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Evening times-Republican. [volume] (Marshalltown, Iowa) 1890-1923, April 13, 1908, Image 4

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CAMEO SALMON
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REAL ESTATE FOR
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J. H. JOHNSTON,
Aormotor Wind Mills, Pumps, Tanks,
., Tripod Steel Towers.
He Can Fix your Pump or Wind Mill
New Phone 616. 603 E. Church
MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA.
$
iw
5 3
Ideal Home Heat
Is the heat that is dustless, wholesome, hygienic,
pure and economical. No heating plant should
be installed in the home that does not meet
these requirements.
r-.f§| No other heat so nearly approaches this
ideal as does that from the
GREAT WESTERN HOT WATER HEATER
IT IS PURE.
IT IS WHOLESOME.
IT IS DUSTLESS.
IT IS HYGIENIC.
IT IS ECONOMICAL.
IT RETURNS A DOL
LAR'S WORTH OF
HEAT FOR EVERY
DOLLAR'S WORTH
OF FUEL.
Other inferior and inadequate systems cost less
to install, but the Fuel Cost—Which is the Real
Cost and the Cost That You Pay Year After Year,
is Greater.
''i
tl
Let us send you the testimony of scores of
satisfied users.
jppp -''-v
GREAT WESTERN HEATER COMPANY
MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA
SALMON
U-&
5 f"£
•FC*
vI
A 452 acre Iowa farm, two miles from a good little town with two
good sets of buildings, with deep wells and windmills, all fenced and
cross fenced. Land lies gentle rolling. Price $100 per acre. Mortgage
$21,000. What have you to offer for the equity.
Odett Land Company
122 East Main, Marshalltown, Iowa
Gillette Transfer Co.
8TORAGE FOR HOUSEHOLD GOODS, MERCHAN
DISE, ETC., PIANOS AND SAFES MOVED
NO. 116 WEST MAIN STREET, MARSHALLTOWN. IOWA.
r'\l
v.
Holy Week
Look at the label and be sure
you get CAMEO BRAND
Salmon
SUPREME"
15c for Small Can
25c for Larger Can
a 1 1
Letts-Fletcher Co., Distributors
Ask Your
Grocer
SALE OR EXCHANGE
it'i A well improved 120 acre farm In Marshall county, Minnesota,
mostly fenced close to school and postoffice, eight miles from a good
railroad town good soil and good water. Mortgage $600. Price $30l
per acre. Will take good Income property for the equity.
A good 160 acre farm in Marshall county, Minn. Pair buildings,
close to ma.rket, In a good well settled neighborhood. Price $25 per
acre. Mortgage $1500. Will exchange for good income property.
A $1,360 second mortgage on a well improved 320 acre farm In
Marshall county, Minn., drawing Interest at the rate of 7 per cent, due
in two years. Will exchange this for a residence that is well located.
'320 acres of wild land in Mercer county, N. D., to exchange for
income property. Price $15 per acre. Mortgage $1,920 due in 4 years
at 6 per cent.
Transient Rooms
~AT—
Leland Hotel
WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Proprietor.
Employment Agency.
Clean Beds. 105 North Center St
Si sa.WK:
•iiiori housewives prefer Gold Medal
Flour. fUxoiLK.
"A.
tfr-jTW
i-f*
Published Dally By The
TIMES-REPUBLICAN PRINTING CO.
TERMS:
One year by mall .....
.$5.00
By the month by mall 45
Delivered by carrier by the month. .50
Rural route edition per year 4.00
Entered at the postoffice at Marshall
town as second class mall matter.
EASTERN OFFICE
R. J. Shannon, Manager, Brunswick
building, New York, N. Y.
THE POOR INVALID'S CHANCE.
A chance for the poor man and the
Invalid without large, .moans presents
Itself In Wisconsin, that part of Wis
consin once pinelands and now covered
with brush and second growth of dif
ferent trees. Here the waters run clear
as crystal, the trout leap in brooks
that have never been tinged with the
dark alluvium of the loamy cornlands.
It is a pretty good place for a poor
mar who wishes to be independent and
work for his own hand. It should be
a paradise for the invalid to whom
long and expensive travel is debarred.
He can make his living on the berry
patches, climb hills, live out doors.
Trout streams abound. Good hunting
is almost everywhere for the man who
craves a squirrel, a pheasant or even
a deer. He is in the wilderness when
he gets a mile out of the little town
where the available population comes
down twice a day to be present at the
eventful arrival of a passenger train.
If he can Interest himself in work and
play and keep good company with
himself his opportunity is there among
the brush and scattered ipines, where
a few years ago grew the lumber of
which the cities of the northwest have
been builded.
BUSINESS AT LEADING POINTS.
Rather slow business, backward col
lections, but cheap money, seem to size
up the retail trade of the country.
St. Paul.—Retail sales of seasonable
wearing apparel increase with the
Easter demand, but jobbing trade in a
number of important lines is smaller
than last year. Unsettled market con
ditions affect the dry goods trade, and
current business is below normal, but
jobbers look for a good supplementary
demand later on. Men's furnishings,
hats and gloves are fairly active, and
millinery houses report a satisfactory
spring business. The demand for foot
wear for Immediate delivery holds up
well and steady improvement is noted
in the demand for harness. Machin
ery trade is quiet. Collections contin
ue Irregular.
Kansas City.—Retail business in
some lines shows a gain of twenty-five
per cent over .this time last year and
there Is considerable improvement in
dry goods, drugs and millinery at
wholesale. Shoe and leather houses re
port a sharp demand for seasonable
goods for immediate shipment. Collec
tions are fair. Trade in implements
continues very satisfactory, especially
for planters, listers and harrows, and
second order cultivator trade is devel
oping. Wheat conditions are excel
lent.
New Orleans.—Business In all lines
is of moderate proportions, excepting
in groceries and country produce. In
which there Is still considerable move
ment. Weather conditions have been
unusually favorable for planting crops
are doing well, but country merchants
are buying very conservatively, and
onlv for immediate needs. Collections
generally are slow,
filr. There is verj
the winds blow with balsamic healing|jn ]owf'r grades dealers make eonces
across miles of leafage and the hills
and rocky bultss convey a sense of
•the freedom of the mountains.
Why Is It a poor man's chance?
Simply because he can summer in a
camp under the ledges of the hills be
side the clear waters and among the
second growth pines and gain money
as he gains health. How? Picking
berries for shipment 'to Dulutli, the
Twin Cities, Milwaukee and Chicago.
The tubercular invalid who must live
out doors can make all his light ex
penses and .put good wages in the
bank if he elects to use his hands while
he fills his weakened lungs full of the
piney air of northern Wisconsin. Said
a native in reply to the question, What
do the working people do in this coun
try? "Why. every married man I know
picks berries in the summer." It is
profitable he asserted. Men make from
$100 to $150 a month during the berry
season. "Why," said he, "my neighbor
and his wife pick berries all the sea
son nearly three months. At the be
ginning of the blueberry season they
often clean up $15 a day. This sea
son lasts about six weeks and the
huckle berries then come on and are
In quite as much demand." Wild
strawberries abound and bring good
prices with an unfailing demand.
Wagons go about gathering ithe ber
ries of individual pickers. The berries
grow on every hillside and are free to
all. "We lived in Fulton, 111.," con
cluded the native. "Nine of us in a
family and It kept us pretty busy to
pay the grocer and doctor. We Iiaven't
had a sickness in the five years wo
have lived here and we're doing well
and paying for the land to keep a
bunch of cows on." The land sells at
a low price. It should. It is thin above
the sand, rough and ibrushy, but many
a man is living well on the proceeds
of his herd in uhe pinelands tract of
Wisconsin. It is hard to see how he
could spend his money if he had it.
Retail trade Is
little trading in
rough rice, receipts being light, and
the demand for clean rloe Is limited,
but the market is Hrin. There Is a
fair demand for plantation sugar, and
offerings are absonbed, but prices are
a shade lower. There is very little
trading In molasses, excepting In the
lower grades.
Philadelphia. Wholesale dry good
houses and jobbers of woolens report
a slight improvement in sales and col
lections are better In retail lines there
are increased sales. In wholesale mil
linery. sales are increasing and collec
tions arc improving, but the volume of
business Is less than last year. Manu
facturers of cloaks and suits are fairly
busy, but tho volume of business is not
up to the preceding year, and com
plaints are heard regarding collections.
Shirt waist manufacturers are now
shipping out considerable goods, but
their sales are below the season of
1807. Manufacturers still adhere to
their policy of purchasing wool only
for Immediate needs dealings are
largely In the liner grades and price
of the latter are well maintained, but
sions to close sales. Collections are
still tardy. The money market is easy
with rates ruling at 4V2 to 5 per cent
for call money and 4% to 6 per cent
for time loans.
Chicago.—Trade expansion Is not en
tirely seasonable, owing to continued
unsettled weather, and new demands
in the leading industries come forward
slowly. Distributive dealings in gen
eral merchandise, however, make a
satisfactory exhibit, there being sus^
tained buying in the principal staples
for the interior and better buying at
both city and country retail stores. Ad
vance orders for summer and fall ship
ment make a fair aggregate in the
textiles, footwear, furniture and hard
ware, and more than the usual num
ber of visiting buyers are at present in
the market here, some of them requir
ing prompt forwarding of spring lines
which they had previously bought
sparingly. Shipping rooms thruout the
dry goods district have lately been kept
very busy, and railroad managers re
port the movement of general mer
chandise to be showing the most satis
factory increase within the past six
weeks. Advices from the agricultural
regions remain highly encouraging,
and claims hitherto made of high con
dition of growing winter wheat are
fully corroborated. Farm needs are
exceptionally heavy in tools and ma
chinery, and there is also strong buy
ing of materials for fencing and build
ing. Money is in ample supply. The
offerings of commercial paper have
not increased as expected, and the dis
count rate for best names is quoted at
5 per cent.
WOMENS CLUBS THREATENED.
Correspondence schools have been
outdone. An enterprising literary
genius has established a bureau and
advertises that he will write addresses,
club papers, etc., at a certain price per
thousand words, and—he will treat the
transaction in the utmost confidence,
He proposes to emancipate the over
worked' club woman and permit her to
remain in 'that state of ennui resultant
from a surfeit of club, social and do
mestic duties.
Occasionally college orators are guil
ty of plagiarism. Novelists and poets
have been accused of the same crime.
Congressman frequently employ pri
vate secretaries, who possess the abil
ity to write speeches that read well in
the Congressional Record. Other pub
lic officers have been known to have
speeches written for them. Literary
larceny by ambitious authors and lit
erary deception by aspiring politicians
•have been condoned, but this« new
fangled club woman's bureau is near
ing the limit. It is demoralizing. It is
a dishonest effort to transform our
hard-working, hard-thinking, good-in
tentioned club woman into a mere ma
chine for speaking thoughts and ideas
manufactured on a commercial basis.
A phonograph would answer the pur
pose.
The promoters of this essay bureau
probably see great possibilities for ex
pansion. Who knows but what their
well oiled literary machines may in the
near future, be grinding out flowery
sermons which easy-going and easy
minded preachers will be palming off
as original.
Topics of the Times
If you haven't signed somebody's
nomination papers do so quick, for
there are only ten days more in which
papers can be circulated.
The friends of Governor Cummins
should remember thajt every vote
gained in southern Iowa counts for just
as much as a vote in any other part
of the state and there is more room
down there in which to gain.
Go into Jim Good's homo town and
among his neighbors who know him
and you will diseover nothing but good
words for him. lo the same with the
other man and you will vote for Good.
A correspondent asks "Where was
our nestor when the Aldrich bill was
pajised over the opposition of almost
every bank and commercial body in
the country?" I'nable tu vote bu.t aid
ing It by pairing with a democrat, who
was opposed to it is wtiat the records
show.
It Is reported from Washington that
Col. Hepburn has refused to take any
Interest In the Allison-i'ummins fiprht
for the reason that he has never been
a very enthusiastic admirer of Ali-
5 a I I a a a 1 3 2 8
SUS
Vf.-'V-1'-
SPRI NQ
A
son. "Pete, the fighter, fails to ap
preciate his antithesis.
If we want temperance reform, how
would it do to grant wrtmen the suf
frage on all mulct consent petitions?
In the zoological gardens ait Bre-slau,
Germany, there is a spider monkey
which was operated on for cataract
and now wears glasses. For more
than a year after it was received at the
7.6o it was very healthy and lively:
then It became very quiet, ceased to
play and crouched In a corner. It was
cket
tw°
HANDICAPPED.
FASTEfS
examined "and" found 7o "be suffering "J,"™
from cataract, so It was immediately
taken to the eje hospital and operated jlcr
wears with becoming gravity.
When we speak of the power of the
press we make recognition of an in
fluence for newspaper advertising far
greater than that of any other form of
commercial publicity known to man.
IOWA OPINIONS AND NOTES
Three or four years ago one of the
principal arguments against Cummins
was the charge Sf bolting," says the
Hardin County Citizen. "Since the fel
lows who persistently made the charge
boU
th*
l'boy—nothing
yeaf"say.
a
are like the to There
is where sincerity in politics comes in."
It is the inalienable right of every
American citizen to vote as his con
science dictates, but he is under ob
ligation to himself, the community
in which he lives, and to his country
to have that conscience enlightened
to the fullest possible extent that he
may vote intelligently and with the
highest motives," moralize? the Early
News.
It is understood that the democrats
have adopted the slogan of "a new
broom sweeps clean" for the coming
campaign, which causes the Parkers
burg Eclipse to conclude: "If this is
true Bryan will be forced to take a
back seat
"Talk about the Irony of fate," ex
claims the Madrid Register. "For weeks
the Daily Capitol of Des Moines has
been lambasting Cummins for drain
ing the state treasury, and now the
decision of the courts forces the pub
lisher, I*afe Young, to reimburse it by
refunding over $4,000 which he is al
leged to have overchang?ed while state
binder."
•Ora Williams has never been cor
nered yet. He learned newspapering on
the Sioux City Journal when George
D. Perkins was on earth the first time,"
declares the Ames Intelligencer.
(The Fonda Times believes "there
should be no factionalism in this grand
old state after the June primaries. We
believe that Cummins will receive such
a large majority that the 'standpatters'
will have to take off their hat to him
and fall in line. L.et us hope that fac
tionalism will receive a proper burial
and 'fitting tribute at the poles on
June 2."
AUNT BECKY YOUNG.
(Clinton Herald.)
There died in Des Moines early
Monday morning one of the most be
loved women by the soldiers in the
civil war. Early in the conflict she
became a nurse, and so true to her
calling and fearless in the execution
of her duty when the air was rent
with bullets, was this grand woman
that she became the idol of the north
ern soldiers. Speaking of this grand
woman the Des Moines Capital says:
"The
ex-soldiers
and sailors of
Iowii and all members of the relief
corps and thousands of other Iowa
people will learn with sincere sorrow
of the death of Aunt Becky Young
of this city. For more than 35 years
she had been attending reunions of
the old boys In central Iowa. She
was present at nearly every meeting
of the Iowa encampment. She always
had a smile and a glad hand for the
old soldier. During the war she was
an army nurse, and endured all the
hardships of the life of a soldier. Tier
slonder little body contained a mar
velous courage and the sweetest dis
position. All who knew her were her
friends. She had great love for hu
manity. Kvery go^id cause had the
benefit of her endeavor. Her latest
work before her strength failed was
in the latest good cause. She was
always serving the public al.vays do
&
j,*
a—French St. Louis Post-Oispatci-
lng something for the good of the
state or society. She was a patriot In
whom there was no guile. She stood
ready to die for her country any min
ute. She had the old soldiers' pas
sionate love for the flag. This com
munity ha.s never known a more un
selfish character. She is gone to join
her comrades on the other shore. A
grateful community and loving friends
will keep her memory alive. Her
good example will be the sweot heri
tage of all who knew her.'
The name of Aunt Becky Toung
was dear to the hearts of soldiers
during thi» terrible conflict, and has
bper'
on. In less than a month it was fitted army of the Potomac, Rome of whose
with a pair of spectacles, which it wounds she dressed during the pro-
There is now a bill before congress
providing for a parcels post delivery of
merchandise mailed at the office of
distribution. The present rate of 11
cents per pound 'is cut as low as 25
cents for eleven pounds, the theory
being that the government would have
no railroad 'transportation to pay for
and the local merchant would not find
Uncle Sam delivering goods below cost
for the catalog houses.
^asured by the survivors
I of the wa.r for the union. There are
yftt m.,ng thonPallds of mon who kn{w
as a
ministering angel in the
gress of the great battles fought in
Virginia. There was but one Beckv
Young, and her death' will cause gen
eral mourning In Grand Army circles.
Tn her long and useful life she did
well her part.
*\ZZ W"1 demonstrate machines,
1
Automobiles
Pontiac and
Mier
S!T IN BUGGY TYPE. 7
Cadillac
-"t
cj
Also Other Higher Priced Cars.
catalog.
for lriformation and
JOHN HANSON
TAMA, IOWA.
PLUMBING
I.OT WATER BOILERS
are like the girl with the curl. When
they are good they are very, very
good, but when they are bad they are
horrid. II yours shows the slightest
sign of being the worse for wear
YOU NEED US PLUMBERS.
Don't wait until it actually leaks or
blows up. Send for us at once and
have us put in anew one for you. Bet
ter by far pay our moderate bill than
run the risk of being scalded or worse.
Think so?
'Phone Your Troubles To
BUCHANAN-BOUGHTON CO.
20 North Center St.
CHICAGO
GREAT"
n/7 WESTERN
HI
*0UTT RAILWAY
Bargains in Rates
Round Trip tickets (Homeseekers*)
to the West, Northwest, Southwest,
South and Southeast on sale First
and Third Tuesdays of each month.
One way tickets (Colonists') to
Pacific 'Coait Points, Mexico City,
Canadian Northwest, and other
points in the Northwest, WeSt and
Southwi^t. On sale Daily, March
IA to April 30th.
SPECIAL
2 Cents per mile between all stations
on the Chicago Great Western Railway.
Tickets on sale Daily.
For Information and Tickets
apply to the
GREAT WESTERN AGENT
I 1-:
A
are provided with
New Process Evapor
ating burners, having
all the conveniences
of a steel range and
gasoline stove com
bined. Examined and
tested by the Nation
al Board of Fire Un
derwriters.
-*?s
S S
"Insurance" Safety Gasoline Stove
I1E JOSEPH JEWELRY
JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS
In your family if you buy
Is without question the
simplest stove on the
market, lights with a
torch, a child can oper*
ate it.
$8.50
to
$23.00
NATIONAL PROCESS STOVES
BENDLAGE HARDWARE CO.
The Stove Store
35 West Main Street Marshalltown
Easter Jewel Thoughts
RESORT TO THIS
ESTABLISHMENT FOR
THE JEWELED ACCES
SORIES THAT TOUCH
OF THE EASTER
COSTUME 2.
Newest Veil Pins
Nattiest Barrettes
Jeweled Hat Pins
Silvered mesh Purses
Stylish Bracelets,
Faddish La Vallieres
Proper Belt Buckles
Nobby Belt Pins
Novel Back Combs
EVERY DAY ALMOST
WE ARE IN RECEIPT
OF SOMETHING NEW.
THIS APPLIES ESPECI
ALLY TOWARDS NOV
ELTIES THAT WOULD
LOOK WELL WITH
YOUR EASTER OUTFIT.
Egg Coal
iJr* -1
For your range. Free from stone
/"and slate.
Sooth Side Coal Co.
S-**
E. M. STICKLER, Mgr.
'Phnnp 94
*'.'4
0
'u
-I
#1

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