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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, December 01, 1920, Last Home Edition, Image 10

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10
RAIL ISSUES
SUFFER DECLINES
Southern Pacific Heads List,
Dropping 4 Points.
NEW YORK. Dec. I.— Sentiment was
extremely bearish at the opening: of the
stock market today, initial quotations
generally showing fractional declines.
Steel common, selling ex-dividend 1%
per cent, sold at 80%, a loss of %.
Interest was attached to the trading In
CMle Copper, which sold down % to 7%.
Other copper stocks showed fractional
decline*.
Baldwin Locomotive declined *4 to
85%. followed by a rally to 95%.
Mexican Petroleum, after yielding %
to 158, rose to 180%.
Pan-American Petroleum, which opened
% lower at 77%, rose to 78%.
Southern Pacific was traded In on a
large scale and yielded % to 108%.
There was henry trading In American
Ship and Commerce, which yielded % to
103%.
Atlantic Gnlf & 'West Indies continued
in good demand and rose 2% to 109.
Invincible Oil, after opening with a
decline of % to 25%. rose to 28%.
The railway stocks suffered sharp de
clines short.y after midday. Southern
Pacific was most prominent on the brea.
and after advancing to aboTe 109. dropped
4 points to 105%.
St. Paul common declined 3% to anew
low for the year of 25%.
Union Pacific fell nearly 5 points to
116%. Reading, B. & 0., New York Cen
tral and Rock Inland. Northern Pacific
and St. Paul prefered fell from 1 to 3
points.
Steel common broke to 79%.
Atlantic Gulf, from an early high of
109. yielded to 104%.
Chile Copper was traded In on a very
heavy scale during the forenoon, but
selling of this iasue was met with gool
buying and the stock advanced % to
85%.
After the Initial declines the general
list tnrned firm despite an advance In the
call Sfconey renev.al rate to 7 per cent.
Mexican Petroleum rose 2 points from
the low to 161 and Invincible rose further
to 26%.
Steel common was steadily bought and
roae from 80% to 80%.
Missouri Pacific was the weakest or
the rails, dropping 1% to 19% e.nd the
preferred fell 1% to 40%.
New Haven, after selling down to a
new low came back to 19%.
Southern Pacific dropped a full point
to 107%, but qnickly rallied to above
108.
(By Thomson A McKinnon.)
—Dec. 1—
In the midst of a trying period such
as we have been passing through, when
general confidence is lacking, ami the
business outlook uncertain, a mere sug
gestion of something unfavorable is suf
ficient to start anew wave of liquidation
such as we have experienced today in the
railroad list.
The railroad brotherhoods have always
been striving for greater power. Just ns
all labor unions have been doing. This,
however, does not mean that we are go- j
lng to upset the country further by a
great railroad strike.
Southern Pacific probably w a * an ex
ception to the remainder of the list, and
was sold because of disappointment on
the part of stockholders who evidently
were not pleased with the rumored plans
of the segregation of the oil property.
CLEARING HOUSE STATEMENT.
NEW YORK, Dec. I.—Subtrenaury 1
debit, $696,884; exchanges. $1,041,938,550;
balance, $77,151.073.

Money and Exchange
Indianapolis bank clearings today were j
$2,606,000. against $2,710,000 a week ago. ‘
NEW YORK. Dec. I—Little change was
manifested at the opening of foreign ex
change today.
Sterling was unchanged at $3.48%;
francs, .0606. unchanged: lire, .0367. up
.0001; marks. .0143, up .0001; Canadian
dollars. .8890, unchanged.
NEW TORK, Dec 1. bar
silver; Domestic unchanged at 99%c. For
eign, l%c higher at 69%c.
LONDON, Dec. I.—Bar silver was %and
higher today at 44%d.
MOTOR SECURITIES.
(By Thomson & McKinnon)
—Dec. 1—
—Opening— i
Bid. Ask
Briscoe 7 9% j
Chalmers com 1 1% ■
Packard com 11% 12%
Packard pfd 76 79%
Chevrolet 200 300
Peerless 22 22%
Continental Motors com 6% 7%
Continental Motors pfd 93 95% I
Hupp com 11 12
Hupp pfd 90 95
Reo Motor Car 24 24%
Elgin Motors 5 6
Grant Motors 2 2%
Ford of Canada 265 268
United Motors - 30 40
Federal Truck... 20 22
Paige Motors... 1J IS
Republic Truck..... 27 30
ACTIVE OIL STOCKS.
(By Thomson A McKinnon)
—Dec. 1 —
—Opening—
Bid. Ask.
Anglo-American Oil 18% 19%
Atlantic Refining ....1020 1060
Borne-Scrymser 400 420
Buckeye Pipe Dine 85 88
Cbesebrough Mfg. Cons. ...-. 105 210
Cbesebrough Mfg. Cons. pM. 100 102
Continental Oil, Colo 110 113
Crescent Pipe Line 28 31
Cumberland Pipe Line 125 135
Elk Basin Pete 8%
Eureka Pipe Line B 100
Galena-Signal Oil. pfd., new 88 92
Galena-Signal Oil. com 50 53
Illinois Pipe' Line 157 162
Indiana Pipe Line 85 S8
Merritt Oil 11% 12%
Midwest OU 1 1%
Midwest Rfg 145 147
National Transit 25 27
New York Transit 160 165
Northern Pipe Line 98 102
Ohio Oil 288 293
P. A R 5% 5%
Osage Hominy 1-16 %
Pena.-Mex 40 42
Prairie Oil and Gas 510 520
Prairie Pipe Line 205 210
Eapulpa Refg 4% 5
Solar Refining 56*> 390
Southern Pipe Line 100 104
South Penn. OU 247 252
Southwest Penn. Pipe Lines. 00 05
Standard Oil Cos. of Cal 320 330
Standard Oil Cos. of In 1 720 730
Standard Oil Cos. of Knn Goo fil*<
Standard <>ll Cos. of j'~.
Standard Oil Cos. of Neb 410 430
Standard Oil Cos. of N. Y 3-**
Standard Oil Cos. of Ohio 400 415
Swan & Finch 45 60
Union Tank Line 100 105
Vacuum Oil 310 313
Washington Oil 30 35
NEW YORK CI RB
(By Thomson & McKinnon.)
—Nov. 30—
Closing
Bid. Asked.
Curtis Aero, com 2 3
Curtis Aero, pfd 15 25
Texas Chief 7 12
First National Copper.. ?i I*4
Goldfield Con 3 8
Havana Tobacco 1 2
Havana Tobacco pfd... 3 6
Cont Teresa S 4
Jumbo Extension 5 7
Inter. Petroleum 18% %
Nlpisstng 8% %
Indian Pkg 2% 3%
Royal Baking Powder.lol 115
Ryl. Baking Pow pfd.. 78 83
Standard Motors 6 8
Salt Creek 27 29
Tonopah ExDenston.... 1 7-16 9-16
Tonopah Mining 1% %
United P. S. new 1% %
V. 8. Light and Heat.. 1 %
V. 8. Light A Heat pfd. 1 3
Wright-Matin 4 6
World Film % %
Yukon Gold Mine Cos.. 1 %
Jerome % %
New Cornelia 14 16
United Verde 23 27
Southern Trans 25 27
Sequoyah 3-16 5-16
Rep. T 1 %.
! Steel Wire Prices
Hit by Reduction
PITTSBURGH, Dec. I.—Effective today
| the price of steel wire products Is cut
approximately B 0 cents per 100 pounds,
j mnklng the new quotations on wire nails
' $3.75 a keg and on plain wire $3.25 f.
! o. b. Pittsburgh.
I This price reduction, the first In sev
! eral years, was announced by the Pltts
| burgh Steel Company. Shipments of all
I unfilled orders, beginning today, will
be Invoiced at the new quotations.
The Republic Iron and Stoel Company
at Youngstown has reduced price of
sheets to 4.05 cents for blue annealed,
4.85 cents for black and 6.20 centa for
galvanised .all base gauges.
Another Independent maker is quoting
black sheets at 5.50 cents and galvanized
i at 7 cents.
| Trumbull Steel Company has reduced
tin plate to $7 per base box. the price
\ maintained by the American Sheet anil
I Tinplate Company, United States Steel
j subsidiary.
* .
N. Y. Stock Prices
—Nov. 30 —■ Prev.
High. Low. Close. Close.
! Advance Rumely 18 18 18 19
1 Allle-Chalmers .31 30% 30% 30
; Am. Agricul 08 66% 67 06%
Am Beet Sugar 53% 53 53% ...
Am Car A F0un.124 123% 123% 123%
i Am. Can 25% 25% 25% 23%
Am HAL com 8 8 8
Am H & L pfd 47 46 46 % 46%
Am. Drug 7% 7% 7% 7%
!Am In Corp... 41V* 40% 40% 40%
;Am Linseed 01 60 60 60%
■Am Locomotive. 83 54% 84% 83
Am Smelt & Ref 45% 44% 44% 43%
Am Sugar Ref. 94 93% 93% 94
Am Sn Tob Cos. 73% 72% 72% 72%
Am St I Fonn.. 31% 30% 31 31%
Am Tel A Tel.. 99% 98% 09% 09
l Am Toha. eo ..117 Vi 116 116
!Am Woden .. 72% 70% 71% 71
Am Zinc A Lead 7% 7% 7% 7%
Anaconda M Cos 40 39 % 39% 40
Atchison 84% 83% 83% 84
At Gulf A W 1.106% 105 106% 104%
Baldwin Loco .. 08 06 06% 96%
B A O 39% 38% 38% 39%
Both Steel •B" 34% 52% 54 54%
Brk Rap Trans 11% 11 11 12
Can Pae Ur 117% 116% 116% 116%
Cen Leather .. 36% 38 38% 38
■ Chan Motors .. 78% 77% 78% 78%
iC A O 64*; G3% 63% 05(4
iC MASt P 33% 32% 32% 3%
jC MASt P pfd 52 51 51% 52%
Chi A Northw.. 77 75 % 75% 76
C R I A Pae... 31% 29% 29% 31%
CRIAP 7% pfd. 77% 77 77% 77%
Chill Copper 11% 7% S% 12
Chino Copper... 18% 18% 16% 1.8%
Coca Cola 22% 22 % 22% 22%
Col F. A Iron.. 29% 20% 20% 29% |
Columbia Gas... 57 56% 57 57 i
, Columbia Grap 14% 14% 14% 14%
Conaolidat. Gas 79% 70 79% 79 I
Continental Gas. 63% 68% 03% 63 ;
Cont. Onndy Cos. 3% 5% 5% 5%
Corn Prod 73% 70% 71% 72 |
Crucible Steel... 90% 57% 88 89% I
Cuban Cane Sug. 25% 24% 24%
Del. A nnd 103 103 103
Den A Rio G.. 1% 1 1 1%
D. A R G. pfd 1% 1% 1% 1%
Erie 15% 14% f4% 15% I
Erie Ist pfd 23% 22% 22% 23% j
Famous Plavers. 53% 53% 53% 53%
Fisk Uuh. C 0... 13% 13% 13% 13% I
Gaston. W.AW.. 3% 8% 3% 4 ;
Gen. Electric.. .127 126% 126% 126%;
Gen. Motors 16% 13% 16 16
Goodrich 43% 43 43% 42% I
Gt. Nor. pfd SO% 79% 79% 80%
Grt. Nor. Ore.. 30% 30 30% 29%
Houston Oil ... 84% 82% 83 83%
Illinois Cent.... 89 89 89 89
Inspiration Cop. 34% 33% 33% 34
Interboro Corp. 4% 4% 4% 4%
Inter Harvester 95 94% 94% 94%
Int i Nickel 13 14% 14% 14%
Inter. Paper ... 49 47 47 47%
Invineible 0H... 26% 24% 25 22%
Kan. City 50... 21% 20% 20% 21 |
Kelly-Spring. .. 42% 41% 41% 43%
Kennccott Cop. 18% 18% 18% 19
Lackawana Steel 52% 52 52% 51%
Lehigh Valley.. 49% 49% 49% 49%
Loews, Inc 18(4 18 18 18% ,
Marine c0m.... 13% 15% 15% 15%
Marine pfd 53% 52% 52% 53
Max. Mot. com. 2% 2% 2% 2% 1
Mex. Petrol... .103% 159 159% 159%
Miami Copper.. 16% 16% 10% 17
Mid. States Oil. 13 12% 12% 12%
Midvale Steel... 32% 31% 32 32
M , K. A T 3% 3% 3% 3%
Mo. Pac. Ry.... 22% 21 21% 22%
Nev. Con. Cop.. 9% 9% 9% 9%
X. Y. Air Brake. 88 88 88 !
N. V. Central.. 75% 73% 73% 74%
New Haven 21% 19% 19% 21%.
•Nor. A West..lol% 100% 100% 102%
Nor. Pacific 86 84% 84% 86% !
Ok. Pd. A RfCo. 3% 3% 3% 3%
Owen Bottle cm. 49% 49% 49% 49% j
Pan-Am. Petrol. 79% 77% 77% 77%
Penn. By 40% 40% 49% 40%
People's Gas... 36% 35** 35% 30%
Pierce-Arrow... 24% 23% 23% 24 |
Pierce Oil C 0... 12% 12 12 12%:
Pittsburgh Coal. 01% 61 61 81%
Pull. Pal Car.. 104% 104 104 101%
Pure Oil 34% 34 34% 34%
Ry. Stl. Sprln. 86 85 S3
Reading 88% 87 87 % 87%
Rep. Ir. A Stl,. 67% 60 00% 60%
Keplogie Steel. 72% 00 68% 72%
Ry. Dt of NY. 65% 67% 07% 68%
Saxon Motors... 3% 3% 3% 3%!
Sears Roebuck .104 '■% 104% 104% 105%!
Sinclair 25% 24% 24% 24% j
•Southern Pac..111% 108% 109 112%
Southern Ry... 25% 23% 22% 24%
Stand Oil N. J..f160 640 6*o 020
St L.A H.F com 24% 23% 23% 24% !
Stromberg Crb. 41 40 41 42%
Studebaker 40 44% 45 45%
Tenn. Copper.. 8% 8% 8% 8% i
Texas Cos 49% 48% 48% 48 % j
Texas A Pac.... 20 18% 18% 20%'
Tob. Products.. 04% 53% 53% 04 i
Trans. Oil 9 8% BT*8 T * 9 j
Union Oil 22 21 21% 31% j
Union Pacific...l22% 121% 121% 122% |
Un. Ret. Stores 01% 56% 69% 60%
U. S. F. P. Cor. 31% 39% 31% 31% (
United Frt. C0..19C 196 190 195%
•U. S. In. Alco.. 70 68% 68% 71% 1
U. S. Rubber... 67% 66 60% 66% I
U. 8. Steel 82% 81% 81% 81% 1
U. S. Steel pfd. 107 106% 106% 100% 1
Utah Copper 01% 60% 61% 51% i
Vanadium Steel 42% 41% 42% 43% j
Vir.-Car. Chem. 38% 38% 38% 36% 1
Wabash 9 8% 8% 9
Wub. Ist pfd... 24% 23% 23% 24%
W. Maryland... 11% 10% 10% 11%
West. Union.... 87% 87% 87% 87
West Elec 42% 42% 42% 42% |
White Motors.. 39% 39% 39% 38% j
Wilys Overland 7% 7% 7% 7% ;
Wilson A C 0... 43% 40 41 44%
Worth. Pump.. 47 45 45 47
•Ex. Div.
NEW YORK LIBERTY BONDS.
—Nov. 30—
Prev.
High. Low. Close. Close, i
L. B. 3%s ... 91.90 91.00 91.00 91.90;
L. B. 2d 4s . 83.90 85.72 85.72 85 70
L. B. Ist 4%s 86.98 86.72 86 90 86.72 j
L. B. 2d 4%s 85.90 85.62 85.70 85.80'
L. B. 3d 4%s 88.80 88.42 88.42 88 86
L. B. 4th 4%s 86 34 86.34 86.18 86.301
Victory 3%5.. 93 00 95.70 95.70 95.801
Victory 4%s . 95.90 95.70 95.70 95.86 j
TWENTY STOCKS AVERAGE.
NEW YORK, Dec. I.—Twenty Indus
trial stocks averaged 70.04. a decrease of
.14 per cent Twenty active rails aver
aged 77.55, a decrease of .97 per cent.
NEW YORK METAL MARKETS.
NEW YORK, Dec. I.—Copper—Dull;
spot, November, December, January and
March offered, 14c. Lend—Dull; spot,
November, December and January offered
5.50 c. Spelter—Dull; spot, November, De
cember and January offered 5.70 c.
CHICAGO STOCKS.
(By Thomson A McKinnon.)
—Nov. 30-
Open. High. Low. Close.
Carbi and Carbo 53 53% 52% 62% I
Libby 12 12 11% 12
Mont-Ward 20% 20% 20 20
Nat Leather.... 8% 9 9% 8%
Stewart-Warner 29 29 28% 28% !
Swift A Cos 106% 107 106% 106(4 !
Swift Internat. 26% 27% 26% 26% '
Arm. Leather.. 15% 15% 15% 15%
HAY MARKET.
The following are the Indianapolis
prices for bay by the wagon load.
Hay—Loose timuhy, new. $2T@29;
mixed hay, new, s2b@2B; baled, s2o<g2S.
Oats —Bushel, new. 56©58c.
Corn—New, 80@85c per bu.
WAGON WHEAT PRICES.
Indianapolis flour mills and elevators !
today are paying $1.70 for No. 1 red
wheat. <1.07 for No. 2 red wheat and
$1.04 for No. ■ 3 red.
WHOLESALE BEEF PRICES.
The following are today’s wholesale
market prices for beef cut# as sold by
the Indianapolis markets:
Ribs—No. 2,40 c; No. 3.22 c. Loin*—
No. 2,25 c; No. 3,18 c. Rounds—No. 2,
25c; No. 3,18 c. Chucks—No. 2,15 c; No.
I, 12c. Plates—No. %. 14c; Ne. 8,12 c. c
HOG MARKET
TONE STRONG
No Change in Cattle Market—
Prime Sheep Stronger.
RANGE OF nOG PRICES,
Good Good ' Good
Nov. Mixed. jteavr. Ught
26. <IO.OO [email protected] SIO.OO
| 27. [email protected] Io [email protected] 10.40010.50
I 2s. 10.50 10.53@ 10.75 [email protected]
i 29. 10 50 [email protected] [email protected]
30. 10.50 [email protected] [email protected]
Dc.
I 1. 10.50 [email protected] 10.50 @ 10.60
There was a good active tone to trad
ing In hogs on the local live stock ex
change at the opening today, due to a
good demand by Eastern shippers. Some
of the local packers participated in the
trading, but Kingan A Cos. were not In
the early forenoon trade and representa
tives stated that they would buy but few
hogs today.
Prices were steady to 10 cents higher,
with a top of $10.85 on a few lots of good
heavy hogs, anil the bulk of the good
heavy hogs selling at $10.50^10.65.
Lights were generally steady, but a
few brought $10.60. while mixed hogs
generally brought $lO.5O8j!lO.00.
Roughs generally brought <9.50, but a
few were sold at $9.75.
Pigs sold at $10.50<3!10.75.
The bulk of sales ran close to $10.30<3
10.60.
There were rumors that some buyers
stayed out of the early market believing
that there would be a lower tendency
due probably to 3,000 bogs that would
arrive on the market later, but others
thought that this would not materialize,
due to the good demand shown by East
ern shippers. Receipts approximated 10,-
000 early in the forenoon, and It was
thought that receipts for the day would
"totnl between 13,000 and 14.000.
There was no material change in the
tone of tradlug on the cattle market than
that which prevailed Tuesday. Buyers
were taking some cattle, but they were
not urgent in their demand, and prices
were practically steady.
Receipts for the day approximated <OO.
There was a fairly active tone to the
trade in calves, with receipts rather
light, at between 300 and 400, and prices
about steady. . . ...
However, commission men stated that
there were fewer calves brought the top
of the market today than there were on
the Tuesday maiket.
There was another light run of aheep.
between 300 and 400. but there was no
material change in prices, except that
the price of i rime sheep had a stronger
tendency at <3'34, with more sheep sell
ing at $4 than on the Tuesday market
There was nothing over $3.50 at the
opening of the Tuesday market, but late
a few Bold at $4.
HOGS.
Best light hogs, 100 to 200 lbs
average 10.>0^10.n0
200 to 300 lbs. average 10..V>@K).H5
Over 300 lbs 10 01*310.50
Sotrs 9.250 9 .3
Best pigs, under 140 lb* IO.SOuf 10 75
Bulk of tales 10.5<>®10.00
CATTLE.
Prime cornfed ateera, 1,300 lb*
and up [email protected]
Good to choice steers, 1,200 to
1,300 lbi 10.00-tf13.00
Good to choice ateera, 1,100 to
1.200 lbs 10.25013 25
Medium steers, 1,000 to 1.100
lbs. 8.50010750
Common to medium ateera,
800 to 1,000 lbs 6.500 800
—Heifer* and Cows —
Good to choice heifers 9.25012.75
Medium heifers 3 000 8.75
Common to medium hetfera.. 5 000 650
Good to choice cows 8 000 9.1A)
Fair to medium cow* 6.250 000
Canners $.250 4 0U
Cutters 4.250 s—>
-Bulla-
Good to choice butcher bulls 7.250 8.25
Bologna bulls 5 000 025
Light common bulls 4.000 5.00
--Calves —
Choice veals
Good veals 13.00013.50
Medium veals 12.0001300
Lightweight veals 8 00011.00
Heavyweight calves 4.000 9.50
—Stocker* and Feeder*—
Good to choice steers. 800 lbs.
and up ........ 9.00010 00
Good to choice steer*, under
800 lbs 8000 8.55
Medium cows 5-000 5.60
Good cows 5.500 0.0*)
Good heifers 0.500 7.50
Medium to good heifers 6.000 6 75
Good milkers 50.600125.00
Medium mllktrs 60.000100.00
Stock calves, 250 to 450 lba... 7 000 9.00
SHEEP AND LAMBS.
Good to choice sheep 3.000 4.00
Fair to common 2 000 2.50 ,
Bucks 2.500 3.50 ;
—Lambs —
Common to choice yearlings. 4.000 7.00 1
Spring lambs 9.26010. OU
Other Live Stock
CHICAGO, Dec I.—llogs- Receipts.
21,000; market steady; bulk, $10Qlo4d;
butchers, $lO 20ft 10 30; packers, s'*(.7sft
10.10: lights. sloftlo.4o. plgii, [email protected];
roughs. $9 40ft9.75. Cattle- Receipts,
11.000; market steady; beeves. $7.50ft17;
butchers, $4.75ft 12.25 ; can Here and cut
ters, 83 [email protected], Stockers nnd feeders,
s4ftlo; cows, [email protected]: calves, SU.SGft
13. Sheep—Receipts, 12,000; market 25c
up; lambs, $8 50@13; ewes, $2.50@t1.
CINCINNATI, Dec. 1. —Hogs—Receipts,
5,800; market slow nnd s*tftsl lower;
heavy, mediums, mixed, lights and pigs.
$10.60; roughs, $9; stagr, 37.50. Cattle
—Receipts, 600; market weak; bulls
steady; calves, sls. Sheep and lamb* -
Receipts, 500; market higher; sheep, $2
@6; lambs, s6ftllCo.
CLEVELAND, Dec. I.—Hogs—Receipts,
3,000; market, slow; Yorkers, $11.10ft;
11.25; mixed, [email protected]; medium, sll.lo
@11.26; pigs, $11.104£11.25; roughs, $9.00;
stags. $7. Cattle—Receipts, 300; market,
slow. Sheep and la tuba—Receipts, 2,00<i;
market, 2Gc up; top, $3- Calves—Receipts
—200; market, steady; top, $lB.
EAST ST. LOUIS, Dec. I.—Cattle Re
ceipts, 3.000; market, lower; native beef
steers, $12ft114.50; yearling beef steers and
heifers, $124813.75; cows, [email protected]; stock
ers and feeders, *sft6; calves. [email protected];
canners and cutters, [email protected]. Hogs—Re
ceipts, 12 000; market, 10©15c higher;
mixed and butchers, slo.6oft, 10.80; good
heavies, $10.054810.75; rough Deuvles, soft
10.50; lights, $10.60@ 10.80; pigs, slo®
10.76; bulk of sales, $10.56® 10.75. Sheep
—Receipts, 5,200; market, steady; ewes,
$4.78©6.75; lambs, [email protected]; canners and
cutters, [email protected].
PITTSBURG, Dec. L—Cattle-Receipts,
light; market steady; choice, $ 13ft 13.50,
good, $11.25@12; fair, s9<glo: veal calves,
9134810. Sheep and lambs Receipts,
light; market steady; prime wethers, $0
ft 6.50; good, $5.25ft5.75; mixed and lair,
S4.SO@S; spring lambs, $12.50® 13. Hoc
—Receipts, 15 doubles; market lower;
prime heavies, $11.25ft11.50; mediums,
[email protected]; heavy yorkers, [email protected];
light yorkers, $11.50® 11.75; pigs, sll®
11.50; roughs, *9® 10.25; stags, s7ftß.
EABT BUFFALO, Dec. I.—Cattle Re
ceipts, 350; murket, slow, steady; ship
ping steers, $13®14; butchers’ grades,
*8.50ftH2.50; cows, *2.50®8.75. Calve*—
Receipts, 200; market, active, steady;
culls, choice *s@l7. Sheep and lambs —
Receipts, 1,400; market, active, 26@50c
up; choice lambs, $13.50@14; culls, lair,
$74813; yearlings, $U®lO; sheep, s3®7.
Hogs—Receipts, 2,00(*; market, active,
strong; Yorkers, sl2; pigs, sl2; mixed,
sl2; heavies, sl2; roughs, $10®10.50;
stags, $8489.
CLEVELAND PRODUCE.
CLEVELAND, Ohio, Dec. I.—Butter-
Extra in tub lots, 00%ft61e; prints, 61%
@62c; extra firsts, 60%4800c ; firsts, 59%
ftGOc; seconds, 554850 c; packing stock,
404845 c. Eggs—Fresh gathered northern
extras, 76c; extra firsts, 75c; Ohio firsts,
new cases, 74c; firsts old cases, 73c;
western firsts, new cases, 72c; refrigera
tor extras, 58c; refrigerator firsts, 50c: a
case contains thirty dozen. Poultry—Live
heavy fowls, 25@20c; light stock, 174810 c;
springers, 20c; old roosters. 18c; spring
ducks, 354837 c; turkeys, 43ft44c; geese,
27® 30c.
CHICAGO PRODUCE.
CHICAGO, Dec. I.—Butter—Creamery,
extras, 52c; creamery firsts, 44%c; firsts,
4 lft 49 c; seconds, 384839 c. Eggs—Ordi
naries, Cl@6sc; firsts, 72@73c. Cheese—
Twins, 24c; Young Americas, 25%c. Live
poultry—Fowls, 15ft 23%e; ducks, 27c;
geese, 27c; spring chickens, 25c; turkeys,
35c; roosters. 18c. Potatoes —Receipts,
48 cars; Wisconsin and Minnesota, $1.40
®L6Q.
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1,1920.
Grant County Farmer
Wins Stock Honors
Special to The Times.
MARION, Ind., Dec. I—J, M. Ballard,
well-known stock raiser of this county,
won grand championship honors at the
International Live Stock Exposition at
Chicago, when he carried away one of
the six big prizes with his exhibit of a
carlonil of fat Hamshlre hogs.
Mr. Ballard’s hogs, which the judges
picked as the best of the show, were
spring pigs, but because of their 275
pounds weight had to be entered in the
heavy Instead of the light class.
r : 7
J Local Stock Exchange
j
—Deo. 1—
STOCKS.
Bid. Ask.
Ind Ry & Light Cos. com 60
Ind Ry A Light Cos. pfd.... 84
ludp.s A Norwcs pfd . . 75
Indpla A Sou east pfd 75
Indpls St, Ry 55 65
T 11, I A E com ... 0
T H, I A E pfd 12
Union Trac of Ind com.. 1
Union Trac of Ind Ist pfd 14
Union Trac of Ind 2d pfd 2
Advance Rumely Cos. com... 15 ...
Advance Rumely Cos. pfd... 61
Am. Central Life 235
Am Creosotiug Cos. pfd 90 ...
Belt It R com 65 72
Belt It It pfd 45
Century Bldg Cos. pfd 94
Citizens Gas Cos 32% 30
Dodge Mg. Cos. pfd ....... 94% ...
Home Brewing 55
Indiana Hotel com *. 60
Indiana Hotel pfd 90
Ind National Life Ins C 0... 4% •••
Indiana Title Guaranty 50
Indiana Pipe Line Cos 84 ...
Indpls Abattoir pfd 45 61
Indianapolis Gna 44 50
Indpls Telephone Cos. com... 0
Indpls Telephone Cos. pfd... 90% ...
Mer Pub Util Cos. pfd 48
National Motor Car Cos 0 11
Pub Sav Ins Cos. 2% ...
Standard Oil Cos. of Indiana 710 ...
Sterling Fire Inaurance Cos 8 ...
Van Camp Hardwure pfd... 95
Van Camp Packing pfd 90
Van Camp Products, Ist pfd 95
Van (Imp Product#, 2d pfd 95
Vaudalla Coal Cos. com 5
Vandalla Coal Cos., pfd 10
(Vabash Railway Cos. p'd ... 22
(Vabash Railway Cos. com... 8 ...
—Bunks and Trust Companies
Aetna Trust Cos 102% ...
Bankers Trust Cos 118
City Trust Cos 85
Commercial National Hank.. 05
Continental National Bank. 112 ...
Farmers Trust Cos 2(6) ...
Fidelity Truat Cos 12>J
Fletcher Am National Bank 156 ...
Fletcher Savings A Truat Cos 163
Indiana National Bunk 279% 286
Indiana Trust Cos 175 195
Merchants National Bank .. 279
National City Bank 112 120
Peoples State Bunk 179 ...
Security Trust Cos, 121
State Savings A Tfuat Cos.. 92 97
Union Trust Cos 340 ...
Washington Bank A Trust. 15
BONDS.
Broad Ripple 5a 60
Citizens Street Railroad 5*.. 73 78
Indiana Coke A Oa* 6 87
Indian Creek Coal A Min 0s 95 ...
Indianapolis, Col & So ft*... 08 ...
Indianapolis A Greenfield 5a 05
Indiannpol.a A Martins 65... 00 ...
Indlauupolia Northern 5a ... 45 55
Indiana pods A Norwea 6a... 50 61
Indpls, Shelby A H E 5s ... 70 ...
Indianapolis Street Ry 4a... Hu 05
Indpls Trac A Ter 5* 72 79
Kokomo, Marion A (V 5a... 80 M
Terre Haute, I A E 5a 45 53
Union Traction of Indiana 5s 53 69
Citizens Gas 5a 70% 81
Indiana Hotel Cos 2d 6s 95% 100
Indianapolis Gas 5s 73 81
Indpls Light A Heat 65.... 77 83
Indianapolis Water 6s 88 90
Indianapolis Water 4%*.... 70 75
Mer Heat A Light ref 5e.... 87 01
New Telephone lat 6s 94 ...
New Tel I.c*n* I>ta 6a. 93% ...
South lud Power 0a 86 ...
LIBERTY BONDS.
First 3%* 9050 91 00
Second 4s 85 4<> ....
First 4%a 86.80 (-0 30
Second 4%a 85.00 85 20
Third 4%s 88.00 88.26
Fourth 4%s 865*1 85-86
Victory 3% 96.40 90.70
Victory 4%s 95.50 96.70
On Commission Row
TODAY'S PRICED.
Apples -Barrel, JOftH.
Beans- Mb hi/an navy, in bag*, per lb.,
s%ftfli ; Colorado plntos, la bags, per lb.,
I<&i\ c, red kidneys, in bag*, per lb.,
12*. ftl.V . California pink chili. In bag*,
per lb., B%@D%e; lime's. per lb., 12%e;
nurron fats, per lb, li@l2c; blackeyes.
In bag* per lb, BftUc: California lima*.
In e hs, per lb, 9%ftloc.
Peae Dried green, per lb., 10c; spill
yollotv, 100 10. bag. per lh., 10c; marrow
fat;*. per lb, 10c; marrowfala. In bag,
per lb , 10c.
Beets -Fancy homo-grown per bu.,
$l5O.
Bananas—Extra fancy high grads fruit,
50ft,tiOc per huuch, per lb. 6%<jloc.
Cabbage—Fancy Northern, per lb., l%e.
Carrots—Fancy, home-grown, per bu.,
si®:.2s.
Celery—Fancy New York (2-3 crate),
4-5 doz, $4484.30; trimmed, per bunch,
$1.25; fancy Michigan, square box, $1.75.
Cocoanuts—Fancy, per uua., $1.25.
Cucumbers —Fancy hothouse, per dos.,
$1 50.
Cranberries- Fany C. C. Howes. per
bbl, sls; fancy C. C. Early Black, per
bbl, *l4; fancy C. C. Centennials, half
bbl, boxes, $7.50.
Egg Plant —Fancy, home-grown, per
doz . $1
Grapefruit —Extra fancy Florida (Blue
Goose), 30s. box, $5,25; 40s, box, $6; 645,
04s, 70s and 80s, boi, $6.2,_
lettuce —Fancy hothouse, leaf, per lb.,
20c; bbl lots, per lb, 18c; fanc.v home
grown endive, per do*., 50c; fancy Wash
ington iceberg, per crate, $5.
Onions—Fancy home-grown, yellow or
red, per 100 lb. bag, sl.3sft 1 HO. fancy In
diana whites, per 100-lb. bag, $2.50; per
bu., $1.40; fancy Spanish, per crate, $2.25.
Oranges —Extra fancy California Valen
cias, per crate, ss@7.
Pnraley—Fancy home-grown, per do*.,
26@30c.
Potatoet—Fancy Michigan and Wiscon
sin round whites, per 100-lb bag, $3.05;
In 5 or 10-lb bag lots, per 150-lb bak, *3.50;
fancy Montana gems, per 100 lb. bag,
$2.60.
Pears—All kinds, $1.50412 50.
Quinces Fancy California D’Ango,
$0.50.
Radishes—Button home-grown, per
doz., 26c; fancy long, per doz., 28c.
Sweet Potatoes —Fancjr Tennessee Nancy
Halls, per hamper, $2.00; fancy Eastern
Jcrfcqys, $3.
Spinach—Fancy, per bu., J 1.50.
Rice—Fancy head, per lb., lie; Blue
Rose, per lb., 10c.
Turnips—Fancy home-grown, new, per
bu., [email protected].
Mustard—Fancy home-grown, per bbl.,
$1.76.
Kale—Fancy home-grown, per bbl,
* Cauliflower—Fancy New York, pet
crate. $2.50482.75.
Oyster Plant—Fancy hothouse, per doz
50c.
v Leek—Fancy home-grown, per doz., 35c.
Sage—Fancy home-grown, per doz, 45cl
Green Onions —Fancy hothouse, per
doz, 17%c.
Mangoes Fancy home-grown, per
small basket, 75c.
Rutabugns—Fancy Canadian, per 50
lbs, $1 ; per 110 lbs, $1.75.
California Grapes--Fancy Tokays, per
crate. $3; fancy Emperlors, per crate, SS;
fancy Emperors, in drums, 31 lbs, net, $7.
Cider—Pure apple, 0 1-gallon glass
Jugs, per case, $6 50; No. 10 tins, 6% lb.
nets, per case or 1 doz, $6.60.
Kumquats—Fancy Florida*, per qt, 35c.
WHOLESALE PRODUCE.
Eggs—Fresh, loss off, 75c.
Poultry—Fowls, l’ft2oc; springers.
20c; cocks, 14c; old tom turkeys, 30c;
young tom turkeys, 12 lbs nnd up, 35c;
young hen turkeys, 8 lbs nnd up, 30c;
cull tblu turkeys not wanted; ducks, 4
lbs and up, 23c; ducks, under 4 lbs. 17c;
geese, 10 lbs and up, 20c; squabs, li lb*
to doz, $0; guineas, 2-lb size, per doz, SG.
Rabbits—Drawn, per doz, $2.75.
Butter —Buyers are paying 54®55c for
creamery butter delivered at Indlanapo-
Us.
Buttcrfat —Buyers sre paying 63@64c
for exaam delivered at IndlanapolU.
GRAIN MARKET
TONE UNSTEADY
Country Bank Failures Have
Influence on Market.
CHICAGO, Dec. I.—Fractional, Irreg
ular changes marked the trading In grain
futures on the Board of Trade today.
Reports of additional country bank
failures had a depressing influence, al
though commission houses bought mod
ersTVdy.
Provisions were higher.
December wheat opened off %c nt $1.56,
and regained %c later. May wheat, after
opening up lc nt $1.51%. lost l%c.
December corn was off %c at tHe open
ing, 05%c, but subsequently regained %c.
May corn, after opening off %c at 72%e,
lost %c.
December oats was up %c at the open
ing at 44%c and held that figure In later
trading. May oat < opened unchanged at
48%e, but later lost %c.
(By Thomson A- McKinnon)
—Nov. 30-
Wheat—Bleeping financial conditions
were operative In the extensive decline
of all commodities to the extent that the
buying power was curtailed. Financial
conditions are now coming to the sur
face in the way of minor difficulties
with u few country banks. This exhibi
tion la responsible for belated selling.
We are very much of the opinion that
the so-called weakness in the financial
situation Is much exaggerated. Further
than this, we believe It has been fully
anticipated and discounted by the fie
dine In wheat and commodities. For
this reason, we believe that actual ship
ments of wheat from country to be of
considerable Importance. So far as can
be ascertained officially the export or
wheat nnd flour from July 1, last, to
November, the total export of wheat and
flour from July 1 to November 1 is 146.-
000,000 bushel. A eonseratlv* estimate of
November shipments Is 30.000,000. This
total shipment abroad of 175.009,000 leaves
a very small amount to cover export for
the next sevon months nnd provide a
carry-over. Cash wheat Is strong every
where, with premiums Increasing. In
fact. It 1* said that new export bust
ness Is hampered by scarcity of offer
ings. December contracts become de
livered tomorrow. There are only 242,-
000 bushels of contract wheat now in
Chicago and the spring wheat which Is
being brought down from northern mar
kets Is not grading sufficiently well to
meet requirements for delivery. Further
than this, It Is selling on track nt con
siderably better than the delivery dis
count There seems no weakness In the
underlying situation except a state of
mind on the part jf the investor.
Corn —The huge surplus of corn which
will be uvatluble at aome time during
the crop year Is uppermost In the minds
of the trade. Therefore, the market en
counters more or less selling when It
appears strong. There are 888.000 busi
ness of contract* grades In elevator here
and current receipts arc selling nt bet
ter than a delivery basts. There Is not
much likelihood of any extensive deliv
eries unless the movement from the
country Increases. The relative cheap
ness of this grain wtII bring It Into more
general use. not only for consumption,
but for Industrial purposes. Relieving
that the financial condition of this coun
try is aouiid, we fee! that nut only are
corn values sufficiently low but a bet
ter demand will appear In the course of
time
Oat*--Tbo*e in touch with the storks
of oats lu the country appear as sellers
whenever the market 1* strong. There
fore, ndvancea are modest The returns
to the producer ss Indicated by terminal
market prices nrc decidedly too small
t< warrant th Idea of any heavy move
ment from the country. Price* should
respond to strength to corn.
Provision* Short covert:.g In Novem
ber lard has been the feature In today's
provision market Now that this hs*
been completed a value may respond to
the slow trade In rash meat* and ex
pectation of lower priced hog*.
CHICAGO GRAIN TABLE.
—Dee. 1—
: (CHEAT— Open. High. Low. Clo<-
Dec 156% 1.05 1.60% 162%
March.. 151% 1.50 1 49% 1.55%
CORN -
Dec 05 sis% 05% 08%
May.... 72% 74 72% 74
OATS—
-1 Dec 44'-. 45% 44% 45%
May 48% 49% 48% 49%
PORK -
Jan 22 50 23 35 22 50 23 25
LARD
Jnu 15.00 15.25 14 92 15.25
RIBS—
Jan 12.50 12 70 12.35 12.67
CHICAGO CASH GRAIN.
CHICAGO, Dec. 1. Wheat No. I hard
winter, $1.68%©i.: No. 2 hard winter,
$1.08; No. 1 northern sprint, $1.05%f(j
1.00; No, 2 northern spring, SI.(W. Corn
No. 3 yellow, 72%'<j.75c; No. 4 white. 6*l
4f07%c; No 4 yellow, 70% & 72c. oat* -
No. 1 white. 48%<ftfi0c; No. 2 white. 47%
4f500; No. 8 white. 40%.'; No. 4 white.
45%'tf lsi*c; standard. 44%(0%c.
TOLEDO CASH GRAIN.
TOLEDO. Ohio. Dee. 1 (.Muse: Wheat
—Cush and December. Corn No.
2 yellow (old), 84 <•, Hew, 79<\ Outs
No 2 white, 54H55c. Rye .No. 2. $1.47
Barely—No 2, Sic. Clover seed Cash
(1919). $11.40; cash (1920), $1155; !>•
camber, $11.70; January, $11.85; Febru
ary. $12.10; March, $12.10. Timothy—
Cann (1918), $3.25; cash (1919), $3 35; l>c
camber, $3.45; March. <3.55; January,
$3 45; February, $3. Alxtke (.’ash
(new), $10.25; Cash and March, $10.60.
PRIMARY MARKETS.
(By Thomson A McKinnon.)
—Dec. I.
Wheat. Corn. Oats.
Chicago 321,000 168.000 152,000
Milwaukee .. ~ 8,000 41,000 40,000
Minneapolis ... 458,000 44,000 21,000
Duluth 301.000 9.0(K)
St. Louis 130,000 24,000 58,000
Detroit 4,000 4,000 0.000
Kansas City .. 223,000 19.000 6,000
Toledo 0,000 8,000 0,00)
Peoria 4000 40,000 20,000
Omaha 47.000 70,000 18.000
Indianapolis .. 7,000 101,000 12,000
Totals 1,572,000 476.000 350,000
Year ago 834,000 000.000 422,000
—Shipments--
Chicago 31,000 153,000 131,000
Milwaukee 19,000 29,000
Minneapolis ... 232,000 52,000 69,000
Duluth 274,000 2,000
St. Louis 74.0(H) 23,000 55,000
Toledo (1,000 7,000
Detroit 4,000 2,000 4,000
Kansas City ... 270.000 23,000 20.000
Peoria 1,000 32,000 7,000
Omahu 77,000 52,000 32, (.00
Indianapolis 41,000 30,000
Totals 909,000 397,000 382, (MX)
Year ago ...1,084,000 480,000 482,000
—Clearances—
Dom. W. Corn. Oats.
New York 129,000
Philadelphia .. 27,000 35,000
Baltimore 229,000 111,000
New Orleans .. 293,000
Totals 688,000 111,000 36,000
Year ago ... 179,000 10,000 108,000
INDIANAPOLIS CASH GRAIN.
—Dec. 1—
Bids for ear lots of grain and hay at
tha call of the Indianapolis Board of
Trade were:
Wheat-Steady; through billed, trnck,
milling, No. 3 red, $1.85.
Corn—No. 2 white, old, 75@77c; No. 3
white, new, 71@73c; No. 4 white, new,
Goft7lc; No. 2 yellow, old, TOftSOc; No.
5 yellow, new, 70ft78c; No. 4 yellow, new,
72ft74c; No. 2 mixed, old, 73ft75c; No, 3
mixed, new, 72@74c; No. 4 mixed, new,
09@71c.
Oats—Finn; No. '2 white, 50%ft51c;
No. 3 white, 49%ft50%c; No. 2 mixed,
40%@4Sc; No. 3 mixed, 45%ft47e.
Huy—Steady: No. X timothy, $27.50®
28; No. 2 timothy, *26.5()fti27; No. 1 elo
ver mixed $25.50®26; No. 1 clover hay,
$25.50ft 20.50.
—lnspections
Wheat—No. 4 red, 1 car.
Corn —No. 2 white, 2 cars; No. 3 white,
3 cars; No, 4 white, 7 cars; No. 5 white,
2 cars; No. 6 white, 2 cars; No. 2 yel
low, 6 cars; No. 3 yellow, 4 cars: No. 4
yellow, 7 cars; No. 5 yellow, 12 cars;
No. 0 yellow, 5 cars; No. 2 mixed, 3 cars:
No. 5 mixed, 2 ears; ear, 2 ears; total,
57 cars. ,
Oats—No 1 white, 3 cars; No. 2 white,
5 cars; No. 4 white, 1 car; No. 1 mixed,
1 car; total, 10 chts.
Hay—No. 1 timothy, 1 car.
LOCAL HIDE MARKET.
Green Hides—No. 1,7 c; No. 2, Oc. Green
Calve*—No. ?, 10c; No. 2, B%c< Horse
hide*— No. 1, *4; No. 2, $3. Cured Hide*
—•Ho. 1. 9c; No. 2. Bc. \
In the Cotton Markets
NEW YORK, Dec. I.—An unexpected
recovery In Liverpool, following early
weakness, caused a firm opening of the
cotton markket here today, first prices
showing a net rise of 25 to 48 points.
(Vail street and the trade were good
buyers on the advance, while New Or
leans and other Southern Interests sold.
The firmness at the start was fairly
well maintained and at the end of the
first twenty minutes the list was about
35 points higher, helped by n late cable
reporting a better demand for the spot
article from the continent.
New York cotton opening: December,
15.70 c; January, 15.70 c; March, 15.90 c;
May, 16.00 c; July, 16.50 c; October, 15.95 c.
NEW ORLEANS, Dec. 1. —In response
to sudden strength In the Liverpool
market following earlier weakness, the
cotton market here today opened strong
at a net gain of 31 to <0 points.
Immediately after the call the market
rose to a net gain of 61 to 70 point* or
more, than $5 a bale above yesterday's
low prices.
LIVERPOOL, Dec. 1. Spot cotton
opened quiet. Price* were steady.
Sales, 4.000 bales. American mida, 15.50d ;
good mlds, 12.75d; fully mids, 11.75d;
mlds, 10.25d ; low inlds, 7.50d ; good ordi
nary. 4.50d; ordinary, 3AOd. Futures
steady.
Weather
The following table shows the state of
the weather at 7 a. m.. Dec. 1. as ob
served by United States weather bureau:
Station. Bar. Tem. Weath.
Indianapolis, Ind. .. $0.97 31 Cloudy
Atlauta, Ga 30.12 42 Cloudy
Amarillo, Tex 30.20 84 Clear
Bismarck, N. D 30.04 24 Clear
Boston, Mass 30.22 36 Rain
Chicago, 111 30.02 42 Cloudy
Cincinnati, 0 30.04 38 Cloudy
Cleveland. 0 29.88 42 Cloudy
Denver, Colo 30.00 40 Clear
Dodge City, Kb*.... 30.20 28 Clear
Helena, Mont 30.02 28 Clear
Jacksonville. Fla. ... 30.20 56 PtCldy
Kansas City. Mo. ... 30.22 38 Cloudy
Louisville, Ky 30.06 40 Rain
Little Rock, Ark 30.26 40 Clear
Los Angeles, Cal ... 30 00 54 PtCldy
Mobile, Ala 30 28 44 Clear
New Orleans, La. ... 30.32 48 Clear
New York, N. Y. ... 30 00 40 Rain
Norfolk, Va 29.96 58 Cloudy
Oklahoma City 30.30 34 Cloudy
Omaha. Neb 30.10 32 Cloudy
Philadelphia. Pa 29.94 48 Rain
Pittsburg, Pa 29.92 44 Cloudv
Portland, Ore 29 73 44 Cloudy
Roaeburg. Ore 29.72 40 PtCldy
San Antonio, Tex 30 26 50 Clear
San Francisco, Cal... 30.00 54 Rain
St Lou! M 0... 30.14 38 Cloudy
St. Paul, .. Minn... 30 02 34 Cloudy
Tampa. Fla 30 22 60 Cloudy
Washington, D. C. .. 29 90 44 Cloudy
WEATHER CONDITIONS.
Th* central storm ta now moving
slowly i\*t*rd, having been attended
by widespread precipitation since Tues
day morning from the middle Mlseleelppt
Valley to the Atlantic Ooaat. Somewhat
lower temperatures prevail In the rear of
the dlstorhnnn over most of the Ohio
and middle Mississippi Ktste*. hat as a
ruls the temperature change* have not
been of marked degree over large areas-
It Is warmer generally west of the Rock
ies. due to a depression covering meet
of th* Pacific region.
J. H. ARMINGTON,
Meteorologist, Heather Bureau.
WHOLESALE FEED TRICKS.
Ton aack*. Cwt
Acme Brand $42.00 $2 15
Acme Feed 42 00 215
A '"me middlings 40 00 2.35
Anne Dairy iced 52.50 2.65
E-Z Dairy Feed 42.50 2 15
Anne H A M 39.25 203
Acme atock feed 34 50 1.75
(Tacked com 38 25 195
Acme chick 49 00 2.30
Anne Scratch 40.00 235
E Z Scratch 4175 2 20
Acme dry mtah 32 00 2.05
Acme hog feed 50.00 2.55
Ilomllk yellow 38.25 195
Roi'cd barley 53.00 2.70
Alfalfa Mol 47 00 2 40
Cotton seed meal 48.00 2.45
I.inaeed oil weal 01 00 3.10
GRAINS.
Shelled corn, small lot* 86
Shelled corn, large lot* 85
Shelled corn. 2 bu lack .90
Oats. 3-bu suck CO
Oats, large bulk ."0
CORN MEAL AND FLOUR.
Corn meal, cwt. net $2.20
E 7. Buke. baker*’ flour 98 lb sick ... 0.90
Marriage Licenses
Carl Alchhorn, 150 N. Alabama 5t.... 27
Lola Rhoades, 104 S. Noble at 29
Bertram Forch*, 135 (V. Twenty-first
t 25
Marcia Brewer. 629 Garfield are 20
David Johnson. 028 Fayette 5t........ 35
Muttle Ridley. 92S Fayette st Si
I.out* .lame*. 2702 N. Illinois st 40
Elizabeth Uedtngton, 2702 N. Illinois
st 39
George Lyles. (Vest Baden. Ind 40
Ivn Allen, Spring Hotel 40
William Taylor, 1152 (Vest Twenty- j
Eighth st 20!
Maple Kelley. 950 (V. Twenty-Ninth st. 18
Jesse lluopa, dty 24
Clara Iteiaier, 31S B. Minnesota at.... 17 i
Births
Fred and Bertha Bremertnan, 1054 West \
Thirtieth, boy,
Frank and Elsie Pto. 517 Brown, boy. j
Truuuin and Mary Tucker, St, Vin- i
cent’s Hospital, boy.
Edward and lllluu Kleinscbmldt, 1001 1
Fletcher, girl.
(Valter nnd Henrlettr Ruenaman, 2740
South Illinoia. girl.
Hurry and Aituu Glass, 1112 North i
Hamilton, girl.
('hurls, and Florence Hudson. 2KW
Cast Washington, girl.
John n<l Mila Bates, 427 North De- 1
qninev, girl
Vorlln and Ora Lewis, 2541 North
Delaware, girl.
I.e,ter and Mabel Morrtaon, 830 Enat
Fifty-Second, boy.
Wude and Helen Gillinan, Methodist
Hospital, boy.
John and Helen Bauder, 2215 North
Meridian, boy.
James and Marian Boyle, Methodist
Hospital, boy.
Albsrt and Ida Polter, 1316 Prospect,
boy.
Meri and Rose Sbaatz, 516 East Mar
ket, boy.
Harry and Emma Coffey. 929 Harriaou,
boy.
oti* and Essie Francis, 911 (Vest
Twenty-Sixth, girl.
Albert und Esther Perry, 2402 South
Meridian, boy.
Robert and Marie Waters, 002% South
East, girl.
Raymond and Edna Berry, 140 East
Vermont, boy.
John and Mary Brown, 2016 Adams,
boy.
Timothy and Anna Glenn, 442 Douglas,,
hoy.
Frederick and Carrie Miller, 330 lowa,
boy.
William and Mary Thomas, 2213 Pier
son. boy.
Daniel and Frieda Poore, 520 Birch,
girl.
Deaths
Lillie It. Street, 01, 4353 N. Pennsyl
vania. chronic myocarditis.
Adam H. Sarber, 88, 518 E. Tenth, hy
postatic pneumonia.
Harry Frank Girton, 38, 745 N. East,
chronic myocarditis.
Mary Rose, 04, 1019 N. Rural paresis.
Ilunnibal 1). Collins, 24, 119 N. Cali
fornia, pulmonary tuberculosis.
Nora Combs, 51, St. Vincent's Hospital,
carcinoma.
Lee T. Conoly, 30, 437 Goodlet, lobar
pneumonia.
Jennie Paul, Cl, 2058 Brookside, '
Bright’s disease.
Hannah Ana Mansur, 94, 1321 N. Me
ridian, pulmonary oedema.
James IMxon, 53, City Hospital, pul
monary tuberculosis.
Anna Rivers, 34, 748 Utica, netiras- !
then la.
Mary E. Caylor. 10 daya, 1854 Hollo- j
way, premature birth.
Mattie Eugliu, 34, City Hospital, car- i
cinoma.
Dorothy Parson, 1, City Hospital,
broncho pneumonia.
(trace B. Poehler, 34, 867 W. Twenty
aeveuth, pernicious anemia.
BILL HART WINS $7.72&.
LOS ANGELES, Dee. I.—William fl.
Hart, picture star, obtained a judgment
for $87,779 against Thomas H. Inpe, film
producer, in court as due him under a
contract with Inc* la June, 191 T.
OWNERS OBJECT
TO OVERCHARGE
Works Board May Reimburse
Brookside Ave. Residents.
The board of public works today prom
ised a delegation of property owners re
siding in Brookside avenue between Ru
ral and Twentieth streets that it will
investigate claims of over-assessment
nnd, if the facts warrant, repay them out
of the erroneous assessment fund. More
than SI,OOO is involved, it is estimated.
The complaint of the. property owners
arises out of the fact that they were
assessed for changes in curbs and side
walks made when Brookside avenue, was
straightened, more than a year ago to
make the operation of city street ears
less hazardous. The. property owners
were charged for the work, but it wis
brought out today that the work should
have been done under resolutions adopt
ed more than four years ago in which
it was agreed the city would beer most
of the cost of making the changes
Curves in Brookside avenue west of Ru
ral street were corrected during the Bell
administration under these resolutions,
but the work east of Rural street was
not done until the Jewett administration
came in.
The board received bids as follows:
For a local sewer In Buckingham drive
from a point 25% feet east of Boulevard
place to a point 23% feet east of Cor
nelius avenue. Columbia Construction
Company, $0.29 per lineal foot.
For a local sewer in Belmont avenue
from the flr*t alley north of Michigan
street to Tenth street, Columbia Construc
tion Company, $0.78 per lineal foot, and
Sheehan Construction Company, $0.73.
Resolutions were confirmed as fol
lows :
For the permanent Improvement of
P.erkley road from Boulevard place to
Sunset avenue, and for sidewalks and
graded lawns in the same section; side
wulks and graded lawns in Boulevard
place from Fall Creek boulevard to a
point 11 feet north of Twenty-Fifth street
and for the permanent Improvement of
the first alley east of Ashland avenue
from Twenty-Fifth to Twenty-Seventh
streets.
Father Asks Court
for Possession of Boy
The pies of Joseph A. Itentach, an
automobile salesman, of 2005 Central ave
nue. that he be granted a writ of habeas
corpu* as the flr*t step in gaining the
custody of his son, Albert A., 6. will be
heard by Circuit Judge Harry Chamber
lin Dec. 27.
Rentsch has filed suit in the Circuit
Court against Mrs. Flora Kretsch, 3293
Park avenue, who Is charged in the com
plaint with holding the boy a prlaoner
in her home. Mr*. Kretsch Is the mother
of the first wife of the plaintiff and has
had the custody of Albert since the death
of his mother.
Mrs. Kretach was permitted to take his
son to her home following the death
of Mra. Marie Rentsch, last February.
It la aald that Rentach recently remar
rled and that Mra. Kretsch refuse* to
give up th* child. The defendant. It Is
understood, la prepared to contest
Itentsch's attempt to gain the custody of
hts child
The plaintiff contends that the defend
ant has no legal right to the custody
of hi* son. Mrs. Krets-h will be required
to produce the child in court.
New State Auditor
and Tax Man on Job
Two new State offcials today assumed
their official duties In the Stntehouse.
They are (Vllllam G. Oliver, auditor of
State, and John O. Brown, State tax com
missioner, who aucreeds 8. N. Cragua
us a member of the State Tax Board.
Mr. ((liver's first nffeial act was as a
member of the State Board of Finance,
which sot Jan. 3. 1921, ns the dnte for
selection of depositaries for State funds,
j Formal notice for applications will be
scut out within n few day*. It was an
j uounced and In (he meantime, applica
j tions will be received, action on which
will be taken nt the meeting of the board
j on Jan. 3.
Mr. Brown was officially "initiated”
into his office by sitting in a number
I of conferences between the tax board and
; delegation# of taxpayers from various
• cities of the State,
i
Receiver Is Named
for ‘Black* Ponzi’
Judge T. J. Moll of Superior Court.
Room 5, today, following an agreement
of counsel, appointed Carl Schocnemann
as receiver for Samutl G. Bullup, negro, i
who has been called the “black Ponzi.” .
The receiver gave bond In the sum of
$2,500 which wa* approved by the court.
The receivership was asked In a pe
tition filed yesterday by Robert A.
Woodard, who claims that be has an un
satisfied Justice of the peace judgment
against Bullup for $75.
Bullup is now in Jail, the court was
informed.
JUDGES BEGIN SEVENTH YEAR.
Judge Vincent Clifford of Superior
Court, room 4, and T. J. Moll of Su
perior Court, room 5, today begun the
seventh year of their Judgeships. Both
took the bench on Dec. 1, 1914.
FEDERAL TAX jMfe.
mM SPECIALISTS 4, Ip
ImM ACCOUNTING . Ifci
JIkSS COST ENGINEERING VI
AW** APPRAISALS
Chas P. Doney E. Rogers.
DONEY-ROGERS CO. Inc.
BTH FLOOR HUME-MANSUR BLDG.
Bell I’hone. MiUn 6416. ESTABLISHED 1917. Automatic 23-144.
SERVICE
Have you tried it?
We told you something about it last week. Better Pas
senger and Freight Service to points reached by traction lines
than given by any other means of Transportation.
Seventeen trains via Anderson and fourteen trains via
Newcastle for Muncie. Seven through trains to Ft. Wayne.
Sixteen trains to Kokomo. Two through trains to Ft. Wayne
and one through train to Goshen via Peru daily. All limited
trains connecting at. junction points for all cities and towns
in the Gas Belt, northern and northwestern part of the state—
Michigan and Ohio.
“Aeroplane” Freight to Ft. Wayne seven hours, Toledo
fourteen hours. “Cannon Ball” Freight to South Bend, four
teen hours; St. Joseph, Mich., twenty-four hours; Chicago
and Milwaukee, forty-eight to seventy-two hours.
Local freight to all points daily except Sunday. “Express
Freight” on all passenger trains. “Stack it up” against any
thing else. Try it.
Talk to the local agent or write Traffic Department, Ander
son, Ind.
UNION TRACTION COMPANY OF INDIANA
GARDENERS ASK
IMPROVED ROADS
(Continued FTom Page One.)
gardeners use this road in getting their
produce into the city.
The communication of the Farmers'
Federation bore the names of William J.
Fink, as president; Royal L. W. Mc-
Clain, secretary and treasurer, and C. O.
Sutton, J. E. Foltz, Ford Watson. Clar
ence Mills and Albert Neuby, directors.
Sometime ago, the county commission
ers announced that approximately
$1,500,000 would be spent next year in
building new improved roads and com
pleting work on contracts already
granted.
"Moat of these roads are county unit
roads and the city of Indianapolis pays
approximately 90 per cent of those im
provements,” said Mr. George. "We are
now considering lowering the road main
tenance fund from 5 per cent to 3 per cent
because of the money obtained under the
county unit plan.”
Mr. George is unable to see how the
members of the Farmers’ Federation can
suffer from the plan of the commission
ers to allow new contracts under the
county unit plan in 1920 and 1921. He
points out that contracts for improve
ments are allowed on petition of the
property owners and taxpayers.
Commissioners George and Carlin
Shank said they would consider the
communication of the Farmers’ Federa
tion as well ns the application of the
gardeners on the Bluff road. They have
indicated they do not favor changing
the road improvement plana for next
year.
World Publishing Cos.
Files State Papers
Articles of incorporation have been
filed with the Secretary of States by the
Collegiate World Publishing Company of
Indianapolis, with a capital stock of $25,-
000. Directors of the company are J. C.
Hennenberger, Chicago; James (V. Tay
lor and Edward A. Peterson of Indian
apolis.
The name of the Indianapolis Wood
Preserving Company has been changed
to the Indianapolis Chemical Company,
according to papers filed with the Sec
retary of State.
The Buck Company of Indianapolis has
increased its capital stock from $50,000
to $200,000. Officers of the company are
A. W. Buck, president, and E. C. Arnold,
secretary.
Articles of incorporation were filed by
the Clark Specialties Company of Indian
apolis. with a capital stock of SIO,OOO.
The company will engage in the manu
facture of miscellaneous specialties. Di
rectors are Pearl Clark, Zina I. La Dow
and J. W. Busard, ail of Indianapolis.
The Bell Tharp Sales Company has
filed preliminary certificate of dissolution
with the Secretary of State. Directors
of the company were Harry E. Tharp,
Brownsburg; Lonnie R. Tharp and Harry
G. Alexander, both of Indianapolis.
Farmer Wounds, Then
Kills Self With Gun
SIBLEY. lowa. Dec. I.—Thomas Raight,
00. a wealthy farm“r. committed suicide
with a shotgun. When the first charge
failed to reach a vital spot, he reloaded
the gun. The second charge of shot
entered just under his heart.
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