Johnson, 1325 Villa ave 68
Edgar Hoffman, .Jasper. Ind 26
Elinor Seng, 98 Layman ave 5_... 28
Robert McConnell, Northhampton.
Mess . * It 25
Margaret Gardner, 4131 N. Meridian.. 22
Clem Hebenstreit, 1302 English ave.. 29
Gertrude Lynch, 1002 English ave 27
'll vmond Davidson, 2110 N. Gale st.. 28
Katherine Seidel, 2345% Station st... 22
K nuetii Lawthorn. Noblesvllle, Ind. 21
Edna Wiles, 15C7 N. Broadway 19
Ki.r.l I). Martin, Blcknell, Ind 26
Mar-" rite Henry, 439 N. Pennsyl
vania st 28
Donald Millikan, 6570 Ashland ave.... 20
Denzil <)\erie>, C 159 Bellefontalne st. 18
Moses. Bluffton, 0hi0......... 2S
Edith La hr, R. R. D X... 25
Lionel Blair, 522 N. Mtley ave 20
Sylvia Love, 926 Park ave 18
William Flynn, 210 N. Tremont ave.. 21
Mabl Hurst, 2624 W. Washington st. 19
Ed Jackson, 5850 E. Washington st.. 47
Lida B. Pearce, 5442 University av 39
Births
Vlrgel and Ollie Hyatt, 3115 E. Min
nesota, girl.
Henry and Leila Cabell, 1339 N. Persh
ing, girl.
Herbert and Pearl Horton, 807 Chase,
girl.
Vernon and Polly Saylor, 924 River,
boy.
Ray and Katherine MaGee, 913 N.
Delaware, girl.
Leroy and Gladys Harris, 1421 Com
merce, boy.
Peter and Mabel Pinkerton, 2942 N.
Capitol, boy.
Frank and Florence Thompson, 2629
Indianapolis, girl.
Edward and Mary Fritz, 1814 Deloss,
boy.
Homar and Lurah Nell. 819 S. Key
stone, girl.
August and Ina Woerner, Deaconess
Hospital, girl.
Fred and Elsie Saunders, Deaconess
Hospital, boy.
Eno* and Fannie Gearing, 635 Mass
achusetts, boy.
Cleon and Julia Cromlleh, 327 Glad
stone. boy.
Earl and Audrey McCurdy, 145 W.
Twenty-Second, girl.
Dewey and Carrie Beaver, 1626 Shldon,
girl.
Vernon and Elizabeth Ashley, 676 Arch,
boy. _
Edgsr and Edith Taylor, 243 Detroit,
girl.
Charles and Mamie JoUy f 1344 Gale,
boy.
Charles and Efoma Grannemann, 544
West Twenty-Fifth, girl.
Norman and Mary Dodd, 1450 W.
Thirty-Third, girl
Homer and Gladys D# Witt, 1052 W,
Eighteenth, girl.
1 roy and Erma Scott, 6519 Ferguson,
boy.
Richard and Dora Dearholt, 1739 W.
Washington, boy.
William and Hattie Parker, 3215 W.
Michigan, boy.
William and Pearl Chambers, 805 N.
California, boy.
Charles ami Madeline Sain, 70(5 N.
Alabama, boy.
Oilier and Nannie Kinney, fi23 Holly,
boy.
Omar and Florence Weaver, 613 N.
Tacoma, girl.
Ezra and Nellie Tracy, 1803 W. Wash
ington, boy.
Deaths
Carl A. Schmid, 48. 145 N. Sheffield,
acute lobnr pneumdhla
Florence Williams, 10. 3027 E. Thir
tieth, gunahot wound (accidental).
Anna Bohnste<ft. 52, 1105 N. Senate,
mitral regurgitation.
Charles P. McKinney. 43, 1315 Shepard,
acute dilatation of heart.
Thomas F. Barnett, 47, 513 W. Ray,
carcinoma.
Mary Birch. 83, 2521 S. Delaware,
arterlo scloroals.
Nancy Boling, 92, 318 Minerva, ar
terio sclerosis.
Lemuel L Helton, 8, 505 Wood lawn,
drowning by submersion (accidental).
Peter Gersrdy. 00, 1210 Olive, mitral
regurgitation.
Lewis Edward Neff, 52. 925 Lexington,
fractured skull (accidental).
Dorothy Hamilton, 3, 2405 North
western, lleocolltla.
Henry Clay Darnell, 68, Ct. Vincent's
Hospital, pneumonia.
William Hicktnann, 77, 1742 S. Me
ridian, arterlo sclerosis.
Harry H. Smith, 48. Methodist Hos
pital, streptococcic septicaemia.
Marv Hannah McAllister. 00, 1735 E..
Thirtieth, mitral insufficiency.
Amelia Ilornell Wentz, 82. 2545 Broad
way, arterlo sclerosis.
when nAni Sty "CL4YPOOL” BILLIARD PARLORS
YouSayrUUL In HOTEL Basement
Match games every day. Gene Hennl ng wUI Instruct you. Free lessen# front
9 to 11 ix m. Everybody Invited.
w 1 ■ 1
1 GRIFFITH, SELZNICK
* end Williamson, all chose ths , j
i ■spot'd Bahamas for some of their suc
cessful screen productions.
Qhe Nassau Hotel & Steam
ship Company?, Ltd., is the con
necting link between the Bahamas
and the United States.
Wrilt for “The Isle •/ Dreams m
pamphlet and for further information to
THE NASSAU HOTEL k STEAMSHIP CC-, Ltd. ]
* CLEVELAND TORONTO NEW YORK *'
, Kirby BW#. Bk. f Trade Bk%. 2S W. 43d St. M
(Feraiwly Rockefeller
f Baiiding) £
y
Office Furniture
We have one ot the largest nmaapT-"* 1 1
aisortments of every style |( QWPaaa&sapjfgi
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us help you in the proper se- laa—j—*
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safes and vault door*. || | w## w u*
Safes for home or office. ® •
FIXTURES FOR STORE, OFFICE AND BANK.
AETNA CABINET COMPANY
Display Rooms, 321-29 W. Maryland St., Indianapolis
XT BANK STOCKS "EWTOI*
SELL 415 LEMCKE BLDG. 10DBJ
We are pro- I HANQ 0(1 farm isl
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fTHOS. C. DAY & CO. li'usi HuudiadHßaj
ORDER FOLLOWS
BOLOGNA FIGHT
Nationalists and Socialists
Promise to Keep Peace.
BOLOGNA, Nov. 23.—Order was re
stored here today after the killing of
eight persons and the wounding of sixty
three in Socialist-Nationalist forces.
The day opened calmly, both National
ists and Socialists promising to preserve
the peace. About 2 p. m. a number of
Socialists hoisted a red flag on the Asln
elli Tower. Immediately a crowd of Na
tionalists stormed the tower, removing
the red flag and supplanting It with the
national emblem.
An attempt by other Socialists to aid
their defeated colleagues was foiled when
police and royal guards closed the square.
Socialists within the square raised a
cheer and asked that a red flag be floated
from the balcony of the city hall. Appar
ently believing Nationalists were attempt
ing to storm the hall, someone dropped
a bomb from the balcony. Many were
Injured by the explosion and the royal
guards opened fire.
The Socialists rushed to their meeting
place with the eroded In pursuit. The
crowd was met by a volley at close range
from the Socialist headquarters and two
constitutional members of the minority
were killed.
Spoms
Barbare Denies Mhxing
With Crooked Players
GREENVILLE, S. C.. Nor. 23.—Walter
Barbare, Pittsburgh third baseman, upon
his return home todaf from the North,
received a letter from Barney Dreyfuss,
owner of the Pirates, demanding him to
set at rest reports published that he v*as
connected with Joe Jackson and “Lefty”
55 llliams, suspended White Sox players.
In the game proposed to be held here
several weeks ago, but which was can
celed when they were refused the use of
City or Mill League parks.
Barbare said he had no knowledge of
such a game and he resented the stories
that connected him with Jackson and
Williams.
Local Football Notes
The Southeastern Arrows will meet at
Fountain Square Wednesday night at
7:30, going from there to Garfield park
for practice. The Arrows meet the Gar
fields Thanksgiving day and expect to
win easily. For games call Prospect
3142 and ask for Sam.
The South Side Turner football player#
will be guests of honor at a Turner an
niversary banquet to be held Thanksgiv
ing night. Thanksgiving day the Tur
ners stack up against the Greenwood
eleven and their followers are confident
of a victory. The Turners have not been
defeated this season. They defeated the
Hercules Sunday, 7 to 0.
The manager of the Western Tigers Is
requested to call Woodruff 7851 and ask
for John In regard to a game with the
St. Philip A. C. The Saluts beat the
Highlands, 34 to 7, Sunday.
Greenfield Flier# defeated the Belmont
A. C, 12 to 0. Greenfield has gone un
defeated this season and would like to
book post-season games with team* that
'■an show them opposition. Address the
manager at Greenfield, Ind.
The Grappler A, C.'s will practice to
night and tomorrow night In preparation
for their battle with the Willard* at
Willard park Thursday. For further In
formation call Circle 4511 and ask for
John.
Fast city or State teams desiring
Thanksgiving day or Sunday games with
the Hercules A. C.. should call Prospect
7361 and ask for Frank.
The Riverside A. C.'s have not been
able to schedule game* with city teams
for the past two weeks, although they
have repeatedly challenged any and all
elevens In their class. The South Side
Turners, Mapletons, Brooksldes and
other teams in that division should call
Main 7617 and ask for Ray.
INCANDESCENT
LAMPS
for the long winter nights. Buy
them at the convenient place
THE DAYLIGHT CORNER
MERCHANTS HEAT AND
LIGHT CO.
C. O.’B. Murphy, Gen’l. Mgr.

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