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The Cedar County advertiser. (Tipton, Iowa) 1853-1856, August 26, 1854, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85049614/1854-08-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. 1.
4—•
rt a Lisas* AT Tirron,
SATITRDA*
MP All idvMliMMiti oederad to bt laser*
UMI witboe* speeilyiaa the mater of inaer
Cm*, wilt te eeaUaaad until ordered o«t, a»l
e*hre*d aeewdtartT*
All letters iMriNri (otte Editor Meat
JK
ST PAID.
Of every description,
•fecuM *1 tkii ofcfc
PRASilfl, WALTON k WARRRI*)
WHOLESALE DRUGGIST.
No. I.V NOKM MAIN STRCKT,
ST. LOUIS MISSOURI
e. raANCii. n»ir. IU»AIT»K: T. H.wanni*^
A A O N I E
DEALER IN DRUGS 4- MEDICJXEK
Dye 8t«», Painta, Oila, Glaa^ Gn»*.ertea,
Oandiea, Tovs, Hardware and Fancy Notioua.—
flpton, Iowa. nl
f~
C. i.*CMA!WRER|8,
1
ttab i-**# «fju W %fc4 .. l'
.-»v »•-..•• .i •id' "#wPf
I
HY8IC1AN AND SURGEON, OAct
the Drue Store of Chamber* A 5on, ipon
RETOOL DC h. TURNER.
t)HY8IClANR AND 8UROEON*t. Office
one |oor eaat of T«o»p«rance Houae.Trp
lon, Iowa.
fWa.Ac.ncJ|PHTMCIAN
i
w D-
iowa irui
41.
TSattS.
sabjcribera, ysar,ia *1
80
00
of ia,t*see address,
1 25
RATES OF ADTERTISRVO.
Par alXtMB UmI, Of l««, One insertion, tl 00
|r«,each contiaaa«c*,- Ml
Card*. not saeeedjng W*»,P«r year, 0
t^ar A literal tfseeaat nada tetfcess who
•lUrtiM if JTSaf.
neatly i*4 prcopttj
BUTWB—I CAXDS.
wrf-'m'TiftfiLt,
ATTORNEY
AT LAW
rILL
AND SOLICITOR
Chancery. Tipton, Cidw county, low.
E A Y E
m&xET in ctrmin IT
LAW,
MV9CJ1WX, IOIK4.
practice is the 8th Judicial District,
also buy and wfl BoaI fnltts#
tTTORNEY
AT LAW
Hovae, Tipton, Iowa.
in AM Court,
•IMCLfc mCERi
4Chancery.
TTORNIE8 AT I.AW end Solkttsri in
Tipton. Cedar county Iowa
C. PlAT'f,
AIowa.
TTOBNKY at Law and Notary Public,Tipton,
erOlct in the court hoaaa, with
the Recorder.
So. W. CLAIUt.J 1 ""H CLAOK
CLOA ltOTHBI,
Jtttornn* and Counselors of Low, and
Solicitor! in Chancery
IOWA CITT, IOWA.
*W 11 practice in the diferent court* of tMa
ft*
n!9
IT. M. LO'«)
•JUSTICE OF THE PEACE and Notaey Pok
lie. Tipton, Iowa. nl
WIE.UAM TT. WOODWARD
^Attorney and Counselor at Low and
Solicitor in Chcmctry,
WILL
MOCATINB, IOWA.
Will practice in the Dtatrict and »tpr«M
ourt of thia Mate.
W I I A A O K
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
AKAMODA, JONW COTJNTT, IOWA.
practice in the different court# of IoW*,
and attend to conveyancing, and the eol
lo 'ion of notea andaccounta.
nl
MTME IF A MR ERR IK SON.
RUGGI9TS, and Dnlora in Grtcer»#« Oil*
PainU, Dj« 8t«ft, Confectioneries, 'Hard
«, Tipton, I«.wa. "1
$:
CKEBUk
iCLEC and BURGEON,
I Office oppoaita tte Ea^ie HwUl, Tiftse,
MIJJIL.L11
pHYMCIJ^TlND Stifalok. Rochester
JT Cedar county, Iowa. nl
JAIilCS M. CrfA MBF4US
DBALKO IW
Vittkfi tti Tfi
and allver ware, Tipton Iowa. Watchaa,
ka and Jewelry, carefully repaired aad war.
fd. a-11
|OHN LEMP
Sl
CO —Whoieuje and rotail
*4* dealer» in Dry Goods, Groceriae, Hardware,
Queensware, Boota and ahoea. Clothinjr, Hata,
Caps. Nails. Jtc. Second at. Muacatine, Iowa.
ELIAI WAWRER.
|lf ERC HANT—Dnlor in Dry Gro
,1)1 ceriea, Crockery, Ac. Cadar Blutfs, Ce
llar county, Iowa.
nl
W. CO.,
DEALERSHAMMOND
IN DRY GOODS, Grocenea
Queen'i Ware, Hardware, Boota and 8fcoe*
«addl«a, Bo oka and Stationary, Randy Made
Clothing, Naila, Salt, Wooden Wart, Ac., Ac.
Tipton, Iowa.
dREEN It
nl
18 A AC
V.
N A E E
bX3Ej^^pl
JflLMea and Boys' Ganaents cat and made to
vrdt, ia the latest and moat Improved atylfa.—
Tipton. Iowa. nl
1^- JOHN DICKINSON,
fWl MOOT AND SHOE MAKER.
WLA faaeral aaaortutent kept connUntly oa
'hand. Upton, Iowa.
MERCHANTS-KMcHAUBHTON.
MP on hand Ready Made
Clothing, Boota and Shoes, Yankee No
tions, Dry Goods, Groeeriea, Ac. Rochester,
Cedar county, Towa. nl
SAMUEL P. DANIEU,
DEALYR IN STOVES, TIN WARE,
PLOWS aad Hardware Tipton, Iowa.
8AM U ELD

E
W E L,
ipsvivsa or csnaa COOBTT, IOWA.
WILL be harpy to wait upon all those who
desire his services. He ia prepared to do sur
veying with correctness and dispeteh.
Office in the Court Houoe,
Tipton, loma.
Haaty larTsyori.
JOSSVH Sfni, of Sprlnftale Township,
residence at Samuel King's,» milea west from
Hickory Grove. Geo. WHUTLSB, reaidence
at Upton
Iswft Cftty.
One door east of the Post Oflcc.
ltak Bssks« of all kiads, kept eeaatait
ly on hand. not
TQWyifif
C)C BUILDING LOTS, ia tha town of Tyton
4)U very desirably situated, are ©ftred fo*
G. McGOWAN,
AfTORMET AT UW,
Davenport, Iowa.
•PFld ITU TIE P0ST OEEiCK.
ncrcfttKCEs:
HON. GSO M. DALLAS, Hos. 8. A. DOCOI.^B,
KJCB BBOADBEAD, lSA*c HWTHL
V"* _!**•_
El,',s
Lewis,
E.T. 8AWYER STOO
Fortemrdinr and Commission
MKKRAMIS ANT
STEAMBOAT
AURXTB.
liltuoiH
Merchandise, Produce and ProvUiou* con
tracted through to and from New York and Boa
ton to Reek Ieland. and to auy point oa the MU
•mrippi, at the lowent ratea.
nKraaiNcm:
G. O. kkUtr, Btton P. L. Gregory, f. W.
Liwto*, Sawyer, W*lUct tr Co., New Y«r*
HomikbMnf Skiptrd, T. W. JUxandtr & Co
Pmml. nll-iio
«. *. ranr*n,l [j. a roars*.
H. A. PORTER & BROTHER,
BvoknetUrs and Stationers,
DEALIM I* WALt. 9ATW.H
AND MUSICAL IN8TRT MFATS,
AgruU for Princw' Superior Melodeoue, a (ap
ply at all timea on hand for *al« at mannfavtur
era prices. Alno, sgriits !«jr Firth, Pond ,t co s
New York Plan»N, and fitrninhed »t maunfhctnr
er' prlw» with tMitinn of tranaportatian only.
AUo agenta for MoC'rery'a printing ink, aad
Whlte'e N. Y. Type Foundry.
NO. 50 ILLINOIS STREET*BOOK ISLAND ILL.
n:il-lv
«. r. WHITE, J. r. wgrrr, w. a. WHITK
i W I E k O E S
MttMlfwturrrt tuui Whi^tsatt Dhilrr$
oZfOTsmvo,
AKD OKNTt.RMEV'8
FURNlHfNG GOODS, RUBBER Mtt)
OS Oood*, TrmUct, Vmlitti, etc.
SO. 133 SOUTH WATER BTREKT. (Up Sulr*,)
nll-lj Chirac.. IlllliniH.
e
THE SEEK.
•Y JOUX a. WHiTTSn.
I tenr the far -off voyager** horn,
I aee the Yankee", (rail—
IRt foot on every moun'ain pan,
.. On every stream hi* sail.
if'
whistling round 8t Slary'i Fkttf,
C'pon his loaded train
flit's lea vine on the Pictured Racks
His fresh tobacco stain.
i near the mattock in the mines,
The axe-stroke in the dell,
The clamor from the Indian lodge,
The Jesuit's chapel ball!
aee tht1 swarthy 't appers rome
'From Mississippi's spring*
Aftd war-chiefs with their paintndbow.
.And crests of eaple wings.
Rlhind the squaw's birchen carM%
The steamer smokps and ravea:
A»d city lots are staked for sale
A bore old Indian £r»ves.
Jtf forest lake and water* fall,
"1 see the pedlarV show
mighty mingling with the OMaB,
The lofty with the low.
1 fcear the tread of pioneera
(X nations yet to !»c
fiie fir at low wash of wavea wbaroaoM
Shall roll a human sea
Th* !•}'.(• maits of einpiratero,
Are plaatic yet and warm
chaos of a mighty world
la rounding into form!
Bach rude and jostlinij fragment «oao
ItM ftttine place shall (iad
lb' raw materials *f a state,
Its muscles and its mind!
And westering still the star which leads
The new world in its train,
Has tipped with fire the icy spear*
Kit Qj
many
a mountain chain.
llit snow y *one» of Oregon
i.- Are kindled on its way,
And California's gv!iicn aaads
r.u»m hrirhter in its rav!
Japan.
A« our citixens can now rithand trade
with Japan, the following account of its
resources, taken from the New York
"Rous, i» particularly iateresting:
"Foremost atnoog the resource* of Ja
pan are ita fiaheriea. The sea and Ha
productions, we Whore, contribute fully
at much to the sustenance of the natives
as do the fruits ol the earth—rice, per­
haps, excepted. One of their productions
has a value which is not confined to the
spot, but extends to us-to our
prise, and our trade—we mean the whale,
or, as they call it, kudsuri. There is
nothing of which such extensive use is
made by the Japanese, both for rich and
It is found all around Japan, but
which
poor
particularly in the sea Keumano,
washes the southern coast of the Island
Niphon, the most important territory ot
the empire and it also prevails the
islands of Tsussima and Gotto, and upon
the coasts of Oraura and Nomo. These
whales not only afford oil in great abun
dance, but their flesh, which is consider*
ed very wholesome and nutritious, is
largely consumed. No part of them, in
iwd, tbrown
mld' av''1"
able to some useful purpose or another,
eicpting only th. largo .hoaHer
The*in, which i. gMw"11!'
bl*ck'
teih, which i. red l™1*liU
Ih. iotwunM, "4
nmnix.
wis*!! vmmmmm
verted to innumerable uses—all is made
available to purposes of profit. Wo have
gone into these few particulars respect
ing the whale, because it ia that which
has brought our countrymen into contact
with Japan. Many of our ships have for
some considerable time past frequented
those seas for capturing the whale, an oc
cupation which, it is found, might be pur*
sued with great advantage, undet a com*
mercial treaty with Japan, whose inhn*
man laws at present not only prevent
any assistance being rendered to ship*
wrecked mariners, but expose them to
positive maltreatment, and even to vio
lent death. To obtain redress in this re
spect was the primary object of Commo
dore Perry's expedition.
Japan abounds in natural and artifi
cial productions of great value. Its min
eral riches are enormous, and includes
metals of various kinds, especially gold,
silver and copper. Sulphur and nitre
are also found in large quantities —there
is no want of coal, and there are precious
stones of almost every variety agates,
sapphires, jarspars, cornelians, and even
diamonds while pearls are found in
great plenty amonf? the shells upon the
coast. Then the fertility of the soil is
very great. The mulberry tree grows
extensively and affords food for countless
myriads of silk worms. The Kudsi, or
paper-tree, serves innumerable useful
purposes including the manufactuse of
cloth, stuffs and cordage. The verusi, or
uarnish tree, is another valuable produc
tion of the county, yielding large quanti
ties of a miRcy juice which the natives
employ to varnish, or japan, as we call it,
rarious articles. Then there are the bay
tree, the fig-tree, the cypress-tree, with
very many more, all more or less valua
ble, and from which a great variety of
ttsefut things are made and last, though
not least, there is the tea-shrub, from the
'eaves of which the co.n.non dnuk ol the
people is brewel, and w.iioli is capible
of yiel lin? article ot commerce. Trees
growing nuts ot various kinds are abun
dant the maple i=s extensive and excel
lent bambooi art very pientilul and of
great ose, as they are everywhere in the
Indies they cultivate as much bemp and
cotton as they eanfin'i roo^a for in their
fields and as to rice, wluch is the main
food of the natives, that grown in Japan
is considered the best in all Asia, and it
can bo produced in almost auy quantity.
Their corns are of several sorts besides
the komt or rice, there are the konuuggi
a kind of barley the kaoumggi, their
native wheat and the daidswi, a species
of bean-all of which abound with su
perior turnis.
The manufactures of Japan have hiths
erto been confined aiaaosi exclusively to
their own domestic wants, but mauy ol
them are nevertheless valuable us articles
of export. Our adoption hare and
throughout Europe of the term japan us
opplied to certain kinds of varnished
wore, indicates how w-*ll known has been
their peculiar excellence in, if not their
invention of that usetul art. Tho\ make
various articles from the papeMree, re
sembling our papier-mace, which they
paint, and varnish on paper, very highly
—and these might form objects of con
siderable trade. Their silks, muslins,
and cotton goods are most ot them very
superior, and some of them are calcula
ted to become highly rerAsrcAe and their
carvings in wood, ivory, pearl an! fish
bone, are most ingenious and elegant.—
These are but a few of the products of
their handicraft, bat they are sufficient to
show, taken in connexion with their nat
ural productions, how varied and how
valuable are rosouroos of the Japa­
nese.
HOKESTY.—We yesterday
noticed a praiseworthy instance of hon
esty in a juvenile, which we deem wor-
record a8 an
[nan vva8
ent«r' strcet| and
example to others.—
driving a buggy on I ourth
his pocket book jolted out of
poc^ct) which
veilU.(e) aQd
The man drove on ignorant of his loss,
until a little boy who had witnessed the
accident and picked up the wallet, ran af
ter him, calling loudly for him to stop.
He at last succeeded in arresting the
owner's attention, after running a couple
of squares, and gave up the wallet. The
mau looked thanks, nnd the lad was turn
ing away apparently satisfied with doing
an honest action, when he was invited to
bold on. We waited till we saw him re
vive a bank n^te for his trouble. The
story is suitable for rehearsal to a Sun
day School class, and more especially as
the honest urchin did not expect to re
ceive a reward (or having only done his
u y
lte
i»w"d
e
1
•t"'1
twkk. the f«. blubber, wb.cb bo.l
«M A
b«n''
TB« most valuable part of every n»n s
education, is that which he receives
himself.
W N o w i
SATURDAY. AUGUST 26.1854.
MIMQUTI aad Slavery.
Tho following front the St. Louis Her
ald goes to confirm the opinion that Mis
souri will probably become a free State
within a few years.
"la Misaouri, alarory ia at a stand, if
not retrograding. It may be said with
almost literal truth, that the shareholding
lrnmigratioo of Missouri entirely ceased
throe years a^*. There is now a slave
holding emigration from Missouri. Be
sides, slaves ara constantly being sold to
the south. There are no more slaves in
Missouri to-day than than were three
years ago. The prospect is, that.lea
years hence the number will be greatly
less than it is now.
There are now in the State 700,000
whites, and 97,000 slaves, being more
more than eight freeman to one slave.—
Ten yen re hence, likely enough, thore
will be twenty freeman to one slave.
The anti-slavery feeling is very strong
in Missouri, and the opposition of the in
stitution which so depresses the enter
prise and checks the prosperity of the
State, anticipate the work of emancipa
tion should Kansas and Nebraska be free.
With the example of free people and ee
territory on all sides except almost stand
still Arkansas, it is thought slavery will
rapidly die out even in the hemp and to
bacco growing regions, the only portions
of Missouri where even now slave labor
is at all profitable, Very few slaves are
in St, Louis, and the proportion of col
ered population appears smaller than in
Cincinnati or our Lake cities.
The state of Missouri embraces a vast
territory with every advantage of fine
climate, rich soil, abundant minerals, and
navigable rivers, and if once free, would
at least keep pace with Illinois and Iowa
in growth and developeinent. But with
the blight of slavery upon her, the best
class of emigrants pass through or shun
her fertile valleys a.id praries, and pro
gressive enterprise feels a dead lock-
Farms in Illinois bring about double the
price similar lands do in Missouri, and
while the younger free state ia a web
work of profitable railroads, slave Mis
souri haw only an unproductive line of
of some 40 miles.
A great major*? of the peofle of Mis
souri see, feci and acknowledge the curse
that crushes theui, and are casting about
for some practicable mode of emancipa
tion a desirable work which the rapid set
tlement of Kansas and Nebra ka by en
terprising freemen, and the consequent
rstabli»iiui3ut of schools, railroads, manu
factures and the various iustitutions tha'
flourish on tree soil, will be wwc U help
consumatc. So mote it be."
The fight between Poole an Worrissey
in New York is justly condemned by all
the papers as an outrage upon decorum
which should be severely punished. The
dispute between them arose in a bar
room —an appointment was made to fight
the next morning on Amos street wharl,
at 7 o'clock. Both parties were on the
ground and went at each other directly.
Poole, who is said a be a tremendous
'rough and tumble' fighter, avoided Mor
rissey's first blow, caught him by the leg.
I got him down, and in a few moments had
htm pounded to a jelly. Morrissey pre
sented a shocking spectacle, and scarcely
could any of his friends recognize him.
His eyes were closed, and one of them
was found to be gouged from one end of
the socket which injury will probably sin*
pare his sight for life. There wer* large
bunches on all parts of his head. His
face, above and below the eyes, is black
cned by violent blows given on the bridge
of his nose. There is a hole in his c'teek
and his lips are chawed up in a frightful
manner. He also sustained fearful inju
ries about the breast, arms, and back,
where Poole kicked him with heavy cow
hide boots after he had halloed 'enough.*
So severe are Mornssey's injuries that it
is very doubtlul whether he will be able
to walk the streets for the next
months.
hung over the side
fell into the sUeet
Love bum brightest when all
ifetWM
Maxima, etc.
Error must die if it does not
in the cru' ib!r of the philosophe
crumble in the hand of time.
Wisdom comes aftev thought wit be
fore it.
What i« ealWd selfishness frequently
consists in not doin^ what the selfishness
of another person wi«hes you to do.
People wlr do n wrong seldom have
any difficulty in finding excuse* ia juati
fication for it.
Deliberate slowly, executc promptly.
Kmpty vessels make t5ie greatest sound.
Ceremony is a plant that will never
grow in u strong soil
Those who know the least of others
think the most ol themselves.
Contentment to the mind is as light to
the eye.
Charity begins at home but does not
end there.
Gain Loosing life to win money.
The true motive of one's actions, like
the true pipes of an organ, are usually
concealed but the golden hollow pretext
is pompously placed in fiont for show.
Every man is occasionally what he
ou^ht to he perpetually.
We giveaway nothing so generously,
and receive nothing so reluctantly as ad
vice.
When Vice is united to Fortana, she
changes her name.
lie who gives a trifle meanly, Is mian
er than the trifle.
The wisest habit is the habit of care ia
the formation of habit.
The man wiio anticipates too much in
the future, looses the present he looks
before him and has bis pockets picked.
The Unknown is the natural element of
genius.
Modesty subdues and conciliates oppo
sition.
Acts of love anil kindness naturally
conciliate esteem.
Next to being a great poet, Is the pow
e o u n e s a n i n o n e
Millions of blades of grass make a
meadow, and millions ot millions ol
grains of sand makes a mountain the
ocean is made up of drops of water, and
life of minutes.
Expectation takes up more intrust
than fruition can discharge.
Truly fine natures dislike finery, but
coarse oue's may dislike both fineness
finery.
At Wilmington* ©slaware, on the
fourth, Mr. Valentine, a member of the
City Council, was arreted for firing
crackers. A despatch snys Valentine
was taken before the Mayor, who was
about to fine hiin. Valentine thereupon
very grossly insulted the Mayor, aud he
was committed to the eel! for contempt.—
This created much feeling among the
parties, and $20,000 bail was refused.
About 11 o'clock friends went to the
house of the Mayor aud undertook to
mob hiia. The Mayor came out with a
pistol iu each hand, and dispersed the
mob alter making several arrests. The
mob handled the Mayor very roughly,
tearing his clothes nearly off". A citixen
offered a thousand dollars to auy set ol
men who would lake valentine out of the
cell by main force. Therein no telling
where the thing may end, as the friends
of Valentine appear determined to carty
the uuat&r to extremes.
delendani?
Witness, Not that 1 remember.
Counsel, Have you obtained any at
store?
Witness, Not that I remember.
Counsel, will you try to recollect —bara
in mind that Y"U are under oath.
Witness, I am trying, (a pause.)
mm UY'iit,. v»
rt.sW,
now? '.«N
six
A Cnao HOTKL.—Joe Spencer'a col
ored gentleman of decided talent in the
culinary line, haa a hotel at Cairo, that
rather knocks the feet from under any
thing else there. It is a flat boat on the
river, very neatly furnished and finished
with a row of bed-rooms, each clean and
shining like anew pin. with handsome
bedsteads, snowy sheets, and luxurious
beds. Joe serves up great dinners there,
being constantly provided with game, fish,
&,c., of the finest varieties. On top of
the boat are handsome cribs with good
bedding and musquito bars, where the
traveler can enjoy the open air it he leels
disposed. Joe has this remarkable ho
tel labeled on the outside —"The best ho
tel in Cairo." On the inside is a very
comfortable looking sign, ia letter*
a
1
the out-beaming of that aniens
*y
Counsel, well witness what do you say must bloom unsullied, or else
pised
1,-
Wtmvsy k J^aveA't made any discove*
ries yet.
Counsel, Have you not told persons
within a week that you had bought liquor
of defendant?
Witness, Nut that I remember.
Counsel, Did you not tell nie yester
day that you had bought spifHs of defend
ant?
W itness, Yes sir.
Counsel, You did, alia! well sir, when
you told me that did you tell a^ lie or the
truth?
Witness, I told the truth.'
C'Uusel, Then yon have bought spir
its of defendant?
Witness, yes sir.
Counsel, what did you mean by swear
ing you could not remember?
Witness, I meaut that I couldn't.
Counsel, Did yon pay defendant for
the spirits?
W itness, Yeb sir.
Counsel, llow much?
Witness, Twelve and one-half cents.
Counsel, what kind of spirits did you
buy -y.
Witness, Spiriit of Turpeniuu. -JUoi
burg Reveille.
ftslTThe Russian troops in WaMachta
are described aa beinjf thoroughly cut up,
and the well known writer iu the Medi
®90t| bad
spiru
long, "-^*o bed-bugs here? jarmy, and. all iktjuou*di our Kwnral*
tmk-1«« M« i*"
has taken possession of our
II
ipipwpwwppii
a-- )?4n ••v-
Have you a Daughter?
Then how great your respoi iiiUiy!-*"l
Can you look at that fragile lorin—aae
and not shudder to think ol the dangers
that surround iier A rluhl ol Eve, trail
and fallen at best, long belore her young
heart has been sobered by experience, or
learned any cold lesaon of this world's
selfishness and falseness, she is called
upon to take steps tint must tell on the
brightness or blackness of her destiny.-
As she first steps forth upon life's stage,
how her bounding spirit sends out its as
pirations in the holy confidence ol hope
and love. With her bosom unsettled to
the fascinating infl-icnce of flattery and
folly, as she looks out ou life, robed iu its
rainbow colorings, how bright, how beau
tiful it appears to her! She thinks not
tf the deception—the suspects not hol
lowness, but believes the reality will
prove as the surface appears.
Poor child, how little does she know of
the dark, withering shades of human de
pravity, whose blighting influence she
may soon feel! How little does slws
snares
along her untrodden path, she must pass
unsca'.hed—utisoiled. One false step,
and she is mined—he* name is blacken
ed—her happiness gone. Gold cann
gild it, leauty cannot adorn it, tears of
bitterest anguish cannot wash away the
stain. Let the tribute of wealth be laid
at her feet—let pleasure breathe her soft
melody around her, let every joy, like
gems of morning, sparkle around her
path, and yet a clout! is on her brow, a
blight is on her character—she feels that
her glory is departed—that lirrs is a mis
erable lot. Ark- her imprudent nets of
childhood ever forgotten
the
Are those follies over which u man
would smile, and feel a kind of pcidc,
ever overlooked or forgotten when com
mitted by a girl He may reform with
honor, but the very namo of reform in
woman is disgracc. The summit ol mor
al excellence and mUueaee, the world's
admiration and esteem may be gained by
him over whose youth, marked with dis
s i a i o n a n o i a y e v e i o o
get fulness has been'thiown. But poor
woman, often neglected and uncultivated
as she is, must present to an exacting
world a whole life from cimdiioou up,un
tinged, unsullied by a -single stain.
Nor is this the aibiirarv decision ol
society. It is written on woman's own
heart. To be loved, to b** esteemed, to
jn#t
t}iat
hon
stand unclouded and irreproachable above the doctrine oi non-intervention, and
this is her natural'
slander or suspicion,
and holy ambition. Interwoven with her
nature, it concentrates the very element
of her being, aud is tU once the good of
her Ufa and the safeguard of her happi
ness.
This, then, is that on wnich woman's
happiness depends, which can Hmg glad
uess around her life, or wring anguish
from her heart, must be decided by her
kelf long before her maturity lias given
strength or experience. Who, then, is
Out OT TME COSHOSWIilTS'l WIT
!«tsscs. —The following curious cokKjuy
took place not a hundred miles from Fitch*
burc-ii. the otle day, between the com- I U I
monwealth's counsel and a reluctant wit-1 responsible for the manner which her
ness, in a liquor case. I character is formed, her mwiJ moulded,
Counsels-Have you, prior to July lQth j^r destiny sliaped Oh! how many a prSyCr-bojk of the colony, aud the inu*
last purchased auy intoxicating liquor of i
0f vvoe
jl0W
many
ing agony, of crushed hopes, of cold, I
rayless despair might have been prevent-
ed, had a father's time and attention, of
en expended on tritles, been directed to
that pale and delicate flower, which, ex
posed to the rude blast and scorching sun,
de«-
HORRIBue.-We copy the following
aiticle from the Pultimore Patriot of Sat
urday last. Can it be possible there is
any law which sanctions such brutality
The Patriot says: "We learn fromCapt.
He well, tliat a iinti came to the lockup
last evening and claimed slitl er for the
night under circumstance* ot a peculiar
nature. His head was completely shaved,
with not a vestige of hair upon his crani
um, in fact nothing visible but the bare
scalp. His back was one mass of coag
ulated blood, caused he said, by fifty
stripes being inflicted upon him, at Foil
McHenry.
In answers to questions from the cap
tain he stated that he had been a soldier
in the U. S. army, stationed at Fort
McHenry, and that he had deserted, and
on being arrested, was sentences to have
his head shaved, to receive fifty lashes
upon the bare back and be drummed out
ot the service, which had accordingly
been done. Since writing the above, we
have learned that the name of the man
»s Pat. lck Kelly. We al»o understand
ANA UIC WEU UNUWU
oal Journal at Vienna, no very authentic I that the two bugleuiea who were detail
authority, perhaps, says, in writring his
farewell lett-T from the Russian camp,
ed to lash hint are now under arrest be
cause they did not lay on the U»h with
more severity. It it laid they also will
you hav in
„inmion
up Sah
UjrmH| nito a
dud„a U)
cept that the expedition is to move up JVV
branka instead of Salt River. The whigl
have inhabited the Salt Rivar country 1^..
long, that they have destroyed nearly a||
the timber, and worn out the land. t»of*
eroor Hempstead, in conjunction witl|
"Our Delegation," l*as made a very thop*
ough exploration of Nebraska, and prRe^
nonnt es it far auperior to the Salt Rivf|
region.
think of the deceiver, with his bland smile I inhabitants present themselves in adoiff,*
and unforgiving spirit Vet through all!
these snares, tb.se hidden fires that lie'
It is a lact worthy of note in this
location, that there is no law at all. Thl|
great embodiment ot democratic pnt4f
pies, "squat er sovereignty," governs cjpy/
ery thing. Every man siui under hi*
own "vine and fis: tree," and gets along
the best way lie can. The ruling deny
of the land is "Bill Nebraaka." Tip
tl(m Mort hiiu thret} tmM,b dayi uwi^
with a loud voice,'Kjreat is Bill Nebr*%
ka, the god of the pecvliir institution
A scientific party of gentlemen is nt*
out exploring the route lor the purpose ©f
selecting the most practicable watering
and camping places. The expedition wih
move about the first it December, and as
navigation will probably !e closed, it W
proposed to pertorm the journey by huyft
It is rumored that O'te of 'our delegation'
will probably accompany it, aud, in casa
he does so, 1M contemplate* remaining
some six yetrs, with the view of becom
ing more intimately acquainted with the
great doctrines of 'squaltci sovereignty,'
and non-intervention. Occasional iuin*
and traces of civilization indicate that the
country has ouce been inhabited, and it
if now confidently l»elieved that this huh*
rrto comparatively unknown region was
the abode of the 'real mankind,' spo
on of in President Taylor's inaugural.*—
This w reudered the more ceitain from
the fact U*at a scrap of the Nicholson k*
Ur was found among the ruins. Gov.
Hrimes has kindly offered to furnish a
detachment of the Iowa Militia as an et»
cort to the company till the get beyond
the limits of the State, and President
Pierce bad intended furnishing a regi
ment of U. S troops tu receive them
that point, but as the power* of Cong?ess
not (fiend to Territories of I lie V
i Stairs, he fears that it might interfere
therefore declines. Gov. Hempstead de
I signs devoting the greater poricn of hts
I time to the prestation of a Lictnst law-
Cap?. Cumiuing, ol tlie Dispatch, will be
in waiting on the heights of the Nebras
ka shore, with a commission in his han1
from the President, prepared to make a
low bow to the procession as it passes
The editor of the Stale Gazette, and the
conductors of sundry other Nebraska
sheets, purpose makiug nppltea'ionto the
first legislature of the non-intervention
coiouy, t0
T|it,
a life of linger-
out
have their names changed.^
^t.t,r»ska bili is adopted as the
ce|laneous
a
reading matter will consent of
joud of Nebraska speeches sr
j,y «our Delegation.*
i
i mt*k ill
TERMS, 91 50 in ADVANCK.
Wt£
NO. 39.
for the ~4Ji*riiter.
HXA»ARASTBFT» or T« OT E*IOAV
fMX. AQffuot liTttl, 1*54. 3*
Ma. Eniron.—I see by yoor paper
R.ver, but *»,
thpre probabalty
p0„tp0n«
of its beiof^
xltU
you
\M(j cor*,
it.
Your inforraa'iOR.
is correct aa to the stale enterprise, e*-
nt
The ditficulty of navigating th|i m«r
is the chief barrier to the prosperity of thr
country. This, liowerer, we propose to
remedy by lowigt duties en intaiul com
mcict, aud Senator Douglas lias been sug
gested as the collector of customs. We
shall also make application for grants ot
land for fourteen railroads rnnning right
through the colony, and 'our Delegation.'
assure us thut the p.ospccU of success
are first rate, uu'ti&t it is found that the
passage of the bill might infringe upon
the principles of uou-mtervention. The
truth is, we intend to have a rich time of
it, let tilings go as they wili
Give my respects to Mr. Got Beat and
D. Feat, and tell them 'Cedar is tha
bill she will be entitled to one officer
the expedition, and haa il* privilege of
naming the man. s
By order of the Co nmatid'.T-i!i-Chief.
PETER USKDl'P,
AdjuUmt.
Disrcvsa Tsaairoav TAK*.S raosi
CA I.ironsiA.—By a recent survey of the
boundary line between California and
Oregon, it has been decided that the dis
puted territory belongs to the latter and
not to the former, as was generally sup
posed. It includes two of the finest mm
ing districts in the country. The miner*
are somewhat excited about the matter,
as they fear a curtailment ot their privi
leges heretofore exercised, as it has been
their custom to vote both iu California
and Oregon, but they refusedto^^ax*
in i^h^T

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