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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, December 06, 1920, Last Home Edition, Image 11

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MINE OFFICIALS
SCORE CORNWELL
West Virginia and Alabama
Troubles Considered.
>**
Announcing a plan to carry tbe fight
of the Mingo County coal miners “to a
flnlsh" and criticising th® attitude of
Governor Cornwell of West Virginia, of
ficials of the United Mine Workers of
America have issued a statement declar
ing that the union's international board
has decided unanimously to give the
miners of Mingo County and Alabama
the “full moral and financial assistance
of the international union.” The state
ment declares. In Its criticism of Gov
ernor Cornwell, if he “were true to his
oath of office he would disarm private
detectives," alleged to be employed by i
West Virginia operators.
In discussing the situation of the 411,000
miners and families in Aiahama “In their
wonderful fight for the right to establish
the principle of collective bargaining and
compel recognition by the coal operators
of the award of the United States Bitum
inous Coal Commission," the statement
declared that “intense persecution" has
been leaped upon them by the arrogant
coal operators of the State."
The statement further declares that:
“Eevery conceivable method has been
against them —eviction from their
homes, foreclosure upon their household
and personal effects, false arrests aud im
prisonment. prohibition of tbe right of
assemblage, denial of their statutory and
constitutional rights, unwarranted use of
Stat® troops in the coal fields, denuncla- j
tlon by an unfavorable press and a most
malicious public campaign of misrepre
sentation have all failed to break their
dauntless spirit. It is fndeed question
able whether the people of Armenia,
whose sufferings have shocked the world,
are in any worse circumstances than the
oppressed mine workers of Alabama."
In Mingo Count, West Virginia, the'
declaration points out: “They have waged
a remarkable struggle against overwhelm
ing odds, despite the innumerable out
rages inflicted by the private army of
hired gunmen employed by the coal op- j
erators of that region. Many men have
been shot in cold blood by these modern
Hessians, while in a multiplicity of in
stances others have suffered from brutal
assrultt upon their person without hav
ing redress in the law. The_ Governor of
that commonwealth has utterly failed to
give protection to these citizens and has
displayed his shameful weakness by re
cently calling for the use of Federal
troops in the Mingo County strike field."
Pitched Battle Ends
in Big JSooze Seizure
LEXINGTON. Ky., Dec. 6.—Nine stills j
of fifty to 100-gallon capacity, 0 500 gal
lons of still beer and 100 gallons of moon
shine whisky were seized by Federal )
agents in the raid in the “South America"
in Whitley County Saturday,
a pitched battle between thirty
reputed moonshiners and fourteen pro- ;
hibltiou agents and United States officials.
Six men were captured.
clerk-carrier examination.
An examination of anplicants for post- {
tlons as clerk-carriers in the Indianapo- !
11s postoffice will be held in room 421
Federal Building, Jan. 13. Henry N. |
Trlmpe, secretary of the local examln- j
lng board of the civil service commls- j
sion, announced today. The tests are i
open to men ouly. Complete information ,
can be bad upon application to the civil j
service office.
BASEMENT STORE
The Basement Store
Men’s Furnishings
Goods Department
is meeting the demands of the thousands—who want good tasteful
gifts for him—yet who insist on getting the city’s best values in
these lines!
* Men’s New Percale
Men are buying them for them
selves, women are buying them for
“Everybody’s” happy, including
the maker who took a terrific loss to
get in tune with new conditions.
Sale price 95£
Men’s Silk Bathrobes
Four-in-Hands for Men
Sale Price
SOr $ 5.95
Sold originally at $8.75, more recent
ly at $8.50, on sale Tuesday at this re
markably low figure.
-rrr.j j i j i O n the premise that a pleasing gift
\V lde Open ends, barred and Is one that contributes to comfort and
tacked slip easy bands. Large appeals to one’s sense of the practical,
~ ° these bathrobes will be quickly cleared
range of patterns, stripes, away.
plaids and fancy designs. ThGy Gre °, f attra< - tive blanketings in
. •, , J , scores of colors and patterns, cord at
bpecial values waist and neck. Sale price $5.05
I
The Wm. H. BLOCK CO.
i v . *•; v
JS" a’ •- * ‘V-t -VU sJk’j/f--'-'
TEARS IS THE APPLAUSE ‘MADAME X' RECEIVES
Cannibals Will Never Worry About Dress Reform —Connie Is Naughty
A mother is always a mother.
No matter how low a woman may
sink into a life of sin, her love for her
first born will always hang like a rosary
about her heart.
a That’s the story
unfortunate Jac
quellne Floriot.
q'he role of Jac-
Mlsa Frederick. quellne is rich in
dramatic and emotional possibilities, and
I can safely say here that Miss Frederick
In the big scenes of the mlvle does some
truly wonderful acting.
I think she is at her best in the scenes
leading up to the murder of Baroque, a
j typical "gentleman” of the underworld
; who considers woman his property and
i his meal ticket. At this stage of the
; story, when Jacqueline has become a low,
i wanton ami absinthe-loving degenerate,
who occupies the same room with the
beast Laroqtie, Miss Frederick mount.!
to strong dramatic heights. The thought!
of her son, Raymond, whos she has not
seen for twenty years, causes the real
women in her to react against the black
mail demands of who was con
spiring with some cheap French attor
neys to blackmail Jacqueline’s husband
into making a big cash settlement to pre
vent the exposure of his wife's pitiful
social decline.
In the power of absinthe, she shoot*
and kills Laroque in an attempt to pre
vent her son learning the truth con
cerning his mother This paves the way
to the famous court scene, where Jac
queline's son, unknown to him, defends
his mother of the crime of xmtrder. ThJs
scene is difficult indeed to film, as the
plea, which the son makes to the Jury,
is the big moment of the play. Director
Frank Lloyd has not realized the pos
sibilities of this scene in the movie, but
the really fine work of Miss Frederick
and William Courtlelgb as the son puts
the scene over with BUch a bang that I
doubt If there was a dry eye at the
Ohio yesterday when I taw this picture.
I believe that Miss Frederick has ac
complished the beet work of her career
as this fallen and pitiful Jacqueline. She
is marvelous in the scenes depicting Jac
queline us the absinthe-soaked warton
One may not desire to be too near tarn
p. forlorn creature, but you are bound
to hunt your handkerchief and cry with
the rest of ua.
William Courtleigh is impressive and
satisfactory as tbe hard-hearted Louie
Floriot, who turns his wife out on to the
street* of Paris when he discovers her
in the arms of another man. A really
fine bit of uctlng is done by Lionel Bel
more as the suave blackmailer, M. Rob
ert Parissard.
Here's a tip—take several handker
chiefs to the Ohio his week when you go
to see “Mme. X," because you will need
them.
At the Ohio all week —W. D. H,
-I- -|- -|.
CANNIBAL MOVIE ATTRACT 9
HI'GK CROWDS AT THE ISIS
Yesterday I made several unsuccessful
attempts to get into the Isis to see the
movie, “Shipwrecked Among Cannibals,"
which opened a week’s engagement at
the Isis. The crowds were so large that
| ZEN A KEEFE |
&& Mb
gen BT m
fim snsalfl& t JEns
Si ■
Indianapolis has as her guest today,
Miss Zeno Koefe. the film star, who is
at the Colonial today and Tuesday in
person to meet the movie funs of this
i city. , Her latest picture, “Red Foam,"
• Is on view all week at the Colonial.
Prior to Miss Keefe'u appearance here
in person, tbe Selznlck people sent out a
little article by Miss Keefe called “How
■ I got Into Motion Pictures.”
We saved her story until sh * person
ally visited Indianapolis, and here it is:
I'll make a confession —I was a stage
child. At the age of three 1 was on the
1 stage Impersonating a kewple or some
thing of that nature, and I’ve been on
the stage from that time to this—almost.
Truly, I was a serious child, with
serious ambitions and strong Inclinations
toward tragedy, but my mother saw a
future for me in comedy, so I was sea
! tured In vaudeville. And I was really
greatly humiliated because I had to w.-ar
a funny Ynma Yama costume and sing
1 and dance In vaudeville instead of doing
S “heavy" stuff.
After several yeara In this work, I de
cided that pictures offered a bigger field
for my endeavors. So I went to the
t coast. Thousands of others had gone,
| too, and there weren’t enough star parts
|to go around. Bo I had to take what
I could get at first, which wasn't much.
Finally, I worked up to leudlng roles
when Mr. Selznlck noticed my work.
He offered to make a star of me after giv
ing me a year of training as a subdeb
before making my debut.
So, for n year. I've been watched,
coached and groomed for star roles. I
played opposite Eugene O'Brien and had
leading roles In Ralph Ince productions.
I hope that the result will Justify the
care that has been taken in my stellar
education and that my case will be worthy
of emulation.
I found it necessary to wait until ■ late
show before I was able to get near the
| door of the theater.
: I consider this movie more from sn
! educational standpoint than I do from
i a mere entertainment viewpoint, al
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, MONDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1920.
though I noticed that some of the
strange customs of the savages depicted
in this movie, caused many in the audi
ence to view the picture from a comedy
standpoint.
Edward Laeinmle and William F. Ad
ler were shipwrecked on the island of
New Guinea and while there they took
movies of a strange savage tribe known
as the Kia Kia or head hunters. Al
though many of the savages appear in
as much of nature's attire as decency
would permit, the picture tries to reflect
tbe strange habits of these head hunters.
One gets the idea that the natives would
prefer to dress like Adnin, but their
love for ornaments compels them to deck
, themselves out in some weird “clothes.”
i I think that “Shipwrecked Among Can
nibals" can be considered educational,
Just as the Johnson cannibal niovi-s were
received. Even to this day, the Kia Kia
meu still enjoy the idea of cutting off
. the head of a human being but, of course,
| this desire has been suppressed.
I “Shipwrecked Among Cannibals” is an
1 Interesting Journey to an Island by the
means of the movie camera. Those who
. favor dress reform should see this movie.
| At the Isis all week.—W. D. 11.
-I- -|- -|-
HE WAS MISTAKEN:
BIIF. WAS NOT A VAMP.
The latest contribution to the screen
of Wanda Hawley is named “Her First
Elopement," but it might ns well have
been named "He
hn * k 1 "*" * u ”
I ]p twist vampire
rupt the charms of a
vampire, whose dash
-IJI lng appearance has
Wanda Hawley. quite upset a num
ber of young men of the fashionable set
of the neighborhood. One of the “re
formers” is Adrian Maitland, who de
oldes that the vamp In question shall not
lure his good looking brother into tbe
marriage net, and so the benevolent
brother decides to kidnap the vampire
and take her for a moonlight cruise in
his yacht. He thought, poor dear, that
this would convince his brother what
sort of a woman the vamp really was.
-it the same time that Adrian decides
i to kidnap the vampire, Christina Elilott
decides that the vamp is not "so bad”
nd decides to make a pal of the vsmp
log lady. Adrian, the poor simp, mis
takes the sweet Christina for <he vamp
ing party and of course kidnaps Chris
tina Instead of the vamping lady. Oh,
such a mlx-irp. Happy ending.
"Iler First Elopement" may be found
at the Alhambra today, Tuesday and
Wednesday.
-I- -I- -I
CONNIE TAI-MAI Hi K
TELLS A WHOPPER.
1 have nlwnys had my doubts if vlr
““Up \ THE BASEMENT STORE g§Bl!f
Three Hundred and Forty-Five
DRESSES for Women and Misses
; - \ Notwithstanding the fact that we are moving back our
im 'v \ \ regular assortments to make room for Santa Claus, these
I7uf |\®ttL dresses are such extraordinary values that our buyer
jl {it U could not “pass them up.”
When women see them they will purchase by the
twos and threes. They are suitable for street, for office, for afternoon.
To the dresses we purchased so favorably we have added others from our higher
priced groups that sell regularly all the way to $25.00.
The Materials Are — The Colors Are —
French Serges Tricotines Navy French Blue Black
Velours Jerseys Satins Seal Brown Reindeer
Taffetas, Georgette Crepes, Etc. Fawn Pekin Etc.
There are youthful straightline models —smart coatee effects aud becoming overdrape models. Some are beaded —
fancy braid trims many, and others are embroidered in wool embroidery.
Included are dresses for the mature woman or for her daughter—dresses suitable for street, office or school wear.
$15.00, $18.50, $20.00 and $25.00 dresses. Sale price $9.98
tuous vamps, as they are called on the
screen, romp and play wtih angels and
my doubt is increased after seeing Coil
stance Talmadge vamp very virtuously as
Nancy Fla veil In "Dangerous Business."
A vampire must necessarily possess a
naughty if not a well-behaved eye. In
this movie, Constance as Nancy does not
care for Arthur Braille, who is mamma s
choice as a husband for Nancy. Nancy
does not return the love of the shy Clar
ence Brooks, a most respectable party.
The war comes on and the shy Clar
eiice volunteers and goes to France. The
“exquisite" choice of mamma waits for
the draft and when seized, mamma de
mands that Nancy become the wife of
Braille. Nancy attempts to sidestep do
ing a cakewalk to a wedding march up
tbe aisle with Braille and succeeds only
when she tells an awful fib —that she is
secretly married to the very proper and
shy Clarence.
Poor Clarence knows nothing of
Nancy’s sudden notion and some delicate
situations result when Clarence arrives
back home. Miss Talmadge is able to
handle these “situations” in a cute com
edy manner without bringing a blush to
her checks or to the audience.
’’Dangerous Business" remains on view
at the Circle all week. It reminds one
of the stage play, “Scandal.”
-I- -I- -I
BRADY’S STORY
IS NOW A MOVIE.
Some time ago Cyrus Townsend
Brady wrote a story which he called
“Tbe Isle of Regeneration’’ and in the
printed form It was widely read. The
story has been made into a movie under
the same name with Antonio Moreno
and Edith Storey playing the two leads.
The chief figure is Kate Brenton, who
has a theory that man, regnrdless of
bis position in life, will respect woman.
To prove her theory, she takes a cruise
unchaperoned with a chap named Val
entine Lungford and she *OOll learns
that her theory Is not altogether work
able with Langford around. She es
capes from his yacht In a motor boat
and Is finally cast upou a lonely South
Sea island.
There she finds a white man who has
been shipwrecked on the island, but he
has ceased to be civilized. Ills name is
Charnock and Kate becomes his teacher.
Charnoek'a actions are always that of a
gentleman and Kate Is convinced that
her theory is as good as gold. Os
course Langford and a searching party 1
arrives and Langford tells Charnock
about Kate cruising with him un
chaperoned. Kate runs away when her
cave man believes Langford. The two ]
civilized meu leave the island. Kate is
hidden In a cave and cannot be found,
but Charnock is so much In love with
her that he returns. All is wall.
On view at Mister Smith's all week.
-I- -!- -I
ACTION AND MORE ACTION
IS FOUND IN RUSSELL MOVIE.
Those who enjoy the sight of seeing 0
man with a six shooter nip off the hat
of a man's head without injuring the
party, will be delighted with William
Russell's "The Iron Rider,”, which Is
being shown for the first time In this
citj at the Regent this week.
This movie has plenty of action, as
Russell heads a gang known a* tbe
Iron Riders, who siart out to clean up
things in u Western town. The villain.
of course. Is dressed up like an iron
rider and complicates the pure motives
of the Iron Riders by staging hold-ups
and the like. This gets our friend Rus
sell in many a mix-up. There is gun
play, ropes around men’s necks, a shot
from the distance and the rope Is clipped
In two.
Viola Vale Is the girl In the case over
whom Russell Is “wild.”
“The Iron Rider" is full of action.
It la a Fox picture.
ON THE STAGe! '
1 The Shriners have purchased the Murat
' for the opening of "Not So Long Ago”
I tonight and will give a big theater party.
The Murat will be open to the general
public during the remainder of the wees.
William Rock's Revue of 1920 will open
a week's engagement tonight at Eng
lish’s with an impressive cast.
Valeska Suratt is headlining B. F.
Keith's bill in Juck Lalt’s “Scarlet."
Featured at the Lyric this week is
tbe Rag-O-Marimba Band and the A1
Golem Troupe.
The Park is presenting this week,
"Puss Puss," with Ben Small.
A musical fnree, "Too Many Wives," Is
the feature offering at the Rialto,
The Broadway is presenting a uew bill
of twelve features this week.
GAME PARADISE
FOUND IN NORTH
Canadian Wilds Offer Pioneer
Sport for Hunters.
ANRORA, 111., Dec. 6.—The baby
grizzly bears, one brown bear, one
black bear, three big-horn sheep, six
mountain goats, five caribou and two
moose comprise the bag brought out
of the Mount Robson country in a forty
days' hunting expedition by Morris
Ackerman. Dr. Frank Itomlg, J. Paul
Thompson of Cleveland and Dr. Clar
en'-e F. Hardy of Milwaukee.
The party struck Into the mountains
at Jasper Park on the Grand Trunk Fa
lflee railway with four guides, a cook
and twenty-five pack horses. Their
main camp was in the heart of the
range northeast of Mount Robson. Mr.
Ackerman, who has hunted big game In
many parts of the world, declared the
region was the best big game country
In North America. He reported seeing
300 mountain goats and 125 big horns.
The abundance of game la due to the
overflow from the protected area of
Jasper Park.
Mr. Ackerman had a narrow escape
from death in an encounter with a she
grizzly and two yearling cubs. He
had leveled his rifle at one of the cubs
when tbe mother bear rushed upon him
from the brush ten feet distant. A quick
shot bowled her over dead with one of
her paws six Inches from the doctor’s
feet.
Dr. Hardy with a guide came upon a
big grizzly that had dug himself Into
tbe snow for his winter's hibernation.
The guide wounded the animal. With
a growl of rage the brute charged the
park train, scattering the horses and
making a swipe with bis paw at Dr.
Hardy a* he passed. The bear got away
In the I rnh without being killed.
Dotted Line , (x) and
Indian Wariness Win
for Congresswoman
Oklahoma Suffragist Tells
How She Landed Solid
Vote of Red Men.
VALLEY CITY, N. D., Dec. 6.—Are de
the campaign rivalries have died away,
Miss Alice M. Robertson, Congresswom
an-elect from the Second district of Ok
lahoma. doesn't mind telling how she
won. She won through the Indians’
votes, she said recently, and she won
their ballots by—but ret her tell It.
“When there Indians came Into poses
slon of hundreds of acres of fine lands
through Governmental gifts white meu
were after them to defraud them of
everything possible," said the Congress
woman.
“The Indians were Induced to put thetr
cross (x) on a dotted line on some
pretext only to learn later they had
signed away their land for some paltry
consideration.
“1 told these long-vfferlng Indians that
the League of Nations was of the same
character. I told them foreign nations
asked the United States to sign on the
dotted line without asking for complete
knowledge of the deal. The Indians saw
the point at once. That's the reason
they voted for me and against the League
of Nations."
Miss Robertson is not the only mem
ber of her family who la interested in
politics. Her nephew, James R. Thomp
son of Santa Barbara, Cal., is a Demo
cratic member of the California Legis
lature. Her sister, Mrs. Augusta Moore
of Haskell, Okla., was defeated In the
recent election for county superintendent
of schools. Mrs. Moore is a Republican,
too, and was more interested in the new
Congresswoman's compalgn than her
own.
500 Are to Lose Jobs
SACRAMENTO, Dec. 6.—The Southern
Pacific Company has announced that 500
employes in the local shops will be laid
off Wednesday. Depression in business
was assigned as the reason.
BRIDE MAKES LONG TRIP.
LONDON, Dec. 6. —Lady Astor, who
Hartlepool, County of Durham, England,
to Conway, Is a long trip for a bride
who has never seen the bridegroom, but
Miss Mary Percival made the Journey,
met the bridegroom here and her mar
riage to Edgar A. Park of Conway was
solemnized. Mr. and Mrs. Park left for
a short wedding tour, after which they
will be at home in Conway.
CHILD POISONED nY MISTAKE.
MICHIGAN CITY, Ind , Dec. o.—Ever
ett Brown, 9. ate poisoned salmon set out
for rats, and died in a few hours. His
father is a conductor for the Michigan j
Central Railway.
COUNCIL TO ACT
ON GAS REPORT
Disapproval of Agreement Ex
pected at Session Tonight.
The city council, as a committee of
the whole, will report the ordinance ssk
ing ratification of the contract amending
the franchise of the Citizens Gas Com
pany out of committee tonight. There
are strong indications that the report
will be unfavorable and that the conneil’s
final action will be to refuse to approve
the agreement.
The agreement binds the ga’s company
to make $1,000,000 worth of specified im
provements by Dec. 31, 1921, and provide
that gas shall be rationed so as to give
cook stoves preference during times of
shortage until next June.
influential members of the council hare
stated that they are not convinced that
the amendments are necessary and that
they fear they may be used as a loop
hole through which the gas company may
seek higher rates. Some councilmen are
insisting that the board of public works
enforce the present provisions of the
franchise, requiring gas of 000 British
thermal unit quality, before seeking to
change that instrument. The overage
quality in the month of October, the last
on which a report has been made public,
was only 547.
The councilmen say that amendments
are not necessary for the reason that
J. D. Forrest, secretary and general
manager of the company, publicly stated
some time ago that the Improvement pro- ,
gram would be pushed through regard
less of what the council did about the
changes.
Human Elbow Joint
Forms Handle for
Man's Walking Stick
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., Dec. 6.
it’s a perfectly good walking stick,
Lieut. H. P. Peck, U. S. A., Just back
from the Philippines, will relegate it to
his curio collection Instead of carrying
It dally.
The cane Is a magnificent piece of ma
hogany. It’s the handle that worries
Peck. It is made of a portion of the
elbow joint of a human arm.
“The elbow Joint which forms the
top of the cane," said Lieutenant Peck,
"is a portion of the urper left arm of a
religious zealot or crazy hermit. It is
a tribal custom of these men, when they
have worked themselves into a fananical
.att; bordering on madness to set forth
from home armed with barangs, or na
tive knives, and slay every man, woman
and child in their paths.
“The datto who gave me the cane de
fended himself against the attack of one
of these mad priests and killed him in
the ensuing combat. Asa token of
friendship he tendered me the cane on
which he had mounted a portion of his
victim's left arm. . v
"The cane Is supposed to ward off
evil spirits, but for an ordinary walk
ing stick I would prefer to have one
with a less grewsome handle attached
to It." said Peck.
11

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