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Evening times-Republican. [volume] (Marshalltown, Iowa) 1890-1923, October 01, 1920, Image 1

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It f|u Live in Central
4
Wivj^ of Some of Players
to Be Summoned Be-
.i
7 tore Grand Jury.
HOTOE H|S TWO
:ipJf8W§^ WITNESSES
Men N«ith*r Pl|iyMt Nor Gamblers
'K- to Furnish 8oin« Iftside Information
—Harry Felsslv On* of Incftcted
Players, H*ve Tripled
ffribt Vftting en Cincinnati
t«am in 19$ W*rW Ssries.
EfyJ-Atfrfoelated
Chicago. 'New evidence
which may warrant yriminal prosA
cutioii of. the baseball players In
volved In' ttie "(SWa*" or the 1919
world jtepected by the
grand State Attor
ney from New
Augustifafri^nn, president of the
Qlnotaimtt expected to
^testify, today, sin*' AJfirtd Austrian,
attorney for thq White Sox, said he
believed four playars were ready to
tell what thejf know. The grand jury
complete its regular session tn
dfcijvbut Chief Jystie© McDonkld, who
di-de*edtfte investigation, said it
(WOUld
be retained as a special grand
Jjury. devoting its entire time to the
baseball situation. -Judge McDonald
paid Indictments and prosecutions
could bo returned on the evidence
already.'Bubmittfed, -but that no do
talT would be overlooked in the in
vestigation.
Wives of Players to Be Called.
-^4he nature of the new evidence
which
Hpyne
says
bo
'S*xle«r
IFsJ^.W^ri BiQ Bet.
^eppH^'sAid, JC.t emanate from
ljriciripers of the White Sox team
credit Happy Felsch with ha vine
tftoped ^cepted as a 1ribe
^oPm
yth«
grtmb}e|'s, its a bet at two
0o -oiM ?w| 'Cincinnati in the second
game of ihe series, thua accumulating
.. It ciaTn^ed he wired his wife In
5lilwa\lliw
«iat
KjUplCi
itep«^v
to cdme to Chicago for
thf lIHlV 'g«^fO here and that when
iH&.^nct him Jhls greeting was to toss
|he table.
•J TjUr^^t^ vat^iovta .accounts as to
.playera Baid the
aement over the
up and Mrs.
i£«i money In a
ir
1
You Can't Afford
to Be Without the T.-R.
'*sk~
•SIX
VOLUME FORTy
obtained, is not
known, I|ft would only »ay that he
ft^ojrm«tiop t*om two
W%o aafther baseball men
sipF' ~amblerf,-ainil frho have not yet
l«eh menUoned/tfl the inquiry- Ha
«Uso asserted ,thfcths h*d no evidence
to comlng~3tS20 wostd
the ("players.-,
may tto'cattad to ttfl what they know
kh%"7anegpd "Qxlng" of the 1919
it was imported. Mrs. Clfiudg
•Wllfarns said she knew some rqgnors
^fore ^ir^cted'at ker, 'but denied UHLt
she had. fever b«t on. a baseball gafde
or Jtnemr anything of the "fixing,"
paid to haye been
ionday. Mrs. Felsch
asked by the grand
knows of the transac-
PriQff* Evidftnee.
WW& president 5f the
tifin
«pd Jtirmer chair-
»*%n of fty) iiat|oni|l dommission, ap
ieared '.at |lta.te ^ttorney^ Hoyne's
',}p1tIce. this morning with a portfolio
pf' JttwiHna^tH wift^papers relative to
of Ual Qhaae and Lee Mc
.mere''d'rjf
'.tMt .Y
nested 8):
gf'tjhe papers,
from organized
Hermann had
|ihe grand jury to
said he had
ty Matthewson,
O
i§£
uftger:
the Cincinnati
mi Neale. outfielder:
-'m jjfc^itchers- Jim Ring
W fiegawi. Heiroinh did not expect
aifee^jp b«fore/t|ie grand, jury un-
.. Lqttp Suspicious.
}Oh»jl!W»
^puis^fjr, owner of the
Wfcit* Qo« asked State At-
Mwey HayM t$: investigate lasr
ir'a w«r|4 Immediately after
iMftpHlQil Qpjjfo* games, Hoyne
todwr 'i^tsr his return from
|f#w YQ^. Ilosqu's office conducted
three or four
ajSf
j.ana -iouna j»nough evidence to
?im tht^t the series Tibs
cVooked, he S&i(|h, Not. enough evi-
Was fowd, however, to prove
*|j|4 fact. hs silQk
.|V"Imt?iediately after the world series
jComiWrey me to investigate
W, said ha would pay tlie expenses'
the inY«ftJgati)n. I told him we
»u)d be Jflad t^: l»lp him and that
»e obtained wioence we would
persecute. We worked for three or
four JWfU on the investigation and
v4bta$*4
enwgh ovidence to satisfy
ui th»t theories was crooked, but
I Wf di4 n^ obtaln sufficient evidence
t* *9&
I Mr. Hoi/pe sai^r that he would give
I: .^ut anoth«r afittment later in the
I. day.
I Hof(i9 was catted before the grand
rstaWd**t»K'jjosltion
Soon netting his statement.
Ttrs1 in the case to
the juror* and the grand Jury re
cessed until o'clock this afternoon.
Hoyns "Predicts More Indictmonta,
VJ:\'' State Attorney Hoyne said*'today
that he belifved the present lnveeti
heee of alleged baseball fixing
would.be yri4e*P^ea4 and that he ex
^peeted more indictments to b& voted.
SufDpltni «videnc« to warrant
pro««cut}QR of several players has al
ready toen disfifosed, h9 «aid.
that he and well-
liaMiw',
I
1
11
known New York detective ha.i gath
ered evidence inl New Yorlc which he
bolievad would he valuable to the
grand fury. He expects the evidence,
which consists of documents and
typewritten reports, to arrive here in
time .to l*e presented to the grand
jury Mo iday.
Coming Series Not "Fixed."
By Associated Frees.
New York, Oct. 1.—District Attor
ney Harry E. Lewis, of Brooklyn, ex
pected to complete his examination
of Brooklyh National League players
on reports that gamblers had ap
proached some of them with pro
posals to "throw" the approaching
world series.
(After three players had been ques
tioned by Mr. Lewis, yesterday, ho
said he was convinced that thej
"were on the level." Those
ques­
tioned were Zack Wheat captain,
Pitcher Mamaux, and James W.
Taylor, fielder.
Beeause-of the press of other busi
ness, District Attorney* Lewis, of
Brooklyn, today announced he would
not be able to complete his examina
tion today of Brooklyn National
League baseball players in connec
tion with reports that an attempt
had been made to "fix" the approach
ing world series.
HERZOG KNIFED IN FIGHT.
Encounter Due t6 Charge of Crook
edness by Fan.
Chicago, Oct. 1.—Charles "Buck"
Herzog, star infielder of the Chicago
National ~SSiT6bfl.il team, involved in
the baseball scandal, WHS stabbed in
an encounter with a crowd of. fans
at Joliet yesterday afternoon as the
Cubs were leaving a baseball
making its
slowly thru the crowd when
way
one
of
the fans jumped on the running
board.
"Here are some of those crooked]
Chicago ball players," he shouted.
Herzog, seated in the tonneau of
the car. arose and knocked the man
from the running hoard. He then
opened the door and leaped out upon
the. prostrate fan pummeling Jrfm
With his, fistfl.
The cro^fd surged about the men.
A companion of Herzog's opponent
charged thru the crowd with an op
en knife in his hand and slashed at
him three times.
-Herzog leaped to his feet and
struck at Mm. Byvthis time cooler
heads intervened ana they wsr© sep
arated.
It was learned that Herzog had
been cut across the palm of the right
hand, on the left arm and on the left
leg. His hurts were dressed by the
Cubs' trainer and he returned to
Chicago With ihe tenra. Ho was in-,
jured so slightly that he went to a
performance at the Warrick Theater
last night.
Herzog was named by "Rube" Ben
ton of the New York National League
team, at the start Pe the inquiry, as
one of the two ball players who had
attempted to bribe hftn to "throw" 6
baseball game, He was later exoner
ated of all blame by President Heyd
ler of the National League. Ever
since the accusation, however, he has
felt the scandal keenly.
NEW YORKERS HAVE TROUBLES
New Housing Laws, Moving Van
Strikes and on Moving Day.
By Associated Press.
New York, Oct. 1.—Lack of under
standing of New York's brand new
housing laws,
the Btrike
of hundreds
of moving van skivers arid forecasts
of rain today gave the 75,-000 fam
ilies of. the' city's migratory popula
tion plenty to worry about.
Some of the confusion attending
the annual -fall moving sday were al
leviated, however^ by the decision of
anxious thousands to "sit. tighl" as
advised by Arthur J. W. Hilly, chair
man of Mayor Hylan's committee 6n
rent profiteering.
CARMELLG RUSSO
CONVICTED BY JURY
Centerville Girl Found Guilty of Man
slaughter Fo^ Shooting Tohy Mat
to» Whose Attentions She Resented
Claimed She Was Insane at Time
of Tragedy.
By Associated Press.
Oenterville. Oct. l.—Carafello Rus
so was found gyilty of manslaughter
today by a jury before which she was
tried for shooting Tony Maltto. Her
defense was that tlfe man's atten
tions had driven her temporarily in
sane. The defense's attorneys were
given until Oct. 9 to move for a new
trial.
CHARLES PONZI IN EVICTED.
Now U. S. Prisoner Witli Eighty-Six
Counts Against Him.
By Associated Press.
oBston, Oct. 1.—The federal grand
jury today indicted Charles Ponzi,
promoter of the scheme by which
millions were obtained from investors
on
promises
to pay 50 per cent prof­
its, on a charge of using the mails in
a scheme to defraud. The indict
ments, of which there were two of
Torty-three counts each, were the
longest returned here in years.
Ponzi now is a federal prisoner a.t
the EasfCambridge jail and is under
indictment oi .state court charges of
larceny.'
MARNE STONE IN LEGION HOME
American Legion Memorial Corner
stone from Chateau Thierry.
By Associated Press.
Indianapolis, Oct. 1.—A stone Ktewn
from the bridge over the Jiame at
Chateau Thierry, where American
troops halted the German drive in
the summer of 1918, will be used as
the cornerstone of the war memorial
building
WttlCh Will
house
the nation­
al headquarters of the American Le
gion, it was announced here today.
The flying squirrel can leap fifty
yards.
Vl r-'
-i
•r '&4
BEYOND PARTY
il
Takes Advance Step Iby
Proposing Department
of Public Welfare.
TALKS TO WOMEN
park
where they had an exhibition*"game.
A crowd of fans had gathered
outside of the park and were "mill
ing" about the entrance, waiting for
the appearance of the. team.
The automobile in which the play
ers were rldingr
was
SOCIAL JUSTICE
OF
Welfare of Women and Children of
Nation Should "Dominate New De
partment—Public Health of Next
Importance Strikes Vigorou^
Warning Against Paternalism in
Industry.
Marion, O., Oct. 1.—Declaring that
American motherhood is the most
precious of all American'"possessions
and setting forth' high Ideals of so
cial justice. Senator Warren Q. Har
ding, republican .nominee for presi
dent, delivered the most. remarkable
address he has made since his nomi
nation.
He spoke to a large audience of
women, prominent thruout the
country In the g/oat cause of social
justice, and advancement of the
cause of human rights. His ut
terances were given profound at
tention. Not only did he set forth
exalted, ideals of social justice but
at the^ game time he declared for
plans of legislative and administra
tive procedure calculated to put these
ideals into^effect.
The address today was non-politl
cal. Jt dealt with problems of a
\_u.i. ps. ucau niui ^IUUICIUO ut
higher realm than politics. Many of „„r
the women 'in the audience were of
tfra democratic fait*
In the picture he drew of his views
of social justice, Senator Harding
kept ever
in
the
foreground
the pro­
tection ofvAmerioan womanhood. He
declared theft the great army of
"potential maternity demands from
America, careful
and
their labors.'**
Protection For Motherhood
"The protection of the motherhood
of
America,"* said Senator Hardtosr,
"cannot be accomplished until the
state and the nation have enacted,
and by their example have enforced,
customs which protect
aujiui
jua-
trJ
by "the
Vmwfcans.
rica,r mth-
Senator Harding addressed ,his
audience as Americans and declared
in his openjng statement tljat the
new extension of women's activities
had been, taken and will be taken
"without peril to that most precious
of all American possessionftr-Ame^i
ca's motherhood."
He declsyed citizenship is phased on
obligation and that he would not
even consider a policy of social jus
tice unless founded on the American
doctrine and the duties of everyone
to all and that the best social wel
fare worker in the world is the man
or woman .who lives righteously and
does his or her work well.
Favors Department of Public Welfare
Senator Harding declared for a
-government department of public
Welfare as the most efficient way of
advancing a humanitarian program.
That this points to a new department
to deal with the public welfare,
headed Jay cabinet officer, w^ien
Senator Harding becomes president,
is generally accepted here. It means
a
most
important departure from
present administrative plans with re
spect to problems touching social
welfare and social ju^fice.
Great danger existed, Senator
Harding said, in any' tendency to
take the burden of social conscience
from the local communities, from the
individual man and woman, and put
it into the hands of a centralized
power.
"Twelve million women in the
United States," said Senator Harding,
"40 per eent of them between 15 and
20 years of age, are engaged in paid
occupations pr professions. Such an
army of potential maternity demands
from Amerilft. careful and adequate
protection in the conditions which
surround their labors. For such an
army there must be an increasing
enlightenment in industry and busi
ness which will tend to break down
distinctions of sex in matters of re
muneration, and ^establish equal pay
for equal •vork. The needs of such
an army, engaging in the tasks qf
America, probably can not be under
stood by mcri^ilone. In the
admin­
istration of federal and state laws,
and in the educational services which
will assist industry and the public,
and the women themselves, to under
stand the needs of women, we will
require the 'services of the most
capable women we can get upon
federal and state boards of employ
ment, labor adjusemnt
and, indeed,
wherever the welfare of maternity and
the welfare of American childhood,
directly or remotely, are involved."
The eight-hour day and a living
wage for women
were
favored by the
speaker. He raised his voice.^tco, in
behalf of th^Women on the farms of
the United States, aiKkht* paid theae
women a tribute.
Senator Harding spoke, out, too. for
extension of the children's bureau
an£ said it was a grim jest thut ih«
government spending twice &fl
a
MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1920.
much for suppression of hog cholera
aa for the welfare of the American
child.
lie spoke for prevention of abuseu
of child labor, for protection

iioalih
of American maternity and civ id
hood, for a. national campaign in be
half of health hnd higher standards
of physical well-being, for industrial
peace ttyru adjustment and •joncillu
tion.
For Eight-Hour Day.
,rtThere
is a growing and a probab­
ly wise sentiment in
America.,"
living
is
"I
wage, and il
entirely uiiialr to tne vSUittr^'hich
fuliila its obligations to humanity in
any piece of humanitarian legisla
tion aiiectin& industry, that .other
states, by
failing
to perform their
obligation, gain a temporary advan
tage in costs of production.
I
believe
that one of the principal functions of
uie .department of puolic welfare will
be to eniigntcn and have local ac
tion, so tnat we muy have thruout
our statesman increasing sense of ob
ligation to meet a national standard
oi' tjoeia.1 justice.
desire particularly to
emphasise
the need of safeguarding thet pros
perity of the American farmer, HO
that he may compete with industry
in obtaining labor, 1 am hearing con
stantly voices raised |n tyehalf of the
women in industry. I desire to raise
mine now iu behalf of the women,
on the farms of Jhe United States,
who in tlio labor shortage of this
year have gone into the fields—your£f
birlsfcand old women—to give a ser
vice which, if lt had not been given,,
would have deprived us this year ot
an adequate food supply. There must
be labor, normal labor, available to
farm- as -well as factory."
In connection with better health,
Senator Harding urged the grouping
of all the federal health agencies un
der the proposed department of p'ub
lie welfare.
He touched on law enforcement
and referred to the Wilson League of
Nations. He opposed the execution of
a mortgage pledging the human and
material resources of the United
States to a doubtful and war-breed
ing enterprise.
In dealing with law enforcement,
We must all condemn without
qualification the failure of enforce
ment of prohibition just as we mtist
all condemn the failure of established
authority to prevent outrages or vio
lence such as lynching." *-M'
In the course
adequate protec­
tion in the conditions which
womarrffood
itself. "v
"I pledge myself today," said Sen
ator Harding, "to support with all
that Is in me whatever practical pol
icy of social welfare and social jus
tice can be ^brought forwar^
combined wisdom of all Aim
Nothing can concern America,'
ing can concern me as an American,
more deeply than the health, the hap
piness and enlightenment of every
fellow-American/'
of
his
Mutterju&&e0,
Senator Harding made it clear that
he
was not attempting
surround
to set forth a
compieto social justice program and
that this was of such breadth that it
coultl not be fully discerned until the
department of public welfare wa,®, a
working organization.
.J-
irt4'J
FINANCIERS WANT PEACE.
€ays There Should be No Trade
Conflict Between Nations.
By Associated Press.
Brussels, Sept. 30.—Distinct and
multiplying of economic im
provement arfe seen countries* most
shaken by the' great wah ant op
tiomLsm over their future is felt, ac
cording^ to speakers at the interna
tional financial conference here.
Some of those who spoke today
declared that within a few years the
wdrld will return to-active competi
tion between sellers and that the
present contest between buyers will
pass.
Charles Wauters, Belgian minister
of commerce, asserted the
temporary
advantages enjoyed by countries al
lowed
to export freely will turn to"
their disadvantage as a
result
of
prohibitive rates o'f exchange.
"Let us not only dwell, together In
peace and unity,"
said Henry .Bell,
manager op Lloyd's Bank, London,
"but*1et us all deal together freely
and in harmony."
Mr. Bell said .the question of free
trade arose Immediately in connec
tion with a discussion of the sltua"^
tion. He preferred delegates to the
conference to the declaration of the
supreme economic council against
the artificial barriers to internation
al commerce, and expressed the hope
the conference would make it clear
that behind all questions of interna
tional trade was the question of dur
able poace.
"It i«( a great error," he declared,"
to consider the success of
one
rthe contrary,
nation
in trade a detriment to others. Com
merce is not a form- of conflict, but,
pn
it is that which
should bind nations together."
GERMANY NEEDN'T F^AR REDS.
Socialist German Leader SayseOnly'
Dreamers Think it Possible.
By Associated Press.
Berlin, Oct. 1.—Only romancers
and dreamers beiieve that, the Rus
sian red army will
eventually
strikes
at Germany and seek to establish a
soviet here with the aid of which it
will make war on Franfee, declares
Wilhelm Dlttman, the independent
socialist member of th^ reichstag.
Dittman, who was one of the Ger
man delegates to the Moscow com
munist congress, in an article in the
Freiheit turns upon 'bolshevism,
which, he declares,"is an .impossible
system which can exist
only In
Rus­
sia because of the "crass ignorance
of the Russian peasants."
"German workmen," he goes on,
"who are not two-legged beasts but
upstanding human beings, would
never suBmit to the dictatorship of a
few." He says they have nothing in
common with men who "are neither
socialists nor communists and gen
erally have only a vagu'e understand
ing of politics, government and so
ciety.
"They are mostly unable to read
and write," Dittman continues, "and
thfeir horizon hardly extends beyond
tbeir own thresholds, as might have
been the case of the German
peasants
of the millde ages. And these men
constitute 75 per-rent of the entiro
population of the country.
"Blind passion
and
high
ardor
have
idealized, soviet Russia as a land
where all the wrongs of the pro
letariat have an end. Hitherto, the
exeluBlou of Boviet Russia from^ve^t-
:^M$rfv t'
7
Senator Borah
Suddenly Quits G.
0.
P.
he
said, "in iavor of an eight-hour day
everywhere for women. The federal
government has set the example in a
policy which looks toward the pro
tection
of our best human resources.
Justice and American standards de
mand that women, who are employed,
should bo paid a
ern Europe has helped to crystallize
and firmly establish these illusory
conceptions," Dlttman concludes.
TALKS ON WATERWAYS.
Goethals Principal Speaker at Ameri
can Port Authorities' Mailing.
By Associated Press.
Chicago, Oct 1.—An address by
Major General Goethpls, builder of
the Panama canal was the chief
event today on the program of the
Ninth annufff convention of the
American Association of Port Au
thorities. Particular stress has beeu
placed by the delegates on water
ways from the Great jLakes to the
gulf and thru the St. lLawrence, and
speakers yesterday predicted that
Great Lake harbors "would soon
become great world ports."
John M. Glenn, secretary of the
Illinois manufacturers, said: "Men of
vision can see the time when deep
dra.ujjht ocean Jiners will pass
hawsers aB a daily matter of course
over the mooring posts at Great
Lakes harbors."
SAY COAL WILL BE PLENTIFUL.
Officers of National Association Tell
lowans Not to Be Alarmed.
By Associated Press.
Des Moines, Oct. 1.—Prospects are
good for plenty of coal for all pur
poses during the coming winter, in
the opinion of D. G. Wentz and J.
B. A^ Morrow, president and vice
president of the National Coal Asso
ciation^ expressed here today.
There la no occasion for alarm
they said.
The two roen were hero to confer
with officials of the Iowa coal oper
ators Association and to get informa
tion about the situation in Iowa.
l&4p sot necesary to lay in the full
*apply at this time, Mr.
?ilOrow asserted, and In some places
lt can not be done, but there will be
coal when present stocks are burned.
SOLDIERS JOIN MOB.
Ex-Service Men Fail in Attempt to
Lynch Tonncsaoo Negro.
By Associated Press.
Jonesboro, ferxn., Oct 1.—Thirty
five to fifty men, many of them
•.
Campaign
By Associated Press.
Washington* Oct. 1.
Senator
Borah, republican, of Idaho, has writ
ten republican headquarters at New
York and fchlc^go asking that no
more speaking dates be made for
him in the republican presidential
campaign.
Senator Borah also has telegraphed
to Senator Johnson, republican, Cali
fornia, another of the league of na
tions Irreconclleables, and Is await
ing a reply. Mr. Borarh declined to
discuss the message, but there were
reports that it had to do with the
league of nation's issue.
ser­
vice men from the national sanator
ium at Johnson City, shot up the jail
here last night in an effort to obtain
a negro held in connection with an
attack on & white waitress at the
sanatorium. One prisoner was
slightly wounded in the attack.
The Jailor refused to give up the
prisoner and members of the state
militia from Johnson City dispersed
the mob.
GRAFTER PLEADS GUILTY.
Pfaelzer, Head of Consumers Packing
Company, Admits Crookedness.
By Associated Press.
Chicago*, Oct. 1.—Eli Pfaelzer,
president of the Consumers Packing
Company1, entered a plea of guilty be
fore Judge Evan A. Evans, lnf the\
United States district court hei/e to
day, where he and seven other of
ficials of the firm are on trial for
conspiracy to use ^e mails/to de
fraud.
Pfaelzer is the second defendant to
plead guilty. Louis Davis, a fiscal
agent, having entered his plea sever
al days ago.
FLOUR GOES TO LOW LEVEL.
Drops to Lower Price Than Any
Time Since September 1919.
By Associated Press.
Minneapolis, Oct. 1.—-For the first
time since September 1919, family
patent sold under the $12 per barrel
mark at some of the mills here to
day. At one principal mill flour
dropped 50 cents, to $11.90 a barrel,
while at another large flour concern,
a reduction from $12.80 to $12.15 was
made.
Bran also declined $1 a ton at one
mill, today's quotations being $34.00
@$3.5.00 a ton.
CONRAD ELUDES PURSUERS.
Escaped Burglar Gets Rid of Hand
cuffs and Steals Automobile.
Special to Times-Republican.
Iowa City, Oct.* 1.—Albert Conrad,
burglar and jail breaker who escaped
from a deputy sheriff yesterday
while being taken to prison, is ptill
at large.
The sheriffs posse, back from a
night search, round an automobile
which Conrad abandoned on the
highway pear Elmlra $fter the pow
er failed. He recently brofce into a
garage,filed the han^cuff^ from his
wrists, a,nd stole a car.
WHITE DISPUTES TAFT.
Says Associated Press Not Attacked
by governor Co*.
By Associated Press.'
New York, Oct l.-r-Deni&l of the
published charges of farmer Presi
dent W. H. Taft that Governor Cox
"attacks the Associated Press for
failing to give to. the public a fair
account of his speeches, the crow-da
and other phases of his long tour,"
was made here today by George
White, chalvman. of the democratic
national committee.
Persian horses, tho handsomer than
those of jLrabia. are less fleet.
„A
'v v'- V'-*-**
CLEANING IN
BALJJORLO
Magnates Propose to Plac$
National Pastime Be
yond' Reproach.
MAY DISPLACES OLD.
COMMISSION PLAN
Governing Board Which Would Have
Jurisdiction Over Minor as Well as
Major Leagues Proposed by Presi
dent'Heydler, of National League—
Punishment For Every Crooked or
Undesirable Player.
By Associated Press.
Chicago, Oct. 1.—Plans for a new
governing body to replace the na
tional eommission now in control of
the major baseball leagues were out
lined today by President John H.
Heydler, of the National League.
The new body must be nation-wide
in scope, limitless in power and com
posed of men so prominent and
reputable that their names will be a
guarantee to the fans that there will
be no place for a dishonest player or
promoter in the national pastime,
Heydler declared.
The movement to form a new
body is already under way, he said,
and will take form as soon as the
world series is completed.
Control Miners Too.
"The national commission has done
wonders fojr baseball," he said, "but
the present investigation proves that
/baseball needs a nation-wide
SINN FEINER ALLEGES PLOT.
Accuses Government of Policy of
Assassination.
By Associated Press.
Dublin, Sept. 1.—Charges that the
reprisals in Ireland were a calculated
policy
Of the government,
WOunded,
1
E
that
the
occasion for them was often afforded^
Reprisals to Be Stopped.
By Associated Press.
Dublin, Sept. 30.—Warning'against
reprisals, no matter what the prova
cation, was giveiTthe royal Irish con
stabulary today by Sir Hammer
Greenwood, the chief secretary for
Ireland, in a speech on the occasion
of a distribution of medalV He
dewlt upon the provocation which
had been given the police with 103 of
their number murdered and 170?
but "declared no reprisal^
could be countenanced by the au
thorities. He congratulated the men
upon their general maintenance of
discipline.
Continue to Murder Policemen.
By Associated Press.
Belfast, Oct. 1.— police patrol
was ambushed yesteday near Tub
bercurry. County Sligo, by a large
party of armed civilians. District
Inspector Brady was shot dead, the
head constable gravely wounded,, and
another constable less seriously
wounded.
Unconfirmed reports say "^several
houses have been burned In reprisal
for-the attack.
"While searching a house in Lis
carroll, Country Cork, on Tuesday, a
party of the military was fired on by
civilians. The soldiers returned the
fire, killing one of their assailants.
Two Constables Killed.
By Associated Press.
Limerick, Ireland, Sept. 30.-—Two
constables were shot
and
killed
ture of $9^ a day, or a total of $150 a
person for the one month's visit it
will be seen that visiting motor tour
ists during 1920 will expend a tot^l
of f7i|0fr0,000, or ah average of $6,
I'OO.OOO a month.
DRIFT IS CITYWARD.
wrs
Cities
will
1
but
centralized power to control not only
the major leagues, but the minor9,
down to the smallest circuits.
"There must be .no cases in the
future like that of ISeaton and Smith,
who were released by the Pacific
Coast League for cause, only to find
a haven in the Southern Association
for a time. The new body must be
a,ble to reach out Into the farthest
corner of baseball and punish any
guilty or undesirable'player.
"I believe every one, who wants to
see the game put back on its pedestal,
will agree with me, and I expect th?
hearty co-opcratlon of all."
absorb practically all
be
The^p-ar department today
by the provocation of agents, and tence expired. His imprisonment
began at Fort Jay, NT. Y., on July 21,
1919, and continued until March 20,
1920, when because of good conduct
he was granted a parole. He was rer
that a plot exists for the assassi
nation of the Irish republican lead
ers, were made today by Arthur
Griffith, founder of the Sinn Fein
organization.
near.
O'Brien's Bridge last night when a
police patrol was fired upon.
wAAT GOOD ROADS MEAN.
Non-Resident Motorists Spend $74,
000,000 in California This Year.
San Francisco, Sept. 27.—Califor
nia's good rpads system and ideal
motoring conditions will reap a mo
tor tourist srop estimated by the
California State Automobile Associa
tion to be worth in excecss of $74,
000,000. The state motor sales de
partment recently issued a statement
to the effect that during the first six
mopths of this yeat 62,000 non-resi
dent license permits were Issued. At
this time Superintendents Chenu es
timated the total number for the yeai
would be double this figure, or 124,
000 motorcars from other states tour
ing in California in the twelve
months.
Striking, an average of four per
sons a car, according to Secretary
Manager^). E. Watkihs of the asso
ciation. Wis would mean that in the
course of this year alone 496,000
people from other states alone would
tour California. Estimating that
each motoring party will
A
remain in
the state an average of one month
(many of them remaining half of the
year) an average minimum expend!-
I* es
4J ,r
.. ,*V
While
Country LoStos P^)ulation
Larger Towns Gain.
Washington,
Oct. 1.—Cities are in­
creasing in population seven and a
half times as fast as the rurai dis
tricts, the census bureau disclosed
tonight in a compilation of figures
covering approximately 85 per cent of
the new census. The figures indicated
that the completed census would
^how the majority of the population
to be city dwellers.
For the last ten
rural growth
was but one-thir great as it was
ill the
previous
^de, but the cities
almost maint their rate of
growth, 'getti ive new inhabitants
lrom 1910 tf .0 for each six added
during the ^ceding ten years. All
populatlo- nters, even the small
country .lets and towns, showed, a
greater «r portionate ipcrease than
the p- rural districts. The great
est ases, however, were by cities
of i0,tr^0 or more inhabitants.
"While the bureau attempts no ex
planation of the reasons for the in
creasing migration to the cities each
year during tho last decade,, pre
sumably higher wages, shorter work
ing day, and home conveniences at
tracted the rural population, espec
ially during the war, when wages in
big industrial centers went up rapid
ly.
Although showing a check in
rate of population growth for the
country as a whole, the bureau's fig
ures fcidicated that(the complete cen
sus would place the total number of
inhabitants of the continental United
States at approximately 105,768,100,
a gain of 13,795,840, or ,15 per cent.
OF
of
this increase, it being estimated that
12,172,800, wottid reside in towns of
2.500 or more inhabitants, while 1,
623,0-10 would
added to the farms,
and the small hamlets. For the cbun
try-side itself, the increase would be
approximately one million
and
a
quarter.
Such a movement of the people
will place the urban population at
approximately 54,796,100
and
the rur­
al population at 50,792,00L In 1910
the rural population outstripped that
of the cities by almost 7,000,000
people, there being 49,348,883 in the
country and 42,523,383 in the cities.
SRWtH OFFERED CLEMENCY.
War Department Explains Release of
Army Officer,
"Washington,
D. O.
Oct.
/l^—Lieut.
Frank H. (Hard Boiled) Smith,
whose
release from prison following convic-f
tion by court martial of brutal treat
ment
of
American soldieijg in France,
has just become known objected to
any clen^ncy. Secretary Jiat War
Baker said today. \f 4
Smith's
commanding ifflcen i!i4
secretary
said, had
appealed for a
redtict^n of the 'eighteen months!,
sentence. Smith objected to any'
change in his term, saying he wlsKed
to serve
out his sentence to avoid
further publicity.
s. Sentence Had Expired.
oxpikln-
Smith was free because hls seh_
the "war department."
TEA&IS LINE UP FOR
CRUCIAL GAMES
Cleveland Meets Detroit in Closing
Series and'Takes Lead in f^irst
Game of Doublbheador—White Sox,
With Reorganized Infield and Out
field, Battle St. Louis at St. Louis.
By Associated Press.
Detroit, Oct. 1.—Cleveland and De
troit met in the opening contest of a
four-game series which may decide
the American
League
In order to cinch tlie pennant the
Indians
must
win three out of their
four games with the Tigers.
Mails and Ehmke were chosen to
do the hurlirfg in the opening game.
A crowd of less than 1,000 saw the
game because of the cold weather.
The score at the end of the 6th in
ning was: Cleveland 4, Detroit, 0.
Crippled Sox at St. Louis.
St. Louis, Oct. 1.—The Chicago
"White Sox and St. Louis prepared to
open the series that may prove the
deciding factor in the American
League pennant race. Three games
Will be played, th« final contest Sun
day bringing the 1920 campaign to a
close.
Trailing Cleveland, the league,
leaders, by a game and a half, the
Sox still have a dhance to finish in
the van and enter the list with
Brooklyn for the supremacy of the
majors.
Today's game will be the first in
which the Sox have participated
since the gambling expose, which re
sulted in the suspension of seven
rtiembors of the club,
As a result Manager Gleason has
been forced to reorganize both in
field and outfield. The White Sox
batting order today, announced by
Manage* Gleason, is as
fJohn
follows:
Leibold, left field: Strunk. right
field Eddy Collins, .^second base
Collins, center field Jourdan,
Hy. third base Mc
first base Afurpl
Clellan, shortstop Schalk,
Faber, pitch.
catcher
,' .•.
4
Weather For Iowa:
Fair Tonight and -r
Saturday, Wanner
NUMBER 234
Defeat of Russians on
Northern Front Virtn
ally Complete.
BLOCK REDS' PLANS,
FOR FALL OFFENSIVE
One Entire Russian Division Sur
renders After Murdering Its Offi
cers—Poles Claim Bolsheviki Were
Whipped Unmercifully—Now Near
ing Vilna, Lithuanian Capital, and
.Continuing
Advance.
By
Wa
Asspcia
Warsaw,
*. 1 -P.
elated Preaa.
Sept 30 .—The defeat of
the Polish front
*43
the Russians on
seema vi&ually complete. The soviet
troops are reported fleeing eastward
in disorder in an effort to avoid h*
ing surrounded by the Poles, who ors
in close pursuit.
The result of the Polish victoryTa "Js
declared by the military experts
eliminating any chance for the bdl-s,
sheviki launching the fall dfTensive. -3
which War Minister Trotssky wss1
credited with planning! to drive baclr^
the Poles from the territory they
cupied after the failure of the "boviet'
attempt to capture Warsaw.-
On© Division Surrenders,
«ad^ice.s
fjPm th®
Sduth, Worth'arid'Ctntr I'
The. bureau also announccdt thatt,
the lowest temperatures for October
wert
leased from parole July^28, when Ihe Ala., ^and Jack8or"iHe and Tampa,
reduced sentence expired. Fla.. 52 degrees being registered at
"There is nothing unusual in ihe
granting of parole in this case," the
\yar department says. "Paj-oles are
recommended
after proper investiga
tion'by the
commandant
of
the dis­
ciplinary barracks and formal ap
proval of such recommendations is
given
by
4
front report^
that one Ivussian division surrender-?•
to,,t^
1)0163
after having murder-lb^
ed all the commissaries with tt
tried to compel the troops to olMtr^l
resistance.
Tonight's communique declares itifr
bolsheviki all along the' northern
front were, whipped unmercifully,.
much to the discouiageinent^f tbeir^i
commanders. The comipander of the?
Third bolshevik army committed ^0*-,
cide, it is asserted, when he reatizedf
that his command had been coni-.
pletely smashed.
JU't
This afternoon's reports, show t'la a
.the Poles are le§s than thirty-d«4
miles from Viln'a the l/tiruaiKanir
ital, and their
By ~A*socia|&i Pfesnt
Washington, Let."
killing frosts* tver? rer Ml*
We&fhW bureauvthisL
per Michigan, tho uiper
and- middle and lower'3.15s"cu."L vd*7
leys, and li^it frosty -as ih r*
Arkansas, nonir JLissiuSippr. and
North Alabama.
registered tills- morning at51
Atlanta/ Tuomasville, Ga., Mobile,
Tampa.
M'SWINEY LIVES ON/
Reported to Have Passed Very Bad
Night—In Severe- Pain.
By Associated Press.
Milwaukee,
championship
here this afternoon.
Football weather prevailed and the
playing field was sticky from driz
zling rains which lasted thru the
morning. Two games were sched
uled for today because of the post
jPonement of yesterday's game on
account of cold weather.
|i
London, Oct: 1.—Terrence Mac
Swiney, lord mayor of Cork passed
another very bad night at Brixton
prison, where he this morning began
the
fiftieth day of his hunger strike.
He slept a little before midnight but
not after that hour, paid a bulletin
issued by the Irish Self-Determlna
tion League this forenoon, and dur
ing the morning was suffering severs
pains in his arms and back.
FAVORS HEALTHY WORKERS.*
A. A. Dureau Urges Physical Exam*
•nation of Industrial Employes.
By Associated Press.-
1
Oct. 1.—Rigid physical
ekamination of worknlen in idustrlal
plants, conducted along the lines of
army and navy examinations, were
advocated
by A. A. Dureftu, safety
engineer for Morris & Co., Chicago,
before the. National Safety' Council
Congress today.
"The physical condition of employ
es is an important factor in the re
duction of accidents and. in the coat
of production," he said.
v,
BIG DROP IN HIGH PRIOED CAHS
Locomobile Reduced ih Price $1^5^
and Mercer Models $1,0QQ.
By Associated PreBS.
1,
New York, Oct. 1.—The"' Hares
Motors, Incorporated, operating com
pany for the Locomobile and Mercer
concerns, announced today the price
of standard Locomobile cars had
been reduced $1,350, arid Mercer
models $1,000.
V/. S. DESTROYER HITS MINE.
Ship Reported Damaged WhiU En
tering
Riga Harbor.
By Associated jftresa.
Riga, Oct. 1.—The United States
destroyer
Call struck a mine as she
w^s entering Riga bay this after
noon, according to a wireless mes
sage. No details
vwere
given.
Tho Weather,
Iowa—Fair tonight and probably
Saturday rising temperature.
Range of temperature at Marjrhall
towh: Thursday, 43 and 30: Wednes
day. 50 and 32 Sept. 30, 1919, 12 and
52. At 7 tnls morning, 33 yester
day, 34. Killing frost.
Bobby
Ward Wins Over Cari Leonard
By Associated Press.
Davenport, Oct. 1.—Bobby Ward,
St. Paul, stopped Carl Leonard.
Richland, in thq second round of a
scheduled ten-ro'und bout here last
night
I
-**'4 I'Tg
:j
J..
y/,&SS
2.
JV
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