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Webster City freeman. [volume] (Webster City, Hamilton County, Iowa) 1884-1946, August 08, 1911, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85050913/1911-08-08/ed-1/seq-6/

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1
FLOUR MILL
BUSY PLACE
Reporter Makes Visit of Inspection
to Ifew Webster City Flouring
Hill—Place Looks
Good.
NOW MANUFACTURING FLOUR
"Hamilton County's Best," Name of
New Brand of Flour—Inter­
esting Place to Visit.
The future of the Webster City
flourttLg mill promises to be sue
ceasful under the managment of A
C. Hoot, the gentleman' from Ma
quoeta, who purchased the property
last spring.
After several months of prepara
tion la repairing, reconstructing
and installing new machinery
the old mill, he has this week be
gun the manufacture of flour.
lie tma been manufacturing corn
me.jp, ground feed, and other pro
duots
for
in
some two or three weeks
butts now turning out all of the
produote of a first-class mill—in
eluding graham, rye, pancake, and
othqr flours. The mill presented a
thieving appearance this morning
when the reporter inspected it. The
many different kinds of machines in
operation and the network of eleva
tora betting, etc., all in motiou
were bumming at a rate that made
one think of a busy swarm of bees,
Customers were coming and going
at #ose intervals and, withal, the
sigps of success and coming pros
perity were all there. Mr. Hoot has
Already built up quite an extensive
retail trade In shorts, bran and
ground feed, corn meal, etc., and in
dications are that it will continue
to grow. His flour has just been
placed on the market, all of the lo
cal dealers handling the brandr,
manufactured by him.
He will both wholesale and retail
his products, but his retail price
wfl conform with the prices of the
other retail dealers.
flue of the flour inspected by the
neimpafier man appeared to be of
superior quality. In fact, he was
tdB that to several families had
be^B submitted sacks of it for triai.
and %bey were all well pleased with
the results obtained in bread made
It.
(US
I:
tv
pi
*vv
Kj
•«•. Hoot has revived the once fa
mB«r brand of "Plansifter," and al
so added another brand called
"Hamilton County's Best," which
wil toe his leader. Both brands
are manufactured from spring and
winter wheat grown within the lim
its of our own county, so that a'l
who use these home brands of flour
are helping more than one home
Industry. There Is no reason why
flour manufactured by the Webster
City mill is not a9 good or better
than Imported brands and the qual
ity of the goods is guaranteed by
the manufacturer.
The thing that strikes one most
upon entering the mill, is the abso
lute clean'lines6 of the place. De
vices for catching and disposing of
dust, dirt, and so forth, abound on
every side, so that it is next to im
possible for even a fine grain of
dust to find its way into any of the
flours made there. Everything that
goes into the mill is purified and
cleaned to the limit. Marked im
provements have also been made in
the building itself for the conven
ience of patrons, as well as the pro
prietor. The farmer may drive in
to one part of the building, put his
wheat or corn into a dump leading
into an elevator, drive a little farth
er on and receive his ground feed or
flour into his wagon and not leave
ft his seat.
$ The two brands of flour mention
ed are put up In cloth sacks, label
ed with most attractive designs,
y."v and rival the packed product of the
tiP-
•S&'*
13M*
1
big flouring mills of the Northwest.
It is quite interesting to go
through the mill and note the pro
gress of the wheat from the time it
is dumped from the farmer's wagon
ttll It comes from the huge bolting
machine—pure, white and velvety.
It has a long and tortuous route to
.travel—up and down through dif
ferent elevators, machines, etc.—till
It has Journied approximately a half
$ mile before reaching Its destination
in tbe bolter. Another Interesting
thing Is the row of electric magnets
^7* comprised in the feed grinding ma
"chines to arrest nails, pieces of iron
^y, or steel that might be in the grain.
1
No material of tills nature gets by
Ithe big magnets.
Tbe new owner and proprietor of
*tf'-i
i?
the mill is a most genial man to
meet and welcomes the inspection of
his mill by the general public. He
is a miller of unquestioned ability
and says 'hat he can keep the qual
ity of his flour uniform. He has
the support of the business men and
Commercial League, and now with
the necessary boosters in the way
of families to use his brands of
flour, etc., he will shortly be estab
lished in a prosperous business.
After the Vacation.
Home, where the feathers are soft
est,
Home, where the grub is the best.
Home, where a fellow is part of
The circle, not merely a guest,
Home, where the bedroom Is roomy
Where upper berths never are
known,
Where you can't hear the snores of
your neighbors,
And fog whistles never are blown
Home, where the laughter is truest
Home to the kiddies again,
Home, where the* skies are the blu
est,
Back to the porch and the den
Back where there is no confusion
Or clamor, or speeches, or shout,
Where the dining room never
crowded,
Patrick Contray at Iowa Stair Fair.
The music of Patrick Conway and
his band has no superior in the coun
try. Conway is Gilmore's successor
in American band music. He comes
to Iowa this year with his great band,
which has never before been in
west, and will give a week of «q)len
did concerts at the Iowa State Fair
Patrick Conway has with him some
of the finest artists and soloists in
the musical world.
WHAT THE STATE FAIR IS.
Iowa's best advertisement.
The meeting place of Iowa agricul
ture and industry.'
A summer school for the men and
women, boy. and girls.
A great industrial exchange for all
Iowa business.
A delightful outing for all the
members of the family.
The best short course in .agricul
ture that the state maintains.
A standing proof of the greatness
of a great state.
The most complete all-around live
stock and industrial exposition in the
world.
The one place to which all loyal
Iowans turn for the last week of
August.
Couldn't Understand It
Ephraim Smartweed (gazing at the
Singer building)—These here city
folks tell m'e this Is a skyscraper but
I bin a watchin' It fer two honrs, and
I hain't seen It do any scrapln' yet!"
—Judge. •.
•K
A BUSHEL MUST
BE A BUSHE
is
And bell boys aren't rushing
about.
Home, where the songs are the
sweetest,
.Home to the ones that are true
'Back to the life that's completest,
Back to the work we must do
Back to the grind! Yes, and ready
To take up the*battle again
For after the fun and the travel
Home looks mighty good to us
then.
Had a good time? I should say so!
Laughter and sunshine and song
Went with us all as we Journeyed,
Nothing we planned turned out
wrong.
But now that it's over we're happy,
For somehow wherever we roam,
We find that the best Joy of travel
Is always the getting back home.
—Detroit Free Press,
PATRICK CONWAY'S MUSIC.
So Declares State Dairy and Food
Commissioner W. B. Barney
—Urges Buying by
Weight.
CRUSADE FOB SQUARE DEAL
Says a Peck Measure of Potatoes
Weighs Only One-Sixth of
Bushel—Sometimes.
State Dairy and Ifood Commis
sioner W. B. Barney has declared a
crusade in favor of more honest
measures in Iowa. The commission
er had an interview with the attor
ney general a few days ago and that
decision was reached, authority be
ing given him by the last legisla
ture to enforce the weights and
measures law. According to report
from Des Moines the first step of
the commissioner will be to instruct
department inspectors over the state
to make an immediate ter of meas
ures and scales in all the food hand
ling shops. The inspectors will com
pare weights and measures to see 'f
they are true and If they corres
pond.
Housewives and "ultimate con
sumers" over the state will be ad
vised to purchase scales and see that
hereafter potatoes, apples and the
like are purchased by weight in
stead of by measure.
"I have made considerable inves
tigation in this business," sayS Com
missioner Barney, "and I find that
the purchaser will be greatly bene
fited if he insists on purchasing by
weight instead of by measure. It
will be a wise thing for the house
wife to have a good set of scales
handy, so that she may weigh pota
toes and the like when they are de
livered.
The Iowa law establishes how
many pounds shall constitute
bushel of potatoes, of apples, of
beets, of blackberries, etc., and if a
bushel measure does not hold the
number of pounds designated by the
statute the dealer must make up the
difference.
"The supplement to the code sets
the standards of bushel weights,
which, on common products, are as
follows:
Apples, 48 pounds.
Beans, 60 pounds.
Beets, 56 pounds.
Blackberries, 30 pounds.
Carrots, 50 pounds.
Cherries, 40 pounds.
Corn in the cob, 70 pounds.
Corn in, the ear unhusked,
pounds.
Corn meal, 50 pounds.
Cucumbers, 48 pounds.
Currants, 40 pounds.
Dried apples, 24 pounds.
Dried peaches, 33 pounds.
Gooseberries, 40 pounds.
Grapes, 40 pounds.
Green beans, unshelled,
pcunds.
75
56
Green peas, unshelled, 50 pounds.
Millet seed, 50 pounds.
Oats, 32 pounds.
Onions, 57 pounds.
Parsnips, 42 pounds.
Peaches, 43 pounds.
Peas, 60 pounds.
Popcorn in the ear, 70 pounds.
Popcorn, shelled, 56 pounds.
Potatoes, 60 pounds.
Quinces, 48 pounds.
Raspberries, 32 pounds.
Rutabagas, 50 pounds.
Rye, 56 pounds.
Salt, 80 pounds.
Sand, 100 pounds.
Shelled corn, 56 pounds.
Stone coal, 80 pounds.
Strawberries, 32 pounds.
Sweet corn, 50 pounds.
Sweet potatoes, 46 pounds.
Tomatoes, 50 pounds.
Turnips, 55 pounds.
Walnuts, 50 pounds.
Wheat, 60 pounds.
"Hence, if a person buys a bush
el of potatoes," says Commissioner
Barney, "he should not be content
to see a bushel basket heaped full
—he should insist on being weighed
out sixty pounds."
The crusade will not be confined
to Des Moines alone, or to the large
cities, but will he general and
sweeping.
A heavy penalty Is provided for a
violation of the weights and meas
ures law. For the first conviction
a fine of from $10 to 9100 may be
Imposed. The penalty for second of
fenses is not to exceed a fine of $500
or a Jail sentence of ninety days.
Try the dally a month.
#fe'
$3,200,000
INVESTED CAPITAL
$7,000 OAILY EXPENSES
I MILE OF
RAILROAD
A S
750 WILD
AipiMALS
3 HERDS
OF ACTING
ELEPHANTS
OF THE
INDIANS NO
LIKE SCHOOL
Big Building at Toledo not Attrac­
tive to Them—How They
Live on the Reser­
vation.
SEEM TO ENJOY LIFE GREATLY
One Indian has an Automobile and
can Show the White Man
Some Speed.
Just at present there is no Indian
school at Toledo, Iowa. The big
building which has been used for
that purpose is all but deserted.
There Is no one there except Orvllle
R. Greene, superintendent of tho
school, and he is only supervising
the packing of things and checking
over supplies in preparation for a
rest until a new school can be built,
says, a dispatch to the Times-Repuh
llcan.
Here is one instance where the
Indian won out on a fight. Long
has the Indian been "oppressed."
He has seen his land slip away
from him chunk after chunk, to the
white brother. He has never had
the power to prevent things. But
he upset some of the white men's
plans when they tried to compel
him to send his children away to
school. The Sacs and Foxes of
which the reservation at Tama City
is made up are a gritty bunch. They
are set in their way. They try to
have their own way and when their
liberty is trampled on they make a
fuss. The government tells tbe In
dian where he shall live, tries to
tell him what he shall wear, and
does dictate to him just what he
can drink so far as intoxicating
liquors are concerned. The govern
ment also tells him how he must ed
ucate his children. This last ts a
bitter pill to swallow. The Indian,
like every father and mother, thinks
he knows best.
The government purchased seven­
WEBSTER CITY,
IOI
DAY, A G.
4P
"*4'the
AUTOMOBILE
MUU
smv
GREATEST THRILLER
OF THE/ACE
AT 10 O'CLOCK EVERY MORMIIM
BIG, NEW STREET PARADE
One SO-Cent Ticket Admits to Ml. Children under 12 Years Halt Price
2 Performances Daily at 2 and 8 p.,m. Doors open at I
and 7 p. m.
TICKETS SALE SHOW DAY TEED'S DRUG STORE:
ty choice acres of ground a few
miles out of Toledo. Here was
erected a fine big building. This
was to be an Indian school. It was
a school for some years. The govern
ment spent on an average of $20,
000 a year to maintain it. The In
dians tried to pay as little attention
to it as possible. The children of
the Indians had to be almost tied
and gagged to be taken to it. In
fact not so many moons ago they
got up a revolution about the school.
The Indian children ran away and
the parents refused to send them
back. Then the agents of the Unit
ed States stepped in and took the
parents and placed them in jail.
The Indians got out on writs rf
habeas corpus and told tbe govern
ment to he "durned." Then the
government stopped $50 a year
which each Indian, big, little or in
different got. It is whispered that
the Indians told the government of
ficials to go jump into the lake and
take the money with them. At any
rate the government has abandoned
the Toledo Indian school. A b'g
building is to be erected right on
the reservation, which takes In
4,300 acres of ground.
It is a picturesque part of Tamt
county. The Indians have not In
terfered with nature a great deal.
They evidently figure that they can
not Improve on her mood when she
formed that part. Everything
grows wild, plums, cherries, crabs,
strawberries and all the other
things that were so common a few
years ago. The Indians live In their
own primative style. They have not
changed a great deal. It is true
that some of them have homes with
phonographs, pictures on the wall
and other evidences of a newer ex
istence. Joe Tesson, Jr., even has
an automobile. He was out making
as much dust as the white men. In
fact he put on all the speed his lit
tle runabout would Btand and left
the white men far behind. They do
say that Tessen impoverished his
family of ponies for a couple of gen
erations to come, to get the ma
chine, but that may be just an idle
rumor. He has the machine and
it must be paid for, or he would not
have it.
The Indians have some good land
and some poor land. It will per
haps average up as good. Some of
It Is hilly, other Is slightly rolling
and some of It is level as a floor.
They do not set any great records
at farming., They, In fact, do as
Arenas
iwpppipsppp^
I
r(
1,000
600 DORSES
126 BIG
CIRCUS ACTS
60 Clowns
5 CONTINENTS
COVERED BY THE
AGENTS OF THIS
ON A SMLNC
SHOW
-TY-BEll
LISTERS SUUTIRUL
BUTTERFLY ACT
little as possible. Some of them hav«
well managed farms, but
BO
far an
could be seen they were in the mi
nority. They are ready to move.
None of the houses look as though
they were built for any permanent
living place. A small spot Is culti
vated for corn. A few horses aie
about. Few cattle are seen and nol.
a hog, although Indians love their
bacon and ham as well as the nexl:
person. They will also cook every
thing they eat in lard If they cat
get lard. Why they do not raise a 0"
few hogs of their own Is perhaps
their business, but they do not ra'se
any. One of the party expressed
sympathy for the way the Indians
live. But he was sat on promptly
by the rest of the party. The India*
does not want, does not expect, n®r
ask for sympathy. In fact all he asks
Is to be let alone. If his condltloa
Is not satisfactory to him he consid
ers that his own business. His wan*s
are simple and few. His (50 for
himself and wife and each little
Indian furnishes him with spending
money and discourages race sutclde
Uncle Sam furnishes the land for
him to farm in a quantity as large
as the Indian wants. There are no
taxes to pay. He can get most of
his clothes from Uncle Sam if he
works it right. Uncle Sam takes
good care of him and has special
laws for his protection. All around,
says Mr. Healy, the Indian is not a
bit abused.
The Indian school is, or wag,
about five miles from the reserva
tion proper. It should never have
been away from the reservation.
The Indians did not like to hav-t
their children away at school where
they could not tell each night what
they were doing, no matter if they
did trust Orville Greene to a large
extent. Mr. Greene did not say there
was any great falling off In the at
tendance at the school tbe past year.
He had seventy-two pupils last year.
This is a pretty good average when
it Is considered there are only about
326 Indians and speaks well fo
their ability to raise families.
Good Rain Visits Kansas. Ji,
Kansas City. Mo., Aug. 4.—Tho
best general rain this section has re
ceived since April, fell yesterday
morning. The precipitation In this
city was an Inch anA a half. From
one to two and a half Inches feTl
over western Missouri, western
Iowa and^eastern Nebraska, much of
Kansas,
Texas.
,"1
Oklahoma' and northern

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