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Indiana daily times. [volume] (Indianapolis [Ind.]) 1914-1922, June 21, 1922, Home Edition, Image 13

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JUNE 21, 1922.
HARDING IN
LETTER URGES
SUBSIDY LAW
president Virtually
Asking Popular
Support.
CAMPAIGN SOUND
Document Indicates
Purpose to Avoid
Dictating.
Special to Indiana. Dally Times
and Philadelphia Public Ledger.
WASHINGTON. June 21.—President
Harding has virtually appealed to the
people to let their Congressmen know the
sentiment of America is whole-hearted
In favor of the maintenance of the Amer
ican merchant marine.
The presidential word went forth In a
letter to Representative Mondell, Repub
lican House leader, In which Mr. Hard
ing gave his full approval of the House
proposal to postpone consideration of
(ship subsidy legislation until Congress
men could lay the question before their
constituencies. House leaders had urged
upon the President a delay on the sub
sidy bill of at least a month, so that
members, availing themselves of the sum
mer recess, might sound out folks back
home.
BELIEVES PEOPEE
WILL BE IN ACCORD.
‘•f cannot but belieTe the American
people will be in accord," wrote the Pres
ident, “If they appraise the Immediate
Mft liters through our .'resent operations
■and sense the situation as it relates to
r America's future. 1 believe Congressmen
will return from the contact with the
people confident that the merchant ma
rine bill Is no less appealing than relief
to agriculture in distress or to the rail
roads in their necessity."
Throughout the letter the President
made It plain that the Administration, al
though not seeking to urge the merits of
the pending bill or dictating to Congress
a course of action, requires speedy and
definite decision on the question of Amer
ican shipping. Existing conditions can
not continue, the President asserted, and
if America is to remain self-contained
she cannot afford to permit her fleet,
badly balanced and war-built as it is,
to fall into disuse.
MANNER NOT INURE
CAMPAIGN DOCUMENT.
“There was an expression of the popu
lar mind in 1920,” continued the letter,
in a manner not nniike that of a cam
paign document.” the party now charged
with responsibility spoke in no uncer
tain terms about the promotion and main
tenance of an American merchant m.arine.
“The question was not made paramount,
but the pledge was covenanted, and it
was well understood, because the people
knew in a general way that vast tonnage
In shipping was a Government possession
as the result of war activities, and a prac
tical Government must turn this one war
■asset to permanent, peace-time advant
age.”
■ Until house leaders had made it plain
■that they feared to proceed with ship
■subsidy legislation without consulting
Ffheir constituencies, the President had
demanded immediate considera-
Bn of suosidy bill. His acquiescence in
proposed brief delay, -however, does
not budge him from his insistent stand
that ship relief legislation should be con
sidered at the present session. The
President's reason for this is two fold:
First, the Government is losing $50.-
OO'.OOO annually on present operation and
the situation is becoming intolerable. If
American shipping is to survive it must
be put on anew basis and that in the
immediate future.
Second, it 'will be impossible to pass
general legislation of the type and im
portance of a ship subsidy bill at the
short session beginning in December.
That session, at which nothing is done
until after the holidays, gives Congress
hardly more than two months to enact
the necessary money bills.
REMOVES THREAT
OF EXTRA SESSION.
The letter to Representative Monde.l,
which the President said was to give
formal confirmation and to express the
satisfaction with which he contemplated
having this measure'taken directly to 'b?
people, will remove, at least for the time
being, any threat of an extra session of
Congress for consideration of the bill. Il
House members within a month or six
weeks, p-roceed with the legislation, the
President apparently will be satisfied.
Much as be desires the passage of the
bill, he insists only upon its consideration
with action one way or the other, con
fident the word the congressmen will get
from “back home," wiU cause them to
enact the legislation.
In summarizing the situation, the
President explained the futility of the
"old and worn-ont cry" against subsidy,
f The people should know, he said, the
j Government now was subsidizing the
L merchant marine by $50,000,000 a year in
the deficit in operations piled
f2 by the Shipping Board. How to handle
ships of the American fleet without
• continual loss to the public treasury is
I manifestly an important problem for
disposition by Congress.
Another, is the establishment of an ef
ficient marine as an agency of commerce
and an avenue of influence in peace, and
on indispensable element of defense when
the Nation is involved in war.
"No argument is needed on the last
essential other than the reminder that
we tuilded our vast tonnage as a war
necessity," said the President.
The importance of a merchant marine to
America's pretensions of being a seif
contained Republic, was emphasized by
the President.
•'No nation,” he said, “has ever raain
tjnned enduring prominence, or abiding
ijood fortune, except in proportion to its
"Vseinence on the sea. It does not become
us
world, wiieii our righteous purposes in ’
trade are better promoted by serving our- i
selves In making our tenders in the j
piarts of the world.”
SNARES TURTLE
MARKED IN 1908
Man’s Name Still Visible—
Grew Inch in 14 Years.
LONDON, Ontario, Canada, June 21. j
That turtles grow less than an inch in i
fourteen years, has been demonstrated
by J. M. Hellems of Brant County, who |
in 1908 scratched his name on the shell j
of a young snapper, slightly over nine i
inches in length, and liberated it again iu i
a drainage canal in P.urford Township. |
Donld Robb.a Burford high
boy, bunting for zoological rna
rerial, found the turtle again, the name
of Mr Hellems plainly diseernable on its
shell, and found it Is now Just ten inches
In length.
The reptile Is an unusnal species to be
found in this part of America, properly
belonging to the State of Indiana. Only
Sn one or two other recorded instances
has it been discovered north of the Great
Lakes. Possibly were this particular
specimen restored to the Hoosier en
vironment and happier climatic condi
tions of its ancestors, its growth might
(*tiU be accelerated, according to the nat
uralists, who state that it is not much
more thsn fifty years odi, or still in the
•pen of life.
YOUTHFUL CAPITALISTS FORM PARTN ERSHIP
\ -cfei? . M i /
FREDERICK BAUMGARTNER.
BT NORA KAY.
Has the siren song of the summer
which goes, “Ice cold lemonade, five cents
a glass:” yet been heard In the neighbor
hood In which you live? If it has not.
the younger generation in your part of
town is less enterprising than that in
Irvington, for already the youthful, but
alert, young business men, by name
Young, Baumgartner and O'Connor, havo
erected their stand in a shady corner at
Washington street and Emerson avenue
and are doing a thriving business in dis
pensing cold drinks.
According to Coiiier Young, of 5009 East
Washington, president of the new lemon
ade distributing company, the Washing
ton street and Emerson avenue crossing
was selected as a logical business location
because of the fact there are no drug
stores around to lure away their trade.
Then, too, young Mr. Y’onng explained,
Emerson avenue carries all of the north
and south traffic that goes across Wash
ington street from Sherman drive on the
west to Ritter avenue on the east, which
means that there’s a prospective customer
in sight at almost any minute of .tie day
—and the three young members of the
firm always manage to have some cue cn
hand to see that no prospect goes by
without hearing a persuasive sales talk
that seldom fails to sell at least a 5-ceut
glass.
Mr. Young, being 13 years of age and
the most experienced man in the firm,
hving been in the business last sum-
$27,645,000
(Total Issue)
New York Central Lines Equipment Ernst of 1922
Five Per Cent Equipment Trust Gold Certificates
GUARANTEE TRUST COMPANY OF NEW YORK, TRUSTEE.
(Philadelphia Plan)
To be Issued by the Trustee under an Equipment Trust Agreement, dated June 1, 1022.
Payable to Bearer with Optional Registration as to Principal.
Denominations SI,OOO and SSOO
Dated June 1, 1922, Serial Maturities of $1,843,000 Per Annum.
June 1, li>23, to June 1, 1937, both Inclusive.
Warrants for the Semi-Annual Dividends at the Rate of 5% Per Annum
Mature June 1 and December 1
Certificates and Dividend Warrants Payable at tho Office of the Trustee.
Issue Subject to Authorization by the Interstate Commerce Commission
The certificates are for 75 per cent of the cost of standard new equipment , the remainder of the rest to be paid by the rath
raad companies. We are advised by A. H. Smith , Esq., president of the New York Central Railroad Company, that the equipment
rtU cost approximately $36,860,000 and will consist of approximately 18,500 freight train cars and 75 locomotives.
The title to the equipment is to be vested in the trustee and the equipment is to be leased by the trustee to the following
railroad companies, which are jointly and severally to covenant to pay rentals sufficient to pay the certificates and dividend war
rants as they mature:
The New York Central Railroad Compant
The Michigan Central Railroad Company.
The Cleveland , Cincinnati , Chicago and St. Louis Railway Company.
The Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Railroad Company.
The Pittsburgh, McKeesport and Youghiogheny Railroad Company.
The Cincinnati Northern Railroad Company.
TEE ABOVE CERTIFICATES ARE OFFERED FOR SUBSCRIPTION , SUBJECT TO ISSUE AS PLANNED AND TO
APPROVAL OF COUNSEL, AT THE FOLLOWING PRICES, PLUS ACCRUED DIVIDEND:
$1,843,000 due June 1, 1023, at 100%
$1,843,000 due June 1, 1924, at 99.62% to yield 5.20%
v $1,843,000 due June 1, 1925, at 99.45% to yield 0.20%
The following maturities to yield 5.30%.*
ft 843,000 Due June 1, 1926, at 98.93% $1,843,000 Due June 1, 1932, at 97.69%
sl,Bs 1 3.000 Due June 1, 1927, at 98.70% $1,843,000 Due June 1, 1933, at 97.52%
$1,843’., 000 Due June 1, 1928, at 98.48% $1,843,000 Due June 1, 1934, at 97.30%
$1.843,000 Due June 1, 1929, at 98.26% $1,843,000 Due June 1, 1935, at 97.21%
$1,843.GcK) Due June 1, 1930, at 98.06% $1,843,000 Due June 1, 1936, at 97.06%
$1,843,000 Due June 1, 1931, at 97,87%. $1,843,000 Due June 1, 1937, at 96.92%
Subscription hook# will be opened at the office of J. P. Morgan & Cos., at 10 o'clock A. M., Wednesday, June 21, 1922. The
right is reserved to reject a y and all applications, and also, in any case, to award a smaller amount than applied for. The amount
due on allotments tciU be pitiable at the office of J. P. Morgan k Cos., in New York funds, the date of payment to be specified in the
notices of allotment, against delivery of temporary certificates or trusty receipts, exchangeable for definite certificates when prepared.
J. P. MORGAN & CO.
FIRST NATIONAL RANK, New York NATIONAL CITY COMPANY, New York
GUARANTY COMPANY OF NEW YORK
HARRIS TRUST & SAVINGS BANK
i
NORBERT O'CONNER.
mer, gave out most of the Information re
garding the establishment of the busi
ness, its personnel, the profits that have
been made thus far this season, which
opened the first of last week and the
plans which the members have for using
the proceeds of the enterprise at the end
■of the season.
According to Mr. Young, the firm
started with a capital of sl, contributed
by the three stockholders, the other two
beiug Norbert O'Connor, 13, of 115 Ban
croft avenue and Frederick Baumgartner,
12, of 27 South Emerson avenue. Mr.
O’Connor is anew member of the firm,
having been taken in only this season,
while I'oung and Baumgertner have been
in partnership in previous business ven
tures, but the belief of the majority of
the customers seems to he that Mr.
O'Connor’s winning personality and cap
tivating freckles will overcome any
handicap of inexperience.
And while Mr. Baumgartner is the
youngest member of the company, he is
by no means the least important, for he
practically controls the comifaeturlng
end of the business, haring a sympathetic
mother who mixes up the lemonade in the
best home-made style, out of real lemons,
sure-enough sugar and the best grade of
Indianapolis water, according to the ac
cepted formula for the favorite drink.
“And it sells for only 5 cents a glass?”
asked a thirsty patron at the stand.
“That depends on the size glass yon
want," explained the salesman. “The
INDIANA DAILY TIMES
COLLIER YOUNG.
regular size glasses are a nickel and the
big ones are a dime, but they hold more
than twice as much as the little ones and
most everybody wants another one if
rhey only get a small one, so tho big
ones arc cheaper in the- end,”
“You win,” said the customer. “Make
It a big one.”
"How much profit do you make on this,
anyhow?” inquired the persuaded one,
hoping to pick up a few* business pointers
from one apparently well fitted to give
them.
"Well, it wouldn’t be good business to
tell how much we make on each glass,”
he explained,” but last week we cleared
SB, which was s2.fid each, with 2 cents
left over. At that rate we'll make
S3O each in twelve weeks and.”
“Buy a bicycle or an airplane or a
radio?” the patron.
"Not on your life,” responded all three,
almost in chorus, “We’ro goin’ to put
cur money in the bank and save it."
Which, they say, was the way John D.
Rockfeller and most of the other
millionaires got their start to
plutocracy.
LAWRENCE VVITISE YBEKGER DIES.
VINCENNES, Ind„ June 21.-Lawrence
J. Welsenberger, for thirty years presi
dent of the Vlnc nn’s Warer Company,
Is dead pt the b .me of bis daughter,
Mrs. George Dowuey, here. He had'been
ill two weeks.
EGYPT IS FREE
OF CRIME WAVE,
SAYS RUSSELL
President of School in Egypt
Tells of Conditions Pre-\
vailing There.
CAMBRIDGE, Ohio, June 21.—The
crime wave has not hit Egypt to the ex
tent that it has swept over America, ac
cording to President Charles P. Russell,
of Assuit College, Assult, Egypt, who
visited this municipality recently.
While many travelers are held up be
tween villages, it is rarely that any one is
ordered to p'ut up his hands and forced
to pass over his valuables in the Egyptian
cities, declared Russell,
wakeh
In fact, he said, it was an every-day oc
currence in Egypt to see persons carry
ing hundreds of dollars in currency in
their hands about the streets. On a
tramcar, he stated, he saw a man nsk
another to count money for him.
The German post-war business drive is
invading Assuit, Russell stated. Pre
viously that city never was considered
able to afford a piano store. Today a
German firm is selling pianos there. In
Cairo a barker, or street faker, edn get a
crowd Instantly by crying out: “See
something new that's Just from Ger
many.”
Prices are much lower on German goods
than on those from England. This, said
Russell, is helping make them more popu
lar among Mohammedan races. Russell
said ordinary camera films of German
make could be obtained eight cents
cheaper in Europe than is asked for an
American-made film.
Much dissatisfaction In Syria is found
with the French protectorate, Russell de
clared. Desiring American supervision,
but unable to get it, the Syrians spurned
British* help and took French, he said. It
seems the Frenchmen selected for the
work have met with difficulties, for to
day, looking across the boundary at the
improvements the British are making in
Palestine, Syrians, it is claimed, are
Jealous and want British suzerainty.
Parliament Members
Smashing Traditions
LONDON, June 21.—Members of Par
liament aren’t following In the gour
mandizing footsteps of their predeces
sors, according to George Willsher, man
ager of the Parliamentary restaurant.
In the old days ipembers of Parlia
ment were connoisseurs on food and wine,
Willsher says, but the modern legislator
doesn't seem to care what or when he
eats.
It W?R BLOCK C?
Hart Schaffner & Marx Guaranteed Clothes for Men, Young Men and Boys (8 to 18).
Pumps - Sandals - Oxfords
For Women and Misses
Over 85 Distinctive Models for
An Enormous Assortment of Sizes
Dressy Street and $ Jg|
Such a variety of styles at one single /AyW y
price has never before been offered to % "
our knowledge. And such values as these |?-a
far surpass our best efforts at bargain yaffil
giving. ! 5^3
Dainty new summertime creations, *3^.
all excellent qualities.
Women's Comfort
Slippers—Special
Made of black kid, neat one-strap
style, turned soles; spe- (b-j an
dally priced j
THE BASEMENT STORE
A Wonderful Choice is Offered in
Womens Delightful Silk Dresses
tUp to $25.00 Qualities
In the Favorite Fabrics w | | |
Cascade Silk Chantilly Lace
Roshanara Crepe Canton Crepe
Satin-Back Crepe Crepe Knit H B ■
Georgette Crepe Seaspray Silk gs.
Crepe do Chine Ocean Wave Silk
My, but these are wonderful dresses to be offered at
SIO.OO. You oouldn’t buy such excellent materials
and make them for so little at home, not considering
tho clever styles In which they’re fashioned.
Scores of Attractive New Models in
Lupine Beige Cinder
Black Mohawk Mandarin
Navy Emerald Mint Green
Lilac Rose Pink Nasturtium
Jade Bmoke Gray Dent de Lion
Styles that will appeal to the miss or mature woman. *
Sizes 14 to 44.
For sports wear, for street, for office, afternoon or
evening affairs.
Drapy effects, slashed or angel sleeves, round bateau
and V neck, beaded, embroidered, fringed and tasseled.
100 Silk Dresses ) p* QC
For Small Women and Misses f t /
A broken lot of dresses taken from our higher priced \
lines that sold up to $15.00. /
Crepe knit, taffeta and satin dresses, In i _ ®
navy, black, cinder, sand and combinations. A f£fj
If you wear a small size. It would prove profitable to 1
see these lovely dresses. Sizes 15 to 20, 36 to 40. /
§ All-Wool SUITS
SALE *ll -iFi For Men and
PRICE 1 —— Young Men
Two Pairs Trousers Included at $18.95.
Coat, vest and two pairs long trousers, all for $18.95.
Remember, every suit is all wool. Regulars and stouts. Plenty of sports
models and tweeds.
$5.00 and $6.00 Men’s Trousers
SALE Q <C> Ar ' Extra Pair With
PRICE i6sk:d • Your Coat and Vest
Good, serviceable, all-wool fabrics, including all-wool blue serges, excellently tailored
to stand hard wear. Patterns to match suits, as well as good, durable, all-wool work
trousers. Sale price, $3.98.
Domestics, Pillows, Etc.
MOSQUITO NET —Beet
quality white and *1 in
Colors ... .8-yard bolpi IU
PILLOW TUBING —40 in
ches wide; soft, firm thread:
will wear and launder nice
ly; regular 45c qual- 9Q.
lty. yard 4<7C
PEATIIER PILLOWS—
Beautiful art tick ~overings;
these well-made pillows are
filled with new sanitary
feathers; reduced CQ,
from $1.00; each v>/C
BED PILLOWS —Filled
with new sanitary feathers,
covered with a good heavy
featberproof ticking, in rich
dark colors; regular $1.75
quality, on
each
TABLE OILCLOTH—46
inches wide, best quality,
plain white and fancy de
signs ; specially oc
priced, yard .....DOC
Boys’ and Girls’ Skuffer
Oxfords and Sandals
All new merchandise, every pair per
fect; brown leather, exten- Art
sion soles; sizes 5 to 2 at ipLUU
WHITE CURTAIN SWISS
* —Yard wide; assorted de
sign in stripes, dots, etc.;
extra special, 19c
CURTAIN SCRIM—Yard
wide; double hemstitched
border, white and ivory;
JK I *': 10c
DRAPERY CRETONNE—
Yard wide; light or dark
combinations of blue, rose,
brown and green; very de
sirable for children's suits,
home dresses, bun- t ft,
galow aprons, yard ....it/C
DRESS VOILE S—Fine
and sheer; beautiful dark
shades in combination col
ors of blue, brown, red, lav
ender, etc.; 40 inches wide;
specially priced,
yard OuC
Hosiery Specials
C H I L D R EX'S MERCERIZED
ROLL TOP SOCKS—White with
fancy striped ribbed tops; sizes 7
to 9’4; irregulars of 35<* i c
quality; special IDC
WOMEN'S PURE THREAD
SILK HOSE—Fully reinforced 1
high spliced heels ; fashioned legs;
senmless foot; snug fitting ankles;
black, white, nut brown and
brown; irregulars of SI.OO
quality; 3 pairs for CO
$1.75, pair DjC
Men’s Underwear
ATHLETIC UNION SUITS—Of
cross-bar dimities; sleeveless,
knee length; sizes 34 rn
to 46; special OdC
MEN’S FINE RIB UNION
SUlTS—Summer weight; quarter
length sleeves; ankle length;
lizes 38 to 40; CO,.
SI.OO quality DjC
13

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