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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, December 21, 1920, Last Home Edition, Image 12

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12
STOCKS CONTINUE
UNDER PRESSURE
Many Issues Touch New Low
Levels for the Year.
NEW YORK, Dec. 21.—The stock mar
ket continued under pressure at the
opening today, losses ranging from frac
tions to over 1 point being sustained.
Many issues sold down to new low marks
lor the year.
Anaconda continued in supply, declin
ing 1% to anew low for the year of
30%
Steel common got down to its pre
vious low of 78%.
Crucible yielded 1 point to 70% and
Baldwin Locomotive fell to 85%.
Mexican Petroleum again had the widest
range and after dropping 1% to 156%.
advanced to 158%.
Cuban-American Sugar responded to
the favorable statements published yes
terday, advancing 2% to 24, from which
it reacted to 23.
Houston Oil. after selling up to 5.,
dropped to 55%.
American Car and Foundry dropped 1%
to 116% - ,
After the early recessions the market
showed improvement. Steel common ral
lied to 78V. Houston Oil to 57%.
Republic Steel, after selling off to 5i
tame back to above 58. The rails held
firm and showed little change.
The copper issues featured the mar
ket during the forenoon, nearly all of
these Issues selling down at new lows for
the year. _ „
Anaconda dropped 1%, to 30%, the sell
ing based on current discussions about
dividend prospects. _ , _ lt
American Smelting & Rellnlng fell 3%,
to 35. Utah Copper yielded over 2 points,
*°The*stel industrials after holding firm
for a jrood part of the first hour, turned
Baldwin declined from 86% to 85%.
Bethlehem Steel preferred dropped
nearly l point to 49%, anew low for
the year.
Steel common rose to 78% and then re
acted to 78%. . ,
Motor stocks also showed substantial
declines. Chandler falling over 2 points,
to 65%. , „ . ..
Goodrich Rubber dropped 2 points to
anew low of 28%.
OU stocks were irregular.
A violent decline of IS points in Rep
logle Steel to 51 unsettled the Industrial
list during the ca:ly afternoon, many is
sues gettinir down to new low marks.
Vanadium Steel sold off over 6 points
to c new low mark for the year of 20
Coca Cola dropped 2 points to 18.
Steel common yielded to 78%.
Baldwin broke 3 points from the high
to anew low for Th** year of 83.
Mexican Petroleum, after advancing to
159. dropped to 157%. and Royal Dutch
moved un 1% to 56%.
Houston Oil made a sharp upturn
to 64
(By Thomson & McKinnon.)
—Dec. 20—
The earlv trading today gave some in
dication of a ' hange In the marker sen
timent. Commission houses were the
buyers of some stocks, and while the
volume was moderate, the fact that sell
ing from this source h.a diminished to
a verv material extent, is significant of
a more favorable public sentiment.
For a long time we have had to con
tend with an enormous volume of stocks
that were dally offered in the market,
with the resultant shrinkage in values
With offerings now diminished it would
indicate that either liquidation has been
nearly completed or that a more opti
mistic feeling is developing as to the
prospect of business for the coming year
Later In the day there was renewed
pressure on the market, but it was not
general. t>e!ng confined to a limited num
ber of issues, and was credited to pro
fessional interests, and as likely as not
increas.ng the extent of the short Interest
creating a stronger technical situation,
which wt.l become m. nifest whenever we
shall be favored with some encouraging
news from trade circles.
Financially, we are passing through a
very strained banking aituatlon In a most
creditable way and we have every reason
to expect more normal money markets
this coming year. At the present time
there is nothing that we could point to
as an Incentive for bullish market oper
ations, but we are of the op nlon thi
we are now passing through the last hour
of housecleanltig and we expect from now
on an increasing demand from Invest
ment.
CLEARING HOUSE STATEMENT.
NEW YORK, Dec. 21.—Clearing bouse
statement Exchanges, $956.613 613; bal
ances, $74.712,049; Federal Reserve Bank
credit balances, $64,001,114.
Money and Exchange
Indianapolis bank clearings today wore
$2,593,000. against $3,054,009 a week ago.
NEW YORK, Dec. 21—Foreign ex
change opened higher today. Sterling
demand was quoted at $3.53%; franca.
,0595; lire. .0345; marks. .0138; Canadian
dollars, .8425.
NEW YORK CALL MONEY.
NEW YORK. Dec. 20— Money—Call
money ruled 7 per cent; nigh, 7 per cent;
low. 7 per cent. Time rates steady, ail
7%@7% per cent. Time mercantile paper
steady. Sterling exchange was steady,
with business in bankers' bills at $5.50
for demand.
MOTOR SfECURITIES.
(By Thomson A McKinnon.)
Dec. 20—
—Opening—
Bid. Ask.
Briscoe 7 9%
Chalmers com 1 1%
Packard com HVr 12%
Packard pfd ”0 79%
Chevrolet .. ‘*o'*
Peerless ,22 22%
Cont. Motors com 0% 7%
Con Moto s pfd 93 9.>Vh
Hupp com 11 13
Hupp pfd 8b 8*
Rea Motor Car -1 24%
Klein -V tors 5 6
Grant Motors ; 2%
Ford of Canada '205 268
United Motors 50 40
National Motors 6 10
' Federal Truck 20 22
Paige Motors 17 18
Republic Truck 27 30
ACTIVE Oil. STOCKS.
(By Thomson A. McKinnon*
—Pec. 21—
Opening—
Bid. Ask.
Anglo-American Oil 17% is
Atlantic Refining 990 1079
Borne-Scrymscr 4> 425
Buckeye I’ipe l.ine Si S3
Ches brough Mfg. Con. . .*.. ISO 200
Chesi-tirough. Mfg. Cons, pfd. 97 100
ContlnentHl Oil, Colo 105 110
Coaden Oil and Ras 5% 5%
Crescent Pipe l.ine 27 29
Cumberland Pipe Line 120 150
Elk Basin Pete 8 8%
Eureka I'ipe Line 85 95
Gal-na-Slenal Oil, pfd 95 100
Galena-Signal Oil, com 44 . 40
Illinois Pipe Line 150 155
Indiana Pipe Line S3 85
Merritt Oil 11 11%
Midwest Oil 1 lVi
Midwest Hfg 141 143
National Transit 23 25
New York Transit 158 162
Northern Pipe Line '.*> 95
Ohio Oil , 280 285
P. A R : 4%, 4%
Osage Hominy 1-16 %
Penn.-Mex 35 37
Pra.rie Oil and Gas 450 400
Prairie Pipe Line 19 11 195
Sapulpa Refg 4*)* 4%
Solar Refining . 350 370
Southern Pipe Line 98 100
South Penn. Oil 235 245
Southwest Penn. Pine Lines 57 (JO
Standard Oil Cos. of Cnl 308 312
Standard OU Cos. cf Ind. ... 66 6.8
Standard Oil Cos. of Kan. ... 590 (UK)
Standard Oil Cos. of Kj. ... 410 410
Standard Oil Cos. of Neb. ... 4'S) 420
Standard Oil Cos. pf N. Y. ... 320 32*.
Standard Oil Cos. of 0hi0... 400 418
Swan & Finch 45 60
Union Tank Line 100 104
Vacuum Oil 285 2!>o
Washington 01l 30 35
NEW YORK METAL MARKET.
NEW YORK, Dec. 21—Copper-Weak ;
spot, 12%@14c; December, 12%©13%c:
January, February and March offered. 1
14C. Lead—Dull; spot, December and
January offered, 440 c. Spelter—Steady ;
spot, December, January, February and
March, 5.60@55c.
N. Y. Stock Prices
—Dec. 20— Prev.
High. Low. Close. Close.
Adr. Rum. com. 14% 14% 14% 15
Ajax Rubber... 25% 25 23
Allis-Uhalnters.. 29 28% 25% 25%
•Am. Argicultur. 55% 54% 54% 55%
Am. Beet Sugar 37% 35 ' 36% 38
Am. Bosch Mag. 54% 53 53 55
Am. Car A Fdy.119% 117 117% 120%
Amu. Can 23 22 22% 22%
Am. H & L com. 6% 6% 8% 6%
Am. H& L pfd. 37% 36 36 36%
Amn. Drug 7% 7 7 7
Am. Inter Corp. 35 32% 32% 35%
Am. Linseed... 48% 48% 48%
Am. Loco 78% 77% 77% 79
Am. Smt. & Kef. 30% 38% 38% 39%
Am. Sugar Ref. 84 82% 83% 83%
Am. Sum. Tob.. 68% 67% 67% 68
Am. S. Fdry 29 28% 29 28%
•Am. Tel & Tel.. 96 95% 95% 98
Am. Tobacco ..110% 110% 110% 111
Am. W001en.... 61% 60% 60% 01 %
Am. Z. A Lead.. 6% 6 6 0%
Ana. Min. C 0... 35 32 32 35
Atchison 79% 78% 78% 79
At.G. A W. 1... 104% 102% 103% 103%
Baldwin Loco.t 86% 85% 85% 86%
B. A 0 31% 31% 31% 31%
Beth. Steel (B) 51% 50% 50% 51%
Brook. R. T ... 9% 3% 9% 9%
Can. Pae. 11y..112% 111% 111% 112
Cent. Leather... 35% 33 33 35
•Chand. Motors.. 69% 08% 68% 72%
C. 4 0 54% 53% 54 54%
C., M. & St. I*. 25% 24% 25% 25%
C..M. & St.P.pfd 40 38 38% 38V*
Chi. 4 N. W... 66 61% 64% 66%
C., R. I. A Pac. 25 24 24 24%
C.K.l.AP.epcpftl 56% 56% 56% 56
C. &P.7pcpfd 06% 66 66 06
Chili Copper 8% 8% 8% 8%
Chino Copper .. 18% 17% 17% 18
Coca Cola 20% 20 20 20
Col. Fuel A Iron 25% 25 25% 25
Columbia Gas .. 54% 54 54V* ....
Coluinbi 1 Graph 10% 10% 10% 10%
Con. Gas 11 % 75% 75% 77%
Con. Can 58% 58% 58% 61
Con. Cndv Cos.. 5% 4% 4% 5%
Corn Products .65 63% 64% 04
Crucible Steel .82 79 % 80% 81%
Cuban Am. Su.. 25 23% 23% 20
Del. 4 Hudson . 94% 93% 94% 94
D. A R. (}., pfd. 1% 1% 1% 1%
Erie 12% 12 12 12%
Erie Ist. pfd,... 18% 17% 17% 17%
Famous Players 43 4040% 43%
Fisk Rubber Cos. 10% 10% 10% 10%
Gen. Asphalt .. 41% 39% 40% 40%
Gen. Cigars 53 53 53
Gen. Electric... 118% 118% 118% 118%
Gen. Motors .... 13% 12% 13% 13
Goodrich 32% 30% 30% 32%
Gt. North, pfd.. 72% 71% 71% 72
Gt. North. Ore.. 26% 25% 25% 25%
Gulf States Stl.. 29% 29% 29>4 30
Houston Oil 6*5 56% 56% 67%
Illinois Cent 83% 83 83 % 83
Inspiration Cop. 29% 28 28% 29%
Interboro Corp. 3% 3% 3% 3%
Int. Harvester.. 95% 94% 94% 95
Int i Nickel 12% 12% 12% 12%
Inter. Paper 56% 43 43% 47%
Invincible 0i1... 21% 21% 21%
Kan City 50... 17% 16% 16% 16%
Kelly-Spring. .. 33% 33% 33% 33
Kennecott Cop.. 17 16% 16% 16%
Lackwana Steel.4B% 47 47% 47%
Lehigh Valley .52 50% 50% 52
Loews, Inc 16% 16 16% 16%
L. A N 97 97 97 97%
Marine Com 13% 13 13% 11%
Marine pfd 48% 47% 47% 48
Max. Mot. com. 2% 2% 2%
Mex. Petrol... 159% 155% 157% 157%
Miami Copper.. 15% 15 15 15%
Middle St. OU.. 12 11% 11% 11%
Midvale Steel.. 30% 29%/ 30 30%
M. K. A T 32% 2% 3%
Mis Pac. Ry... 17 16% 16% 16%
Nat. Enin. A St. 46 45% 45% 46%
Nat. Lad 67 66 % 67 67%
Nev. Con. Cop.. 8% 8% 8% 8%
N. Y. Air 8k... SI 81 81 81
N. Y. Central.. 69% 68 68% 67%
New .Haven.... 19% 16 16% 15%
Nor A West... sal 95% 05% 95A
Nor. Pacific. . 75% 74% 74% 75%
Ok. Prd. & ltef. 3% 3% 3% 3%
Pacific OU 38% 38% 38% 38%
Pan-Am. Petrol. 75% 74% 74% 75
Penn. Ry / 39% 39% 39% 39%
People's Gas.. 32 28 31 32%
Pierce-Arrow... 19 18% 18% 19%
Pierce Oil Cos.. 10% 10% 10% 10%
Pittsburgh Coal 66% 55% 55% 56%
Pressed Stl. Car 78 77% 78 78
Pullman Pi. Cr. 98% 95% 96% 98%
Pure Oil 32% 32 32 % 32%
Ky Stl. Springs. 78% 78% 78% 79%
Reading 81% 80% 80% 80%
Rep. I. A Stel. 58% 56% 57% 57%
Replogle Steel. 69% 69 69
Ry Dut.ofN.Y... 55% 54 54 55%
Sears-Roebuck. 88% 87% 87% 88%
Sinclair 23% 22% 22% 23%
Southern Pac. . 96% 95% 05% 96%
Southern lty. .. 20% 19% 19% 19%
Stand. Oil, N. J.. 600% 600 600 001
S. LAS. F. com. 19% 18% 19 18%
•Strom. Carb.... 26% 26 26 28
Studebaker .... 40% 39% 39% 39%
Tenn. Cop 7% 7 7 7%
Texas Cos 42% 41% 41% 41%
Texas * Pac. .. 17% 16% 16% 17
Tob. Products .51 50 50% 50%
Trans. OU 6% 6% 6% 6%
Union OU 21 20% 30% 20%
Union Pac 114% 113% 113% 114%
Utd. Rtl. Stores 52% 51% 51% 51%
rS F P Cor... 17 15% 16% 17%
•United Fruit.. IN)% 189% 189% 195
F S ind Alcohol 02% 60% 60% 63
U S Rubber ... 61% 60% 61 01%
V S Steel 78% 79*s 78** 78%
U S Steel pfd.. 105% 105 105 103%
Utah Copper .. 47% 47% 47% 47%
Vana Steel 37 35 % 35% 37
Vir-Car Cbem .. 30 28% 28% 30%
Wabash 7% 7% 7% 7%
Wah Ist pfd .. 19 1.8% 18% 19
W Maryland .. 10% 9% 10 9%
•West Union .. 80% 80% 80% 82%
West Elec .... 41% 40% 40% 41%
White Motors . 33% 32% 33 34
Willys Over ... 5% 5% 5% 5%
Wll ACo 38% 38 38 37%
Worth Pump .. 39% 37 39 % 38
•F.x Dlv.
NEW YORK LIBERTY BONDS.
—Dec 20-
Iligh. Low. Close. Close.
Liberty 3%s 90.10 .89.86 89.90 89 9*l
Libertv 2d 4s 81.56
Liberty Ist 4%s 85 22 84.90 85 00 85.52
iberty 2d 4%5... 84 00 83 00 83 10 84.60
Iber v 3*l l%s .. 89.20 85 *s*l 85 60 .87.20
ihertv 4th 4%5.. 85 20. 83.80 83.80 85.12
Victory 354* . .. 95 04 94.91 91 94 95*10
Victory 4% a 95.06 94.96 94.90 95 00
TWENTY STOCKS AVERAGE.
NEW YORK, Dec. 21—Twenty In.i s
trial flocks averaged <58.52, down I*l3
per cent. Twenty active rails averaged
71.36. down .47 per cent.
NEW VOKK CCRB.
*By T homson & McKinnon)
Dec. 20—
—Closing—
Bid. Ask.
Curtis Aero, c0m.... 1 3
1 , f ’<s '.fro. pfd 10 , 20
Texas Chief 6 12
l-'irsi \ t Copper.. % 1
Goldfield Con .... 5
ifnvuiin tobacco .. 1 1%
Havana Tobacco pfd 3% 7
.Tiinil'i, Extension .. 15 18
Inter Petroleum .. 15% 1(1%
N. pissli; g 1 *%
Indian Pkg. 3% 3%
Royal ltak Pow lift 120
'Koval Bak. Pow pfd 78 S2
Salt Creek 25 27
Tonopah Extension. 15-16 17-10
United P 8 new 1% 1%
U. S. Light A Heat. 1 1%
V 8. Light AH. pf. 1 3
Wright-Mattin ..... 4 6
World Film % %
Yukon Gold Mine... 1 1%
New Cornelia 14 16
Sequoyah ........... 3-16 %
Omar Oil 2% 2%
Republic Tire 1% 1%
CHICAGO STOCKS.
(By Thomson & McKinnon.)
—Dec. 21 —
Open. High. Low. Close.
Carl), and Carb. 49% 48% 48% 48%
Cudahy Packing 57 57 56 56
I.ibby 11 11% 11 11%
Montgry.-Ward. 14 14 13% 13%
Natl Leather... 8 7% 7%
Stewart Warner 26% 26>4 25% 26%
Swift A Cos 109 103 99% 99%
Swift Internati. 25% 25% 25% 25%
Armour Leather 12%
Armour pfd... 81% 81% 80 80
Iteo Motors 17%
WHOLESALE PRODUCE.
Eggs—Fresh, loss off, 66c.
Poultry—Fowls, 19(0.24*;; springers,
23c; cocks. 15c; old tom turkeys, 35c;
young tom turkeys, 12 lbs and up, 350;
young hen turkeys, 8 lbs and up, 40**;
cull, thin turkeys not wanted; ducks, 4
lbs and up. 25e; ducks, under 4 lbs, 20c;
geese, 10 lbs and up, 20c; squabs, 11 lbs
to <lnz. $6; guineas. 2-lb sizei per doz, SO.
Rabbits—Drawn, per doz, $2.25
Butter—Buyers are paying -IOTrSOc for
creamery butter delivered at Indianapo
lis
Bstterfat— Buyers are paying 46c for
cream delivered at Indianapolis.
CATTLE PRICES
UP 25 TO 75 CTS.
Hog Market Steady 'to 25
Cents Lower—Calves Higher.
RANGE OF HOG PRICES.
Good Good Good
Dec. Mixpd. Heavy. Light.
15. 19.15® 9.25 I).00® 9.25 19.26® 9.35
16. 9.25<® 9.35 9.00 9.40® 9.73
17. 9.25® 9.35 9.00 9.35® 9.50
IS. 9.25® 9.35 9.00® 9.25 [email protected]
20. 9.25® 9.50 9.00® 9.15 9.65®10.00
21. 9*25® 9.50 9 00® 9.23 9.60® 9.75
Hog prices opeued about steady to 25
cents lower than the start of the Monday
market todtv*. with heavy t hogs about
steady, and lights, pigs and roughs 25
cents lower.
Good light”' hogs brought [email protected],
with one loud o'? fancy lights at'slo. which
was really not in the market.
Heavy hogs were a shade strong in
some instances gt [email protected]. while medium
hogs held about steady at [email protected].
Pigs generally brought $9.75010, and
roughs, S7.SO@S.
The bulk of sales ran $9<<59.65.
Receipts for the •flay were again fairly
light at 10.000 at an early hour, and with
an estimate of aroujid 12,000 for the to
tal receipts for the Any. There were less
than TOO stale hugs left over from the
Monday market.
Demand was good, both by shippers
with Eastern house connections, and lo
cal pnekers. It was estimated that about
half the receipts would be taken by local
packers. Kingan A Cos. bought around
3,000 hogs during the early hours of the
market.
There was a good tone to trading on
the cattle nfarket, with prices strong to
75 cents higher on some good light hell
ers. Steers, tanners, cutters and butcher
stock was fully 25 Cents higher.
Light receipts and a good demand by
packers was the reasons contributed for
the better tone of the market.
Some commission men are of the opin
ion that good cattle will be fully $2 a
nvt. higher within the next thirty days.
They claim that the cold weather will
create a better demand for meat and the
packers in turn will buy and pay more
for the stuff on foot.
Receipts for the day were around 400
fresh cattle and some stale stuff lu the
pens left over from the Monday tnarkei.
Prtces on the calf market were fully
strong to 50 cents higher On practically
all grades, due to a good demand by
buyers with connection with Eastern
markets, where there will be a good de
mand for the over Christmas trade.
Choice veals generally brought $12.50®
13.50, with a considerable number of sales
at the top, of sll Good veals generally
brought $10011.50.
There were less than 400 calves on the
market. ■
With around 150 sheep and lambs on
the market, sheen were steady and lambs
fully $1 lower. The high prices of lambs
Monday was due to the Western fancy
fed stuff that came on the market.
HOGS.
Best light hogs, 100 to 200 lbs
average 0.50® 0.*5
200 to 300 lbs average 9.00® 0.25
Over 300 lbs 8.50® 0.00
S ()Wg 7.50(3 8.00
Best pigs under 140 lbs 9.75®10.00
Bulk of sales 9.00® 0.60
CATTLE.
Prime eornfed steers, 1,300 lbs.
and up 10.00012.30
Good to choice steers, 1,200 to
1.300 lbs. 0.0001050
Good to choice steers. 1,100 to
1,200 lbs S.oo® 9.50
Medium steers, 1,000 to 1,100
lbs. 7.50® BAO
Common to medium steers,
800 to 1,000 lbs 6.500 7.50
—Heifers and Cows—
Good to choice heifers 7.75010.00
Medium heifers 6.000 7.25
Common to medium heifers. 4.00® 8.10
Good to choice cows . s..V>® 7.00
Fair to medium cows 4.50® 5.50
Cutters 4.00® 4.25
Canners 3.25® 3.50
—Bulla— %
Good to choice butcher bulls. 5.50® 7.00
Bologna bulls 4 50® 5.75
Llghf common bulls 3.75® 4.73
—Calves—
Choice reals 12.50013.50
Good veals lu 00011.50
Light weight veals 7. 90® 8.00
Medium 'eals 9.00a 10.00
Heavyweight calves 7.500 8.50
Common heavyweight calves 4.00® 6.50
—Stockers and Feeders
Good to choice steers, 800 lbs.
and up B.oo® 9.50
Good to choice steers, under
800 lbs 7.00® 8.0.1
Medium cows 4.50® 5.00
Good cows s,i JO® 5.00
Good heifers 5.500 600
Medium to good heifers 5 00® 6 o<*
Good m>lkera 8 0095.00
Stock calves, 250 to 450 lbs... 5.00® 8.00
SHEEP AND LAMBS.
Good to choice sheep 60 0 6.59
Fair to common 2.60® 2.50
Buck 2.50® 3 00
Cull sheep I.oo® 1.50
Lambs—
Common to choice yearlings. . 5.50® 6.00
Spring lambs 8.50® 9.-'<o
Other Live Stock
i CHICAGO, Dec 21. Hogs Receipt*
' 15.000. market 10'<il5c up; bulk. $9 10®
9.25; butcher*. $9% 9.25; packers. ss..ss®
9 90; light*. $9150 9 50; pigs, $9 1009.50;
roughs, $8.7508.85. Cattle Receipts,
10 000; market 50c up; beeves, $7014.50;
; butchers. $4.50010.25; cHiiners and cut
ters. $2.7505; etocker* and feeder*. $4 23
®.i. cows, $4.2508.85; calves. SBOIO.
Sheep- Receipts, 12 000: market 25c up.
lambs, $95; 11; ewes, $15004.50
CLEVELAND, Dec. 21 Hogs Ke
eluts 2500: market active; yorkers,
$9.90; mixed, $9 90; medium, $9 9J: pigs.
s3o; roughs. $7.75: stags, $6. Cattle
Re eipts. 250. market slow, sheep und
lambs- Receipts. 1,000; market steady:
top, $10.25. Calves Receipts, 250, mar
ket $l up, top, SIC.
CINCINNATI. Dec. 21. Hogs Re
ceipts, 6,00), market steady to 2.V lower;
■heavies. $9®9,..0; mediums an i mixed,
$9 500.1.75; lights na! p.gs $10; roughs
$7 75®8; s:-gs, $0 50. uttk* Receipts,
250; market slow and steady; bulls slow;
. calves. sl4. Slicop and lambs —Receipt*,
! 350; market steady; sheep, $1.5004.50;
! Inin In • < @11.50
EAST ST. LOUIS, Dec. 21 Cattle
! Receipts. 3,:O0: market steady: native
beef steers, s9f</11.25; yearling beef
! steers and heifer.*, $11012; cows. $607;
stokers still leaders. s4®6; calves, spj.3o
id 11.50; caiiD-rs and cutters, $304.
; llogs—Receipts, 10.03 V; market .V to 10c
! higher; mixed and butchers, #9.1009.40;
! good heavies, S9O 9 25; tough henvles,
$7,750.8; lights, $9 3009.50; pigs, $9 23®
0.65; bulk of sales. $9.1009.35. Sheep
: Receipt*, 1,700; market steady; e\'cs,
$404.50; lambs, $lO 500 11.50; canners
iiinil cutters, $1.500.;.50.
PITTSBURGH. Dec. 21.—Cattle Re
! celpts fair; tnnikot lower; choice, $10.50
@ll : good. $9,500,10; fair, $8.50@; veal
calves. $14.50015. Sheep and lambs -Re
ceipts fair; market slow; prime wethers,
$5.5006; good, $4.5005 25; mixed fair,
$404.50; spring lambs, $10.500111. Hogs
—Receipts, 15 doubles; market higher;
prime heavies, #[email protected]; medium, heavy
yorkers. $10.25010 50; light yorkers. $10.40
0,10.50; pigs. $10.40® 10.50; roughs, $8.50®
8.75; stags. $606.50.
EAST HI FFALO, Dec. 21.—Cuttle—Re
ceipts, 275; market, slow, steady; ship
ping steers, $11.25013; butcher grades,
$7011: cows, $207.50. Calves— Receipts,
4(H); market, fairly active, steady: culls,
choice, $5015.50. Sheep and lambs Re
ceipts, 8.600; market, fairly active; choice
lambs, $10.50010.75; culls, fair, $609.75;
yearlings, $708.50; sheep, $205.50. Hogs
—Receipts. 3,200: market, active, 2507rs*
up; Yorkers, $10.50010.75; pigs. $10,750
11; mixed, $10014.25: heavies, $10;
roughs, $808.25; stags, $5.5007.
CHICAGO PRODUCTS MARKET.
CHICAGO, Dec. 21.—Butter- Creamery
extras, 52c; creamery firsts, 44%c; firsts,
38048 c; seconds, 33034 c. Eggs—Ordina
ries, 550 59c; firsts, 630 64c. Cheese-
Twins, 19%r Live poultry—Fowls, 230!
25c; ducks, 28c; geese, 26c; spring chick- I
ens, 25c: turkeys, 40c; roosters, 180. Po
tatoes—Receipts, 33 cars; Wisconsin and!
Minnesota, $1.4501.00.
WHOLESALE BEEF PRICES.
The following are today’s wholesale
market prices for beef cuts ns sold by
the Indianapolis markets (quotations by
Swift & Cos.):
Ribs—No. 2,35 c; No. .3.20 c. Loin*— j
No. 2,22 c; No. 8,17 c. Rounds—No. 3, j
24c: No. 3,17 c. Chucks—No. 2,15 c; No.
. 13c. Plate*—No. 2. 14c; No. I, 12c.
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1920.
Local Stock Exchange
—Dec. 20—
STOCKS.
Bid. Ask.
Indiana Rail. A Light, com. 60
Indiana Rail. A Light, pfd. 84
ludpls. A Northwest, pfd 75
Indpls. A Southeastern, pfd. ... 75
Jndpls. Street Railway..., 56
Terre Haute T. A L., pfd
T. H., I. A E. com 1% 6
T. H„ I. A E. pfd 9 12
Union Trae. of Ind., com
Union Trac. of Ind. Ist pfd. ... 14
Union Trac. of Ind., 2d pfd. ... 2
Advance Runiel.v Cos., com
Advance Rumely Cos., pfd
Ainer. Central Life 235
Am. Creosotlng Cos., pfd... 90
Belt R. R., com 63 70
Belt It. R., pfd 45
Century Bldg., Cos., pfd... 90
Cities Service Cos., com ...
Cities Service Cos., pfd
Citizens Gas Cos 31 34
Dodge Man. Cos., pfd 94% ...
Home Brewing 55 ...
Ind. Hotel, com 61
Ind. Hotel, pfd 90
Ind. National Life Ins. Cos.. 4% ...
Ind. Title Guaranty 59 60
Indiana Pipe Line Cos 81% ...
Indpls Abattoir, pfd ...
ludpls. Gas 43 50
Indpls. Tei. Cos., com 5 ...
Indpls. Tel. Cos., pfd 88 ...
Mer. Pub, Util. Cos., pfd... 35
Natl. Motor Car Cos 9%
Public Savings Ins. C 0.... 2% ...
Kauh Fertilizer, pfd 40 ...
Standard Oil Cos. of Ind 655
Sterling Fire Ins. Cos 8 ...
Van Camp Hdw., pfd 93
Van Camp Packing, pfd... 94 ...
Van Camp Prods., Ist pfd. 93 ...
Van Camp Prods., 2d pfd.. 93
Vandalla Coal Cos., com 5
Vandalla Coal Cos., pfd 10
Wabash Ry. Cos., pfd 17% ...
Wabash Ry. Cos., com 6% ...
BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES.
Aetna Trust Cos 104
Bankers Trust Cos 118
Bankers Trust Cos 118
Con mereial National Bank.. 65
Continental National Bank... 112 125
Farmers Trust Cos 200
FlJelity Trust Cos 120
Fletcher Amer. Natl. Bank... 250
Fletcher Sav. & Trust C 0.... 163 ...
Indiana Natl. Bunk 265
Indiana Trust Cos 175 190
Lite Stock Txchange Bank
Mer. Natl Bank 280
National City Bank 112 ...
People's State Rank 187 ...
Security Trust Cos 120 ...
State Sav A Trust 93
Union Trust Cos 340
Wash. Bank A Trust 150
BONDS.
Bread Rip ole 5* 60
Indpls. St. Ry. 4s 70% 73%
Ind. Coke A Gas Cos 84
Indian Creek Coal A Min 6a 95
Indpls.. Col. A Sou. 5* 88
Indpls. A Greenfield 5* 95
Indpls. A Martinsville 5s 57
Inf pis. A North. 5s 40 46
Indpls. A Northwest 5s 50 57
Indpls. A Southeastern 45
ludpls., Shelbyv. A 8. E. 5s 70
Indpls. St Ky< 4s 59 65
Indpls. Trnc. A Ter 5s 70 76
Kokomo. Marion A West. 55.. 80 84
T. H . I . & E. 5* 46
Un. Trac. of Ind 6s 62 55
Citizens Gas 5s 73 78%
Ind. Hotel Cos. 2d 6s 90
Indpls. Gas 5e 71
Indpls. I. A H 5s 75
Indpls. Water 5s 87% 92
Indpls. Water 4%s 70 75
Mer. H. A L Ref. 5s 85 90
New Tel first 6s 64
New Tel. I. Dlst. 5s 93% ...
Bou. Ind. Power 85.....> 86
LIBERTY BONDS.
Liberty first 3%* 89 90 90 20
Liberty second 4s 84.40
Liberty first 4%* 85 20 85 60
Liberty second 4%s 84 4 6 84.70
Liberty third 4% 87 0* 87.30
i Jjerty fourth 4%* 85.00
Victory 3% 95 00 90.30
Victory 4%s 96.06 i
—Bales—
sl,ooo Southern Indiana Power 6t at 86.
On Commission Row
TODAVS PKICEtL
Apples—Missouri Jonathans, per bbl ,
$9; fancy iilluois Jonathans, per bbl.,
$8; extra fancy Grimes Golden, per bbl,
s6'ti9, extra fancy Wine Saps, per bbl.,
$9; Bell Mowers, per uoi.. $6 50; Bild
wins, per bbl,, $5 sb; Spys, per bbl.. $;
Home Beauty, per bbl, $8; Kiunard iled,
per bbl,, s6©B; King,* per bbl., $6; Wolf
Rivers, per bbl., $5; None Such, per bbl.,
$5; Maiden Blush, per bbl.. *4>V); Green
ings, per bbl., $6; Choice Jonathans, per
bbl . $6
Almonds —Extra fancy grades in all
brand*, per pound. 22©32c.
Beans Michigan Navy ;n bags, per lb.,
f s'<lic; Colorado l’iutos. In bugs, per
! lb., 6%©7c; Black Eyes. In bags, per
lb, e©9c, Red Kidneys. In bags, per lb.
12©13o; California Limits. In bags, per
lb.. *9©lo, California Pink ChlL. in bags,
per lb.. 7%©Sc; Lintels, per lb , 12c;
dried peas, green, per lb., 9e; split
i yellow peas, in 60-lb. bags, per lb., 10c;
split green peas, per lb., ittc; Marrow
I tat beans. In bags, per lb., 12c.
j Beets—Funey home-grown, per bu,
| $1.50.
1 Bananas Extra fancy high grade
fruit, 30 i***, per buck; per ib., <9.
Cabbage— Fancy Northern, per lb.,
1 %•'.
Cnrrots —Fancy houie-grown. per bu.,
*l©l 25
. ,-iery Fancy New 1 ork (2-3 crate).
4 5 *ioz„ $4.0; per crate, $6.50: fancy
New fork trimmed, per bunch, $1.25.
Cocoaucts— Fancy, per do*., *L2o ; per
bag *>r 100. $7.75.
Cranberries--Fancy C. C. Howes, per
bbl., *18; per bu.. *0.50.
Cu* umbers—Fancy Florida small, per
| doz., *2.
Grapefruit- Extra fancy Florida (Blue
j Goose brand), 3< a, per box, $0.75; 4s, per
box, st>; o4<*, ids. lbs and tWs. per nox, *6;
fui.* y Fioridus, bis, per box, *4.25, 16s,
*4.75; 545, 61s and Tbs, $4.75; M>. 54.75.
Lettuce —Fancy leaf, per lb..
I 25c; In barrel lots, per ib.. 23c; fuucy
California Icebergs, per crate $4.
( ranges—California, nil grades, *3.50©
5 50.
' unions Fancy Indiana yellow or red,
! per *OO lb. bags, *1.75; fancy ludlanu
white, per 100-lb. bag, *2; fancy Span
ish, per crate, *2.25
j parsley —Fancy large Bikes, per doz.,
I *i.ou.
i'ot.*t*s -Fancy Michigan and Wiscou
sin round whites, per 160-lb bag, *3, 5
or 10-10. bag lots, per bug, *2.90; fancy
\ Idaho Geui., per bag, *2.50.
Radishes—Bolton, large bunches, per
j doz., *l.
MW* t> Potatoes -Fancy Tennessee Na*'y
H ills, per hamper, *2.50; fpney Enateru
Jerseys, pc* hamper, -3
Spinach Fancy per bu., *1.75.
| 't ul'nips Fancy washed, per bu., *1.25
; ifll 00.
Kale—Fancy, per barrel, *2.
Cauliflower— Fancy Californio. per
< rate *2.10.
Oyster Riant—Fancy, per doz., 50c.
Leek- Fancy, per doz., .10©35c.
Huge—-Fnney, per doz., 45c.
Xomaloe**-fancy ripe, per 6-lb. basket,
*1.50; fancy ripe, 6-basket crate, $0
Rutabagas—Fancy Canadian, per 50
lbs, $1; per 100 lbs, *1.75.
Peppers—Fancy, per small basket, 75c;
per 1% bu crate, $6.
Kmnquats—Fancy Florida, per qt., 30c.
Tangerines— Extra fancy 106s, IGBs,
boxes, *3.75, 1965, box, *3.00.
Lemons—Extra fancy Californlas, 300s,
per box, *4.
Grapes—Fancy California Emperors,
drums, 31 lbs, *7; Imported Spanish Ma
lagas, per keg, sll©P2.
Nut Meats—-Pecans, 5 lb cartoons, per
lb, 90c; Walnuts, per lb, 60c; Almonds,
per lb. 55c; Filberts, per lb, 40c.
English Walnuts —Fancy, per lb, 20
©3lc.
Recans—Fancy, per lb, 25©80c.
Filberts —Naples, In bags, per lb, 24©
2Gc; Sicily, In bags, per lb, 20©23c.
Brazils—Large, washed, in bags, per
lb, 32c.
Raisins —Fancy Spanish clusters, 20
pkgs to box, per box, $8.25; 5 1-lb pkgs
to box, per box, *2.40.
Hickory Nuts —Shellbarks, per lb, 10c.
Peanuts —Virginia Jumbo, salted, per
lb, 18c; .Tuuibo blanched, in 10-lb cans,
per lb, 32c.
CLEVELAND PRODUCE.
CLEVELAND, Dec 21—Butter—Ex
tra, in tub lots, 58%©50c; prints, 59%©
60c; extra firsts, 57%@58c; firsts 50%©
56c; seconds, 53©.',1c; packing stock, 32
©3sc; fancy dairy, 40©42c. Eggs—Fresh
gathered, northern extras, 80c; extra
firsts. 78c; Ohio firsts, now cases. 77c;
firsts, old cases, 70c; western firsts, new
cases, 76c; refrigerator extras, 62c; re
frigerator firsts, 00c. (A case Contains
30 dozen.) Poultry—Live, heavy fowls,
27©28e; light stocks, 20@22c; old roost
ers, 19©20c; spring ducks 35©40c; tur
keys, 52©55c; geese, 28@33c.
GRAIN MARKET
TONE SLOW
Trade Is Light in Futures,
With Lack of Demand.
CHICAGO, Dec. 21.—Trading was
light in grain futures on the Chicago
Board of Trade today, with fractional
changes in prices. The trend of the
market was weaker, due to absence of
demand.
There was little activity or interest in
trading.
Provisions were higher.
December wheat opened up %c at
$1.71 and later lost lc. March wheat
was unchanged at the opening at $1.64%
and later gained %c. May wheat opened
off %e at $1.61 und Iftter dropped %c.
December corn was unchanged at the
opening at 69%c, but lost 2c before the
close. May corn opened unchanged at
74c and later gained 1 Vic. July corn
was up lc at the opening at 75%c and
later ndvaneed %c.
December oats was off %e at the open
ing at 47%e and gained %c later. May
was unchanged at the opening at 49%e
and held that figure In later trailing.
July outs opened up %c at 49c and later
advanced nn additional %e.
(By Thomson A McKinnon.)
—Dec 2 \p
Wheat —Wheat has ruled full and easy
most of the day in absence of cash buy -
ing by the British commission and more
liberal receipts In the Southwest. Xne
visible supply showed about as expected
all around. Clearances of wheat and
flour were heavy and stimulated some
purchases of wheat on the w. ak places.
The situation Is still one of export busi
ness and any indication of renewed buy
ing by the foreign interests would, nat
urally be followed by advanced prices.
Corn—Corn has been very strong at
higher prices with the saine kind of
support by leading elevator and cash
houses as was shown las. week. This
has kept the market strong. There was
one reaction lu the corn market of l%c
from the high, but on this break, re
newed takings by the elevator Interests
made a quick recovery. Primary re
ceipts were liberal and no fresh export
busiuess was consummated. Cash
premiums ruled about the same as Sat
urday. We expect the present strength
to rule \intll shorts have completed th*-lr
covering, or until the movement from
first hands is more than sufficient for
the present needs cf the market, and ac
cumulations commence to show. Cash
premiums yielded slightly In the South
west aud here, but uot enough to change
the tenor of the murket.
Oats —oat* did not show any Inde
pendent strength today, but trailed along
after corn, without making any pro
nounced advance. We expect them to
still follow the corn trend.
Provisions —Hog market was little
lower and closed easy with 5,0 U) carried
over unsold. The streugth In grain
helped to steady the provision market,
wnere shall changes lu values only were
made.
CHICAGO CASH GRAIN.
WHEAT— Open. High. Low. Close.
Dec. ... lit 1.72 1.68 1.68%
Mar. ... 164% 1.68% 1.61% 1.62%
Msy ... 1.01 1.62% 1.37% 1.58%
CO UN-
Dee, ... ,60% .72% .09% .71 y
May ... .74 .76 .73% .74%
July ... .75% .77% -74% .75%
OATS—
Dec 47% 47 .47% .47%
May ... .49% .50% .49% .49%
•July 49
PORK —
Jan. ... 22.28 22.85 22.25 22.85
LARD—
Jan. ... 12 H 713 12 12 87 12 92
May ... 13.20 13.15 13.42
Klßft ~
Jim. ...11.42 11 42 11 30 11.37
May ... 11.90 12.13 11.80 12.10
•Nominal.
CHICAGO CASH GRAIN.
CHICAGO, Dec 21—Wheat—No. 1
northern spring. $1 75; No. 2 northern
spring, $1.77 Corn So 2 white (olrt/G
73%-; No 3 white. 71%®T1%c; No 4
white. 70c; No. 2 yellow. 78c: No. 4 yel- i
low 71®T3%c Onts No. 1 white 49%e;l
Nit 2 w hite, 19®49%e No 3 w hite, 48% I
049 c; No. 4 white, 45048%e.
TOLEDO CASH GRAIN.
TOLEDO. Ohio, Dec 20. Close Wh-at j
Cash and December, $2 03; March aud j
Mnv. $2 Corn—No. 2 yellow (old!. Me;
(newl, 79c Onts—No. 2 white, 630.5. C J
R ye—- N o 2. $1 55 Barley No 2. 80c.
Ciareraeed—Cash (1910). sl2. cash (1920) !
and December. sl2 10; January. sl2 20; |
February, sl2 40; March, $12.35 Tim
othy—Cash (1918), $3.30; (1919*. $3.40; |
December, $3 50; January and February.;
$3,52%; March, $3 55. Alslke New,
$16.73, March, sl7 26; December, SIC.
INDIANAPOLIS CASH GRAIN.
—l *cc. 21 —
Bids for car lots of grain and bay at
the call of the Indianapolis Board of
Trade were:
Wheat No sales
Corn Easier; No. 3 white, 72073%*: |
No. 4 white 69%®70%c; No. 3 white,
(*4®®i%c; No. :• yellow, 77079 c: No 4,
yellow. 73075 c; No. 3 yellow, 680 ,<* ;
No 3 mixed, 69071 c; No. 4 mixed, 68®
70c; No 5 mixed, 66®68e.
Oat*—K.nster: No 2 white, 50%®81%J;
No. 3 white, 50050%c.
Hay Weak; No. 1 timothy, $20026.50;
No 2 timothy, $-'.V<i2B.Bo; No. l light]
clover mixed $21024.50. No. 1 clover
hay, $24.50025.
Inspections—
Wheat—No. 2 soft white, 2 cars
Corn No. 6 white, 1 car, No 4 white, i)
cars; No, 5 white, 12 cars; No. 6 white.
1 car; No. 3 yellow, 5 cars; No. 4 yel
low 31 cars; No 5 yellow, 31 cars: No. 0
yellow. 5 cars; sample yellow. 1 car; No.
4 mixed, 2 cars; No 3 mixed, 0 cars.
No. 6 mixed, 1 ear; sample mixed, 1 car;
ear, 1 car; total 109 car*.
outs—No. 1 white, 2 cars; No. 2 white,
13 cars, total. 15 cars
Hay—No. 1 timothy, 1 car; No. 1 clover
mixed, 1 car; total, 2 curs.
HAY MARKET.
The following are the Indianapolis
prKes lor lay by the wagon loan
Hay Loose timothy. new.
mixed hay. uw, $20028: l>al.*d, s2o® 28.
Data—Bushel, new, 50®53c.
Corn New, 7.' tf.MJc per bushel.
WAGON WHEAT PRICES,
.mllauapoliw Hour inllla and elevators
today are paying $1 9u fox. No. 1 red
wheat. SIBB for No. 2 red Wheat ami!
$1.84 lor No. 3 red.
In the Cotton Markets
NEW YORK, Dec. 21, The cotton tnar
■ ket opened steady today, and selling
! by Wall Street and the South was ab
! sorbed quickly by Liverpool and com
! mission bouses.
j October contracts received the best
; support und started three points higher,
j while other options were unchanged to
i 15 points lower, tile whole list later sell
| tng back to last night’s closing level.
New York cotton opening: December,
!14 75c; January, 14 00c; Match, 14 75c;
May, 14.00 c; July, 15.03 c; October, 15.13 c.
WASHINGTON, Dec. 20. Cotton
i ginned from the 1020 crop totalled 10,-
! 878,265 running bales to Dec. 13, the
j Census Bureau announced today. Gtn
: ning to this (late lu 1919, totalled 9,306,
i 646 bales.
Round bales counted as half bales in
the report totalled 198,184, as compared
with 106,662 lu 1010. Amerlcau-Egyp
tlan totalled 54,467, as compared with
| 27,104 in 1919; and Sen Island totalled
1,291, as compared with 6.236 In 1910.
LIVERPOOL, Dec. 21.—Spot cotton
opened dull. Prices were easier. Sales
ran close to 3,000 bales
American middlings, 14.66d; good mid
dlings, 12.16(1; full mids, 11. lid; luids,
9.01d; low middlings, 7.045(1; good ordi
nary, 5.41d; ordinary, 4.66d.
Futures were quiet.
Dumpier Case Blocks
Mrs. Myers’ Hearing
Argument on of Mrs. Inda
Myers, charged with the murder of Fred
erick A. Myers, photographer, asking
that she be released on bull pending
trial, will not be heard by Judge Jnmes
A. Collins until the John Damplcr case
Is completed In Criminal Court.
Although Judge Collins is not pre
siding in the Dampler case, yet the court
has no place to hear arguments until the
courtroom is vacated by the Dampier
Jury.
Weather
The following table shows the state of
the weather at 7 a. m., Dec. 21, as ob
served by U. B.weather bureaus:
Station. Bar. Temp. Weather.
Indianapolis, Ind. . 80.23 26 Cloudy
Amarillo. Tex 29.78 22 PtCldy
Bismarck, N. D. .. 30.52 2 Cloudy
Boston, Muss 30.42 26 Clear
Chicago, 111 30.24 30 Cloudy
Cincinnati, 0 30.28 26 Cloudy
Cleveland, 0 30.44 20 Clear
Denver, Colo 30.10 10 Cloudy
Dodge City, Kan. . 29.08 26 Snow
Helena, Mont 30.20 4 Clear
Jacksonville, Flu. . 30.20 56 Cloudy
Kansas City, Mo. . 29.62 40 Cloudy
Louisville, Ky 30.22 32 Cloudy
Little Hock. Ark. . 29.86 54 Rain
I.os Angeles, Cal. . 30.02 44 Clear
Mobile, Ala 30.00 34 Cloudy
New Orleans, La. . 29.96 62 Cloudy
New York, N. Y. . 30.52 26 Clear
Norfolk, Va 30.50 36 Clear
Oklahoma City ... 29.66 44 Clear
Omaha, Neb 29.74 2S Snow
Philadelphia, Pa. . 30.51 28 Clear
Pittsburgh, Pa. ... 30.46 22 Cleur
Portland, Ore 30.08 40 Cloudy
Rapid City, S. D. . 30.40 2 Snow
Roseburg, Ore. ... 30.06 32 Clear
San Antonio, Tex. . 29.64 70 Rain
Sun Francisco, Cal. 30.12 44 Cloudy
St. Louis, Mo 29.94 36 Rain
St. Paul, Minn. ... 30.20 20 Snow
Tampa, Fla 30.16 58 Cloudy
Washington, D. C. 30.66 22 Clear
WEATHER CONDITIONS.
The Southwestern depression has moved
northeastward to the middle Plains
States, and it liua caused rain or snow
over much of the country from the Mis
sissippi River and Lakes region west
ward to the Pacific. Temperatures are
rising from the Plains States eastward
to the Atlantic coast, the greatest rise*
occurring In the middle Mississippi Val
ley. They are falling In the West and
Northwestern portions, under the Influ
ence of a marked high over the north
west Canadian province*. Pressure is
also high over the middle Atlantic coast.
Snow covering ranging in depth from a
truce to seven Inches was reported last j
evening in the Plateau region, the Mis
souri and upper Mississippi X alleys, and
Lakes region.
T. O. SHIPMAN,
Temporarily In Charge.
Meteorologist, Weather Korean.
____________________________
T*rse Market Notes
MCKEESPORT, Pa., Dec. 21.—The Mc-
Keesport Tinplate Company has declared
a stock dividend ot S7,<XX).OOO. President
E. It. Crawford Issued this announce
ment ;
"This company has today increased
Us capital stock from $3,000,000 to $lO,-
OOO.f'OO, making a stock dividend of $7,-j
000,000. This has been done to take
care of extensions and improvements
made to the plant and property cover
ing the last ten years and which had
not previously been represented by capi
tal stock. The atock is to be Issued to
shareholders of record Dec 26, 1920.”
The McKeesport Tin Plnte plant Is the
largest In the world. McKeesport busi
ness men started it and still own about
all the stock.
WASHINGTON. Dec. 21 A decree ha*
been signed by the president of Mexico
placing a duty of 7 5 cents per kilo on
raw cotton Imported into Mexico, accord
ing to a dispatch received today by the
Bureau of Foreign und Domestic Com
merce from Consul Kerris at Mexico City.
This is nearly double the previous duty
on raw ginned cotton.
LOCAL HIDE MARKET.
Greeu tilde*—No. 1,6 c; No 2, sc. Green
Calve* -No. 1,8 c; No. 2, 6%c. Ilorse
hbiee —No. 1. $4; No. 2, $3. Cured Hides
No. 1. 8c; No. 2. 7c.
CHRISTMAS DAY
PROGRAM TOLD
Routes for 12 Brass Quartettes
Published.
Sections of the city which twelve brass
quartettes will visit under the auspices
of the city park department to herald
the approach of Christmas day. Saturday
morning have been outlined by Super
intendent of Parks James H. Lowry.
The quartettes will start l'rotn the
headquarters of the Indianapolis Mu
sicians' Union. They will be transported
in automobile* loaned by public-spirited
rltlx-ns. Christmas songs like "Silent
Night" and "Come All Ye Faithful," will
be played from 4 to 6 o’clock. Special
stop* will l>e made at all hospitals, the
Indianapolis Orphans’ Home, the Deten
Uon Home, the Central Hospital for the
Insane, the county Jail, the State School*
for the Blind and Deaf and at the larger
apartment house*.
A quartette will be assigned to each
section bounded by the following streets,
streams or railroads:
1. Texth street, Y'ermont street. White
River and Oliver avenue.
2. Washington street, Morris street.
Eagle Creek and White River.
3. Maple Road, the north city limits.
Northwestern avenue and Fall Creek
4. Maple Road, Northwestern avenue.
Fall Creek aud Riverside Bark.
5. Northwestern avenue, Maple Road
und Fall CreeJk.
6. Irvington.
7. Washington street, Capitol nvenno.
White River and Full Creek.
8. Capitol avenue, Fall Creek, College
svenue. nnd Washington street.
9. Brightwood.
10. Tenth street, College avenue, Wash
ington street Hiid the Belt railroad
(e*stL
11. Morris street, Madison avenue.
White River and Pleasant run.
12. Morris street, Raymond street,
Miullson avenue and State street.
The heralding of Christmas is a civic
custom inaugurated Inst year It Is
modeled on a Yuletide rite of old English
days.
TIGER OPERATOR
GETS SSO FINE
(Continued From Page One.)
vlcted of operating a blind tiger and
fined SSO and costs Three pint bottlet
containing a few drops of whisky were
found by the police in the bar-room and
kitchen. In a locked closet upstairs
they found nearly a quart of "Belle of
Anderson" whisky wltu the Inscription
"for mediclual purposes only.” This
caused Judge Pritchard to say that he
believed Shaffer whs guilty of receiving
from a common currier.
CHARGES AGAINST
NEGRO DISMISSED.
William Collier, negro, living on East
Wabash street, left the courtroom smil
ing, for the blind tiger charges against
him were dismissed. The police found a
quart and a half of "white mule" whisky
at his home.
Martin Stankowlch, 223 Geiesendorf
street, admitted that the police told the
truth when they said that they found
four gallons of “white mule" whisky in
his kitchen and that he had a still with
five gallons of mash boiling on his
kitchen stove when they raided Ills home.
However, he explained that he was mak
ing the liquor for his own use, as he
hnd been ill. Judge Pritchard fined him
SIOO- and costs and sentenced him to
serve sixty days at the Indiana Penal
Farm.
Speeinl Judge John Robbins dismissed
the blind tiger charges against Charles
Bochort, grocer, 3529 Prospect street. The
police testified that they found two bot
tles of peach brandy In Bochert’s home,
and ten gallons of the same liquor In a
keg In his shed. They said th#y also
found etc \< bottles In Bochert'a auto- ;
mobile.
Bochert testified the empty bottles wera
for vinegar, and that the liquor was for |
his own use. lie said lie paid S2OO for
the ten gallons. The prosecutor de
manded a conviction on the count chnrg-
Ipg receiving from a common currier, but
Judge Robbins dls*&arged the defendant. '
Marriage Licenses
William F. Mulder, 3246 Carson ave.. 23
Etta Phelps, 1271 Martin st 22
John Hall, 330 W. McCarty st 21
Anna Dailey, 905 E. Maryland 5t..... 16
Charles Schrader, 2217 W. McCarty st. 23
Azena Williams, 2131 W. Morris st... 22
Walter Allen, 406 N. Keystone ave... 23
Elva Scott, Paris, Teun 21
Charles Hill, 1107 N. Senate ave 28
Margaret Casey, 925 Senate ave IS
Solouinn Gibbs, 517 Bowman at 33
Mary Pace, city 30
Virgil Covert, Elizabethtown, Ind■>.. 23
Andra Adams, 447 N. Alabama st 22
Salvatore Azzerella, 515 E. Norwood... 39
Maria Celia, 613 S. East st 34
Frank Y en Prefers, Butte, Mont 22
Evelyn Morris. Severln Hotel 21
William Wood, 534 N. Meridian st... 22
Alma Hand, 1509 X. Illinois st 26
Hal Dowdell, 530 E. Main st 28
Margaret Rodefer, Kokomo, Ind 23
William Temple, Claypool Hotel 38
Nan ‘Mertz, Claypool Hotel 30
Births
Ell and Violet Lucas, 702 Haugh, girl.
George and Ellen Augelopolas, 524 W.
N'exv York, boy.
Estel and Elizabeth Talkington, 132 W.
Nineteenth, boy.
Joseph aud Minnie Weber, 231 X. Sum
mitt. girl.
Albert and Flora Cloffey. 0935 Kawles,
boy.
Austin and Hazel Young, 58 S. Brad
ley, boy.
Cheater and Sylvia Martin, 1913 Fletch
er, boy.
Kay and Florence Wheasler, 2230 Win
ter, girl.
Albert and Anna Btschoff, 2119 N.
Rural, bey.
Jack aud Etta Scherer, St. Vincent
Hospital, girl.
Dalton and Nelle Wallar, Deaconess
Hospital, boy.
N'lcolol and Paraschive Budack, Dea
coness Hospital, boy. '
Elmer and Dessie Williams, 627 N. Da
vidson, girl. ____
David aud Mary Murray, 1121 N.
Holmes, boy. „ , ,
Jasper nnd Kathryn Smith, 300 A
El Alvin l 'and Stella Twell, 1137 Roaehe,
girl.
Earl and Ruth Wiseman, 739 N. New
Jersey, girl.
Harry and Nadine Beem, 631 N. Gray,
boy.
Chester and Mary Neal. 452 Agnes, boy.
William and Nellie Spencer, 407 N.
Wnrman, boy. . , , ,
John and Jessie Keith, 902% Ashland.
Faye and Clara Southers, 2111 E. Wash
ingto’n, bey. „
Harry and Jessie Adams, 1321 South
ern, bo’y. _ , ...
George and Margaret Hummel, 33
Marne apt., girl.
Eldo and Neva Landis, 1009 Harlan,
b °WllUam and Isolene Crouch, 2022
Hovey, boy. _ . „ ~
Earl and Remah Hood, 2514 Martin
dale, boy. . ,
Pinkney and Hester Green, 2009 Apple
gate, glrf.
Deaths
Henrietta Keister, 6,1, 1414 Beilefon
taine. acute dilatation of heurt.
Ernest Irmer, 75, 440 Hamilton, ure
mia.
Elizabeth Grundy. 35, 5025 Drake, peri
tonitis.
Donald Edward Mustard. 30 hours, non
flosuce of foramen ovale.
Infant Weber, 7 hours, 231 North Sum
mitt, premature birth.
A<fln G. Wiley, 36, 1820 East Tenth,
lobar pneumonia.
Guy Pellegrino, 48, 622 Stevens, chrorte
myocarditis.
Emma Belle Hennlgar. 3 days, 1115
Olln, uonclosure of foramen ovale.
Dorothy May Woods, 1, city hospital,
broncho pneumonia.
Reesle Warren, 7 months. 537 North
l,yun, acute srustro enteritis.
Caroline Pierson, 78, city hospital, hy
postatic pneumonia.
MAY NOT RATIFY
NEW NOMINATION
Senate May Favor Holding
Job for Republican.
It was the opinion today of officials at
the Federal building familiar with the
workings of the Government in Washing
ton that the nomination of Burt New,
former executive secretary of the Demo
cratic State committee, to suceed William
L. Elder as collector of Internal revenue
In Indiana, sent to the Senate by Presi
dent Wilson yesterday, will not be rati
fied. It is generally thought that the
Senate will refuse to ratify the nomina
tion of Mr New, compelling Mr. Elder
to remain in office until after March 4,
when a Republican successor will tie
named.
Mr. Elder, it is known, is prepared to
remain in the Government service until
afWr March 4. although he is very anx
ious to be relieved of his duties in or
der to devote ail his time to his private
affairs.
Further light was thrown upon Mr.
Elder’s reasons for sending his resigna
tion to Washington several months ago,
when close friends declared that the red
tape and minute supervision of all ac
tivities of subordinates which Washing
ton bureaus exerclfxe grew irksome to the
collector, who is a man of large personal
business affairs and used to working out
his own ideas It has been a well known
fact since he accepted the post in Sep
tember. 1919, that the salary of $6,000 per
year was no attraction. He took the
place only upon the Insistence of Vice
President Thomas R Marshall that as a
mutter of public se-vlce he should step
in and organize the Internal revenue serv
ice in the State upon a real business
basis.
Just prior to Mr. Elder’s assumption of
the collector’s duties Peter J. Kruyer
had started the work of combining the
old Fifth and Sixth Internal Revenue
Districts, comprising the entire State,
Into the one district. Mr. Elder took up
the task, and according to experts in the
revenue department, has accomplished
good results.
Perry Township Men
in Appeal for Jordan
Aeommlttee of citizens from Perry
township appeared today before the coun
tv commissioners and protested against,
the notions of the board in not reappoint
ing nubert Jordan as road superintend
ent In that township for next year. Pres
ident George stated that the commit
teemen claimed they could obtain a peti
tion containing 99 per cent of the names
of taxpayers of the township asking that
Jordan be reappointed.
Asks Lien on Realty
A suit asking that he be given a Uou
on some real estate In the Fletcher Ju
nior Northeast addition, xvhlch is in the
name of William Smith on ih ? tax dupul
cates, was filed today by Charles Smtth,
a former soldier, who saw service on
the Mexican border and in France, In
the Circuit Court.
Smith claims the defendant, who is hi*
stepfather, Invested $629 of the j laintiff’s
money In the real estate.
FAREWELL DINNER GIVEN.
Members of the staff of the Indiana
University extension department gave a
dinner at the Columbia Club Monday
evoning In honor of Prof. J. J. Pettijohn,
director of the department. Professor
Pettijohn will Jan. 1 to become advisor
to the president of the University of Min
nesota at Minneapolis.
I BUY
AND
SELL
Ind. Rural Credit Asso’n Stock
415 LEMCKE BLDG.
We are pre* | A on farm and
pared to make city property
THOS. C. DA V & CO. 7 Tpu¥jßui?i?v **
OVERSEAS FEUD
BURNS IN TEXAS
Trail of Quick Death in Wake
of Sicilian Vendetta.
DALLAS, Texas, Dec. 21.—Joe Rug
gero, grocer, lay dying here today, the
victim of a Sicilian sued, police suid. He (
was shot last night by an unknown gun
man. Vito Campanella Sr. was arrested,
but later released after establishing an
alibi. Ruggero was under bond for the
killing of Vito Camnpella Jr., in Rug
gero’s store last September.
Some months ago the Campanellas nnd
Ruggeros fought a gun battle in the
streets of Kansas City, in which a
brofher-in-law of Joe Ruggero was
wounded, police records show. The ven
detta. authorities said, was transferred
D-llas some time later, when Sam IGea-i
tivos. a relative of Ruggero, was sho£
the Itestivos-Ruggero clan met
Capanella on the street.
In 1910 Capanella Sr.. Ilyina in
City, received a ’black band”
manding $5,000. He sold out and
to Dallas. A man who bought his tmijLw
of horses was shot and killed a
nights later, police said. Police Infor
tion showed the Ruggero-Campanella
began in Italy, where the two familial
formerly were close friends and neigbV
bors.
MISSION OFFICER *
CALLED BY DEATH
Services for the Rev. D. 0.
Cunningham Wednesday.
Funeral services for the Rev. David
Orville Cunningham, candidate secretary
of the. United Christian Missionary So
c cty of the Disciples Church, who died
at the Methodist Hospital Monday after
noon, will be held at the home, 264
Downey avenue, at 2 o’clock Wednesday
afternoon.
The Rev. Mr. Cunningham went to In
dia as a missionary of the Foreign Chrla-
Lan Missionary Society io 1902, wheie
he was engaged largely in educational
work until 1919, when he returned to be
come candidate secretary at the local
College of Missions, where he secured
recruits in missions ry work.
He is survived by the widow and two
daughters. Hazel and Hilda, and fire
brothers, one of whom is a missionary
It: Japan.
The funeral services will be conducted
by the Rev. Clarence Keidenbaeh of the
Downey Avenue Methodist Church, as
sisted by President Charles T. Paul and
Prof. J. G. McGavran of the College of
Missions and by the Rev. F. J. Corey and
Mrs. Anna A. Atwater of the United
Christian Missionary Society. Burial
will be in Ada, Ohio.
CONTRACTS LET
BY COUNTY BOARD s
Bid for Voting Machines
Under Advisement.
The Marion County commissioners to
day awarded a number of contracts for
supplies for the county institutions for
next year and took under advisement a
bid of SSS.(XX) of the Automatic Voting
Machine Company of Jamestown. N. J.,
for silty voting matchiues. The auto
matic company was the only oempany to
submit a bid, it was announced.
The commissioners awarded the follow
ing contracts: Horse, wagon and har
ness for Snnnyslde, to Charles W. Berry
on a bid of $225; gravel for Franklin
township, to Charles W. Berry, 65 cent*
n yard; filing cabinet for the county
nurse, to .W. C. Brass, for $116.68;
bridges and culverts. No. 689, to R. H.
Scott. $2,490, and Nos. 690 and CSB, to
Ferguson & Hurst, on bids of $1,455
and $1,390: towel supply at Courthouse
to the American Linen Supply Company,
$33.12 a month, and a coffee urn for th*
poor farm to the Vonnegut Hardware
Company of this city on a Hd of $397.
The Merchants Heat and Light Com
pany submitted a bid for heat at $12.-
321.<<*. The Merchants Heat and Light
Company und the Indianapolis Light and
Heat Company submitted the same bid*
for light at $2 per kilowatt hour and *
energy at $2.08. The board took these
bids under advisement.
Fined on Charge of
False Advertising
S. E. Drodt, 1008 Odd Fellow building,
was fined SIOO and costs in City Court
today on a charge of false advertising.
The action was brought by James M.
Nelehr.us. 40 South Hawthorn lane, who
said Drodt advertised for an employment
manager, offering to pay $3,500 a year,
and that when he applied for the posi
tion he was asked to enroll in a corre
spondence school. He alleged Drodt had
no position to offer.
Similar charges an da charge of assault
and battery brought against Drodt by
S. M. Idelson, 2806 North Talbot avenue,
were continued until Jan. 12.
Wilson Veto Seen for
War Finance Measure
WASHINGTON, Dec. 21.—The resolu
tion reviving the War Finance Corpora
tion was to be sent to the White House
today. It passed Congress yesterday
when the Senate agreed to the House
amendments. The general impression is
that President Wilson will veto the meas
ure on advice of Secretary Houston, who
opposed it.
‘fats Magazine
(. INVESTMENT V
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from SIOO to $l2O per year,”
says one reader of “Investment-”
We Send It Free
Write for It Today
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subscription to "Investment” and we
will also put you on the list to receive
our special New Year offerinj of high
grade listed securities on a plan that will
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* Investment Bankers
V 137 South LaSalle Sl m
CHICAGO &
NEWTON
TODD

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