OCR Interpretation


Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, March 23, 1922, Home Edition, Image 11

Image and text provided by Indiana State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85047611/1922-03-23/ed-1/seq-11/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 11

INDIANA HOME
GUARDED FROM
KIDNAPER RAID
Threatening Letters Senx Earl
Park Girl Lead to One
Arrest.
Special to The Times.
FOWLER. Ind., March 23.—Deputv
sheriff's today guarded the farm of Fred
Callaway, near Earl Park, following what
was believed to have been a thwarted raid
by kidnapers and white slavers from
Chicago.
Frank Brown, a cripple, of Chicago,
feis held by authorities here for ques
(K>ning concerning threatening letters re
ceived at she Callaway farm by Miss
Elizabeth Rodahan. 22, a stenographer,
employed by a Chicago firm. Miss Roda
han is' a sister of Mrs. Callaway.
The letters, according to Sheriff John
Boldman of Earl Park, were signed:
‘"Frank Brown," and demanded Miss
Rodahan's immediate return to Chicago.
Unless she returned, the letters said her
nephew, Gordon, 4, living with the Calla
ways. would be kidnaped.
Sheriff Boldman said that about a
week ago four men. armed with shot
guns. searched the Callaway premises.
The Callawavs were not at home. Sub
sequently Brown was arrested by the
postal authorities in Chicago and turned
over to the Indiana official*.
BUILDING TRADES’
ACTIVITY NOTED
Employment Bureau Sees Indi
cation of Normalcy.
Belief that business is approaching
normal faster now was expressed by
members of the Indiana Free Employ
ment Bureau based on conditions for the
week ending March IS. The demand for
labor in connection with the building
trades activity was indicated as the ex
press cause for the betterment noted.
During the week ending March IS,
1,000 persons called at the office and of
number 309 were placed, it was
Ptatad. Os the number furnished em
ployment, the # omen slightly exceeded
the men. Indianapolis residents are re
ceiving preference over those who do
not live here.
Under present conditions it is now pos
sible to list university men and highly
skilled office help who formerly applied
at private agencies for assistance.
According to a statement issued the
free employment bureau is striving to
make "the man fit she Job" and not the
“job fit the man.” With that point In
view, it was said, many applicants for
places do not hesitate to refuse openings
they are not qualified to fill.
Ship in Distress
Sends Help Call
MARSEILLES. France. March 23.—The
American steamship West Caruth was in
distress off the French coast today and
sent out “S O S" calls for help. She
gave her position /is seventeen miles west
of Cherburg. Assistance was sent. The
West Caruth displaces 6.100 tons and
was built In 1919 by the United States
Shipping Board.
Threatens to Make
It a ‘l2-Ship Navy’
WASHINGTON. March 23 Secretary :
Denby and sher high naval authorities
hare threatened to cut the Navy to j
twelve battleships, six less than the num
ber allowed the United States under the !
ratio of the arms conference, in ca<
r>sses the bill reducing the 1
jKBt en' : -fe,i personnel to sixty five
men. it was learned today.
AND SON PETITION.
petition? in bankruptcy were
v*l in Federal Court today by Leonard
' Wheeler, Sr., and his son Leonard
Wheeler. Jr., of Montezuma, both on be
half of themselves and of the Montezuma
Garage, of which they are proprietors
The following schedule* were filed: Mon
tezuma Garage, liabilities $4,441.99. as
sets $3,151.20: Leonard Wheeler, Sr., lia
bilities $146.05: assets. $905: Leonard
Wheeler, Jr., liabilities, $20.98; assets,
$75.00.
Marriage Licenses
Leon L. Park, 1450 S. Belmont ave 22
Berniece Maxwell. 1452 S. Belmont avel 18
Harry Haynes, 1528 N. Missouri st 26
Clifton Bin-kner, 1737 Brooker st 25
Alexander McNiel. Terre Haute, Ind.. 32
Della Frlschman, 407 East Ohio st. .. 28
Amos C. Lawson. 1923 S. Pershing 5t..22
Nellie P. Finnie, 828 S. Tremont st. .. 16
John Patrick. 201 N. Mount *t IS
Margaret Mattingly. 2429 N. La Salle . 13
Erwin Risk, 921 Ashland ave 28
Fay Shipiro, 921(6 Ashland ave 27
Guy Wheeler, 408 X. Liberty st. ...... 49
Lolo Poore. 1901 W. Wilkins st 36
Ralph D. Mayfield, 117 N. Liberty *t. . 23
Aill M. Oberding. 48 X. Mlley gt 21
Births
Os is and Louise Shelby, 2622 North
Oxford, hoy.
Howard and Harriet Ringer, 3844 East
Thirtieth, boy.
k Christian and La Vonne Rodenbeck.
& 11 East Michigan, girl.
George and Victoria Sentran,, ftp West
Maryland, girl.
Fred and Mabel Baldridge. 1019 Wind
sor. boy.
John and Mae Matger, 2401 East New
York. girl.
Lewis and Rose Brackett, 8 North
Colorado, girl.
Harry and Anna Webber, 904 North
Tremont. girl.
Roy and Sattie Smoot, 2147 Hazel, boy.
Blanchard and Leila Day, 2435 East
Washington, boy.
John and Mary Uran. 758 North Holmes,
boy.
Bayard and Fay Benedict, city hospital.
girl.
Floyd nyd Mary Steenburgen, city hos
pital, girl."
John and Mary Martin, 1001 West ‘Ver
mont. girl.
Michael and Josephine Bova, 812 Greer,
girl.
Alvin and Ida Killion, 2423 East Wash
ington boy.
Forrest and Grace Carter, 4805 College,
boy.
Deaths
Harry G. Dunn, 45, 3GOS East Wash
ington. can-inomn.
Mary Elizabeth Cox, 73, 1436 Astor,
arterio sclerosis.
J'aura Holtz O’Neill. 64, 320 North
California, carcinoma.
Bryant Armistead, 34, city hospital,
pulmonary tuberculosis.
Lawrence Fogelmau, 62, 2104 Webb,
terebro hemorrrhage.
Samuel E. Ashmore, 44, Deaconess Hos
pital. influenza.
John B. Clements, 65. 1225 East Ray
mond. hypostatic pneumonia.
Ethel Gladys Bailey. 18 days, 1838
Union, broncho pneumonia.-
John Davis, 51, 322 North Tardlng,
.larnyx tuberculosis.
George Lee Peppers. 2 months. 2082 Al
ford. broncho pneumonia.
Mike Gunter. 62. 929 Park, chronic in
terstitial nephritis.
Ellen Hartnett. 66. St. Vincent's Hos-.
pital. pulmonary embolism.
Michael A. Dwyer, 55, 2328 East Wash
ington. asphyxiation taccidental).
Lorenz Reinhardt, 83, 14X3 Ringgold,
arterio sclerosis.
Nellie McCarty, 35, Methodist Hospital,
byperthyrodism.
Jerry Day. 84. 520 East Vermont, ar
terio sclerosis. .
William Bartholomew. 76, f|3> East
Vermont, lobar pneumonia.
Henrv Ellsworth Hend. 53, 1310 Hoyt.
volvulus.
Clinton Hopper. 39. 2319 Hovey, pul
monary phthisis.
Raymond Louis McKlnstray. 2 months,
938 Fletcher, marasmus.
John Sims. 33. city hospital, pulmonary
tuberculosis.
(WilTiom De* Jean, 66, 4464 Guilford,
blastomycosis.
EARTH SHIMMY
IS OBSERVED
IN SIX STATES
Southern Indiana Among
Localities Where Slight
Tremors Are Felt.
ST. LOUIS, Mo., March 23.—Portions
of six States were rocked slightly last
night by earthquake tremors, according
to observations made at St. Loula Uni
versity.
These States felt the shocks:
Southern Illinois, southeast Missouri,
southern Indiana, western Kentucky,
northern Arkansas and northern Ten
nessee.
The first shock was more severe, ac
cording to the seismograph here ,and oc
curred at 4:30 p. m. Slight tremors were
registered at 4:37, 4:49 and 8:22 p. m.
In southeast Missouri and southern Il
linois the shocks were very pronounced,
although no damage was re
ported. In St. Louis the shocks were
Tery slight.
Some of the towns which reported the
tremors follow:
Paragould, Ark.: Troy, Tenn.; Evans
ville, Ind.; Hickman, Ky.‘, Caje Girar
deau, Dexter, Poplar Bluff and Illlmo, in
Missouri, and Belleville and Ilerrin, in
Illinois.
POPULAR BLUFF. Mo., March 23
The third earthquake tremor in two days
shook Popular today. The shock was of
moderate intensity and long duration.
Windows were rattled. No damage was
reported. At 4:26 p. m. yesterday the
first disturbance occurred and the sec
ond at 8:22 p. m.
2 EMPLOYES OF
BANK INDICTED
Grand Jury Acts in Cases of
Admitted Embezzlement.
Fourteen indictments wers returned to
day by the Marion County grand jury
on charges ranging from robbery to as
sault and battery with Intent to murder.
Among those indicted were Naomi
Cochrane. 15<M North Pennsylvania street,
and James Knight, 1125 Ashland avenue
both employes of the Indiana National
Bank, who admit embeazllng funds in
their care. The amounts which each are
accused of stealing, and which they made
signed confessions about, are $337 and
$625, respectively. The woman said she
stole to keep a young sister in school.
The man said the reason for his defal
cation was speculation in German marks
Others under indictment include: Ne
m!ah Farrell, 2441 Massachusetts avenue,
grand larceny; Lemuel A. Anderson, 906
Beecher street, grand larceny; Wes
ley A. Sloss. 414 Douglass street,
assault and battery with Intent to
murder; Robert Day, 629 Luett street,
and Orivlle Day, G2S Luett street,
grand larceny; John Mulhaul, grand
larceny Loren Storm, robbery and grjtnd
larceny; Charles W. May. forgery; /Amy
Van Camp, grand larceny; Roy Lucas,
John Lux.and Charles ketterman, rob
bery and grand larceny: Samuel Smith,
grand larceny: Ernest Arnett and Ells
worth Walker, burglary and grand lar
ceny. and Roy Lucas, Charles Kotter
man, John I.ux and Arthur Tucker, rob
bery and petit larceny.
Federal Grand Jury
Takes Up Car Cases
Violations of the National Motor
vehicle act, forbidding the transporta
i tion of stolen automobiles in inter
! state traffic, are being considered this
1 week by the Federal grand Jury, ac- !
cording to Homer Elliott, United States
District Attorney.
Mr. Eliott said the motor vihlcle cases
probably will be disposed of by the
grand jury this week and next week will
be given to liquor la wvlolations.
Bank examiners who investigate the
'■ affairs of the defunct First National
I Bank of Corydon, have made their re-
Iport and It is probable the present grand
Jury will take up the cases of Wilson
E. Cooke, George W. Applegate and Ben
S. Applegate, former officers of the bank,
who are under arrest charged with
violation of the national babklng laws.
Witnesses are being examined at the
rate of thirty or more a day and Mr.
Elliott predicted the grand jury will be
able to report Its finding to Judge
l Albert B. Anderson about April 8.
! Several residents of Muncie testified
| today.
Freed as Murderer,
Says He Slew Cop
CHICAGO. March 23.—Nlm<teen-year
; old Charles Sschader, who, a few months
ago. was liberated by a coroner's jury
after shooting and killing his father, to
day confessed, according to the police, to
the murder of Policeman Harry J. Busse,
| Jan. 27.
i Schader said he and a companion held
j up the officer and he fired the shot that
! killed him. The youth was freed after
I killing his father when he declared he
acted to protect his mother.
Muncie Club Woman
Answers Roll, Dies
Special to The Times.
MUNCIE, Ind.. March 23 Five min
utes after she had responded to her namo
at roll call by repeating a verse of scrip
ture, Mrs. Evalyn Meeker. 58, a leader In
local and State club work for many
years, fell dead today at the home of
Mrs. C. A. Cropper, where she was at
tending a meeting of a literary club of
which she was one of the organizers
Death was due to npoplexy.
W. C. T.U.Leader Asks
Place in State Senate
FT. WAYNE, Ind., March 23—Mrs.
' Culla J. Vaybinger, former State presi
j dent of the IV. C. T. U., and candidate
in 1920 for United States Senator on the
Prohibition ticket, today announced she
will seek the Republican nomination for
State Senator from Grant County. She
will oppose present State Senator Alfred
; Hogston.
Warsaw Bather Says
Water ‘Trifle Cold’
j WARSAW. Ind., March 23—The Icy
i waters of Center Lake closed In about
Helen Mellick. 15, Yivtor Richart 19. and
; Howard Hill, 19. They wanted to be the
first persons to swim this year at the
| city's bathing beach.
Their plunges were of short duration,
however. Miss Mellick said the water was
“a trifle cold.”
200 Children Attend
Bible School Classes
About two hundred children have been
attending for six weeks an afternoon
class on week days with the exception of
Saturday at the Central Christian Church
The classes % begln at 3:13 o'clock In th
afternoon and continue. until 4 - o’clock
Ten teachers 3rp used to conduct th?
various classes In regular Bible study
The school closes a six weeks' period of
Instruction Friday.
The school Is being conducted undei
the Marion County Sunday School Asso
ciatlon. j
MINERS MAY
MAKE TERMS
BY DISTRICTS
(Continued From Page One.)
ers agree to interstate wage conference
as provided by the existing scale con
tract
The committee Is composed of IHT
men. They are the thirty-two members
of the”central field scale committee, the
twenty members of the executive board,
international officers and three rep
resentatives from earn of the districts
outside the central field. William Green,
as the international secretary, is a mem*-
ber. He will leave here tonight for
Cleveland.
INDIANA MINK OWNERS
ASK CONFERENCE.
Indiana operators are awaiting a reply
I from the union organization in this
State, regarding the mine owners' re
newed proposal for a separate district
agreement. Citing the fact that virtually
£5 per cent of the duration of the pres
ent two-year contract was spent in joint
conference to meet the “vagaries" or
the miners' program; pointing to efforts,
going to the limit of “propriety,” made
by the Indiana operators to bring about
an interstate conference to forestall the
impending strike; calling attention to
repeated alleged violations of the con
! tract by the mine workers and stressing
| the refusal of the Indiana miners to
break away from the international
j union’s policy and make a separate agree
! ment, the Indiana mine owners have
again written to John Heesler, head of
j the union in District XL renewing the
I invitation to a separate conference.
The attitude of the Indiana operator*
regarding the April X walkout is summed
up as follows in the Invitation:
"This is not a strike Involving c-ues
tions of wages and working conditions,
nor because coal operators refuse to rec
ognize the miners' union, nor because of
any attempt on their part to Interfere
with the union's proper functions, nor
because of any failure or refusal to meet
In Joint conference to make agreements,
but because of the coal operators’ re
fusal to meet to make a contract In the
particular way and Including the pnrtlcu-
Bank on Friendship
at the
National City Bank
—and your money will
earn more than interest
If you are a friend or a friend of a friend of any of
us who work here at the National City Bank we want
to personally be your banker. We want to help you
save your money during 1922. We want you to be
come intimately acquainted with the National City
Bank and its superior banking service.
There are 52 of us here at the bank who want to become
members of the Account-A-Week Club. Your savings or
checking account will help one of us to gain that member
ship. It means greater income to each of us when we be
come a member.
It also means that you have a personal representative in the bipr,
modern, convenient banking institution at all times, ready to give
you individual attention and direct aid in saving and planning for
your future independence.,
I
Your account will help
one of us like this —
The Account-A-Week Club is open to eveiy employe
of the Bank. To become a member we mufct secure at
least four accounts within one calendar month. To
continue to be a member we must secure four or more
accounts each succeeding month. At the end of every
three months each member receives a certain set sum
for each account he has secured, depending of course on
the size of the account. Campaign starts March 15,
1922, and ends March 15, 1923.
That is why your money -will earn more than interest here.
Tour account actually means an Increased income for one of
us. It means a more personal banking contact for you.
Come and bank with us—Read the list of "The willing 52”
-—ask for one of us by name. We will welcome y6ur account
with open arms—be your personal banker from now—and pay
interest on your savings besides.
The National City Bank
INDIANAPOLIS
INDIANA DAILY TIMES, THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 1922.
lar territory desirable to your union.
“This is not a question of sufficient
importance to be permitted to paralyze
the coal industry of this Nation and since
the interstate joint conference cannot be
had, the interests of your members In
Indiana and the coal operators and of
the general public can best be served
by a meeting of Indiana people to at
least make an effort to compose our con
ditions. If eventually (Hessler having
stated separate agreements might be had
later) why now now?”
LABOR WILL DRAIN ITS
TREASURIES FOR MINERS
WASHINGTON, March 23.—Labor will
drain its treasuries and vght to the last
ditch to protect and provide relief for
the 800,000 coal miners scheduled to walk
out April I—if that is found necessary—
James Lord, head of the American Fed
eration of Labor mining department pre
dicted here today.
Union labor considers the present coal
situation one of the most important in
dustdial battles in its history.
Lord, in an interview charged:
Wall street is financing the strike and
wants It.
The uncompromising attitude of the op
erators reveals their decision to force a
suspension of work.
SEES CONSPIRACY TO
HOODWINK FIBLIC.
The whole matter is an operators con
spiracy to raise coal prices and hood
wink the public.
“The American Federation of Labor it
self is prepared to do its utmost to pre
vent wage cuts in the mining areas,''
Lord, a big tighter who was raised in
the English coal fields, said.
“We will raise funds to our full power,
if need be.
“According to present indications, how
ever, the miners are firmly entrenched to
fight through a long summer battle, if
necessarv.
“There are many indications that the
great financial Interests want this tle-Up
and are hacking it. They apparently
want to break the spirit of labor and
force the general level of wages down
lower.
SAYS NO ONE FOOLED
BY PRICE REDUCTION CRY.
“The operators wltl suffer as much as
the miners if the Government protects
the public against a raise in the price of
coaL"
Lord declared the operators “had
fooled no one" in their cry that lower
wages would make a lower price of coal
to the consumer and that “the public
must receive a reduced price.”
“With coal selling at more than $lO a
ton the miner who digs fuel from the
ground receives but SI.OB per ton,” he
went on. “If they would wipe out the
miners entire salary and have him work
for nothing, the cost to the consumer
would be reduced only SI.OO a ton.”
BLAND ASKS CONGRESS
FOR MINE QUIZ
WASHINGTON, March 23.—The flrsl
demand for a congressional lnvestiga
tlon of conditions which are expected
to result in a strike of 600,000 coal min
ers on April 1 was made here today by
Representative Bland, Republican, of In
diana.
Bland, who come* from a mining dis
trict, announced that he would Introduce
a resolution In the House calling for a
comprehensive inquiry ii*(p the coal in
dustry and that he would ask that the
operators and miners be summoned be
fore the House Labor Committee immedi
ately to present their respective cases.
‘FIGHT TO A FINISH ’
FLAN ADOPTED
NEW YORK. March 23—President
Lewis, of the United Mine JVorkers, left
today for Cleveland, carrying a plan for
a “(fght to a finish" with the operators
in the coal tie-up scheduled for April 1.
The plan will be discussed by the general
policy committee of the union at its
“war council” opening tomorrow.
Union leaders are determined to go
through with the campaign that has been
outlined to force the operator* to meet
them in a conference to draw up anew
contract. Following are the principal de
velopments of the last twenty-four hours:
L Lewis announced that not even an
appeal by President Harding would pre
vent the suspension of work ordered for
midnight March 31. However, the miners
are ready to meet the operators to nego
tiate anew contract.
2. Representatives of the American
Federation of Labor, after a conference
with Lewis, announced they had assured
him the American Federation of Labor
stands solidly with the miners.
3. The nationalization research commit-
sy will
tee of the United Mine Workers ha* pre
pared a definite program for nationaliza
tion of the coal industry. It will be pre
sented to the organization for approval
shortly. This plan includes creation of a
department of mines in the Federal Gov
ernment with a secretary In the Presi
dent’s Cabinet, a national mining council
representative of cfinsumers, miners and
technical administrators and a Federal
Mine Commission to control the indus
try’s finances.
INDIANA MINERS SPURN
SEPARATE AGREEMENT
TERRE HAUTE, Ind., March 23.—In
diana miners today again refused the in
vitation of the operator* to confer with
the object of effecting a separate wage
agreement applicable to this State alone.
John Hessler, president of the United
Mine Workers of District 11, replying
to an invitation of the operators, de
clared the Indiana miners would not
break away from the policy of interstate
agreements. Hessler asserted the miner*
are bound by the Washington agree
ment, under which the expiring contract
was negotiated, to take up new wage
scales only at Interstate conferences.
MUNCIE INDUSTRIES
ARE PREPARED
MUNCIE, Ind., March 23.—A1l of Mun
cie's factories and public utilities are
well supplied with coal and it is not be
lieved the coal strike will be felt hero,
unless it should continue for more than
three months. Coal dealers declared they
have supplies ample to meet all domestic
needs for the remainder of cold weather.
R. I. Pickets Fired
Upon; One Wounded
PROVIDENCE, R. 1., March 23—Sev
eral shots were fired and one man was
wounded when deputy sheriffs stationed
at tho Glen Lyon Dye Works dispersed
about fifty pickets en route to the mill
in East Providence today. The pickets
broke and ran for cover. They claim that
the firing began without warning. The
deputies are under orders to allow no
more picketing.
10R-112
Washington SU,
Kast
The Willing
“52”
DOROTHEAKAUTBKY
EDS A CASTETTER
FLORENCE STRATMAN
HELENE ELLIOTT
MARY WEATHERWAX
A DA WITHERS
MERLE IRICK
MARY COR RIO AN
LOT 7 ISE HU ME
EDITH BRENTON
ESTHER DAVIS
El IE EX FITZOIRBONS
HENRIETTA REAGAN
UEJtTHA SCHOTTERS
JULIA SNOW
MARGARET TRAVIS
GLADYJf BAINE
FLORENCE YOUNT
HELENA MAPLE
CLEO RIPPY
JOSEPHINE HENRY
HARRIETT INNIB
HARRIET GUNDER
BERNICE IVEY
MA RJORIE NELSON
WHILE RUSH
LILLI A V WETTER
GEO. P. SUDING
GEO. IT. ERDMANN
IT. P. MANTHEY
R. E. TURNER
JOHN A. SMEAD
11. J. FTTZGIBRONS
WAYNE It. FERRELL
FRED IF. MORGAN
11. R. MOROENTHALER
EDW. I. INGLES
O.J. BUR K HOLDER
C. B. VAN T.UE
ROBERT E. GARRISOR
C. C. WRIGHT
GLYNN MELVILLE
BERNARD FLYNN
KENNA RD DAVIDSON
DON DUNG AN
J. C. RIDDLE
MELVILLE WHITE
WARREN DARNELL
M. D. LAW LOR
A. E. SPILLMAN
C. E. JOHNSON
FRED NORDSEIK
Caillaux, ex-Spy, to
Go Back to Politics
PARIS, March 23.—Rumors that Joseph
Caillaux, former premier, who was tried
by the Senate sitting as a high court on
! a charge of treason and Intercourse with
tho enemy and who was sentenced to five
years’ banishment, shortly will become
a candidate for Election to tho Chamber
of Deputies are again rife.
Caillaux was considered by many, and
Is considered by many today, to have
THE BASEMENT STORE
A Most Opportune Sale of
75 Silk Dresses
For
Women and and $15.00
Misses === Qualities
To give new evidence of The Basement Store’s value
giving supremacy, such is the purpose and achievement
of this event.
Taffetas Messalines Satins Charmeuse
A Clearance from a manufacturer who offered
us his surplus stock at a great sacrifice.
Latest trimming features, styles and colors. Models
suitable for street, afternoon and business wear. Your
choice —§5.55.
SILK BLOUSES
For Women and Misses
$3 and $4 rt** AQ
Qualities
Smart blouses of crepe de
chjne, Georgett e and
mignonette, in tie-back
and overblouse effects.
Pretty new spring colors.
Including Mohawk, navy,
black, white and flesh.
100 Walking Skirts
Up to $5.00 n£
Qualities....
Os all-wool plaids, stripes
and novelty patterns.
Smart pleated styles, pret
ty, practical colors.
Domestic Specials Friday
NO PHONE ORDERS.
CURTAIN MATERIALS—
Yard wide, marquisette,
cross-bar and scrims (lim
it of 15 yards to custo
mer), extra ■* r
special, yard lOC
j ■ ■
REMNANT S—Calicoes in
light and dark colors; extra
special, '7l/..
yard / 72C
BLEACHED SH EETS—72x9O.
while supply PA
lasts U/C
HEMMED PILLOWCASES—
-42x36; neatly made with a
deep hem (limit 10 to a cus
tomer); extra 1 H
special, each 1 I C
COTTON BLANKETS—Bed
size; soft and fleecy; gray,
tan or w r hite border; washa
ble color border; <£■ yq
$2.00 quality, pair..
COTTON PLAID BLAN
KETS —Double bed size,
choice color combination
plaids; $3.50 \>Q
quality, pair .
PILLOWCASES—42x36; Mo
hawk and other well-known
brands; while 09
100 last, each JIC
BABY CRIB BLANKETS—
White with neat color stripe
borders; extra On
special, pair fc*
HOPE /BLEACHED MUSLIN
—Yard wide; limit 10 yards
to a customer, i A i / _
yard J.Z /2C
Fresh Candies
STICK CANDY—Fresh made,
high grade, pure sugar, as
sorted flavors; Y r|
special, pound 13C
CREAM CENTER CHOCOLATES, assorted fruit 09
flavors; special, pound box O t C
The Wm.H. BLOCK CO.
the best financial brain in the country
Remarks are often heard in the mos
official places that Caillaux alone can pul
France out of the difficult financial situa
tion in which she at present finds her
self.
It has been said of Caillaux that he ii
one of tho few politicians who graduallj
came from the right wing of Parliament
to the left and was closely associated
with Socialist politics. If, as expected
his candidacy becomes official !n the peai
future he purposes to join whole-hearted
ly with the Socialists and lead them is
t the next general elections in 1924.
Little Folks’ Coats
Ages 2 to 6 Years
$5.00 ft ft
Qualities 5^.00
Cunning tweed models,
belted or loose styles, in
the leading spring colors—
periwinkle, rose, beige and
blue.
100 Petticoats
Up to $2 tnp
Qualities | “C
Os good quality sateen,
with deep flounces of silk
in pretty figured effects.
All new spring colors.
CURTAIN SCRIMS—Yard
wide, white, cream and
beige; open work borders
(15-yard limit), A
yard
FINE THREAD NAINSOOK
—Yard wide; for underwear
and infants’ wear; ■* j
extra special IttC
COMFORT CH ALLlS—Yard'
wide; new spring patterns;
limit 15 yards to a 1 n
customer; yard Ii C
PERCALE S—Yard wide;
shepherd checks, figures,
stripes, dots, etc.; in an end
less variety of light and dark
colors; we reserve the right
to limit quantities; ijJ
extra special lOC
PLAIN WEAVE CRETONNE
—Rich dark colors in floral
md bird patterns; excellent
tor comfort coverings, porch
furniture, slips, etc.; limit 15
yards to a custo- •* A
mer; yard IUC
BLEACHED SHEETING—
Mohawk, 2 l i yards wide (5-
yard limit), |“q
yard DOC
UNBLEACHED MUSLIN—39
inches wide; fine even thread,
for inexpensive curtaining
and general 101/
use; yard IZ72C
UNBLEAQH ED MUSLIN—
Yard wide (limit 10 yards to
customer), Q
yard OC
CRISPY PEANUT BRITTLE
—Made from pure sugar (2
pounds for 25c), -j C
pound ,I*}C
11

xml | txt