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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, December 01, 1920, Last Home Edition, Image 4

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SCHOOL PATRONS
MAKE REQUESTS
Board of Commissioners Be
sieged at Session.
A delegation of approximately 150 pa
trons of five city schools appeared at a
regular meeting of the board of school
commissioners last night to present re
quests for the betterment of conditions
in their respective schools.
Representatives from School No. 211
a playground be made on va
cant lots east of the new building. They
asked the school board to confer with
the board of park commissioners, who.
It Is understood, Intend to build a public
playground on a city dump along the
Illinois Central- Hailroad tracks. Bert
S. Gadd was appointed to confer with
members of the park board on Dec. 0.
Consideration was promised by the
board to the delegation from School No.
15, whose members related conditions ex
isting at that building and pointed out
the need of anew structure. Colored
patrons of School No. 19 complained of
certain poor conditions In the school
building and called attention to the. fact
that some of the pupils were required to
travel more than two miles to another
school for special classes. The school
board agreed to consider the complaint
at an early date.
REQUEST CONCERNS
COLORED PC PIES.
Three organizations, the Capitol Ave
nue Protective Association, the Maple ton
Civic Association. Und the North Central
Association, representing Schools 43 and
38. appeared in a group to ask that col
ored pupils in those north side schools
be sent to special schools.
To stop petty thieving prevalent at the
Shortridge High School, C. \V. Burton
and Ralph W. Dougins were Instructed
to Investigate conditions and report on
the" best type of lockers. Mr. Burton also
was instructed to order radiator covers
for School 29.
The use of Caleb Mills hall fur rehear
sals of an amateur orchestra was grant
ed, the beard of park commissioners, pro
viding the rehearsals do not conflict with
any ai_'.Grs of Shortridge High School.
The board will advertise for bids on a
■even-passenger automobile, not to cost
more than $-1.5C0, for use of the board.
In response to reports and requests of
the William B. Jungclaus Company, in
charge of the work at Manual Training
High School, which was delayed by the
receut accident, and of the Meir Kle - tri ••
Company, in charge of work at School 18,
the two companies were granted exten
sion of time in which to complete the
work.
The Art Association of Indianapolis
will receive the same amount this year
as was given them last year, $6,914.89, and
arrangements were made wnereby the as
sociation will receive a sum of SHT,OoO for
the next two years. The school board
wfil petition for a limit of SIO,OOO as ap
propriations to this association.
CHANGES IN
TKACH ING STAFF.
The following changes In the teach
ing staff were announced by Supt. E. IT.
Graff: Resignations, Edith Lanhani. M.
Alberta Sigelen. Will Wetter. Fred St rick
ler, Edward B. Birge, Arthur J. Perry
and Capt. Newton Hardin; leaves of ab
sence, Margaret Glblay and Georgia
Henry; appointments. Harriet Badger.
Neli Ash brook Shedd, Lola Wooiford.
Fanny Meidner. John M Ritter. Claude
Barner and Harrison Carver. Frank F.
McCrea was appointed to fill the vacancy
in the military department made bv the
resignation of Captain Hardin.
Following a discussion of the pro
posed special teachers' library, a project
which has been under investigation for
more than a year, Charles. E. Rush, Mur
*y S. Dalman, Superintendent Graff,
N. L. Schneider and C. W. Burton were
named as a committee to make a more
formal report as to the feasibility and
expenses necessary to begin sueh a li
brary.
It was pointed out that a teachers’ li
brary In which would be placed classi
fied foreign school system reports and
pamphlets of similar nature as well ns
books and periodicals regarding tin- art
of teaching and the science of education
and classified mounted pictures to be
used in connection with lectures by
teachers, would be needed in the near
future, when the proposed teachers’ nor
mal school- is organized and swell a step
taken now would greatly facilitate iatei
necessities.
The cost of the library for the first
year was estimated at $3/00.
The building program for 1921 and the
financial report of Business Director
Hitt will be the basis of discussion at a
special meeting of the school board to
be held next Tuesday night.
SUFFERING FACES
WORKERS IN FEUD
(Continued From Page One.)
than real suffering, but now the rainy
season has started and the whole coun
tryside Is drenched in a cold, olammy
dftxzle.
None of the tents has flooring. Minors
charged the railroad refused to make de
liveries, although the lumber has been
purchased. Railroad officials deny this.
The public appears to be about equally
d'Hded In sympathy between the miners
and operators —that Is that small parts
of the public not directly Interested
In the feud. For coal is the only excuse
for existence In this out of the way part
of the United States. Except for iso
lated miners’ shacks, the towns all are
located along the Norfolk A Western
railway, like knots In a string drawn
through a rubble heap.
RLOG THROUGH
RAIN-CHI'RNED CLAY.
The khaki-clad doughboys look very
business like, slogging through the rain
churned clay around the mines and at
the railway stations. Most of them are
veterans. They stand out in contrast to
the handful of boyish-looking State con
stabulary whose uniform is remiuisceut
of'the Y. M. C. A. overseas dress.
Since the arrival of the troops there
have been two clashes between them and
strike sympathizers. In both cases shots
were exchanged between soldiers on this
si<se of the Tug river and riflemen in
Pike County, Ky. The clashes occurred
at’ Rose siding, where the river Is a
muddy, mountain stream only fifty
yards across, marking the State bound
ary. In neither of these frays were
there any known casualties.
Jhe coal feud, which now far over
shadows the McCoy-Hatfiel.l feud of Pike
County, was the outgrowth of the at
tempt to unionize fifty mines in the Tug
River field, which embraces all Mingo
and part of I’lke counties. As fast as
the men joined the United Mine Workers’
Union they were discharged.
The situation became tense and a match
was touched to the powder keg last May
■i 1 "■ 1 ■—a
ColdSjjjjg®^
J tube to-
JLfc'rNA day. Makes your
bead and nose
v feel fine.
Easy to apply
; to act
30 treatment tin FREE—Write
KONDON MFG. CO.
Minneapolis, Minn.
Sorority Hostesses
.'IIS9 MARIAN G.' WILLIAMS.
- , S‘ jjjjjj .
v *•
ie. *v* *
L>)
i / i
C-W'.. / '
% * :
MRS. BLANCHE CLARK MtIJ.F,R.
Prominent in the activities of Sigma
Alpha lota Musical Sorority of this city
are Mrs. Blanche Clark Miller, of the
alumni, and Xliss Marian G. Williams, ol
the active chapter, who will be among
the hostesses for the dancing party to
be given tonight In the ballroom of the
College of Music and Fine Arts by the
organization. In honor of the college fac
ulty. There will be special musical num
bers and various novel features are to
he Introduced during the evening.
The active chapter Includes Christine
Roush. Crystal Topp Miller. Ruth Alfred,
Adah t>. Strong. .Maude Krause, Mary
Harter. Helen Summers, Beatrice I.use,
Iva Nicholson, .Marian Williams and
Agnes Hodgins. The Alumni Club, of
which Mrs. Oliver Willard Pierce is
chairman, will assist the active chapter
in entertaining. '
when eleven -men were killed, lneludtng
Mayor T**sterm.in.
Regular guerilla warefare followed,
bushwhacking and dynamiting of prop
er-rj>eing interspersed occasionally with
out- ind-out duels between the warring
factions.
The ire of the miners was arous’d
particularly by the practice of the oper
ators in ejecting them from company
owned houses when they Joined the
union. Ejections became, wholesale when
the strike was called in July. Women
and children became the principal suf
ferers.
At the height of the strike, the miners
claimed 4.0U0 men out and monthly pro
fluctlon reduced from 4TiO,<kJO to lflQjkk)
:ons. The operators said, however, the
maximum number of strikers out was
and now there, are 1,0"0 men work
ing In thirty nine mines, only 200 of
whom were' brought in from the outside.
According to the miners 2,7<j0 men st.ll
are out.
* Officials of the miners’ organizations
say the pay average/] $1 to SC a day
but ROTif to whom the operators showed
partiality made S3O to s4<* a day. The
operators say all men averaged from $lO
to S3O.
Two Auto Victims
John Hammons. 02, of POO North Jeffer
son avenue, was slightly injured Inst
night when he was knocked from his
bicycle by an automobile driven by Al
fred Winters, 170$ Arrow avenue. Cal
vin Tate, 8. bob of Charles Tate, lSi*
West Washington street, wa severely
bruised about the body when he was
struck hy an automobile at Washington
and Bloomington, street last night. The
driver of the automobile told Mr. Tate
his name was C. B. Spaulding, but he
did not give tala adores*.
FOR BURNING ECZEMA
Apply Zemo the Clean, An
tiseptic Liquid Easy to Use
—Does Not Stain
Greasy salves and ointments 9nnuld
rot be applied if good clear skin is
wanted. From any druggist for 35c, or
SI.OO lor large size, get a bottle of Zemo.
When applied as directed it effectively
removes eczema, quickly stops itching,
and heals skin troubles, also sores,
bums, wounds and chafing. It pene
trates, cleanses and soothes. Zemo is
a clean, dependable and inexpensive,
antiseptic liquid. Try it, as we believe
nothing you have ever used is as effec
tive and satisfying.
The E. W. Rose Cos,, Cleveland, Ok
Banish Catarrh
Breathe Hyomei For Two Minutes
and Stuffed Up Head Will Go.
If you want to get safe relief from
catarrh, cold in, the head or from an
irritating cough in the shortest time,
breathe Hyomei.'
It will clean out your head In tw
minutes and allow you to breathe freely,
awake or asleep, or money refunded.
Hyomei should end a cold in one day
and relieve you of disgusting snuffles
hawking, spitting and offensive breath it
a week.
Hyomei is made chiefly from e.ucalyp
tus, a soothing, heSling, germ-killing an
tiseptic, that comes from the eucalyptus
forests of inland Australia, where ca
tarrh, asthma and other bronchiel trou
bles are seldom known.
Hyomei is pleasant and easy to
breathe. Just pour a few drops into the
Hard Rubber Inhaler, use as directed
and relief is almost certain.
A Complete Hyomei Outfit, including
inhaler and one bottle of Hyomei, casts
but little at the Haag drug stores and
druggists everywhere.
MI-OKA
Ends indigestion
It relieves stomach misery, sour stom
ach, belching and all stomach disease
or money back. Large box of tablets
at all druggists in all towns.
—A.dverti*em*nt.
COMMISSION AND
LEGION TO JOIN
War Memorial Legislation
Will Be Sought.
Cooperation with the Indiana War
Memorial Commission is being arranged
by the State executive committee of the
American Legion In seeking additional
war memorial legislation in the ap
proaching session of the State Legisla
ture. A committee of three members of
the State executive committee, vested
with full power to act, has been ap
pointed' to meet with the commission ou
Dec. 15.
L. R. Gignilliat, State commander of
the American Legion; L. Russell New
gent. State adjutant, and Dr. T. Victor
Keene, member of the national executive
committee, compose the committee which
will aid the commission in its fight for
war memorial legislation.
The general plan of the legion Is to
secure an additional appropriation from
the State and to secure legislation to
permit the city of Indianapolis and Ma
rion County to cooperate with the State
in erecting the memorial.
A ieaolutlon was passed at the meet
ing of the State executive committee ask
ing the Indiana War Memorial Commis
sion to appoint as secretary former serv
ice men. The position of secretary is
the only one to which a salary is at
tached.
Another resolution requesting that no
post of the legion In the State lend the
name of the leglou to any person or so
ciety soliciting funds or putting on ex
hibitions, was adopted.
Poet’s Forces Seize
Ship of Provisions
ROME, Dec. I—Gabriel D’Annunzio's
volunteers at Flume have seized the
steamship Narenta, laden with flour,
cheese and other foodstuffs for the Ital
ian regular troops surrounding Flume,
according to a dispatch to the War Office
today.
General Cavlglia, commander of the gov
ernment troops, has notified D'Annunzio
that a strict blockade will be Imposed
within twenty-four hours unless the
Legionnaires serving under D’Annunzio
retyrn to the army corps to which they
formerly belonged.
‘Dressed Chicken’
Man Is Sentenced
Wlnlfleld James, 431 Christian street,
was fined SIOO and costa and sentenced
to serve thirty days on tlio penal farm
when he was convicted in City Court late
yesterday of operating a blind tiger.
Sergeant Helm got the code words by
which customers ordered their liquor, lie
telephoned and said: "Send a dressed
chicken to 15 North Noble street.”
When nn automobile reached that ad
dre6s the sergeant arrested James and
captured a gallon of "white mule.”
Seize Million Quarts
of Liquor on Border
WASHINGTON, Dec. I.—More than
one million quarts of whisky, gin and
other liquors have been seized from ruin
runners on th< borders of the United
States since Jan. Id, when national pro
hibition became effective, Chief Ashworth
of the United States Customs Service
estimated today.
”1 am convinced,” Ashworth said,
"that from this report that this is only
oue-tenth of that smuggled across the
lines."
PLAN WARD ORGANIZATION.
Plans for a ward organization for the
city campaign will be made by the
Tenth Ward Democratic Club at a party
to be given at McClain’s Hall, Hoyt ami
State avenues at 8 o'clock on the evening
of Wednesday Dec. 8. Otto K.iy. Mrs.
B. H. Gudd, Mrs. Martin Reiff-I, K. j.
Sexton and W. L. McClain are In charge
of the meeting.
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
J ' BURKE
“The Frisky Mrs. Johnson”
Wf Al Swinging through the breezy career of a
gay young widow in'Paris. Brilliant with
H * fashion. Sparkling with life on the bou-
B leyards. Glowing with love and strewn
From the Play by Clyde Fitch
Universal Comedy “Maids A-Courting.”
„ Fox News Weekly
Today—Chas. Ray in “An Old-Fashioned Boy”
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1,1920.
Son to Bring Father
From Scene of War
to Good Home Here
Merchant Obtains Passports
for Purpose of Removing
Ptirent From Hungary.
The prodigal son will return to the
home of his father, but there will be no
fatted calf or a great banquet.
The son will go from the land of plen
ty to the land of want and despair for
the purpose of bringing his father and
a number of children to America.
Henry M. Rothchiid, a merchant tailor
of 433 Massachusetts avenue, will leave
Indianapolis next Wednesday for Hun
gary by way of New York and Paris
to visit the home of his father in Hun
gary. Mr. Rothchlld’s two brothers were
injured while serving In the Hungarian
army.
"I am going over to aid my fnther and
bring him to Indianapolis with me,”
said Rothchiid. “The few letters which
1 have reoeived show the conditions over
there are very bad. My two brothers
were injured In the war and they have
lost everything. I would like to bring
them to Indianapolis.”
Rothchiid is n naturalized citizen and
took an active part in the Liberty Loan
drives during the war. He wishes to
share his happiness and prosperity which
he found In Indianapolis, with his father.
The government has issued • passport
to Rothchiid and permission has been
given him to visit Belgium. Koumania,
Hungary, France and Italy. While In
Europe he will attempt to locate the
children of three Indianapolis families
and will attempt to tiring the children
to America on his return.
Rothchiid has not seen his father for
thirteen years and during tlie war was
unable to hear from him. fie is taking
the first chance to visit him since the
war. He hopes to make the trip and be
hack In Indianapolis within ten weeks.
, < - >
A Stubborn Congh
Loosens Right Up
i This home-made remedy Is 'i won- j
! d.-jr lor quick results. hwtily
und cheaply uiT„
Here is n home-made syrup \\\
which millions of people have \\\
found to be the most depend- \\\
able means of breaking up \'\
stubborn coughs. It is cheap V
and simple, but very prompt in \\
action, t nder its healing, sooth- i
injr influence, chest soreness goes, 1
phlegm loosens, breathing becomes
easier, tickling in throat stops and
you get a good night's restful
sleep. The usual throat and chest
colds aro conquered by it in 24
hours or less. Nothing better
for bronchitis, hoarseness, croup,
throat tickle, or bronchial asthma.
To make this splendid cough
svrup, pour 2‘ .. ounces of I’inex '
into a pint bottle and fill the j
bottle wim plain granulated sugar
syrup and shake thoroughly. If
you prefer use clarified molasses,
honey, or corn syrup, instead f
sugar svrup. Hither way, you
get a full pint—a family supply |
—of much better cougu syrup j
than you could buy ready-made
for three times the money. Keeps 1
perfectly and tastes good. t
Pinex'is a special and high- J I
lv concentrated compout: 1 ~P>
of genuine Norway pine iSL/jl
extract, known the world
over for its prompt healing jk f
effect upon the membranes.
To avoid disappoint*
inent oak your drug- -ftSStfl
list for ”2’ 2 ounces of if,
Finex” with full direr
tions, and don’t accept
anything else, Guar
nnteed to give ah. ditto 'SMwBE
satisfaction <>r money
refunded. The l’inex
Cos., Ft. Wayne, lud.
DINBX
for Coughs
MOTION PICTURES.
GEN. OBREGON
IS INAUGURATED
MEXICAN CHIEF
(Continued From Page One.)
“Can Obregon save Mexico” Is the
question the writer has been asked re
peatedly since his departure from Mexico
City fifteen days ago.
That query can be answered only In
this way:
If Obregon cannot save Mexico then
it is extremely doubtful whether Mexico
has another man who can do evtffi as
well.
Mexico today has the best chance to
“make good” that has presented Itself
In ten years. And, according to one
opinion, voiced south of the Rio Grande
It also Is her last chance.
Obregon Is a forceful character, ag
gressive, a natural leader of men and is
fully cognizant of his country’s prob
lems. Moreover, he has declared on re
peated occasions that he will do all In
his power to promote cooperation with
the United States.
But Obregon's task Is a tremendous
one. It is true that the chief lnternul
problem—pacification of the country—has
been virtually achieved by the six months'
provisional administration of President
de la Huerta. It remains for Obregon,
however, to consolidate the disgruntled
elements, both present and past, and put
them to work.
From a domestic standpoint, Mexico’s
ft RAW, SORE TIOM
Eases Quickly When You
Apply a Little Musterole.
And Musterole won’t blister like
the old-fashioned mustard plaster.
Just spread it on with your fingers.
It penetrates to the sore spot with a
gentle tingle, loosens the congestion
and draws out the soreness and pain.
Musterole is a clean, white oint
ment made with oil of mustard. It j
is fine for quick relief from sore j
throat, bronchitis, tonsilitis, croup, stiff |
neck, asthma, neuralgia, headache, I
congestion, pleurisy, rheumatism, lura- j
bago, pains and aches of the back oi
ioints,sprains,sore muscles,bruises.chil
blains, frosted feet, colds on the chest.
Nothing like Musterole for croupy chil
dren. Keen it hrndv for instant use.
25c and 65c Jars; Hospital Size $3.00
SMS
BEITER mmK
Thousands 1 lave Discovered
Dr. Edwards’ Olive Tablets
area Harmless Substitute
Dr. Edwards’ Olive Tablets—the sub
stitute for calomel—are a mild but sure
laxative, and their effect on the fiver u
almost instantaneous. These little olive
colored tablets are the result of I)r.
Edwards’ determination not to treat
liver and bowel complaints with calomel.
The pleasant little tablets do the
good that calomel does, but have no
Lad after effects. They don’t injure the
teeth like strong liquids or calomel.
They take hold of the trouble and
quickly correct it. Why cure the liver
at the expense of the teeth? Calomel
sometimes plays havoc with the gums.
So do strong liquids. It is best not to
take calomel. Let Dr. Edwards' Olive
Tablets take its place.
Headaches, ‘‘dullness'* and that lazy
feeling corne from constipation and a
disordered liver. Take Dr. Edwards’
Olive Tablets when you fed “logy"and
“heavy.’' they “clear” clouded braia
and “perk up” the spirits. 15c and 30c
rebel situation Is far outahadowed by her
labor problem. In the last few months
strikes have assumed a nationwide char
acter and frequently have been tinged
by a red complexion.
Mexico feels that full prestige cannot
be obtained for her government until
that government has been recognized by
the United States.
It is this recognition that Mexico de
sires most today. The quickest way to
obtain recognition—and Obregon knows
it—ls to begin the translation of prom
ises into actual performances.
New Yorkers to Gej;
26-Mile Ride for Jit
NEW YORK. Dec. I.—John H. De
lancey, transit construction commls
snoner, has announced that operation of
the V’hlte Plains road subway line of
the luterborougb Rapid Transit Com
pany will give a one fare 5-eent ride from
Two Hundred and Forty-First street to
Junius street, Brooklyn, over the new
Livonia avenue extension, a distance of
25.37 miles by the east side subway and
26.19 miles over the west side line.
Dog Shoots Master
YORK, Me., Dec. I.—The caress of a
dog resulted In the killing of Herbert E.
Ware.a hunter, when the dog in play.
Jumped up on him, stepping npon the
trigger of the weapon. A bullet entered
Ware's right eye.
GIVE BOOKS -
There is only one place in which you can find gift j
that will please all of your friends. That is r book
store.
W. K. STEWART CO.
Books, Stationery, Office Outfits
44 E. WASHINGTON ST. INDIANAPOLIS, IND.
RAY LJi
“An Old Fashioned
Mack Sennett Farce
ETHEL CLAYTON
in ‘"Sins of Rosanne”
H. B. Warner in “One Hour Before Dawn”
LARRY SEMON
jMhKftj “THE STAGE HAND”
Three Melody Girl*
SECOND WEEK Cecil 3. De ftliile’s
“Something to 'think About”
GLORIA SWAHSGX
N ' ovv FLAYING
Larry Semon in “The Suitor”
Prices —Mat., 15c, Ssc. Nights, 25c, 40c
AMUSEMENTS.
Riatt© rwfghMßH
ALL THIS WEEK
MUSICAL COMEDY C
BSP (
com
r Ttils Coupon and 10 cents,
Y I Bln |Sf| with 3 cpnts war tax, entitles
BHa i ere I I T?n rn ,u dy to reserved scat in bal-
SlfO Iy 11 _lSi| EJ 3 \ :ony or dress circle at any
i ilu LIU llllulo wed -
Man Drinks Liquor
Evidence, hut Cops
Pinch Him Anyway
The evidence has disappeared and
Roy Willis, 1409% East AVasblngton
street, informs the police he dranlc
It, but this fact did not stop the po
lice from arresting him on the
charge of operating a blind tiger.
When Lientenants Cox and Winkler
searched the Willis apartment on
Nov. 24, they say there were fifty
pints and one quart of home-made
beer there. The police took samples
of this and ordered Willis not to
remove the remainder from the build
ing until he received permission.
The elty chemist reported the
home-made beer contained 3% per
cent “kick.” The two officers went
to the Washington street address to
arrest Willis and get the remainder
of the beer as evidence today. They
got Willis.^
COL. GIGNILLIAT SPEAKS.
Col. Leigh It. Gignilliat, superintendent
n' rviver MtUtirv F"hoo1. addrtssed the
weekly meeting of the Rotary Club at
the Claypool Hotel Tuesday, describing
his trip as commander of the 310 Ameri
can Boy Scouts, who attended the meet
ing of the Boy Scouts of the World last
summer. He spoke complimentary or
Charles W. Moores, Jr., and Nathaniel
Owings, the Indianapolis Scouts who
v ere sent to the conference by tne In
dianapolis Rotary Club.
MOTION PICTURES.
AMUSEMENTS.
MSHLBEitTnp Today, 2:80-8:20 1
Jl-D /%. I Matinee Today I
*• and Saturday |
A. H. WOODS Presents
BARNEY BERNARD
In the New Comedy
H:s Hsissir, Abe Polish
8 ORIGINAL NEW YORK CAST 9
Prices-- -Tonlg ht and Saturday Matl- K
S rue. 50.-, sl. gt 59, $2. Today Matinee, ij
5 30e. 15c,’ sl, $1 60. 2— Box Offices—2. 9
iywaa..-ai.^n—
AL Next Week .R”’
SEATS ON SALE TOMORROW
SHRINE PARTY MONDAY
LH + J ■itHV&tXT
WITH LOVE AND LAUGHTER
EVA LE GALLIENNE and SIDNEY
BLACKMER, and the Original N. Y.
CAST. Eves, and Sat. Mat., 50c
sl, $1.50, $2. Popular Mat. Wed., 50c,
75c, gl, $1.50. 2—Dox Offices—2,
ENGLISH’S^
William Moore Patch Presents
102 l’s Biggest Musical Girilcomedy
“it’s Up to You”
Twin Sister t<* "The Sweetheart
Shop.”
Nights, 60c to 52.5 U; Red. Mat., 50e
to $2. Seats ready.
Thurs.- Fri. - Sat. - Matinee Sat.
Special—Mr. Victor Herbert will
positively conduct the augmented or
chestra opening night.
VICTOR THE GIRL
HERBERT'S IN
MUSICAL THE
COMEDY _
SENSATION SPOTLIGHT
Original ca.Rt and production int&ct,
rh produced by the George W. Led
erer Company.
Price*—Night* 50 c to §2.50; MuL,
.W to S2. Senti Soiling.
AI Week Dec. 6, Mats. Wed. and Sat.
THE GREATEST AND LATEST OF
ALL MUSICAL OFFERINGS
WILLIAM
• lU.bllllil WILLIAM ROCK
onniym and sr of
itUuiv o celebbities
-r nr (IF BEVY 0F 50
t 1 BROADWAY
S\LIUIJS2Oj BEAUTIES
IT’S fi WM£ of a SHOIV
Night, 50c. sl. $1.50, SU, *3.
Mats., 50c to $2.00.
SKATS READY THURSDAY
v. y
WILBUR MACK A CO.
In a Comedy With Song Interpo
lations,
“Two I* Company”
FOSTER A RAE
EVANS A PEREZ
FINK'S MULES—TONEY
The Original Daffy Dfi.
BERT FITZGIBBON
Assisted by His Brother Lew
DONOVAN & LEE
In Their Original Comedy
“Doing Well, Thank You”
ethel McDonough
In
“Milady's Bnsy i l>ay’'
Kinogmms and Digest Topics.
vL ■ - ■
world” RENOWN
ORRIK DAVENPORT TROUP
America’s Foremost Equestrians
DOT MARSELIT and Her
“RAG PICKERS”
6 OTHER
DIVERTISEM ENTS O
Dancing in the Lyric Ballroom
Afternoon and Evening
BROADWAY
CONTINUOUS
VAUDEVELLE
12-3 8 FEATURES-12
No Stops—No Waits
Entertainment Every .Minate
Noon Till U P. M.
Special Bargain Affi&y
Matinee fe-i fa ’l* aa
ALL SEATS ..
Except Sat., Sun. and Holidays.
TRY IT. YOU’LL LIKE IT
whenmlumatST
HITS YOU HARD!
Sloan's Liniment should be kept
handy for aches and pains.
WHY wait for a severe pain, an
ache, a rheumatic twinge follow
ing exposure, a sore muscle,
sciatica, or lumbago to make you quit
work, when you should have Sloan’s
Liniment handy to help curb it and keep
you active, and fit, and on the job?
Without rubbing, for it penetrates,
apply a bit today to tho afflicted part.
Note the gratifying, clean, prompt relief
that follows. Sloan's Liniment couldn’t
keep its many thousands of friends the
world over if it didn’t make good.
That’s worth remembering. All drug
gists—three sizes—the largest Is the
most economical. 35c, 70c, SI.OO. —Adver-
tisement.
Sloans
Liniment

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