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Evening times-Republican. [volume] (Marshalltown, Iowa) 1890-1923, March 24, 1908, Image 5

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Had On« of Her Own.
Mrs. Lottakids, who had been In
vited to attend the opening session of
the mothers' congress, was sending
•lier regrets over the telephone.
"It's awfui kind of you to ask me,
Mrs. Ondego," she said, "but I can't
come. I'm too busy looking after the
children."
PILES CURED IN 6 TO 14 DAYS.
PAZO OINTMENT is guaranteed to
cure any case of Itching, Blind, Bleed
ing or Protruding Piles in 6 to 14 days
or money refunded. 50c.
9®®5XsXSXS)®^^
THE PROFESSIONS
ATTORNEYS
J. M. HOLT, Attorney
EXAMINATION of
ABSTRACTS
BANKRUPTCY proceedings and PKO
"BATB matters given special attention.
Office, 16 West Main Street,
MARSHALLTOWN IOWA
F. E. NORTH UP
Lawyer
bV%R LaShelle's Cigar Store
Marshalltown, Iowa.
MARSH
AL.LTOWN,
I
A.
DENTIST
DR. F. L. HUMESTON
DENTIST
(Formerly with Dr. J. L. Whinery)
DENTAL PARLORS
1
Over Whit^on-Whitehead Co.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
PRICE3 REASONABLE
Offiice Hours:—8 to 12 and 1 to 5
PHYSICIANS and SURGEONS.
DRS. H. $ A. C. FRY
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIANS
and SURGEONS.
General practice." Mrs. Fry makes dis
eases
of women a specialty. H. Fry,
'tlw eye, ear, nose and throat a special
ty.
Office and residence in the
Fry block, 102-104 West Main.
Glasses
Fitted.
J. F. BATTIN, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office Over 19 West Main St.
31
MARSHALLTOWN. IOWA.
Calls Answered Day or Night in City
or Country. -v
Office Hours:
10 to 12 a. m. 2 to 4 and 7 to 8 p. m.
OCULISTS AND AURISTS
Dr. B. F. Kierulff's
INFIRMARY
Treats all diseases of the
Eye. Ear,' Nose Throat
104 East Main. New 'Phone, 314.
Sanatorium
NOSE,
THROAT
Established
I89J
GLASSES FITTED
PERCY R. WOOD, M. D.
MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA
DR. P. LffiRLE
SPECIALIST
«*e, Ear, Nose and Throat
7?, Catarrh
f."-glasses Properly Fitted
Tremont Block, Marshalltown, Iowa.
1. S. MILLARD, sy
Justice of the Peacc,
FIRE AND TORNADO INSURANCE,
SURETY BONDS
NO. 6 SOUTH FIRST AVENUE
New 'Phone 909.
SURETY BONDS
I Issue bonds for Administrators, Ex
ecutors, Guardians, Curators, Contrac
tors, County and Township Officials,
Druggists, Liquor Dealers and all
classes of Fidelity bonds. Fire, Light
ning and Tornado Insurance written.
W. M. CLARK
6
South First Ave. Marshalltown.
Mil 11
la.
AUTOMOBILES
CADILLAC
Cadillac and Buick
Also Other Hisrli.er Priced Cars.
Write for Information and catalog.
Will demonstrate machines.
JOHN HANSON
TAMA, 10WA%
rf
-ejfc.- 1
Kailwafl Score in Decisions
Renderjd By United States
jreme Court
STATE UWS KNOCKED OUT
Management})? Roads Held to Be Pri­
vate Conc^n Important Doctrine
Laid Down in Great Western Suit
That Rate Change Is No Crime
Minnesota'siLaw Invalidated.
Washington,'®. C., March 24.—If
there is a dry -hroat among the west
ern railroad n^n today it is because
the owner of tiat unlrrigated channel
has not* heard of the two decisions
rendered by tht supreme court of the
United States ysterday, both of them
sustaining the ijghts of the transpor
tation companies in a way not often
experienced in tie courts of late.
In these two jases, one originating
in Minnesota an the other th Illinois,
the doctrine is clurly laid down by the
supreme court tfat, while the people
have a right to rigulate the railroads,
and while the rairoads are forbidden
to make unreasonable rates, the trans
portation lines ar^ private property
and must be treaty as such.
"Over eleven thousand millions of
dollars, it is estimat-d, are invested in
railroad property, nvned by many
thousands of peopl, who are scat
tered over the whte country, from
ocean to ocean, and they are entitled
to equal protection Com the laws and
from the courts wlthithe owners of all
other kinds of propety, no more, no
less. The courts haMng Jurisdiction,
federal or state, shouQ at all times be
open to them, as to others, for the
purpose of protecting their property
and their legal rights.''
Bill of Rights ir Roads.
This significant par.graph is found
in the decision of thi supreme court
in the Minnesota rateiase, which was
handed down yesterdiir, and which Is
likely to be forever aftff a bill of rights
of American railroads.',
As if this bulwark igainst the en
croachments of the pbple upon the
railroad property were not sufficient,
the court proceeded to erect still an
other breakwater, .and itdid this in the
Illinois case as follows:
"It must be rennMnt-red that ihe
railroads are the privai- property of
their owners, that while roin the pub
lic character of the wrk \n which
they are engaged the ptblic has the
power to prescribe rules for securing
faithful and efficient servke and equal
ity between shippers and communities,
yet, in no proper sense, js the public
the general manager."
The first of the quotitions given
above was from the .decishn of the su
preme court as read by Jjstice Peck
ham in the habeas corpuscase of Ed
ward T. Voting, attorney general of the
state of Minnesota.
The actual point at !ssu was one of
jurisdiction, the attorney general of
the state having defied ai injunction
of the United States courtand having
been found guilty of contenpt on that
account.
Minnesota Law Knocktd Out.
The case therefore reall: involved
only the validity of the orler of the
federal circuit court in comnitting for
contempt the attorney geneml of the
state.
In reality, the supreme ourt was
forced to decide upon the constitution
ality of the existing railroad law of
the state of Minnesota, by which the
commission is authorized to fx rates
and the railroads are compelled to
observe them under penalty of a heavy
line and imprisonment.
The supreme court has knocled this
law into a cocked hat and has relieved
the railroads from any fear of penalty
for its violation.
The opinion of the court is tl.at the
penalties fixed by the Minnesota law
are so severe that a railroad would be
compelled to submit to a rate which
was confiscatory for fear of imirison
ment.
Technically the decision rendered by
the supreme court yesterday concerns
only the law fixing rates, because that
was the only issue which was tried in
the circuit court.
Practically the 2 cent passenger rate
is also knocked out, or, at least, it will
be as soon as a, test case can be ar
ranged if that has not already been
done.
Rate Making Right Upheld.
The second quotation is taken from
the decision in a case begun by the
Chicago Live Stock exchange six years
ago, charging that the Chicago Great
Western railroad had violated the law
iby charging higher rates of freight
on live stock from the Missouri river
to Chicago than upon dressed meats
and prepared products of packing
houses.
It was insisted that this constituted
an unlawful discrimination against the
Chicago live stock interests.
The interstate commerce commission
found against the railroads and the
transportation companies took the
•natter into the courts to upset the
order of the commission.
Three years ago proceedings were
begun under the Elkins law and ail
these cases were consolidated. The
circuit court found that the live stock
rates were reasonable, that there was
no discrimination, and that the rates
were fixed by open competition.
The supreme court has affirmed the
Coughs Crack the
Constitution
A rack.nRCOUdh issonn t:mes
tin- ion'ruiintr of consump
tion. htop till' coukIi with
1'iso's C.uru bi.forf your lifo
is in danger. It noi-s to the
source of tho trouble and re
stores healthy conditions.
Promptly relieves the worst
CGUKh or cold, and has perraa
n.^ntlv ruled countless cases
oi coughs. colds and diseases
of tiiv.- throat and lunss.
decision of the lower tribunal and in
doing so has almost igone out of its
way to assert the right of a railroad
to receive as liberal treatment in re
gard to its motives as well as its acts
as would be accorded to an individual.
I
Oddity in the News
Black Hand Bars Bible.
Allentown, Pa.—intense excitement
and indignation have seized the reji
dents of the borough of Alliance o/er
a number of Black Hand threats to
blow up the school house, unless the
custom of reading the Bible in the
schools be aboli3iied ^peeOl
The threatening letters sent to vari
ous members of the school board, also
state that the school house would not
be blown up during school hours, while
the children were there, but at a time
when it was empty.
One of the teachers said if the worst
came to the worst she hoped she might
be blown up with a Bible in her hand.
The school board will not abolish the
custom.
Bites Off His Own Nose.
Frankfort, Ky—Adolph Kratssel, a
local butcher, who Is subject to fits,
while standing1 In front of a restau
rant yesterday afternoon, was seized
with a sudden stroke of giddiness and
pitched forward to the pavement.
His false teeth fell out of his mouth,
striking on the ground, and in falling
his body struck in such a position that
his nose was caught between the jaws
of the teeth, nearly completely sever
ing the nasal organ.
Has Eaten 27 Miles of Pie.
Winona, Minn.—W. H. Frye, a veter
an railway mail clerk of this city, has
been In the service ever since 1869, and
next July will celebrate his seventy
fourth birthday anniversary. He is a
pie lover, and naturally has eaten
many pies at railway lunch counters.
He has figured it out that if a line
of pies were laid between Winona and
La Crosse, a distance of twenty-seven
miles, he has during his service eaten
pie equivalent to a strip eighteen inch
es wide thru these pies as thus laid
out.
He has traveled about 2.000.000 miles,
or about eighty times around the
world.
Lost, But Didn't Know It.
Hartford, Conn.—Wincenta Shardish.
the 17-year-old Polish girl who was
lost on her way from New York to
South Windsor, has been found. During:
the frantic search of her cousin, Ed
dis Piltlerin of that place, she was tak
ing life easy with a Polish family In
Windsor Locks, blissfully ignorant of
the fact that she was lost, supposing
that it all went with the trip from
Poland. Naturally, when her cousin
appeared and told her that she had
been lost, she was scared.
The girl arrived on the train from
New York, according to the schedule
set for her, but happened to be seated
in one of the rear coaches of the train,
which was cut off at Hartford, hence
the conductor did not deem it neces
sary to put her off. She remained con
tentedly in the coach until later it was
attached to a Springfield local, and
without even changing her seat she
was carried away from her destina
tion.
The conductor discovered Jier mis
take and put her off at Windsor Locks.
She slept there in the depot that night
and on Thursday, it is thought, some
one read the tag which was pinned to
her and started her for Hartford on a
trolley, but evidently she got off at
Windsor. Then she was picked up by
a Pole who learned she was lost and
who took her to his home, and she
lived with his family until the police
found her.
Goat Team on Long Trip.
Los Angeles, Cal.—A journey from
coast to coast by goat team Is planned
by "Captain" Vivian Edwards. From
here to New York city four goats will
draw the diminutive buggy In which
he will ride.
The start will be made as soon as
the weather clears and Edwards hopes
to keep continually on the road until
his strange trip has been completed,
with the exception of Sundays, when
the animals will be given an opportun
ity to rest.
"I expect to maike the journey with
in one year's time," said the "Captain."
"My goat team can cover fourteen
miles a day. over good roads, and with
favorable weather that speed can be
kept up day after day without over
tiring the animals. The heavier arti
cles of my outfit will be carried by the
burros which will accompany me."
Edwards, who is a cripple and un
able to walk, has already covered thou
sands of miles with 'his goat team,
which consists of four large Angoras.
Last year he went to Hastings, Neb.,
in 200 days.
Edwards' companion will be John
Johnson, who was a sailor on the
United States ship Kaleigh at the bat
tic of Manila bay.
Sexton Becomes Police Guardian.
Trenton, N. J.—David Trout, sex
ton of the First Methodist church, this
city, who was sworn in yesterday as a
special policeman, today acted in his
new capacity and prevented the Rev.
Dr. William A. Frye, appointed pastor
of the congregation
!by
the recent M.
E. conference, from entering the edl
fice.
The
sexton-policeman
was ordered
by the trustees
to
see that Dr. Frye did
not force his way into the church
Qccan Calamities During
1907 Most Disastrous
Shipping History
Serious Naval Accidents.
in
order to carry out the instructions of
Bishop Wilson.
This action results from the dispute
over the pastorate of the Rev. Dr.
Charles O. Jones, the famous southern
preacher, who took charge of the First
church last December. The New Jer
sey conference refuses to recognize
Dr. Jones, because of his relations with
the Methodist church, .South, which is
divided from the church, North.
Man Drowns in Street Mud.
Aurora, III.—A lurch of his wagon as
it rounded a corner threw John Wood
ward. 55 years old, into the mire of
the street, in which he drowned early
yesterday morning. Tho victim was
intoxicated. Traces of a struggle
against the strangling mud were fresh
when the coroner's jury investigated.
This is Worth Remembering.
Whenever you have a cough or coid,
just remember that Foley's Honey and
Tar will cure it. Do not risk your
health by taking any but the genuine.
It is in a yellow package. McBride &
Will Drug Co,
Year
in
AN APPALLING LoSS OF LIFE
Stoutest Ocean Vessels Fared Just as
Badly as the Wornout and Poorly
Manned—Many Ocean Liners Lost.
In the recollection of a veteran ma
rine statistician there never has been
so disastrous a year to shipping as
that just closed. The number of
wrecks, fatal in the number of lives
lost as well as in the enormous amouut
of property destroyed, far exceeded
even a year wlien salliug vessels out
numbered steamships live to one, a
period in which wind dependent craft
were at greater disadvantage and more
liable to shipwreck because of the dis
parity between steam and sail.
The year 1907 will go down in ma
rine history as one in which the stron
gest type of ocean going vessel fared
as badly as did some that were aged,
worn out and probably poorly manned.
The statistics that follow were com
plied for Shipping Illustrated:
The loss on the Japanese coast in
March of the Great Northern Steam
ship company's Dakota, involving more
than $3,500,000 worth of property the
stranding of the fine new Prlns Waide
mar of the Ham burg-American line at
Jamaica, West Indies, in January the
wreck of the Elder-Dempster liner Jeb
ba in the English channel also In
March the enormous cost of floating
the Suevic the burning of the Thorn
hill the destruction of the Sllverslip
by explosion in the bay of Biscay the
wrecking of the Santiago of the Pa
cific Mall Navigation company the
burning of the Fortunatus with her
cargo worth $225,000 the disappear
ance of the Nlcaraguan' in the Atlan
tic the sinking of another Hamburg
American lfner, the Borussla, at Lis
bon, and the loss of the Helvetia, Luci
fer, Mount Temple, Hazel Branch, Wil
liam E. Reiss, City of Birmingham and
the Tampico, the latter with $100,000
worth of copper among her cargo, are
among those that stand out prominent
ly In the list of steam disasters. With
the exception of the Santiago, none of
these wrecks was attended with great
loss of life.
Several of the disasters occurred un
der conditions which, in the judgment
of the proper authorities, warranted
dealing with the certificates of the mas
ters of the lost vessels. The com
mander of the Dakota had his license
revoked. The master of the Joy liner
Larchmont. which vessel was sunk in
Long island sound, with a loss of 134
lives, was severely censured.
Some of the other wrecks which were
attended by an appalling loss of life
were the Berlin In February at the
Hook of Holland, in which disaster
only fifteen were saved and 128 drown
ed the foundering of the Sultan In
the Black sea, with 60 the explosion
of the Iena, killing 120 the foundering
of the Santiugo. with 00 the sinking
of the Columbia after collision, with
the loss of 110, and the foundering of
the Kaplan, a Turkish steamship, with
another 110 souls.
The five masted schooner T. Charltou
Henry, which was sent to the bottom
In a collision with the British steam
ship Chelston off Fire island, was
worth $150,000. When the John Cur
rier was wrecked in August in Alaska
she carried down with her $250,000
worth of salmon cargo. The City of
Cleveland, building at Detroit, Mich.,
was burned in August, with a loss of
$700,000. The Fortunatus also was
burned, with a loss of $225,000.
Warships played a considerable part
In the destruction of valuable marine
property. The British cruiser Assist
ance sank the German steamship Ma
rie by collision in the Tyne. The
French cruiser Kleber ran into and
sank the steamship Ilugoma in the
Mississippi, drowning seven of the let
ter's crew. The Jean Bart was wreck
ed on the northwest coast of Africa.
The Iena blew up, costing 120 lives.
Some of the vessels stranded iu
course of the year, worth hundreds of
thousands, were sold for the proverbial
song. The Norwegian steamship Freys
dale, ashore on the Maine coast, was
sold to a Boston Junk dealer for $180.
Another Norwegian steamship, the
Tellus, stranded at Gay's harbor, in the
Pacific, brought the extravagant sum
of $210 when sold at auction. The
American steamship Carthagena, which
struck Salvage rock, North Carolina,
in July, did not have much of the
salving merits about her resting place
and appealed to a generous purchaser,
who gave $420 for the vessel.
The Marie Gilbert, a fine schooner
when she ran on the Florida coast In
April, was sold to the highest bidder
for $485. The bark Charles E. Le
fuegry, wrecked in the gulf of Mexico,
brought $475. The John J. Ward,
stranded in the Delaware breakwater
in March, sold for $67.50. The John I.
Snow, stranded In July, sold for $108.
Bees as Highway Robbers.
Secretary of Agriculture Wilson
when he went to the cabinet mee:ting
the other day told the newspaper men
of a new discovery his department had
made, says a Washington correspond
ent of the New York Globe. He de
clared the honeybees out in Hawaii, ds
his experts had found, were robbing
the aphis, a kind of ant, of its honey
and making honeydew of it.
"We have kuown for some time that
certain ants milked the aphis and got
a sweet substance from it. But now
the bees, which used to work for their
honey, have taken to highway rob
bery!"
An Aquatic Rabbit.
William Zimmerman, a Postal Tele
graph messenger of Dubois, Pa., re
cently demonstrated that a rabbit can
swim when ft must, says the rh.iladel-
ftnwa, march 24 190S
phia Record. Zimmerman caught a
rabbit on the island north of the boule
vard and took it to the Pennsylva
nia freight depot. Br'er Rabbit made
an especially lusty kick and escaped
from Bill's infolding arms, fleeing
among the freight curs with Bill and
several other youths in chase. Headed
off on all sides, the little creature dived
between the wheels of a mo'v ing lo
comotive and with a flirt of his short
tail jumped into Sandy creek, which
he swam like duck, and quickly dis
appeared toward ids home in the
rushes.
CARRYING THE ARCTIC MAIL
Hardships of a Postman With a Route
1,190 Miles Long.
James Cornwall, a hardy and experi
enced fur trader, left Edmonton the
other day for the northwest wilds of
Canada, his destination being well luto
the arctic circle, says the San Francis
co Call. Cornwall has secured a con
tract for carrying the mail to the few
scattered Inhabitants of those northern
wilds. A distance of 1,190 miles will
be traversed before he reaches the end
of his journey at Fort McPherson, on
the Mackenzie river.
With the exception of the first 100
miles, when horses will be used, the
entire trip will be made by dog trains,
the driver securing relays of fresh dogs
at postoffices en route. At times the
thermometer will be 60 degrees below
zero, and fierce blizzards are frequent
in that district during the winter
months. Dangers of ail kinds will be
met every mile of the arduous Jouruey,
and, if history repeats itself, lie will
lone at least one-third of the mail mat
ter before his task Is half over.
Cornwall will be unable to pack suffi
cient food for the long trail and will
have to rely on his rille for his dally
meat. The dogs will be fed on tallow
and fish.
At night the hardy mail man will
erect a canvas shelter, make tea from
snow water, and after a frugal meal,
from which bread and other luxuries
will be excluded, he will creep into his
sleeping bag.
Despite the great distance, there are
only eleven postoffices between Atha
basca Landing and Fort McPherson.
ancl In order to accommodate settlers,
who in many cases would have to
travel hundreds of miles to secure their
mall, the carrier Is empowered to de
liver precious letters to them. The
weight of each letter is restricted to
one ounce.
UNITED WORLD PREDICTED.
National Patriotism to Give Way to
World Patriotism, Says E. D. Mead.
"National patriotism will one day
give way to 'world patriotism' just as
state rights have given way to a broad
er national .feeling," was the assertion
rwently made by Edwin D. Mead of
Boston In an address at the City club
of Philadelphia, says a special dis
patch to the New York Times.
Mr. Mead spoke on "The Second
Hague Conference and Afterward." He
naid: "We are coming to a time when
there will be a 'united world' Just as
there Is a United States. We wl.ll be
citizens of the world and think of the
good of all humanity first, not of our
own particular nation. The world will
come first and country second.
"The United States is a prototype of
the federation of the world. Bishop
Harrington of England made the state
ment not long ago that this nation is
the greatest peace society in the world
because of its own organization. The
same principles need to be put into the
organization of the nations.
"One fanlt that should be remedied
at future conferences was the appoint
ment of a chairman by the power
which called the assembly. I learned
In Washington the other day that ar
bitration treaties similar to the ones
negotiated by Secretary Hay and re
jected by the senate are again being
drawn up and are practically sure of
ratification." ,,4
VIVISECTION OF FELONS.
Surgeon Thinks Incorrigible Might Be
Benefit to Science.
Dr. G. H. Quay, dean of the Cleve
land (O.) Homeopathic Medical school,
recently urged vivisection of criminals
and of incorrigible youths for the ben
efit of scieuce, says a Cleveland special
dispatch to the Chicago Inter Ocean.
"Of what use to the world Is the
habitual lawbreaker?" be asked.
"Is he not a public charge, a burden
to society? Isn't it better that he be
placed under the care of skilled sur
geons and bacteriologists, that medical
science may benefit? Much more in
telligent and accurate results might be
obtained from the use of human beings
than from the use of dogs, rabbits and
such animals."
Automatic Umbrella Supply.
Automatic umbrella distributers will
soon be Installed in all the Berlin rail
way stations, which will deliver um
brellas to travelers at 50 cents a time,
says the London Mall. If the umbrella
Is returned In two days, the borrower
gets 40 cents.
REAST
i-V./Fv
Sf
Novelist Discusses Interesting}
With a Tliysiciau Her Lit
eral'}' Work
THOUGHT "PUCK" CLEVEREST
"Under Two Flags" She Deemed Sen
sational—Said She Never Cared Fc.
Applause-—Told Doctor Who Visitc*.
Her She Declined to Be Poisoned.
The following Is an account of ai
English physician's last talk wit:
Oulda (Mile. Louise de la Ramee). th
British novelist, who died recently .i
Viareggio. iu Italy, says a special
ble dispatch to the New York Herald:
A sordid two story house in one
the least interesting streets of perhap
the healthiest but certainly the uglies
town on the shores of the Meditei
ranean. The door was opened by
slatternly female, and after a brie
delay I was ushered Into a squalii
room on the ground floor and fount
myself in the presence of Oulda am
four uukempt, unwholesome looking
dogs.
The great authoress was seated on
low couch between a fairly respectabli
fire and the door, which, of course, tin
servant had opened, but had forgottcL
to close. A shrewd little face peeped
up at me from among the. blankets in
which she was wrapped, while a thin
forefinger motioned me imperiously tc
a chair.
After dodging the uumannerly atten
tions of the canine attendants I suc
ceeded In closing the door and settled
down to business. Ouida absolutely
declined either to go to bed or take
any prescriptions, asseverating with
emphasis that she had no great opin
ion of the profession and declined tc
be poisoned.
She was., however, gracious enough
to add that it was a pleasure to listen
once more to an English voice and beg
ged me to stop and have a chat. Oui
conversation was as follows, and I am
glad I am in a position to publish it
without laying myself open to the bug
bear of our vocation, the charge of
breach of professional etiquette:
Dr. M.—Please do not think It im
pertinent of me to suggest that the
thought of all the pleasure which your
books have given to so man3" thousands
of readers must be exceedingly com
forting to you In your present 111
health.
Oulda—I neither appreciate now not
Indeed have ever appreciated the ap
plause of the public. My sole motive
for writing always has been the pleas
ure of seeing myself in print.
Dr. M.—Indeed! Now. I wondei
whether you agree with me in placing
"Under Two Flags" as the first and
"T'-- *rin" as the second among you:
no
Ouida—I am not going to say any
thing against "Trlcotrin," but "Unde
Two Flags" is almost undiluted sens
tionalism. I think "Puck' is by f:
the cleverest of my novels.
Dr. M.—I had forgotten "Puck"
the moment. May I ask you why
can detect no traces either of your
Her style or method In "The Mes
rines?"
Oulda—I do not agree with you.
consider that "The Masserines" ben
the strongest family resemblance
"Moths."
Dr. M.—Do you never intend to
us have another book, utilizing
service of an amanuensis?
Ouida—Don't talk of such a thin
Since I lost the sight of my right ej
through an accident last year I hav
given up all .thought of literary work,
and the idea of employing an amanuen
sis— (Here the lady became almost in
articulate with wrath.)
Dr. M.—I believe you sold the copy
right of your books outright?
Oulda—Yes, like a fool, and I have
put thousands into other people's pock
ets.
Dr. M.—What about your theatrical
rights?
Oulda—At one time "Under Two
Flags" was being played slmultane
ously In three London theaters, and
did not get a penny out of it.
The rest of the conversation was. to
my mind, rather pathetic.
Ouida—I feel poignant regret not so
much for the'loss of my health as fo
my dimmed vision, faded complexion
and scanty hair, with memories of the
days when horses And carriages were
at my disposal, when receptions were
daily occurrences and when servants
were not "dirty beasts" (sic).
I was finally dismissed with a pun
gent criticism of this her adopted
country, which she begged me not to
repeat, and received a hearty invita
tlon to call again unprofessionally
week later.
Now she lies dead, with a little whit:
dog curled beneath her on the pillows.
Bridges First, Then Canal Excavatior
A novelty in engineering constrm
tlon will be a feature of the digging
the Evor~* Chiefp
And many other paiui ui una serious
ailments from which most mothers
suffer, can be avoided by the use of
"Mother's Frieil." This great remedy
is a God-send to women, carrying
them through their most critical
ordeal with safety and no pain.
No woman who uses ''Mother's Friend" need fear the suffering
and danger incident to birth for it robs the ordeal of its horror
and insures safety to life of mother and child, and leaves her in
a condition more favorable to speedy recovery. The child is
ilso healthy, strong and
^ood natured. Our book
'Motherhood," is worth
its weight in gold to every
woman, and will be sent free in plain
envelope by addressing application to
Bradfield Regulator Co* Atlanta,
MOTHER'S
FRIEND
Ga.
tfs t"
drainage can a I system, says Popular
Mechanics for January. The bridges
which will span the cabal will be
made of concrete and placed In posi
tion on heavy concrete foundations
ready to use before the ground is ex
ivated. Engineers have informed the
'vmnage board that the erection of the
^ridges before the trench Is dug will
-ove not only possible, but more eco
nomical than otherwise.
Notice to Our Customers.
We are pleased to announce that
Foley's Honey and Tar for coughs,
colds and lung troubles is not affected
by the National Pure Food and Drug
law as it contains no opiate or other
harmful drugs, and we recommend it
as a safe remedy for children and
adults. McBride & Will Drug Co. .........
A Standard Oil Qottage.
Fircy A. Itockefeller, son of William
G. Kockefeller, has built himself
modest mansion at Greenwich, .Conn.,
in which his little family of four should
not bo cramped. It has sixty-four
rooms and fifteen bathrooms.
His new house stands on one of the.
most beautiful spots in the historic
village of the junction of Clapboar.l
ridge and Pecksland road, almost oppo
site the estate of William G. Rocke
feller. The villa was begun in Octo
ber, 1906, and is just completed.
It occupies a commanding view of
the sound, and architecturally is spok
en of as a triumph of the builder's art
and a show place that should draw the
eyes of ail visitors to the place made
famous by General Putnam's ride.
The house Is 212 feet In breadth and
68 feet deep. It Is built of stucco, with
a large portico In front supported by
huge pillars of white freestone. The
main body of the building is four sto
ries tall.
On the main floor are library, foyer,
dining room, kitchen, pantry, flower
room and Mr. Rockefeller's private
sanctum. The library is sixty feet lone
and thirty feet wide. It is finished in
dark weathered oak, with shelves of
the same material, protected by leaded
Best for cakes
of all makes
"Lace
TRA HEAVY, PER PAIR
PAIR
CORN SYRUP
gla^s, built into the walls. The ceiling
is paneled and will be decorated by
hand. At either end of the library are
huge fire places with Cannes marble
mantelpieces elaborately carved.
The dining room is smaller, but in
the same dimensions of elegance, fin
ished in cherry and white enameJ,
Some idea of the splendor of the cul
inary department may be obtained
from the fact the sink in the butler's
pantry to be used only for washing
dishes cost $700.
Temple of Economy
Every one of the sixty-four rooms in
the house is floored with hard wood.
Air. Rockefeller's private bath Is on
the same scale of magnificence as the
other appointments. Twenty feels
square, it is built entirely of selected
marble. In one corner or a ehofwet
marble. In one corner Is a shower
bath of marble and glass, the approxi
mate cost of which was $1,000. The
house is heated by a vapor device, an
improvement on both steam and hot
water. A two-ounce pressure of this
vapor will keep the house warm.
The villa has three elevators—an
electric elevator for passengers, a hand
elevator for freight, and a third which
will be used as a dumbwaiter.
Spring is here. Have you seen that
elegant line of
36-INCH LACE CURTAINS, CONVENTIONAL 8CR0LL BORDER,
FLORAL MEDALLION CORNER, PAIR
38-INCH WHITE* NOTTINGHAM LACE CURTAINS, WIDE INSIDE
BORDER OF LACE BANDS AND VENETIAN PANELS, FLORAL
FESTOONED CENTER OUTER, BORDER IN POLKA DOT EFFECT,
FLORAL. SPRAY INSERTION BETWEEN BORDERS, PAIR
%.
9ttC "j
42-INCH WHITE NOTTINGHAM LACE CURTAINS, PLAIN CEN
TER, ARABIAN SCROLL BORDER, FANCY FRENCH EDGE, EX­
$1.25
48-INCH WHITE LACE CURTAINS, POLKA DOT CENTER WITH
BAND CONVENTIONAL BORDER, POPPIES INT£RTWINED WITH
FOLAGE, BEAUTIFUL FLORAL CORNER SET, FLORAL EDGE,
$1.39
54.INCH WHITE LACE CURTAINS, FIGURED CENTER, WIDE
SHOWERY RIBBON BAND SCROLL, FLORAL BORDER WITH
FOLIAGE 5-INCH COMBINATION LACE BAND AND FLORAL
EDGE, PAIR ,,
$1.50
36-INCH ORGANDY CURTAINS, 4^-INCH RUFFLE EDGE WITH
HEADING, PAIR
-75c
40-INCH SWISS LAWN, 4'/2-INCH HEMSTITCHED RUFFLE, TAPE
SEAMS, PAIR,.
I/$1.98
89.
State of Ohio, City of Toledo,
Lucas County.
Frank J. Cheney makes oath that he
is senior partner of the firm of F. J.
Cheney & Co., doing business In the
city of Toledo, county and state afore
said, and that said firm will pay the
sum of ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS
for each and every case of Catarrh that
cannot be cured by the use of Hall's
Catarrh Cure. FRANK J. CHENEY.
Sworn to before me and subscribed In
my presence, this 6th day of December,
A." D., 1886.
[SEAL.] A. W. GLEASON,
m-m Notary Public. •,
Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken intern
ally, and acts directly on the blood and
mucous surfaces of the system. Send
for testimonials free.
F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O.
Sold by all druggists, 75c.
Take Hall's Family Pills for const!
patlon.
An everyday sweet for all people.
In
air-tight tins,
10c, 25c, 50c.
CORN PRODUCTS
MFG. CO. 4
1
OPAQUE CLOTH SHADES, 6 FEET WITH ROLLER, SPRINGS
AND BRACKETS COMPLETE, EACH
Don't fail to see our elegant stock of
LADIES' and CHILDREN'S
SPRING HATS
Temple of Economy

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